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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

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This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25.

INSIDE 5 NEWS

Graduate student applications go up as first-year Graduate student enrollment goes down.

4 OPINiON

Cruz and Sadler on guns, economic philosophy and trolls. Plus, a DHFS campaign for civil discourse.

Learning about “sex-positivity.”

Mike Davis reaches potential

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 6

LABEL HEAD

Alumni back new medical facilities By Alexa Ura

The Texas Exes joined the ranks of supporters of a local initiative that would increase property taxes in Travis County to help fund a new UT medical school and teaching hospital. The UT alumni association officially launched the UT M.D. campaign Wednesday in support of Proposition

1, an initiative on the Nov. 6 ballot. The proposition calls for a five-cent property tax increase to be allocated to Central Health, Travis County’s health care taxing authority. The proposition would increase the county property tax rate by 63 percent from 7.89 cents to 12.9 cents per $100 of assessed property value. The increase is expected to raise an estimated $54 million to be used to fund various

health services, including $35 million a year toward the proposed UT medical school and teaching hospital. Texas Exes president John Beckworth said the association’s board of directors voted to support a UT medical school earlier this year after the UT System Board of Regents and the Seton Healthcare Family of Hospitals com-

MEDICAL continues on page 2

CAMPUS

6

UNIVERSITY

Admissions case speaks to diversity

SPORTS

A look at how current West Virginia head coach Dana Holgorsen has given Texas fits

Ruling may impact nationwide policies

10

By Joshua Fechter

LIFE & ARTS

UT’s Lockpicking Club explains how some bike locks are easy pickings.

ONLINE from the blogS Orientation 2.0

New Student Services announces a new program for first-year students.

bit.ly/SCTI2A

TODAY Poetry on the Plaza

The Harry Ransom Center presents Poetry on the Plaza with Actors from the London Stage. Pick up a free poster and bookmark with the 2012-2013 Poetry on the Plaza schedule

Brown bag panel

The Public Affairs Alliance for Communities of Color (PAACC) hosts a brown bag panel discussion on the Supreme Court case Fisher v. University of Texas. This event will be held in the Sid Richardson Hall (SRH) 3.124 from 12:151:15 p.m.

Study in England

Hear about how you can take SOC 321K, KIN 350 or EUS 346 in Leeds, England, this June with Dr. Ben Carrington, Department of Sociology. This info session will be held in Bellmont Hall (BEL) 602A from 4-5 p.m.

Quote to note This is 2012 and I refuse to go back in time. All we want is the university to take more of a firm stance to these kind of things. — Chas Moore NEWS

Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff Former UT student Chas Moore pauses while voicing his anger during the “Walk to West Campus” protest on the corner of 26th and Rio Grande Streets Tuesday afternoon. Moore organized the protest to urge the University to take more action in response to several reported incidents of bleach balloons being thrown at students of color.

March urges action Students walk in protest against racism, accuse University of systemic negligence By David Maly & Bobby Blanchard More than 100 members of the UT community marched through the streets of West Campus Tuesday evening, chanting their concerns about recently reported incidents of bias in the area. In a march titled “Walk to West Campus: Standing in Solidarity Against Racism

& Hate,” members of the UT community addressed several reported incidents including several students of color being hit with bleach-filled water balloons, the use of racial slurs and insensitive ethnic-themed parties hosted by registered student organizations. The march was organized by former UT student Chas Moore, along with students from both UT and HustonTillotson University. Moore

said he organized the march to send a message to the UT administration and other relevant authorities that discrimination is still a major, systemic issue at UT. “This is 2012, and I refuse to go back in time,” Moore said. “All we want is the University to take more of a firm stance to these kind of things.” The march began at the Martin Luther King Jr. statue on the East Mall and continued through UT’s campus

MARCH continues on page 2

Don’t you hate, don’t you fear, people of color are welcome here. — Walk to West Campus marchers

Lawyers representing organizations that promote equal rights for minority groups said if the U.S. Supreme Court rules against UT’s admission policy, it could have a negative impact on diversity in higher education nationwide. On Oct. 10 the court will hear oral arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas, a case filed against UT by two white female students who claim their admission was denied on racial grounds. UT states the University admits 25 percent of students through a holistic admissions process that examines academic and personal achievements and special circumstances, which include ethnicity and socioeconomic status, among other factors. The University accepts 75 percent of incoming students based on high school rank. A panel discussion Tuesday evening, “Fisher v. Texas and You: A Conversation with Civil Rights Leaders,” featured lawyers from several organizations that filed briefs supporting the University’s admissions policy. Thomas Mariadason, staff attorney for the Educational Equity and Youth Rights

FISHER continues on page

2

CITY

CITY

Obama and Romney Voter registration deadline nears to face off in first debate By Christine Ayala

By David Loewenberg President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will meet on stage for the first time Wednesday night to debate domestic and economic policy. The first of three scheduled presidential debates is expected to focus primarily on the economy, although health care and the role of government will likely be discussed. It is unclear whether public or higher education will be discussed during the 90-minute debate. Both candidates have identified a need to address the rising cost of college tuition but have put forth different strategies to do so. Obama’s plan for higher education has centered on making college more affordable for middle class students by expanding Pell

Barack Obama President/ Democratic candidate

Mitt Romney Republican candidate

DEBATE continues on page 2

As the Nov. 6 Election Day approaches, time for eligible voters to register is running out. To vote in Texas, citizens must register 30 days prior to an election — Oct. 9. Registration requires applicants to be residents of the county, at least 18-years-old, not a convicted felon and not declared mentally disabled by a court of law. Students who are registered can choose to vote in Travis County or in the county of their parents’ home, but not both. Dee Lopez, director of Travis County Voter Registration, said the office is receiving more than 3,000 voter registration applications daily. “We try to make sure the date is publicized online, on social media like Facebook and Twitter and we know the local news channels have Oct. 9 on their websites as well,” Lopez said. Lopez said students should

Dana Finley | Daily Texan file photo Students line up to register to vote near the Co-op on the Drag.

