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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

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This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25.

INSIDE

SPORTS PAGE 6

2 NEWS

Hook the Vote will register students to vote until the midnight deadline Tuesday.

Recent graduate Diego Medellin debuts with 23{WOYZECK}23”

Austin Toros hold open tryouts for 2012 campaign

LIFE & ARTS PAGE 8

High court set to hear Fisher NATIONAL

4 OPINiON

A first-person perspective on why the High Court should rule in favor of race-conscious admissions.

The Cases for Racial Admissions

When the Supreme Court hears arguments in Fisher v. Texas on Wednesday, UT’s admissions policy will become a focal point in the national debate on affirmative action for the second time.

6 SPORTS

Chevoski Collins becomes the 15th recruit in the Longhorn’s 2013 class.

10 LIFE & ARTS

Jakob Dylan reunites with The Wallflowers to release Glad All Over.

1961 Executive Order 10925 President John F. Kennedy issues an order mandating that government contractors “take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed, and employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin.”

1964 Civil Rights Act President Lyndon B. Johnson signs a law allowing federal courts to apply affirmative action to improve representation in discriminatory organizations. Universities interpret this to mean they should increase enrollment among underrepresented groups.

Fisher v. Texas By Andrew Messamore

TODAY Trash to Treasure

The Campus Environmental Center holds its annual Trash to Treasure sale from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the FAC patio.

The University’s race-conscious admissions process will enter the center of a national debate over affirmative action Wednesday as the Supreme Court prepares to hear the case Fisher v. Texas. The court will hear oral arguments from the University and from attorneys representing Abigail Fisher, a white student who was denied admission to UT in 2008. Fisher sued UT claiming the University violated

UNIVERSITY

On Oct. 9, Che Guevara was executed by the Bolivian army in an anti-guerilla raid backed by the U.S. military. Following the Cuban Revolution and years of service with Fidel Castro, Guevara resigned from his post in 1965 and went on to lead guerillas around the world.

In Grutter, a 5-4 decision from Supreme Court rules affirmative action constitutional as a “factor among factors” to “enrich everyone’s education.” In Gatz, a 6-3 decision rules “point systems” for race unconstitutional. Hopwood is overturned.

admits high-ranking graduating seniors at Texas high schools. It is likely the court will be reexamining the principle of using race to increase diversity, not just whether UT’s admissions policy is constitutional, said James Harrington, an adjunct constitutional law professor and director of the Texas Civil Rights Project. Lower percentages of black and Hispanic students have been admitted through race-conscious admissions than through the Top Ten Percent Rule in every

COURT continues on page 5

Forum expands on social issues By Jordan Rudner

Soviet Sherlock

In 1967

A three-judge panel of the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rules affirmative action to create diversity to be unconstitutional. The case began after four plaintiffs were rejected from the University of Texas School of Law when UT considered race as a factor.

2003 Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger

CAMPUS

“How to Write a Protest Song: Lessons from Woody Guthrie to Pussy Riot,” a talk by history professor Karl Hagstrom Miller, will be held from 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. in BMC 5.208.

Today in history

In a 5-4 decision the Supreme Court rules affirmative action by universities to be constitutional for “diversity” but not for addressing “historic inequality.” The Court also rules quotas unconstitutional.

1996 Hopwood v. Texas

her right to equal protection under the 14th Amendment because the University included race as a factor in her application. UT says race-conscious admissions are necessary to create meaningful diversity, but Fisher argues the University racially discriminated against her because its policies favor underrepresented groups. The court will rule on whether her claim is constitutional in 2013. At UT only 25 percent of students are admitted under the same process as Fisher. Around 75 percent of students are admitted through the raceneutral Top Ten Percent Rule, which automatically

Musical Protest Talk

Russian Film Series presents 1970s Soviet adaptations of “Sherlock Holmes” films with English subtitles. They will be held at 7 p.m. in CAL 422.

1978 Regents of the University of California v. Bakke

Chelsea Purgahn | Daily Texan Staff Alan Watts, assistant director of the Drug Dynamics Institute, gives a tour of the new lab at the UT Advance open house Monday morning.

The presidential debate last week focused almost exclusively on issues of healthcare and the economy. But for voters who want a discussion about social issues like women’s rights and immigration, the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies is providing an alternative forum. The Center for Women’s and Gender Studies is host-

ing a series of lectures that examine this political cycle’s issues through a lens of gender identity while placing them in historical context. In the second of three discussions in their “Pizza Party Politics” series, UT researchers discussed the often-overlooked racism involved in the early suffrage movement in Texas and the role that sexual violence plays in current discussions of immigration reform. Anthropology profes-

sor Martha Menchaca said early Texas suffragists often campaigned on an anti-immigrant platform, capitalizing on the racism of white male political leaders who wanted to drown out the Hispanic voice in the electorate. Associate sociology professor Gloria GonzálezLópez, who has written several books on the issues of immigration and sexuality,

FORUM New UT lab seeks to simplify drug testing Student charged in digital attack

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UNIVERSITY

By Christine Ayala University researchers and entrepreneurs will now be able to work on crucial drug research more efficiently with the opening of the UT Advance lab on Monday. The new lab will test the effectiveness and safety of unapproved drugs under rigorous conditions fulfill a required step in the Federal Drug Administration approval process at a lower cost. Before the lab, UT researchers depended on outside facili-

ties to conduct research for FDA approval. UT Advance is the third component of the Drug Dynamics Institute, a research center in the College of Pharmacy. The institute also operates TherapeUTex and UTech Dorm Room, labs that work with drugs still in the development stages. Janet Walkow, Drug Dynamics Institute’s executive director and chief technology officer, said UT Advance will save drug researchers a substantial amount on time and money in their

LAB continues on page 2

By Joshua Fechter A UT student turned himself in Monday for launching a computer attack on UT’s registration website last spring. He was arrested around 2 p.m. Monday and released on bond around 5 p.m. According to the arrest affidavit issued Friday, undeclared junior Garret Ross Phillips has been charged with breach of computer security, a state jail felony. He is accused of launching a “denial of service” attack April 24 that overloaded the

site with fabricated communication requests, preventing students from accessing the site. UT spokesperson Cindy Posey said no personal data was compromised during the attack, but it shut down the website for more than three hours. Posey said to prevent online security breaches, information technology services personnel monitor site traffic and direct students away from the affected site in the case of a security breach. “That’s the only way to respond to this type of at-

Garret Ross Phillips Undeclared Junior

tack,” Posey said. According to the affidavit, around midnight April 24, Phillips used BitTorrent, a file sharing service, to download a program

BREACH continues on page 2


News

2

LAB

The Daily Texan Volume 113, Issue 40

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CONTACT US

research efforts. Walkow said this will allow a lot more proposed drugs worked on by UT researchers to make it through the first stages of the FDA approval process. “You have these great people doing research and in development activities, which is great, but unless you can meet FDA guidelines for establishing that something is safe enough to go into humans, it’s not going to go anywhere,” Walkow said. “I don’t want to leave intellectual property and research innovations on the lab bench.” Walkow said the lab will also provide learning opportunities for students, as they will now be able to observe more ongoing research. Because the lab is federally regulated, students will not be able to actually work on the research or testing. Alan Watts, assistant director of the Drug Dynamics Institute and UT Advance lab researcher, said the regulations and documents needed for any FDA approvals require the researchers to

Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

BREACH

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

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that overloads servers with fake visitors and prevents a website’s intended users from accessing it. Around 12:15 a.m. he typed the Office of the Registrar’s information into the program and the attack was then initiated around 8:13 a.m. Cam Beasley, UT chief information security officer, reported the attack to University of Texas police at 3:33 p.m., according to the affidavit. The attack occurred during registration for students classified as juniors. According to the affidavit, UT’s Information Technology Services linked the MAC address the attack was initiated from to an electronic

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low

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88

72 I got mine at J. Crew.

The Daily Texan

work methodically to record all the necessary data. Watts said the lab will test the potency of a drug and check for degradation in tablets, capsules and aerosols. Watts said there will be an emphasis on aerosols, which can be more difficult to test. “We would take a small sample and see if the active ingredient is still present at the same levels that it was initially,” Watts said. “What can occur sometimes is that there are instabilities and that drug will degrade and the patient doesn’t get the proper dose.” At the lab’s opening ceremony, Sen. Kirk Watson said enhancing research is one of several components necessary for the University to become acknowledged in the medical community. “I believe that Austin, Texas, can become a center for health care excellence, but in order to do that we need to achieve some goals,” Watson said. “Among those goals was a medical school. Another goal was that we have a 21st-century teaching hospital, but also among those goals was to enhance research like what we’re doing here.” identification number issued to Phillips. MAC numbers identify hardware connected to a network. Police traced the IP and MAC addresses to Phillips’ residence in Dobie Center. A search warrant was issued for Phillips’ residence Sept. 27, and authorities found the program used in the attack on Phillips’ laptop during the search. The MAC address for Phillips’ laptop matched the suspected MAC address linked to the attack. Phillips said he was the sole owner and user of the laptop and no information found on the laptop indicated the device had been hacked or controlled by an outside source during the time of the attack, according to the affidavit. — Additional reporting by David Maly

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

CAMpuS

SG motivates voting registration By Bobby Blanchard

With Tuesday marking the last day students can register to vote for the Nov. 9 elections, Hook the Vote is having one last campuswide voter registration drive. Hook the Vote, a Student Government agency dedicated to registering students for elections, will have registration tables throughout campus from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday. Starting at 8 p.m., Hook the Vote will host a voter registration rally at Gregory Plaza.

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Texan Ad Deadlines

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said national debates often gloss over sexual violence within the immigrant community, assuming candidates mention immigration issues at all. “Issues of sexual violence within transnational families have been overlooked,” González-López said. “I have been more and more concerned about the lives of Central American

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Issue Staff

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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FORUM

Gender issues are very important in this election, because really, they affect every other issue.

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Kayla Oliver, Pete Stroud Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Jushua Fechter, Jordan Rudner Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Maria Arrellaga, Ben Chesnut, Chelsea Purgahn Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jack Mitts, Stefanie Schultz Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nidhi Reddy, Patrick St. Pierre Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Marks. Matt Warden Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jasmin Castanon, Ricky Stein, Eli Watson, Laura Wright Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrea Loera, Lauren Lowe, Amy Yu Comic Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ploy Buraparate, Laura Davila, Marty Eischeid/Amanda Nguyen, Rory Harman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill, Andy McMahon, Stephanie Vanicek, Colin Zelinski Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Angela, Bumstead, Zeni Demissie, Vince Gutierrez, Hannah Peacock, John Solis

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Gage Paine and Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin. “Voting, even though it is something you hear about all the time, is something that really matters in our everyday lives,” Calve said. The voter registration rally at Gregory Plaza will also have free food and entertainment for students. After registering students, Hook the Vote will also work to inform students about issues in the election. Calve said Hook the Vote will host a debate between College Republicans and University Democrats at 8 p.m. Oct. 24.

Chelsea purgahn | Daily Texan Staff Associate professor of sociology Gloria González-López talks about her research on sexuality and immigration at “Pizza Party Politics” Monday afternoon.

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“The idea is to have tables wherever students will go during the day,” Bill Calve, Hook the Vote president, said. Calve said there will be tables on the West Mall, inside and outside of Jester, in front of Gregory and in front of the Co-op on the Drag. At the rally, Hook the Vote volunteers will continue to register students until midnight. Calve said there will be speakers at the event, who will talk about the importance of civic engagement. Feature speakers include the vice president of Student Affairs

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immigrant women who come into the U.S. and, in the process, are exposed to all sorts of sexual violence. But talk about sexuality involving immigrant men and women is largely absent from the discourse.” Christine Adame, a 2012 UT alumna, said she came to the event to better understand political immigration issues through the lens of gender. “I’ve been watching the debates but hearing less about immigration, and I wanted to be able to analyze it from the perspective of gender issues,” Adame said. Last week’s presidential debate touched mostly on health care and the economy, while the third and final debate will focus exclusively on foreign and domestic policy. If the candidates go head-to-head on birth control, abortion, immigration and other social issues, it will have to be during the 90-minute debate Oct. 16 in a town-hall style discussion. Adame said this was another reason she decided to come to the discussion. “I don’t feel like these issues are getting enough attention,” Adame said. Nancy Ewert, program coordinator for the center, said the lack of mainstream attention to social issues was one reason the center decided to host the discussions. “Gender issues are very important in this election, because really, they affect every other issue,” Ewert said. “We want to give a deeper perspective on things that usually people only hear in sound bites.” The third talk in the series will focus on reproductive rights, the Affordable Care Act and same-sex marriage, and will be held at noon Oct. 29 in the GEB fourth-floor conference room.

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World & Nation 3

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Skydiver to free fall for spacesuit research

NEWS BRIEFLY British police seize elderly couple’s plant

By Jeri Clausing Associated Press

LONDON — British police say an elderly couple unwittingly grew a monstrous cannabis plant in their yard after buying what they thought was an innocuous green bush at a flea market. Police in Bedford, a commuter town 55 miles from central London, posted a picture of a luxuriant cannabis plant growing as tall as the fence in what appeared to be someone’s back yard. In a message posted to Twitter Friday the force said the plant had been “seized today.” “Elderly couple bought shrub at car boot sale, tended carefully — biggest cannabis plant we had seen!!” the message said.