VIDEO: bit.ly/UagUMj be aware of the additional mailing deadline if they plan to vote outside Travis County. Students registered elsewhere in Texas will either have to visit their designated precinct on Election Day or contact their County Clerk’s office to request a mail-in ballot, which should be received by Oct. 30. Lopez said this election season, many young people

were trained to register others. She said while the county normally offers training sessions monthly, they will have daily training sessions available from now until Oct. 8. “We’ve had classrooms full of young adults coming in to get trained from government organizations, government classes and public official

VOTE continues on page 2


News

2

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

FRAMES | FEATURED PHOTO

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 113, Issue 36

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

Low

70

95 I just want something I can easily in my mouth.

Junior biology junior Jewel Benn watches the movie Super Troopers put on by the Jester Residence Hall Council for National Night Out Tuesday night.

MEDICAL continues from page 1

MARCH continues from page 1

mitted to providing funding for the school in May. “There are compelling reasons to support the medical school, including the research and teaching opportunities that could come from it,” Beckworth said. “The medical school would also provide health care services needed in the community and a positive economic impact for the region and the state.” The UT regents voted unanimously in favor of committing $25 million annually to operate the medical school and $5 million per year for eight years to cover laboratory equipment at their May meeting. Seton pledged $250 million to fund a teaching hospital to accompany the medical school. The UT system already boasts six health institutions in Dallas, Galveston, Houston, San Antonio and Tyler. The Texas Exes is comprised of more than 99,000 members, 80,000 of whom reside in Travis County. Dennis McWilliams, UT alumnus and member of the association’s board of direc-

and the West Campus area, stopping at the Barbara Jordan statue on campus and at the 26 West apartment complex, where students have reported three incidents of bleach balloon attacks. At the stops, students who reported being victims of bleach balloon attacks spoke about their experiences. The march ended at Burdine Hall, where a panel was being held on the upcoming Supreme Court case, Fisher v. University of Texas, in which the constitutionality of UT’s use of affirmative action in its admission policy is being questioned. Chants used include: “No more violence, no more silence,” “Don’t you hate, don’t you fear, people of color are welcome here” and “Take the Powers, out of the towers.” Moore said he was very happy with the turnout for the march, and he hopes it will show the University’s administration that there is still systemic bias in the UT community. Gregory Vincent, vice president for community and diversity engagement, addressed the issue of discrimination at UT in a press conference

THE DAILY TEXAN

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Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Kayla Oliver, Pete Stroud Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Samantha Katsounas, Allie Koletcha, Jody Serrano Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Mary Ellen Knewsten, David Maly, Alexa Ura Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristine Reyna Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Amyna Dosani, Sherry Hu, Luis San Miguel Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Andrew Torrey Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nathan Goldsmith, Pu Ying Huang, Zachary Strain, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fanny Trang, Marisa Vasquez Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Macias Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shila Farahani, Oluwademilade Adejuyigbe, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrence Peart, Brett Seidler Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer, Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Wes Maulsby Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ghayde Ghraowi Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Omar Longoria Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Carly Coen, David Loewenberg Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emily Ng, Shelby Tauber Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christopher Caraveo, Nitya Duran, Hank South Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . René Castro, Milla Impola, Hannah Smothers, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meital Boim, Mark Carrion, Casie Kruppa Comic Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julio Avila, Alyssa Creagh, Kas Frankiewicz, Holly Hansel, Anne Kathrine T. Haris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shaun Lane, Forrest Lybrand, Denny Taylor Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhonda Huynh, Jack Mitts Editorial Illustrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Creagh Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tyler Reinhart

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(512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Chang, Zach Congdon, Draike Delagarza, Jake Dworkis, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ivan Meza, Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

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pany Apollo Endosurgery, said he attended graduate school at Stanford University because UT’s lack of a medical school did not allow him to adapt his degree to his chosen field. “It’s easier to tailor a degree in the medical engineering field, for example, if you have access to a medical school,” he said. Texas Exes spokesperson Tim Taliaferro said the association hopes to educate alumni about the transformative impact a UT medical school could have on the community. The Texas Exes operates from the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center on campus but is not directly affiliated with UT. Taliaferro said the campaign is a Texas Exes initiative rather than one from the University. Sen. Kirk Watson, DTexas, said the Texas Exes’ support for the proposition demonstrates the impact a medical school could have on the University and the community. Watson said it is the first time the Texas Exes have supported a local proposition. Watson has played an integral part in the push to establish a medical school and modern teaching hospital in Austin, leading the initiative through his “10 Goals in 10 Years” vision. “The Texas Exes have a unique love for their university and a strong sense of how transformative a medical school could be,” he said. “Proposition 1 will cement a new, vital partnership to help keep Austin and Central Texas healthy, and the Texas Exes’ historic support shows how important that is. The medical school needs this funding source, just as Travis County families and individuals need these services.” Other Proposition 1 supporters include the Travis County Democratic Party and the Austin Chamber of Commerce. Some community members, such as the Travis County Taxpayers Union, oppose the proposition because it will increase property taxes.

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Tuesday afternoon. “I don’t believe this is a systemic issue. I think we have a diverse campus,” Vincent said. “President Powers has made diversity one of his four strategic priorities, and I believe that diversity has strengthened the learning environment for our students.” Some students at the conference were displeased with his response. Ethnic studies junior Jamilah Beene said she cannot understand why the University does not see discrimination as a more widespread issue at UT. “Everywhere we go there’s racism,” she said. “The fact that these four African-American students have made these reports, the fact that these fiesta parties are going on.” Four incidents involving black students nearly being hit by bleach-filled balloons in West Campus were reported to the police in August. An employee of the 26 West apartment complex, who spoke on condition of anonymity because it could affect their employment, said liquid-filled balloon attacks are a common occurrence at the complex

and other complexes in the area. One marcher, psychology senior Zachary Moore, wore a homemade stockade throughout the march to express his disgust with the UT administration’s recent responses to reports of bias in its own community. “The stockade is how I feel,” he said. “I feel constrained by racism in my neighborhood.” Social work senior Mandy Stein broke out in tears while speaking in front of the 26 West apartment complex along the march as she asked the marchers not to judge everyone based on the actions of some people. “From the bottom of my heart, whoever did it, I am sorry,” she said. “Please don’t dismiss everybody, because there are people out there who care and who want to help.” Stein and undeclared freshman Kiersten Melvin said they have heard about the bleach balloons being used throughout their time at UT and they hope these efforts will put an end to the incidents. “It literally eats me to my very core,” Stein said, referring to bleach balloon attacks.

VOTE continues from page 1 classes,” Lopez said. “The [voter] applications are increasing every day from the UT area.” Jordan Grenadier, government junior and Young Conservatives of Texas executive director, has been trained to register other voters and said her government professors have encouraged students to register with her. “It seems like there is an increase in people interested in registering just because it’s a presidential

election, and that’s really publicized and everyone knows it’s happening soon,” Grenadier said. Kevin Alcantar, government sophomore and University Democrats community outreach director, said his organization has made voter registration a priority by tabling often on the West Mall and participating in activities that encourage new voters, including Hook the Vote’s registration drive.

“When we’re tabling we yell out information about the deadline to tell people it’s coming up soon while trying not to be influential about who they vote for,” Alcantar said. “We’re not saying, ‘Come register to vote for Barack Obama.’ We just want people to register.” Voter registration cards are sent to applicants 30 days after they apply. Early voting will take place from Oct. 22 to Nov. 2.

DEBATE continues from page 1 Grants, maintaining low interest rates on student loans and strengthening community colleges. Romney’s higher education platform includes a call for simplifying the federal financial aid system, encouraging private sector participation and replacing regulation with competition. Government professor Bruce Buchanan said this debate holds special

implications for Romney because Obama is maintaining a narrow but consistent lead in most battleground states. “I think the debate’s very important, especially for the person that’s behind, which happens to be Gov. Romney at the moment,” Buchanan said. “He’s got a tough assignment, because on the one hand he’s got to forcefully make his case in

terms of policy while disagreeing with the president’s policy, but on the other hand not be perceived as disrespectful to the president.” The debate, held at the University of Denver, is set to begin at 8 p.m. Wednesday and will be moderated by journalist Jim Lehrer. The following two presidential debates will take place Oct. 16 and Oct. 22.


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Opinion 4

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

Cruz and Sadler on trolls, guns and money Editor’s note: On Oct. 2, U.S. Senate candidates Paul Sadler (D) and Ted Cruz (R) had their first televised debate. After arguing about how many more debates the pair would have before the Nov. election, Cruz and Sadler discussed economic philosophy, the national budget and health care. No mention was made of Texas college students. The best quotes follow, and more are available at dailytexanonline.com On economic philosophy: Ted Cruz: “I do think part of the philosophy of President Obama and this administration is trying to get as many Americans as possible dependent on government so that the Democrats can stay in power in perpetuity.” TC: “Most Americans don’t want to stay dependent on the government. They want to work for the American dream. They want to work to provide for themselves and their families.” Paul Sadler: “That’s the craziest thing I’ve ever heard in my life. You’re seriously accusing the president of using a government program to manipulate people to not get a job, to be dependent on the government for services?” TC: “What Texans are looking for — what is inherent, I think, in the ethos of Texans is we’re not looking for a handout. We’re looking for the opportunity to stand on our own two feet, to be entrepreneurs.” On balancing the national budget: PS: “We actually doubled our national debt under George W. Bush — when you were working for him, I believe ... We continued adding

to it under the Obama years but we had to continue and deal with the Iraq War and the Bush tax cuts that were never paid for.” TC: “I actually will commend Mr. Sadler. He’s running a campaign with a great deal of courage because he’s running an unapologetically liberal campaign. He’s running in support of raising taxes and he’s running in support of a host of liberal views, and I commend him for his candor in that.” On foreign policy: PS: “You don’t cut off foreign aid, particularly in a country where they’ve got a fledgling government being formed ... It’s time for us to stop a hold on that aid because it’s in our best interest to stay involved.” TC: “I think the only justification for continuing that aid or any portion of that aid is if it protects the vital national security interests of the United States.” On Obama’s refusal to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu: PS: “I think the president — you just slandered our president and you don’t even know what his schedule is.” On health care reform: TC: “I think health care reform should follow a couple principles. Number one: it should expand competition, expand the use of the marketplace. Number two: it should empower patients and consumers and disempower government bureaucrats.”

GaLLEry

PS: “You’re going to give all [Obamacare’s] benefits away so that you can make political points against the president, and that’s not good for Texas and it’s not good for the United States.”

On illegal immigration: PS: “We should have already passed the DREAM Act for these children in this state who through no fault of their own are here, but have no country. All they want is the American dream. Ted likes to talk about liberty, but he only wants liberty for people he agrees with.” TC: “Mr. Sadler supports amnesty for those here illegally; I do not.”

TC: “My approach to immigration is that it should be a staged approach. I think the first priority is we’ve got to get serious about securing our border and stopping illegal immigration.” On gun control: S: “Do you even own a gun, Ted? Do you hunt?”