ROSWELL, N.M. — Skydiver Felix Baumgartner’s attempt at the highest, fastest free fall in history Tuesday is more than just a stunt. His planned 23-mile dive from the stratosphere should provide scientists with valuable information for next-generation spacesuits and techniques that could help astronauts survive accidents. Jumping from more than three times the height of the average cruising altitude for jetliners, Baumgartner hopes to become the first person to break the sound barrier outside of an airplane. His team has calculated that to be 690 mph based on the altitude of his dive. His medical director Dr. Jonathan Clark, a NASA space shuttle crew surgeon who lost his wife, Laurel Clark, in the 2003 Columbia accident, says no one knows what happens to a body when it breaks the sound barrier. “That is really the scientific essence of this mission,” said Clark, who is dedicated to improving astronauts’ chances of survival in a high-altitude disaster. Clark told reporters Monday he expects Baumgartner’s pressurized spacesuit to protect him. If all goes well and he survives the deathdefying jump, NASA could certify a new generation of spacesuits for protecting astronauts, and provide an escape option, from spacecraft at 120,000 feet. Currently, spacesuits are certified to protect astro-

Man dies in hospital, consumed live bugs MIAMI — The winner of a roach-eating contest in South Florida died shortly after downing dozens of the live bugs as well as worms, authorities said Monday. About 30 contestants ate the insects during Friday night’s contest at Ben Siegel Reptile Store in Deerfield Beach about 40 miles north of Miami. Edward Archbold, 32, of West Palm Beach became ill shortly after the contest ended, according to a Broward Sheriff ’s Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Authorities are waiting for autopsy results. None of the other contestants became ill, the sheriff ’s office said. —Compiled from Associated Press reports

Luke Aikins | Associated Press Felix Baumgartner makes a 25,000-foot high test jump for Red Bull Stratos. On Tuesday, over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier.

nauts to 100,000 feet, the level reached by Joe Kittinger in 1960 when he set the current free-fall record by jumping from an open gondola 19.5 miles high. Kittinger’s speed of 614 mph was just shy of breaking the sound barrier at that altitude. But whether Baumgartner, a 43-year-old Austrian military parachutist and extreme athlete, can attempt the jump depends on New Mexico’s often unpredictable weather. Winds from a cold front already delayed the jump by a day. Even the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, 200 miles to the north, was forced to delay its

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mass ascension of more than 500 balloons over the weekend. Baumgartner’s jump can only be made if ground winds are less than 2 mph. Midday Monday, the team remained optimistic for liftoff. The best window for the week was Tuesday and Wednesday, before another front is expected to move in. Baumgartner is to be lifted into the stratosphere beginning around 7 a.m. MDT by a helium balloon that will stretch 55 stories high. Once he reaches his target altitude, he will open the hatch of his capsule and make a gentle, bunny-style hop.

Any contact with the capsule on his exit could tear the pressurized suit. A rip could expose him to a lack of oxygen and temperatures as low as minus 70 degrees. It could cause potentially lethal bubbles to form in his bodily fluids, a condition known as “boiling blood.” There are also risks he could spin out of control, causing other risky problems. Despite the hazards of the dive, he and his team of experts say they have confidence in their built-in solutions and have a plan for almost every contingency. The spacesuit and capsule were

tested in two early skydiving practice runs, one from 15 miles up in March and 18 miles in July. Baumgartner, who has made more than 2,500 jumps from planes, helicopters, landmarks and skyscrapers, has been preparing for this leap for five years. After 25 years of skydiving, Baumgartner promises this jump will be his last. He says he plans to settle down with his girlfriend and fly helicopters on mountain rescue and firefighting missions in the U.S. and Austria.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Opinion 4

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

Building a campus that includes everyone By Cortney Sanders Guest Columnist

I won’t be in class on Wednesday. Instead, I will be in Washington, D.C. at the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the historic arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas. This case will decide whether UT will be able to continue on the path to becoming a place where students of all races and backgrounds are truly welcomed into our university community. When the Court makes its decision, it should let UT keep the raceconscious admissions policy it has now. The policy is working. In fact, UT should do more, not less, to ensure that all students get the benefit of meeting people of different races, cultures, ideas and viewpoints. Ensuring that UT provides open pathways to leadership and opportunity is especially critical for African-American students. For much of the University’s history, we have been excluded by law or marginalized in fact. Right now, about 75 percent of each freshman class is admitted under the Top 10 Percent Law, which only considers high school class rank. For the remainder, the admissions office considers not only grades and test scores, but also more than a dozen factors in an individualized review of applicants’ background and experiences. These factors include personal essays, leadership qualities, extracurricular activities, community service, family responsibilities, socioeconomic status, whether the applicant comes from a single-parent home, work experience during high school, whether languages other than English are spoken at home and race. I was guaranteed admission to UT because I was valedictorian of my high school class in Houston. But I think it is critical that there be a pathway into UT for students who bring unique talents and experiences to the table, even if they missed the cutoff for Top 10 Percent admissions. I love UT, and I’m glad I’m here, but I have had both good and not

so good experiences as one of what is still a relatively small number of black students on campus. As a freshman, I often found myself sitting in my room wondering whether I belonged here. Very few people whom I encountered in my residence hall, in my classes or anywhere on campus looked like me. I remember calling my mother in excitement when I saw five other African-American students on campus one day during the spring semester of my first year after taking a biology test. How many white UT students ever find themselves in a similar position? When I go to my classes, I am often either the only AfricanAmerican girl or the only African-American student. Sometimes, even when the class is larger than 200 students, I look around and see maybe only one other black student. Professors and other students often expect me to speak for my race or give “the black perspective” as though there was only one. While African-Americans have similarities, our personal paths to UT may be very different. My perspective growing up in Houston could be very different from that of someone from a small town who is the first in her family to go to college. Sometimes, contributing what I know about black culture and traditions feels comfortable. For example, I was in a small English class where I was one of three black students. During a series of discussions about “The Color Purple,” the renowned novel by Alice Walker, my classmates all said that they appreciated my input because they had never looked at things from my perspective. Growing up, we often listened to jazz, and I was able to connect the role of jazz in the novel to the important contributions that AfricanAmericans made in pioneering that genre of music, which is not just entertainment but a critical tool of self-expression and one of the first true American art forms. I also shared my insights based on conversations with my grandparents about their experiences with Jim Crow segregation.

Today is the last day to register to vote Today is your last chance to register to vote in November’s election. Hook the Vote volunteers will be registering voters at tables across campus during the day. At 8 p.m., there will be a rally on Gregory Plaza with free food, T-shirts and opportunities to register until midnight. gallery

When I go to my classes, I am often either the only African-American girl or the only African-American student.

UT has taken strides to promote a more inclusive campus climate. But several recent incidents have served as stark reminders that we still have a long way to go. In the past few weeks, African-Americans and other students of color say they were hit with bleach-filled water balloons thrown from apartment balconies in West Campus. And some sororities and fraternities have recently held themed parties in which members and their guests – who were mostly white – dressed up in clothing associated with offensive racial stereotypes. These incidents emphasize that UT still needs to do more to pursue diversity. On a campus that is robustly diverse, these incidents are less likely to occur and, if they do, less likely to be tolerated. I won’t get a chance to talk to the Supreme Court justices, but if anyone in Washington, D.C. asks what I think, I’ll tell them: “Don’t Mess with Texas.” Now is not the time to tie the hands of University officials, students, faculty and others who are working together to create a campus environment that truly embraces all of us. UT students of all races are standing together to make our collective voice heard. We need our University to continue to be able to use the necessary tools to admit and support students who will strengthen all of our experiences with diversity. Only then will we fulfill our school’s motto: “What Starts Here Changes the World.” Sanders is a government and African and African Diaspora Studies junior. She was the 2011-12 Political Action Chair of the Black Student Alliance, which filed an amicus brief in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, along with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Voting & veiled excuses By Nidhi reddy Daily Texan Columnist