C: “I want to know, is it true or false that as a state legislator, you voted against our concealed carry law in the state of Texas?”

S: “I voted against the concealed weapons law because I didn’t want my 95-year-old step-grandmother, who carries a pistol, to be a felon.” On their friendship: TC: “I’m sorry, Mr. Sadler, that you think I’m a troll.”

Civilization depends on dining hall discussion By Edgar Walters Daily Texan Columnist

Lauren Moore | Daily Texan Cartoonist

Don’t diminish depression By Mac McCann Daily Texan Columnist

Last week, the Counseling and Mental Health Center hosted Suicide Prevention Week. In light of their efforts, I can’t help but think of my own inner demons. It’s never easy, but I have to face it: I have major depressive disorder. Before I was diagnosed, I had a very negative and incorrect perception of major depressive disorder. When I heard ‘depression,” I assumed somebody was throwing a pity party and just finding an excuse to be grumpy all the time. I thought of the celebrities with lives most people can only dream of, complaining about how depressed they were. It was outrageous to me; they’re filthy rich, they’re famous, they’re successful. I was sure they were just whining for attention. Then, when it was described as a mental illness, I drew even worse conclusions. I thought of psychopaths and weirdos and homeless men passed out drunk on the streets. So you can imagine my embarrassment when I was diagnosed with depression myself. Even now I worry that people will treat me differently or think less of me when they find out I suffer from it. So with all the stigma attached to depression, what exactly is it? Major depressive disorder, commonly known as clinical depression, affects approximately 10 million people, or 3 percent of Americans. I used to be among those who thought depression was a made-up problem and a scam for the pharmaceutical companies to raise profits. I figured

I’ve survived days of total despair and desolation, so when a good day rolls around, I appreciate it in ways I never could have before my depression. people were running to therapists because they were too cowardly to face their own problems, but then I learned the hard way that depression is very real. According to the American Psychiatric Association, clinical depression is caused by an imbalance of two neurochemicals, serotonin and norepinephrine. The symptoms are not simply bad moods or sadness. Yes, depression does induce sadness and negative moods, but it also slows and deadens your bodily functions and leads to insomnia. Your interest in life declines, and formerly enjoyable activities provide no satisfaction. It becomes difficult to think straight, and concentration is unattainable. Constant fatigue, without reason, without end, wears you down. Food loses its taste. Anxiety never ceases. You’re wracked by recurring remorse and guilt, and everything feels like it’s your fault. But in my own experience, worst of all are the overwhelming feelings of worthlessness, helplessness and hopelessness. Suicidal thoughts take over your mind, leaving you unable to function. There were days that I was consumed by depression. I remember one particularly beautiful day when I was not outside. I was in my bed with the lights off. Logically, I had absolutely no reason to be unhappy. But emotionally, there was not a

LEGALESE

single drop of joy to be tasted. I was crippled, immobilized, unable to do anything at all — yet there was nothing I even wanted to do. Everything sounded like a bad idea. I wondered if life was even worth living. Thankfully, I’ve rediscovered how valuable life is. Depression is a bitch. There’s no other way to put it. But I’ve survived days of total despair and desolation, so when a good day rolls around, I appreciate it in ways I never could have before my depression. The smallest things — a smile, a laugh — are more powerful than I could ever have imagined. According to UT’s Counseling and Mental Health Center, suicide is the second leading cause of death for college students. Eighteen percent of undergraduates and 15 percent of graduate students have seriously considered suicide; 8 percent of undergrads and 5 percent of graduate students have actually attempted it. So to those of you struggling — you are not alone. Don’t hesitate to get help. We all face our own unique challenges. Those challenges can make life more difficult, but they also make us stronger. We all endure hard times, but I can only hope that we will learn from those experiences and see life for the gift that it is. McCann is a Plan II freshman from Dallas.

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

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On Oct. 1, all 166 UT campus resident assistants (myself included) gathered in the San Jacinto multipurpose room for a speech by Sam Duggan, managing director of the student housing department at Texas Tech University. The 90-minute lecture introduced a monthlong civility campaign, an initiative to promote considerate conduct in the residence halls. The presentation touted the benefits of a civil campus atmosphere — many obvious but all valid — with primary focus on student happiness and productivity. RAs will be the first to tell you that more civility can only be a good thing, but Monday’s presentation raised questions about how best to achieve that goal. I took particular issue with Duggan’s presentation of what he called “Rule Number 18 for ‘Choosing Civility’”: Avoid personal questions. According to Duggan, discourse can only be considerate if it skirts potentially controversial topics — politics in particular — in favor of more benign ones. He’s neither alone nor original in that sentiment, echoing persistent American taboos on unsuitable dinner table conversation. Perhaps the character Linus, in the 1966 Charlie Brown Halloween Special, put it best when he remarked, “There are three things I have learned never to discuss with people: religion, politics and the Great Pumpkin.” It’s easy to understand why a contemporary observer might conflate political discussion with uncivil behavior. We live in an era marked by dissent both loud (U.S. Congressman from South Carolina Joe Wilson’s 2009 “You lie!” outburst during President Barack Obama’s 2009 State of the Union Speech) and violent (like the 2011 attack on former U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.)).