When I entered UT as a freshman, I was just 17 years old. I resented being younger than all of my friends, and being too young to buy scratch-off lottery tickets or go into certain bars on Sixth Street. But beyond those complaints, I hated most of all that I couldn’t vote. I wished that, like many of my peers, I had been old enough to vote in the 2008 election. Writing this article three years later, I find myself comparatively disillusioned about the presidential election and politics in general. And I’m not alone. A 2010 RockTheVote survey found 59 percent of the people surveyed between the ages of 18 and 24 feel more cynical about politics than they did in 2008. A Gallup poll from July 2012 predicted a 20 percent lower turnout in youth voting in November’s election compared to 2008. “If we’re thinking about apathy in young people, I think it’s always really important to clarify that it’s a specific apathy - it’s an apathy to partisan politics and not a ‘young people don’t care about politics’ kind of thing,” said associate government professor Bethany Albertson. At the Strauss Institute’s Oct. 2 screening of the televised discussion “Why Bother? Engaging Texans in Democracy Today,” attendees shared their own motivations for participating — or not participating — in politics. “So, I kind of came up with this Crips and Bloods theory… they’re two different gang organizations kind of going for the same thing,” said one student in the audience. “I kind of see that in the Democrat and

Republican parties.” Increasing polarization of political parties and distrust of the government has left students feeling alienated from national politics and from the generation before them. Statistics, however, indicate that there are benefits to siding with a political party; partisanship makes you more likely to vote and requires less time for independent research on candidates and issues. Young people often complain about the polarization of parties and sometimes even fuel the flame by contributing to the backand-forth name calling, but we are largely uninvolved in local or state politics, arenas where individual votes really do count and can influence what happens where we live and work. “I thought of a message of Grace Lee Boggs, an activist and an academic in Detroit, gave to the young Occupiers – ‘Do something local and don’t diss the political systems, but understand their limitations ... ‘We begin to see that voting is really a piece of this huge puzzle of civic engagement that involves a lot more time and commitment,” said Carmen, a 27-year-old audience member. “When you do start getting involved on a local level, you start to learn things … that yes, our vote does count.” Instead of following the “Don’t Vote” mantra of Lupe Fiasco, a rapper deeply dissatisfied with the American political process, college students should get involved in organizations that aim to solve the problems they are passionate about. Frustration with partisan politics too often becomes a thinly veiled veiled excuse to not participate at all. Reddy is a radio, television and film and mathematics senior from Bedford.

What college students can teach Chris Matthews By Patrick St. Pierre Daily Texan Columnist

The lingering memory of the hard-fought football game we hosted this past Saturday night has got me thinking largely in sports metaphors. Specifically, the axiom “act like you’ve been there before” comes to mind. The saying goes both for wins and losses. When you win big, act like you’ve been there before – you may just establish the image of a perennial winner. And, when you have a tough loss, act like you’ve been there before too – a display of devastation will show a lack of confidence in your ability to bounce back. If you had the good sense to be watching the game Saturday night, you witnessed one of the best college football games yet this season. Both teams played exceptionally well and our Longhorns can take pride in the tremendous effort they gave. Longhorn fans, too, can rest easy knowing they provided the sort of enthusiastic and energetic support that is expected of a record-breaking crowd. And when we lost, our fans made no bones about the fact that they’ve tasted defeat before. In short, we were poised. Emotionally invested throughout the game, yes, but poised at its conclusion. A similar competition, with fewer hits to the helmet, was waged three days before kickoff when President

Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney squared off in the first presidential debate of the 2012 election season. The consensus about the debate is that Romney won. So Romney supporters have cause to rejoice, while Obama’s camp is liable to grimace at their candidate’s poor showing. But both Obama’s and the UT football team’s losses are only small parts of an ongoing series. This is a notion that UT fans, by the poise they demonstrated Saturday night, seem to understand. The same cannot be said for MSNBC political commentator Chris Matthews. Following the Denver debate, Matthews, a well documented Obama supporter, was asked for his analytical view on the evening’s dialogue. The rant he offered in lieu of substantive rhetorical analysis has been the subject of popular media ridicule for the past week and was mocked in a comedy sketch on Saturday Night Live. Since Matthews is given license to provide his personal opinions, his political views often go unchecked. This is by design. Matthews isn’t a reserved moderator but rather an invested spectator. In this way he is much the analog of the UT football fans. And, when his team fell short of its goal, he abandoned all reason and despaired. It wasn’t pretty. A frazzled Chris Matthews, his hair and suit jacket disheveled, is now seared into my memory and has done

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more to immortalize Obama’s lackluster showing than Romney supporters could have hoped for. He was understandably upset that his candidate had fallen short. But he dealt with defeat in an unbecoming manner and created the feeling that he, and perhaps President Obama, had not been there before. Though he was expressing his rightful frustration, his rant showed a lack of confidence in his candidate’s fortitude. I am proud to say that UT football fans showed great trust in their team’s resilience following Saturday’s loss. We supported our team fervently throughout the contest and we accepted the defeat with composure. The manner in which we accept loss likely doesn’t mean much to our opponent, but it proves to our team and ourselves that this is a circumstance that we can handle. Hopefully the team can derive some confidence from that. It may be a tough sell to make that rowdy, obnoxious and often intoxicated football fans are a more poised bunch than the political media elite. But Longhorn fans don’t mind admitting that we’ve been there before, both in victory and defeat. Why political pundits act astonished at their candidate’s mistakes or poor showings is beyond my understanding. I’m just happy to have been one of the thousands with horns raised after Saturday’s game. St. Pierre is an English and philosophy junior from Austin.

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News

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

COURT continues from page 1 year since 2007, UT records show. The key element of the decision will be if race can be used to “level the playing field of opportunity” to increase diversity in underrepresented groups, Harrington said. “There is one view that says every individual must be treated equally, and there is another remedial view that says the purpose of equal protection is to allow people to be where they ought to be and level the playing field of opportunity,” Harrington said. “The current composition of the court sees the first view.”

5

a closer Look at in-state admission (2011) overall class

automatic admissions

Under “holistic review”

(top 8 Percent) [75 percent of class]

[25 percent of class]

asian

19 percent

19 percent

17 percent

Black

6 percent

6 percent

5 percent

hispanic

25 percent

29 percent

14 percent

Merits of Diversity

White

45 percent

41 percent

58 percent

More than 70 organizations have filed briefs supporting UT’s admissions policy arguing that colleges have a compelling interest to use race-conscious admissions to create racial diversity. When the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled race could not be used in admissions between 1996 and 2003, Hispanic and black student representation dropped, according to UT’s brief. The Supreme Court overturned this decision in the 2003 case Grutter v. Bollinger, and UT began using race in admissions again for applications in 2004. A racially diverse education is necessary to prepare students for diverse work environments they encounter after graduation, said Melissa Hart, author of a brief filed on behalf of UT by the Council for Minority Affairs at Texas A&M University. “Studies have shown that everyone, regardless of their race or gender, learns more effective critical thinking and leadership skills if they learn in a classroom that has a racial diversity of students,” Hart said. Debo Adegbile, acting president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said in a conference call last week that there is “overwhelming evidence” that affirmative action helps create a space where racial stereotypes are challenged. Adegbile, a soccer player in college, related a personal story about his experiences with a teammate who called him a “fuzzy foreigner” after practice early during his freshman year. “We didn’t have to end our relationship in the way that it began that day,” Adegbile said. “He began with a preconception and he was able to replace it by meeting a person with difference.”

other

5 percent

5 percent

6 percent

“the MisMatch effect”

taking action Social work and Spanish junior Samantha Robles and history senior Joshua Tang have organized a student campaign called We Support UT to publicly defend UT’s admissions policy. The group organized a teach-in to educate students about the case and held a town hall forum with attorneys from civil rights groups siding with the University. “It’s not just UT’s fault, it’s also the fault of K-12 not preparing students for college,” Tang said. “A lot of our black and brown children are falling through the cracks. We know the problem, and then we have cases like Fisher where the very little that is being done is threatened.” If the University’s policy is rejected, UT will appear unwelcoming to groups that are already less likely to attend UT and application rates will drop, said Choquette Hamilton, associate director for development of African and African diaspora studies. “The negative press certainly impacts application behavior,” Hamilton said. “The reason is perception of access. If students feel their admissions prospects are low, they are going to say ‘why should I waste my time and money to apply?’” A ruling in Fisher’s favor would harm efforts to attract students to UT through programs like Advise Texas and University Outreach Centers, Robles said. UT should seek other ways to increase racial diversity regardless of the ruling in the Fisher case, she said. Wednesday’s hearing marks the start of the last phase in a case that began in 2008. The court’s ruling, likely to come in the spring, will determine the future of UT admissions policy and could have implications for affirmative action policies across the country.

March 25, 2008 Abigail Fisher is denied admission to UT-Austin but admitted under the CAP program. She declines and later decides to attend LSU.

May 29, 2008 The temporary injunction to re-evaluate Fisher and Michalewicz is denied, and the District Court later hears the argument.

Jan. 18, 2011 After hearing arguments, the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rules UT’s admissions policy to be constitutional.

Feb. 21, 2012 Supreme Court agrees to hear Fisher v. Texas. The University hires law firm Latham & Watkins to represent UT. Latham & Watkins defended the University of Michigan in Grutter v. Bollinger in 2003.

April 7, 2008 Fisher files a complaint to the Western District of Texas. Another plantiff, Rachel Michalewicz, joins her in the case two weeks later. Both are represented by the law firm Wiley Rein LLP.

Aug. 17, 2009 The Western District of Texas rules UT’s admissions policy is constitutional. Fisher and Michalewicz later appeal the decision to the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Sept. 15, 2011 Abigail Fisher requests case to be reviewed at Supreme Court. Michalewicz withdraws from the suit.

Oct. 10, 2012 The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments from attorneys representing the University and Abigail Fisher.

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Fisher’s attorneys argue race-conscious admissions discriminate against Asian and white students who do not face the same application standards as Hispanic or black students, violating the 14th Amendment’s requirement for equal protection. Lino Graglia, a constitutional law professor, said race-conscious admissions harm black students because affirmative action policies allow them to enter schools where they are “typically less qualified” than other applicants and less likely to succeed. “It seems to be pretty well understood today that the result of race preference in higher education is to hurt blacks,” Graglia said. “What you are doing here is taking black students out of schools they are fully qualified for and putting them in a more selective college where they are almost guaranteed to graduate in the bottom of their class.” At UT, blacks and Hispanics have lower four-year graduation rates than whites and Asians, UT records show. Graglia called this scenario the “mismatch effect.” Fisher’s supporters cite “the mismatch effect” in reference to the University of California, which eliminated race as an admissions factor in 1996. While black enrollment of the University of California at Los Angeles declined from 5.4 percent to 3.2 percent of the student body between 1998 and 2005, the four-year graduation rate of black students increased from 29.2 percent to 48.3 percent between 1998 and 2005. Graglia said the stated aim of increasing diversity did not increase meaningful racial understanding that benefited different groups on college campuses. The Texas Association of Scholars, of which Graglia is a member, is one of 17 groups that filed briefs on behalf of Fisher. The authors argue there is no quantifiable evidence that racial diversity eliminates stereotypes. Instead, they say it increases the chance

that students will be regarded as “tokens” of their race. Law and government professor Lucas Powe said the removal of race-conscious admissions would impact campus diversity, but said other tools that converge with racial factors might achieve some diversity through other means. “There’s nothing more effective in getting race than using race,” Powe said. “But if you can’t, just look at what you can do with using race neutral tools like the Top Ten Percent Rule. If you’re interested in economic diversity, just pick zip codes from the poorest part of the states and get students from there.” Fisher has not challenged the constitutionality of affirmative action policies relating to gender or socioeconomic status.

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Sports 6

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

BASKETBALL

Hopeful hoopsters hungry for chance By Michael Marks

SIDELINE NFL TEXANS

At 6-foot-8-inches and 230 pounds, Ed Johnson can work up an appetite. From professional basketball leagues in Italy to Mexico to Nicaragua, the athletic power forward has made a living by feasting on big men in the paint. “I look at them like lunch meat,” Johnson said. “And I’m hungry.” Following his dream to play basketball in America, Johnson was one of 63 players who spent his Saturday at Concordia University trying out for the Austin Toros, the NBA Development League affiliate of the San Antonio Spurs. Each of the D-League’s 16 teams holds open tryouts prior to training camp. Although there are no guarantees that any players who try out will make the roster, to do so wouldn’t be unprecedented. First-year coach Taylor Jenkins is quick to cite University of Georgia product Terrance Woodbury, who attended last year’s open tryout and went on to play in every game last season. “Yes, you have a shot,” Jenkins said at the beginning of the tryout. “This is a great opportunity to hopefully find a couple guys who can come to camp and make our team.” Jenkins stressed that he wasn’t looking to fill a specific position but wanted to find the “best fit” for the Toros. Retired NBA vet-

JETS

MLB CARDINALS

NATIONALS

YANKEES

Becca Gamache | Daily Texan Staff The Austin Toros of the NBA Development League, held open tryouts Oct. 6 for a chance to make their regular season roster, and 63 players attended for their chance to play professionally in the NBA system.

eran Sean Marks, who is now the Toros’ General Manager, echoed Jenkins’ sentiments. “We can’t be so picky. If we’re looking for a guard and there’s a talented 4 or 5 man, then you have to leave your options open,” Marks said. “We’re looking at two or three [players] at the end of this who will maybe end up on the team or in camp.” Greg Mammel, a point

guard who played at Division II Barton College, is currently splitting time between coaching eighth-grade basketball in San Antonio and working at a sushi restaurant. He wants to be one of those two or three. “This is my first tryout for a pro team. Obviously, the goal is to make the team, but for me, it’s also to see if I can measure up against these

FOOTBALL COLUMN

guys,” Mammel said. Although Saturday’s tryout was a first for Mammel, other players were veterans of the professional tryout circuit. Travis George signed with the Toros after impressing at last year’s tryout, but was waived from the team after two games. “The competition here is great. It’s a lot better than last year,” George said.

After being cut from the Toros, George spent last year playing in Thailand for the Bangkok Cobras under Joe Bryant, Kobe Bryant’s father. The 6-foot-9inch power forward has also played professionally in Belgium, Sweden and Mexico. “I feel like it’s my time,” the 27-year-old George said. Results from the tryout have not yet been announced.

Jackson Jeffcoat and the Texas Longhorns have lost their past two meetings with the Sooners, but know the importance of the upcoming matchup for the momentum of their season.