Television and YouTube make inescapable vicious campaign advertisements, some shocking enough to offend a generation benumbed to ad hominem attacks. Factcheck.org, a nonpartisan project of the Annenberg Policy Center, decried the tone of the 2012 election season as “deplorable” and “marked by a cavalier disregard for facts on both sides.” A 2012 poll conducted by nonpartisan KRC Research reports that 63 percent of respondents believe America has a “major civility problem;” 82 percent responded that incivility in government is “harming America’s future.” Our bad behavior undoubtedly colors our perception of politics. At the very least, it might help explain the rise in student apathy toward the 2012 election relative to 2008. But if our definition of civility necessitates the exclusion of politics, it’s no wonder that politics has stooped to the level of barbarism. The best way to address the problem of an increasingly uncivil political system is to discuss it openly. Where better to begin that discussion than in the residence halls, where many students make some of their most profound discoveries about the world of adulthood? Civility should call for considerate discussion within the realm of controversial topics, not in lieu of it. Sure, all students in the residence halls deserve to have a positive experience, and tolerant, inclusive language is crucial to that objective. But on a college campus, hyperpoliteness should not preclude educated discussion. I applaud the motion to run a civility campaign during the month of October in an election year, but only if DHFS is willing to acknowledge the value of political discourse and thereby improve its tone. Just as long as nobody mentions the Great Pumpkin. Walters is a Plan II junior from Houston.

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News

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

FISHER

continues from page 1 Project at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, said that the policy should not be ruled unconstitutional and if the court does so, it would repeal similar policies across the nation. “If you can do it in Texas, you can do it in New York, you can do it anywhere else,” Mariadason said. Mariadason said including ethnicity gives context to applicants’ achievements listed on their application, but race is not a deciding factor when determining admission. “UT isn’t looking just to accept students who are coming from either poverty or great privilege,” he said. “They’re looking for diversity, and diversity is a broad concept that cuts across, in many ways, within all of our different communities.” Mariadason said the policy improves UT’s atmosphere because universities are tasked

with providing students with a good education, which includes exposing students to different perspectives based on race, religion and socioeconomic status. He said exposure to those perspectives improves students’ critical thinking skills by allowing them to work through problems of students whose perspectives they do not share. Karolina Lyznik, staff attorney for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said facilitating an educational environment that promotes diversity equips students to handle diversity in the workplace. “Diversity is the future, and it’s something that we all really need to take a stand for and to focus on because of the benefits to all of us, and not just to the 1 percent or number of people who gain admission through a race-conscious admissions plan,” she said. Damon Hewitt, director of the education practice at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said if the plain-

5 NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund representative Damon Hewitt explains why affirmative action and diversity are necessary in society during a talk in Burdine Auditorium Tuesday evening.

Marisa Vasquez Daily Texan Staff

tiffs’ argument that the University discriminates against white students in favor of minorities were true, minorities would compose a larger segment of the student population. According to preliminary enrollment data for the fall se-

mester of 2012 provided by the Office of Information Management and Analysis, Hispanic enrollment at UT is 18.4 percent, black enrollment is 4.5 percent and Asian enrollment is 15.2 percent. White student enrollment is 49.8 percent.

Amee’ra Fuller, microbiology junior and Black Student Alliance member, said when she came to UT she worried about finding students who shared her values but found people who not only shared those views but challenged them with

differing perspectives. “I can learn from students, not just the teachers,” she said. We Support UT, which organized Tuesday’s panel, will conduct a demonstration in support of UT’s holistic review at 11 a.m. Oct. 17 in Gregory Plaza.

CITY

South by Southwest conference goes green By Carly Coen South by Southwest Eco, a three-day conference from Wednesday to Friday at the AT&T Conference Center, will host 270 speakers from environmentally focused enterprises in the public, private and academic sectors to recognize and discuss challenges of civil society, the economy and the environment. Mitch Jacobson, program manager for UT’s IC² Institute, said one of the biggest

goals of the conference is to develop an instant source for networking. The IC² Institute researches entrepreneurship, business and technology. The conference will include professionals and students with a focus on sustainability in fields including energy resources and environmental conservation. Jacobson said there is a rapidly growing number of ways to create usable energy, but natural resources are still being depleted. “It’s frustrating that we have

so much information, because the way we use our resources is out of control,” he said. Although SXSW Eco, in its second year, focuses on networking, another goal is to change the way people define the word “progress,” Deanna Hoelscher, natural sciences adjunct professor, said. Hoelscher, who is speaking at this year’s conference, said society often sacrifices environmental resources and sustainability for progress. “This conference serves as

UNIVERSITY

Graduate student applications grow despite decrease in enrollment By Bobby Blanchard While UT saw the number of first-time undergraduates increase by 900, its number of first-time graduate students fell slightly, which is part of a national trend. Nationally from 2010 to 2011, applications at 655 public and private graduate schools increased by 4.3 percent, but firsttime enrollments fell by 1.7 percent, a report by the Council of Graduate Schools said Friday. UT saw a 1.01 percent increase in applications, but its enrollment of firstyear graduate students decreased 1 percent. Pat Ellison, associate director of admissions and assistant dean of graduate studies, said UT received 26,416 applications for the fall 2011 semester and 26,554 applications for the fall 2012 semester, an increase of 138 applications.

Ellison said UT admitted 3,072 graduate students in the fall 2011 semester and then 3,057 in the fall 2012 semester, a 15student decrease. “Our changes are not extreme,” Ellison said. “I wouldn’t say we’re seeing the [national] trend. We’re pretty flat. For us it’s just not that big of difference.” Debra Stewart, president of the Council of Graduate Schools, said in a statement that on a national level, the decrease is concerning. “While the 1.7 percent decrease in first-time enrollment is not dramatic, the fact that we are now in the second year of reversed growth is a sign that we must respond with strong investments in graduate programs and student funding,” Stewart said. From 2009 to 2010, the percentage of firstyear graduate students dropped by 1.1 percent. In her statement, Stewart

said it is concerning that the number of first-year enrolled graduate students has decreased two years in a row. Ellison said UT sees a small but steady increase in its number of applications each year, but its enrollment numbers remain stable. The Council of Graduate Schools’ report said students are seeing that the money that comes from a graduate degree is worth the money they spend on it. “Graduate education is a cornerstone of a thriving, highly skilled workforce, and a graduate degree holds out lifetime benefits for individual students,” Stewart said in her statement. “The 4.3 percent increase in application numbers reveals that students are eager to attend graduate school.” Not counting law students, there are currently 11,128 graduate students enrolled at UT.