By Michael Marks

Zachary Strain Daily Texan Staff

Sports Editor

The last time Texas and Oklahoma each entered the Red River Rivalry with a loss was in 2007. Colt McCoy’s 324 yards and two touchdowns weren’t enough to rally the Longhorns to a win as they fell to the Sooners, 28-21. Texas went on to another respectable 10-win season that ended in a Holiday Bowl victory while Oklahoma won its third Big 12 title in four years. The Longhorns, coming off a 48-45 loss to West Virginia

this past weekend, have much loftier expectations for themselves than a Holiday Bowl appearance. They lost five games last year and beat Cal in the Holiday Bowl. Been there, done that. Texas has BCS bowl aspirations and the talent to turn that dream into a reality. But that won’t happen unless the Longhorns — twopoint underdogs in their next game — take down the Sooners on Saturday. While Texas isn’t quite ready to label this weekend’s game a “must-win” game, it recognizes that the stakes are higher because it’s already suffered a loss. “I think every game’s a

must-win game,” junior guard Mason Walters said. “It’s tough we didn’t get it done last week but we can’t let one week beat us twice. The next game’s always the most important. OU’s on the schedule this week.” To reach a BCS bowl this year, the Longhorns may not have to win their conference. There’s a good chance the Big 12 will send its champion to the Fiesta Bowl and another squad to another BCS bowl as an at-large. But for Texas to contend for that conference championship and earn a spot in a BCS bowl, it needs a win over Oklahoma this Saturday

OU continues on page

7

Chevoski Collins became the 15th member of the 2013 Longhorn recruiting class on Monday morning, verbally committing to Texas in an announcement at his high school in Livingston, Texas. Collins’ commitment is the first for the Longhorns since mid-June, when Butte Community College tight end Geoff Swaim chose Texas. Collins considered offers from Oklahoma, Baylor and Oklahoma State, but ultimately couldn’t resist staying closer to home. “When I went to the University of Texas, it felt like family,” Collins told ESPN. com. “I just felt welcome there. And it’s so close to home, my family can come see me.” Rivals.com rates Collins as the third-best athlete prospect in the state of Texas. Although he currently plays quarterback for the 1-4 Livingston Lions, Collins will likely spend his Longhorn career as a defensive back.

Collins won’t be the only member of the Longhorn secondary who spent significant time on offense in high school. Freshman Adrian Colbert, sophomore Quandre Diggs, junior Adrian Phillips and sophomore Josh Turner were all used to having the ball in their hands before coming to Texas. Collins will join Cibolo Steele safety Erik Huhn and Bastrop cornerback Antwuan Davis as the third addition to the Longhorn secondary from the class of 2013. All three were recruited by UT secondary coach Duane Akina. Texas is expected to accept only three or four more commitments for this recruiting cycle after bringing in classes of 25, 22 and 28 from 2010 to 2012. The 2013 class has the potential to be Texas’ smallest since 2003, when Texas signed only 18 players. With so few spots available, the Longhorns can afford to be selective in deciding which players will fill out the class.

RECRUITS continues on page 7

VOLLEYBALL

Horns down Cardinals in five sets after furious rally from Eckerman By Rachel Thompson In December, the top two volleyball teams in the nation will dig, block and set for a national title in The KFC Yum! Center in Louisville, Ky., The Longhorns defeated the Louisville Cardinals in that same gym Monday night. The game was a break from Big 12 play for the Longhorns, as they went up against a strong Louisville squad who checked in as the No. 15 team in the nation. It was a typically difficult nonconference contest for Texas, as head coach Jerritt Elliott likes to schedule tough

TOP TWEET Mike Davis @MikeDavis_1

“ It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.....”

FOOTBALL RECRUITING

Red River Rivalry: a must-win Collins commits, ends long drought

By Christian Corona

ORIOLES

foes in the middle of Big 12 play in order to keep his team sharp, in part because the Big 12 is going through a downward swoon as far as top-to-bottom quality. The win was Texas’ eighth straight winning match and the No. 9 Longhorns saw a night of strong performances, including a careerhigh 27 kills and 23 digs for sophomore All-America outside hitter Haley Eckerman. But she wasn’t the only Longhorn with a strong performance on the evening, junior Bailey Webster notched 14 kills and seven digs and junior setter Hannah Allison posted a careerhigh 61 assists.

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Sophomores Khat Bell and Haley Eckerman, shown here in a 3-0 win against TCU on Oct. 3, helped pace the Longhorns to a five-set win Monday evening in Louisville, Ky.

SPOTLIGHT Alex Okafor, 80 Position: Defensive end Height: 6’ 4 ½” Class: Senior Hometown: Pflugerville, TX

Senior defensive end Alex Okafor was named the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Week on Monday after his career day against West Virginia. In the loss, Okafor matched previous career highs with two sacks and two forced fumbles, while also blocking a field goal attempt and registering three quarterback pressures in the Longhorns’ 48-45 defeat. Okafor’s blocked field goal was the first of his collegiate career. The game was the third time in his career that he recorded two sacks.

SPORTS BRIEFLY LHN to televise Texas-ISU game

The Longhorn Network will air Texas’ game against Iowa State on Nov. 10. Grande Communications, AT&T UVerse and Verizon FiOS remain the biggest providers of the network. The network has exclusive rights to televise the game, except in Iowa, where it will also be shown on six ABC affiliate stations. Texas’ games against Wyoming and New Mexico were on the Longhorn Network earlier this season. Last season, the network had exclusive rights to Texas’ games against Rice and Kansas.

— Lauren Giudice


sports

7

OU

continues from page 6

Courtesy of Livingston High School

Class of 2013 recruit, Chevoski Collins, No. 14 , verbally committed to Texas on Monday morning. Collins plays quarterback in high school but will likely play defensive back in college.

afernoon at the Cotton Bowl. “I can’t predict who will win out and who will lose out in the end, but it’s definitely important in the end,” sophomore quarterback David Ash said of this week’s game against Oklahoma. “One thing about this game is that records don’t matter. It’s an intense rivalry, a lot of players know each other. A lot of players are from around here. There’s nothing quite like it ... To be able to be the best, you have to beat the best. That’s what we’re trying to do.”

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by Rivals.com as the best wideout in the country, and has been talking to UT receivers coach Darrell Wyatt. Although Treadwell is entertaining offers from dozens of schools including Florida, Illinois, Michigan and Ohio State, it is speculated that he will likely visit Austin before making a decision. Other potential Longhorns include cornerback Cole Luke (who visited campus this weekend), Dallas Kimball defensive tackle Justin Manning and safety Marcell Harris of Orlando, Fla.

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Caleb Benenoch, an interior lineman from Katy who decommitted from Michigan State in June, is among the most likely candidates to be the next UT commitment. Benenoch is considering offers from schools around the country, although he has listed Texas as one of his top choices after visiting Austin this past weekend. Even though he does not currently have a scholarship offer, wide receiver Laquon Treadwell is a dark horse to sign with Texas in February. The Illinois receiver is rated

Braz

RECRUITS continues from page 6

Over the last nine seasons, the Longhorns have suffered their second loss to the Sooners three times — in 2003, 2007 and 2010. On the first two occasions, Texas went on to win 10 games and play in the Holiday Bowl. In 2010, of course, the Longhorns went 5-7. In the other six seasons, Texas made four BCS bowl appearances — including two in a national title game — and went 67-11 (.859) over that span. “Both of us have losses,” sophomore cornerback Quandre Diggs said. “It raises the stakes, of course, you don’t want to get the second loss. You want to go out and be successful. You don’t ever want to lose anyway.”