a reminder that the health of the population and of the world are equally, if not more, important than money,” Hoelscher said. Sam Maslin, a business administration graduate student, will represent UT in a panel discussion at the conference this week. As a student, Maslin said he sees how limitless the opportunities are for young adults at the conference. “A lot of adults that are part of South by Southwest Eco only see it as a networking oppor-

tunity,” Maslin said. “When I think about the conference, all I can see is how inspiring it all is.” Maslin said most students focus on what job they will have in five years, not whether that job will still exist. “You have to care about the environment no matter what sector of work you’re hoping to go into,” he said. During the course of the conference, select distinguished and keynote speakers’ presentations will stream live from sxsweco.com/live.

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Sports 6

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

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SERIES PILATES REFORMER TRAINING

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FOOTBALL

Davis finds his place

Brown out this week vs. WVU with hurt ankle

STARTS HERE

SIDELINE MLB RANGERS

By Lauren Giudice A’s

Running back Malcolm Brown will miss Saturday’s game against West Virginia because of a left ankle sprain, UT athletics reported Tuesday. Brown sprained his left ankle the first time he touched the ball during the Longhorns’ conference opener against Oklahoma State on Saturday. He had limited playing time and finished the game with three rushes for seven yards. Brown is the second leading rushing behind sophomore Joe Bergeron with 245 total yards on 40 attempts and three touchdowns. Although Brown’s loss will be difficult for the offense, his teammates are ready to lead the running game. “With Malcolm out now, the rest of the guys in our room, Joe [Bergeron], myself, Johnathan [Gray], Robo [Ryan Roberson], Chet [Moss], Alex De La Torre, everybody has to step up to try to fill that void for this week,” senior running back Jeremy Hills said. Last season the running back corps struggled

ASTROS

CUBS

RED SOX

YANKEES

TOP TWEET Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Mike Davis catches the ball Saturday night against Oklahoma State. In the second quarter of the game, Davis dropped a touchdown pass. On the final drive of the game, he caught a 32-yard pass that led to the game-winning touchdown.

Wide receiver redeems himself Saturday night By Chris Hummer

BROWN continues on page 7

Mike Davis was upset with himself. David Ash had just delivered a perfect deep ball to the front corner of the end zone, and instead of waltzing in for an easy touchdown the ball bounced off Davis’ hands and bounded away. On the sideline Ash was quick to come over and discuss the play with Davis, and Davis made it clear: you can come back to me.

Malcolm Brown Sophomore running back

“I just told David, ‘Man, I had it. Just come right back to me, and I’ll make a catch for you,’” Davis said. Two quarters later, on the Longhorns’ final drive with the game on the line, Ash did just that. He saw Davis in one-on-one coverage on the right hash mark and let the ball go, trusting his receiver to make a play. Davis delivered. Thirty-two yards downfield, Davis and Oklahoma State corner Justin Gilbert, one of the top cover corners

STAT GUY

in the country, leaped into the air, each with fingertips extended skyward reaching for the ball. Davis, fueled by his earlier drop and two years of frustration with the offense, bounded higher and pulled the ball down, placing the Longhorns on the five-yard line. “He was ready to make the play, and that was on him. I didn’t throw him a great ball, so he made the play for it,” Ash said. The catch put Texas in position for the game-winning

touchdown and served as a taste of redemption for a highly touted, often criticized, talented yet inconsistent junior wideout. But to understand Mike Davis you have to go back in time a bit, specifically to his recruitment period and his first two campaigns on campus. In 2009 Davis was one of the top-ranked wideouts in the country heading out of Skyline High School and

DAVIS continues on page 7

VOLLEYBALL

Holgorsen’s offenses test Texas By Hank South

Daily Texan Columnist

It’s not every day a quarterback passes for almost half a mile, guiding his offense to more than 807 total yards. However, if the feat were going to be accomplished, West Virginia head coach Dana Holgorsen’s air-it-out offense would be the likely gateway. Last Saturday, Geno Smith, West Virginia quarterback and Heisman frontrunner, burned Baylor for 656 passing yards, and 8 touchdowns, en route to a 70-63 victory. Even though the Big 12 is known for spread-style offenses, Holgorsen was well aware of his team’s feat last weekend. “Not every Big 12 game is like this,” Holgorsen said following the game. And he would know best after stints at Oklahoma State and Texas Tech as offensive coordinator. With West Virginia heading to Austin Saturday, let’s take a look at how Texas has fared against Holgorsencoached offenses. In 2005 Holgorsen’s first season with offensive coordinator duties at Texas Tech, the No. 10 Red Raiders visited Austin only to be dealt a 52-17 loss. Tech quarterback Cody Hodges was coming off a 643yard performance the week

before but only managed 369 yards against the Longhorns’ defense. Overall the Red Raiders eked out 468 total yards, averaging 5.8 yards per pass. The next year, Texas headed to Lubbock and struggled with a 21-point deficit in the first half. While Texas eventually rallied back to win the game 35-31, the game was deemed more of an escape. The Red Raiders, behind sophomore quarterback Graham Harrell, put up 518 yards of offense, 519 through the air and -1 via the ground. Harrell threw all three of his touchdowns in the first half as the Texas defense gave up 10 plays of 16 yards or longer all before the half. “Everything he did was right. The right throw, the right receiver, the right route,” former cornerback Aaron Ross said. It goes to show how disciplined a Holgorsencoached quarterback is. In 2007 the Red Raiders came back to Austin and, in Holgorsen fashion, tallied 476 total yards, 466 of them through the air. Harrell sought revenge from the previous year throwing five touchdowns but ultimately came up short, as Tech lost 5943 behind the Longhorns’ 551 total yards of offense. Texas had a two-year breather from Holgorsen when the coach headed to Houston for the 2008 and 2009 seasons. However, the