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Life & Arts

8

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

VETS

THEATER

continues from page 10

Ben Chesnut | Daily Texan Staff A scene is acted out for 23{WOYZECK}23, which premieres October 9 at the Lab Theatre. The play, inspired by Georg Buchner’s Woyzeck, is UT graduate Diego Medellin’s directorial debut.

Graduate ends unfinished play By Jasmin Carina “23{WOYZECK}23” is recent UT graduate Diego Medellin’s directorial debut. This production is just the beginning for Medellin, who intends to continue creating new work and collaborating with artists around Austin. The play, inspired by Georg Buchner’s “Woyzeck,” premieres Oct. 9 at the Lab Theatre. Buchner, the original playwright, died before he completed “Woyzeck,” leaving the play open for interpretation and adaptation. “23{WOYZECK}23” tells the tragic tale of Franz Woyzeck, a working-class man who struggles with the pressures of supporting his family and trying to maintain his own mental health, which dwindles as the story progresses and eventually sends him over the edge. Medellin’s vision of the play grew from reading different translations of Buchner’s “Woyzeck.” Medellin puts his own spin on the play by incorporating modern-day American culture into Buchner’s 19th-century play. “What’s interesting is that the translations have very little stage directions, which at times can help one visualize the world,” Medellin said. “I enjoyed the fact that even though there weren’t any stage directions to guide me, I was able to bring this world to life just through the power of the words.” Medellin’s last production at the Lab Theatre was a col-

laboration among friends titled “Cloud Tectonics,” which helped inspire his new work. “We were inspired by the many great people before us who had used that space [the Lab Theatre] to tell an interesting story,” Medellin said. “I was interested in building a gap between recent college graduates and current students. I wanted to have the opportunity to work with each other and build a community within a space that we both were familiar with and enjoyed.” UT theater and dance graduates and current students consistently create, produce and collaborate in the theater community around Austin. Their drive and passion to work together to create meaningful pieces for the community is illustrated through the constant flow of new work in the theater department and all over Austin. The Lab Theatre grants students the opportunity to bring their visions to life through their own completely student-produced pieces in the theater. “The Lab is a risk-free opportunity to collaborate with who you want, to put on whatever show you want and to create whatever you want — not every theater department has that, so it’s important to take advantage of the space,” junior theatre and dance major Alison Stoos said. “Theater as of now is the place where I can find this process working for me. So the next step for me is to continue to learn how to create work and

collaborate with other people no matter the approach — whether it be directing, writing or performing,” Medellin said. Senior theatre studies major Joseph Dailey stars in Medellin’s upcoming production. According to Dailey, Medellin is a very focused and smart director who allows his actors to bring part of themselves into their work. This lightens up the seemingly dark production. Dailey’s experience working on the project is special in that it is the first production he has ever participated in that makes the audience piece everything together themselves, which is both weird and exciting for Dailey. The audience is given the responsibility to gather their own conclusions, which keeps them fully engaged and invested in the story throughout the show. This also gives the actors a certain freedom in their work. “It is nice to make something you love with people you love,” Dailey said. “You seldom get to see a group of people who respect each other on stage. The strength in the ensemble is incomparable.”

Play: 23{WOYZECK}23 Place: Lab Theatre Date and Time:

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The social life of a student veteran, Ollar said, can be “lonely — an uphill battle.” “You leave your whole life,” Ollar said. “The Army buys you a ticket and you start your life over again.” The traditional social scenes at UT are also largely closed off to veterans. Though Ollar said that some student veterans join organizations like pre-professional fraternities or educational clubs, they don’t always feel welcome. But for many of UT’s student veterans, the same life experience that hinders their integration into student life influences their academic pursuits. Middle Eastern studies senior

MUSIC

continues from page 10 crossed when you’re young.” Fans of 1996 breakthrough album Bringing Down the Horse will find a lot to like about the new release, which carries a lot of the same earthtoned roots-rock feel. While Dylan’s two stripped-down Tom Waits-inspired solo releases met with critical acclaim, he has stated that he prefers working with a band

APP

continues from page 10 from ACL artists. Zilker Park Map: More than 350 acres, Zilker Park is a huge recreational area. And with 70,000 people attending ACL each day, getting through the park can be very strenuous. The mobile app’s interactive map, unlike a paper map, can pinpoint users’ exact location. The screen will refresh, showing users what they are close to and can even notify friends of the user’s location. St. Edward’s University junior and ACL volunteer Brency Cuellar believes the app is an eco-friendly alternative to paper maps. “The mobile map will definitely make it easier to help people that are lost,” Cuellar said. “Plus, using the mobile map saves the city money by cutting down on paper usage.”

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and being part of a unit. Everyone in Glad All Over sounds like they’re having fun and that can make all the difference when creating an album.

The result is Dylan’s eighth quality album as a lead-singer/ songwriter since 1992, something any musician would be proud of.

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Group Text: Mobile app users can send a group text to their friends whenever they get separated from each other. Messages are sent and received immediately, informing friends of each other’s whereabouts. “The group text is the most helpful,” Ramirez said. “[During Lollapalooza] I could add my cousin who had the app too. This was cool because I didn’t have to scroll through other numerous contacts on my phone. I would send a message through group text and have a reply instantly.” ACL Wristband Register: Beginning this year, ACL attendees will be able to register their festival wristband through the mobile app, or at multiple check-in sites at the festival. Registering your wristband allows you to receive a new one on-site if your old one gets damaged. It also gives you the opportunity to be a part of two contests: a three-day VIP upgrade and a VIP trip for next year’s ACL.

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Ollar said about 80 people attended the event throughout the day. Although most attendees are veterans or their acquaintances, Ollar said, “If you love a vet, you’re welcome [to attend].”

You leave your whole life. The Army buys you a ticket and you start your life over again.

“Another cool feature is that whenever you run your wristband by one of our check-in sites, it will automatically update your Facebook status around the park,” C3 employee Lindsay Hoffman said. “There’ll be multiple check-in boxes throughout the park for you to update your status.” The ACL app is not cluttered with information and it’s very user friendly. The only thing lacking is a transportation map. Fun Fun Fun Fest’s mobile app comes fully equipped with a transportation map, including various parking spaces and bus stops near Auditorium Shores, where the festival is held. Although there are shuttles that will take you to ACL, finding them could be difficult. Festivals are always going to have problems that you cannot control. But at least with the mobile app, you’re much less likely to miss this year’s hottest acts or lose track of your friends.