offensive mastermind reemerged at Oklahoma State in 2010 as the offensive coordinator. The No. 10 Cowboys visited the 40 Acres and dropped 532 yards of offense on the Longhorns’ defense en route to a 33-16 victory. Behind junior quarterback Brandon Weeden’s 409 passing yards, the Cowboys snapped a 12-year losing streak to the Longhorns. Holgorsen-coached offenses average 499 yards against Texas, 441 of those yards through the air. However, the Longhorns have always held their own, averaging 459 yards through those four games, and have an overall 4-1 record against the offensive guru. While the Longhorns have found success against Holgorsen-mentored teams, the Mountaineers squad visiting Austin Saturday is arguably his best ever. Behind Smith, the school’s all-time passing yardage, touchdown passes and completions leader, West Virginia is averaging 442 yards through the air, with help from arguably the nation’s two best receivers, Stedman Bailey and Tavon Austin, who have 17 touchdowns and 1,195 yards between each of them. If the Longhorns’ defense isn’t ready for a track meet Saturday, Holgorsen and company will fly out of Austin with another victory.

holgorsen’s offense vs. the longhorns Year

Team

Total Off. Yards

Passing Yards

Result

2005

Texas Tech

488

369

52-17, Texas

2006

Texas Tech

518

519

35-31, Texas

2007

Texas Tech

476

466

59-43, Texas

2010

Oklahoma State

532

409

33-16, OSU

Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan Staff Haley Eckerman ranks 11th in the country in points per set. She and the Longhorns hope to remain undefeated in Big 12 play.

Horns aim to continue success in conference By Rachel Thompson After diving into Big 12 play with victories against Oklahoma, Baylor and Texas Tech, the Longhorns’ next challenge will be to trample a team of Horned Frogs on Wednesday in Gregory Gym. Texas, 11-3 and 4-0 in Big 12 play, is coming off two on-theroad sweeps and an exhilarating home sweep of Oklahoma. TCU, 13-3 and 2-1 in conference play, will head to Austin after a loss to Iowa State. “We’ve got some big challenges ahead, but there’s going to be some great opportunities to see where we stand in the conference,” head coach Jerritt Elliott said. “It’ll be a great match against TCU.” As of Oct. 1, Texas led the nation in blocks per set, with sophomore outside hitter Haley Eckerman ranking 11th in the nation for points per set. Texas swept TCU at last year’s meeting in September, with 10 kills from thenfreshman middle blocker/ outside hitter Khat Bell and 36 assists from then-sophomore setter Hannah Allison. “Our blocking is really,

really good,” Elliott said. “This may be the best blocking team we’ve had. Our defense continues to improve, which we’ve put a lot of stress on in the next few weeks. A lot of it is getting comfortable with our players on the floor, which will be a key component for us.” The Horned Frogs are not without important assets of their own: junior middle blocker Yvonne Igodan was Big 12 Offensive Player of the Week earlier this season. TCU currently ranks first in the Big 12 for opponent hitting percentages and service aces. They also rank above the Longhorns in digs per game. Elliott said a key point of focus heading into Wednesday’s match is allowing the young team to gain traction and find its comfort zone on the court. “For a lot of these young players, it’s building their confidence slowly,” he said. “We’ve got to do this the right way and be patient with them and also teach them that they can play at a high level and be confident.” Maintaining a consistent equilibrium throughout the game is another area of importance, Elliott said.

Blake Gideon @SlimGid37

“I consider myself to be a professional people watcher. Especially in airports. Must be genetic, my sister shares the same gift ha”

SPORTS BRIEFLY Doubles team advances in Tulsa

Texas Junior David Holiner made it to the second round of the qualifying men’s singles round of the ITA Championships on Tuesday before being knocked out by University of Tulsa’s Alejandro Sanchez in a three set match (6-3, 6-7, 6-0). Sudanwa Sitaram and Daniel Whitehead narrowly escaped the first round of the qualifying doubles Tuesday after defeating Oklahoma State’s Rifat Biktyakov and Richard Del-Nunzio (9-8). Sitaram and Whitehead will continue play Wednesday. Holiner will still play in the championships in the main draw doubles round with his partner Chris Camillone. Holiner and Camillone are the No. 8 ranked doubles team. Sophmore No. 42 Soren Hess-Olesen and No. 46 Whitehead will continue play for the Longhorns in the main draw singles Thursday. Hess-Olesen has shown that he can advance well into a tournament as he reached the finals at the Napa Valley Classic.

—Nitya Duran

Texas struggles, Ellis still in tourney

Just like that, three Longhorns have made quick exits from the ITA All-American Championships. The doubles tandem of sophomores Lina Padegimaite and Noel Scott, ranked No. 18, were eliminated by Georgia’s Kate Fuller and Lauren Herring, by a score of 8-4 in the first round of the qualifying doubles draw Tuesday. With four days complete in the eight-day tournament the Longhorns have yet to make their mark. Aside from junior Elizabeth Begley’s three-set win in the opening round of pre-qualifying, the Longhorns have been unable to put up a show, going 26-49. The only Longhorn remaining is senior Aerial Ellis and she will take part in the main singles draw Thursday.