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Christi Crews joined the Navy at 18 after the emotional turmoil of her first love being killed in Iraq. After leaving the Navy, she “decided to educate [herself ] about the Middle East instead.” In the Middle Eastern studies program at UT, Crews has “learned to love and appreciate the [Middle Eastern] culture for what it is … and to negotiate and find middle ground and common interests with people who have different opinions.” Crews says she hasn’t had trouble making friends at UT but admits that she doesn’t “fit into that 18, 19, 20-year-old student category.” Looking around the tailgate, Crews said most of her friends are from the SVA. The SVA holds tailgates for every home game and

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Comics

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

9

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Tuesday, October 09, 2012

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Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

CAMPUS

UT vets unite for football fun

Twitter Tuesdays Daily Texan Life&Arts @dtlifeandarts Which bands are you most excited to see at ACL this year? #twittertuesdays

Every Tuesday, @thedailytexan Life and Arts section will run the best responses in print to our #twittertuesday question. Tweet us your response and your answer may appear in @thedailytexan. #twittertuesdays

Taylor Prewitt | @TeeAaaPee JACK WHITE.

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff Event coordinator for the Student Veterans Association Tania Nesser and nutrition senior Amanda Lavers play cornhole at the SVA tailgate Saturday afternoon. Jumbo janga was another popular game that was played at the tailgating event.

By Laura Wright This past Saturday, a group of student veterans enjoyed an afternoon at the Student Veterans Association tailgate. In the burnt orange blur of pregame festivities, these Longhorns blended in with the rest of the crowd despite the fact they’re actually quite rare. There are approximately 750 veterans studying at UT. Stephen Ollar, SVA president and economics senior, said there were only two veterans in this year’s incoming freshman class of over 8,000, which means that the number of veterans on

campus is, at least for now, staying small. Small, however, doesn’t necessarily mean closeknit. UT doesn’t “flag” students as veterans in the same way that it doesn’t list students’ hometown or ethnicity in the directory. This makes it difficult for veterans at UT to identify each other. Ollar said he has “sporadically met a few” ex-military students in his classes but that “a lot of veterans don’t identify themselves as such.” Organizations like the SVA, which seeks to support veterans and the dependents of veterans in the UT community, play a crucial role in helping veterans

find a community on the 40 Acres. Members of the SVA community, including Ollar and government and history senior Steven Denman, claimed a small patch of grass just north of the stadium for their tailgate. Before coming to UT, Ollar and Denman were both stationed with the Army in Ft. Richardson, Alaska. Now they are both working toward law school. Denman, originally from Michigan, said he chose to come to UT after leaving the Army because of Austin’s warm weather — and because he felt that the “pro-liberal” Austin culture would give him the

ACL FEST

App to alleviate festival confusion

By Eli Watson For newcomers and festival aficionados alike, the Austin City Limits Music Festival is a musical maze that can be difficult to venture. It is common to lose friends in a sea of middle-aged spectators laid back in their lawn chairs, or

heading to the AMD stage to see guitar virtuoso Jack White and being swallowed by a line of beer guzzlers. Although ACL’s mobile application cannot magically solve such problems, it’s built to make them and other problems easier to endure. The application offers multiple services: a day-today schedule organizer, map and group text. Here’s a brief how-to about using some of the app’s most useful features. Schedule Organizer: In a matter of minutes the schedule organizer can put together your must-see acts for the day, along with 15-minute reminders prior to each act’s performance. If you attended this year’s or last year’s Lollapalooza music festival in Chicago, then ACL’s

mobile app should look very familiar, since concert promotion company C3 handles both ACL and Lollapalooza. “It’s nice to see how similar they are,” junior Alejandra Ramirez, who attended Lollapalooza last year, said. “Just like Lollapalooza’s mobile app, the ACL app allows me to organize my schedule as well as check out bands I have never heard before.” With time to kill, users can check out a new band, look them up through the app and even visit the group’s website. Through ACL’s very own Slacker radio station, which is also a part of the app, festivalgoers can even listen to tracks

APP continues on page 8

“perspective of the left, the middle and the right” that the military lacked. Ollar, in contrast, is a lifelong Texan and a second-time UT student. Ollar was born and raised in Midlothian, a small town outside of Dallas. After earning a cell and molecular biology degree from UT, he joined the Army. Now he is back at UT to earn an economics degree after finding that “there’s not a lot of options available for veterans.” As they drank and talked, the two men revealed the difficulties of rejoining civilian life as a student.

VS.

TORCHLIGHT

PARADE & RALLY

THIS WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10 PARADE LEAVES FROM

West 25th & Whitis at 8pm RALLY Main Mall at 8:30pm

Bassnectar. I hear he has siq drops and wub wubs.

Mary-Anna Jollett | @MaryAnnaBananaa RHCP and The Black Keys!

Michi | @DaisyHavoc

RHCP, Tegan and Sara, and The Wombats. Ahhh so excited!

Hugo Rojo | @hugorojo

Been dreamin’ of Florence + The Machine lately... Universe is trying to tell me something!

VETS continues on page 8 MUSIC REVIEW | THE WALLFLOWERS

Photo courtesy of The Wallflowers Jakob Dylan and his band reunited after seven years.

Wallflowers return to spotlight By Ricky Stein

UT OU

Garrett Sullivan | @goofygarrett

In many ways, Jakob Dylan is one of the most underappreciated artists in rock today. Over the last two decades, the 42-year-old singer/songwriter has been both highly prolific and highly consistent, releasing two solo albums and six with his band The Wallflowers. Yet despite all that productivity, Dylan remains most widely recognized as the son of one of rock’s all-time greatest artists. His father is Bob Dylan, and while this has certainly opened some doors for him along the way, it has also created a stigma that has made it difficult for the younger Dylan to be appreciated and recognized for his own merits. After a seven-year break from The Wallflowers during which he embarked on an acoustic-based solo career, Dylan returned to the rock band format with Glad All Over, released Tuesday by Columbia Records.

Produced by Jay Joyce (Emmylou Harris, Cage the Elephant) and recorded in Nashville, Tenn., at Dan Auerbach’s Easy Eye Sound studio, the album’s 11 new tracks feature original band members Greg Richling on bass and Rami Jaffee on keyboards, with The Wallflowers’ longtime guitarist Stuart Mathis and drummer Jack Irons (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam) rounding out the lineup. The album opens with the electro-charged one-two punch of “Hospital for Sinners” and “Misfits and Lovers,” two danceable rock songs with a Rolling Stones’ “Some Girls” party vibe. Lead single “Reboot the Mission” grooves into this category as well. Irons lays down the foundation with a pulsating funk/soul beat, giving a slight nod to the Clash’s “Guns of Brixton” (the song also features a guest appearance by former Clash guitarist Mick Jones) while Dylan croons in his breathy baritone over surging electric

guitars. The song’s video features several extended popn-lock sequences, undoubtedly a first in the illustrious Dylan chronology. Other standout tracks include the Wilco/Pete Yorntinged “Love Is a Country,” the organ-soaked “It Won’t Be Long (‘Till We’re Not Wrong)” and the cryptic, slightly Radiohead-esque “Constellation Blues.” There are no obvious instant classics quite on par with previous hits such as “One Headlight” or “6th Avenue Heartache,” although “Reboot the Mission” and “Misfits and Lovers” both come pretty close. Nonetheless, the album is a good continuation of the band’s sound as it simultaneously reaches into unexplored territory. Dylan’s lyrics are thoughtful and literate, although they don’t always hit their mark. At his best, his songwriting can be astute and observant, as when he sings, “Love is a country better

MUSIC continues on page 8

The Daily Texan 2012-10-09  

The Oct. 09, 2012 edition of The Daily Texan

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