—Christopher Caraveo


sports

with injuries. During the Longhorns’ loss to Missouri, Brown, Bergeron and senior Fozzy Whittaker were all injured. The injuries exposed the Longhorns’ offense, and they failed to score a touchdown. Bergeron and Gray, who is a true freshman, will need to step up. The loss of Brown will be tough for the Longhorns but not as devastating as it was last year. On Saturday Gray led the running backs with 68 yards on 12 carries. “I was excited Johnathan Gray came in for Malcolm Brown and did a tremendous job late in the ball game,” head coach Mack Brown said. “I think he obviously has earned the right to play early in a ball game.”

— Jaxon Shipley, sophomore wide receiver

sealed the game for Texas, but it was a bigger play than just in the context of the win. It was a signal that after two years, the Longhorn passing attack had finally arrived, and with it so had the Davis everyone, including himself, had expected.

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He’s got a different attitude and a whole different mindset. As you can see, he’s gained his confidence back.

TAILGATE DAYS PRESENTED BY

BROWN

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was convinced to come to the 40 Acres, in part because of the high-powered Colt McCoy-led passing attack the Longhorns ran at the time. However, during his freshman season Texas went through a changing of the guard at quarterback. McCoy graduated, and high school All-American Garrett Gilbert took the helm. It seemed like a great fit with Gilbert’s pro-style traits, but the Longhorns stumbled to a 5-7 record. Despite the team’s issues, Davis showed flashes of brilliance: He was the most effective wideout on the roster as a freshman, catching 47 balls for 478 yards

of the offseason, he was no longer an immature underclassman; he was carrying himself as a pro, and his teammates have noticed. “He’s got a different attitude and a whole different mindset,” wide receiver Jaxon Shipley said. “As you can see, he’s gained his confidence back.” That confidence was on full display on Davis’ fourthquarter grab. There was no hesitation. He just went up and made the play. “Last year he would have had a tendency to be down on himself. He would not have had the confidence to come back,” head coach Mack Brown said. “To have the confidence to come back and make a play against one of the best corners in the country says the world about him.” The catch essentially

Braz

continues from page 6

Davis’ numbers may have improved slightly from his freshman to his sophomore season, but he still felt annoyed by the team’s inept passing. “It was just terrible,” Davis said. That frustration crept into Davis’ play in 2011. Late in the season his routes became less sharp — he started dropping balls and, most importantly, his confidence faltered. But during the offseason Davis went to work. He ran sprints at 5 a.m., did pass catching drills every day in the 100-degree heat and worked one-on-one with Ash to improve their timing. This effort slowly brought about a change in Davis. His confidence worked its way back as his attitude about the game transformed. By the end

ngre

DAVIS

and a pair of touchdowns. But things started to go badly during his sophomore campaign while the Texas offense struggled to find an identity through mounds of turnovers. In 2011 the Longhorns featured three different starting quarterbacks, and during parts of the year there would often be a new signal caller from drive to drive as Ash and Case McCoy battled for the starter’s role. With the QB situation in flux the passing game struggled, and by extension, so did Davis. As the team’s most explosive deep threat, his talents were ignored as the young quarterbacks adjusted to the position. And even when they did target him downfield, the ball was so underor overthrown that he had no chance to make a play.

7

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Life & Arts

8

FOXING

continues from page 10 “A big goal of Foxing’s is to promote a literary community,” Mize said. The journal also aims to break the stuffy, pretentious standard established by other literary journals by including as many forms of printable works as possible. Poems, short stories and comics have all been submitted as of the extended Oct. 1 entry deadline and are currently under the review of the journal’s 12 editors. The publication encourages submissions of all artistic disciplines to ensure diversity. Mejia said Foxing Quarterly’s ideas are solid and unique enough to satisfy

various groups in Austin’s deep pool of quirky niche audiences, but at the publication’s current fundraising rate, a November publication will not be possible. Whether this is indicative of disinterest in anything that cannot be read electronically or poor fundraising efforts by the editorial staff is unclear. Mejia and his fellow editors, after much debate, have chosen not to charge for entry to Foxing Quarterly’s events but will be forced to do so for their launch party to meet the pledge amount. They love being able to host book exchanges and parties for free because it draws awareness, but high party attendance won’t pay the bills. “We will be printed,” Mize said. “We’ll just have to problem-solve.”

LOCKS

continues from page 10 the lock with them after stealing the bicycle, there is no evidence of entry or theft, he said. McKenzie demonstrated how bike locks that use a circular key can be broken into very eas-

LGBTQ

continues from page 10 another man. Although the incident was tragic, Rutgers now offers specialized housing options and trained faculty support. In the past few years, the

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

ily with a ballpoint pen. Taking the tip of the pen out of the plastic covering reveals the ink wrapped in gel, which can then be shoved into the lock, taking the form of the pillars and keeping the lock secure. A few twists and the lock is open. On the other hand, a bike lock that uses a flat key with angled edges is much tougher for a

potential thief. “I’m not sure people would even be interested if there wasn’t this club recruiting and tabling around campus,” Bulger said, expressing concern that the club may be sparking curiosity rather than facilitating interest that already existed. McKenzie said that the club upholds a strict code of ethics.

“Done right, this is still ethical,” he said. “People won’t see it that way, so we need a safe place to do it.” McKenzie said that if he learned of any activity committed by someone in the club using their skills maliciously, the perpetrator would be kicked out immediately. “The caliber of person we attract is higher than that,” he said.

nation has also seen impressive recognition of LGBTQ rights in public policy. For example, last week U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced same-sex relationships will be recognized as family relationships in immigration proceedings. “No one should have

to choose between their spouse and their country, and no family should be left out of the immigration system,” California Congressman Michael Honda told NBC News. Although we may have pride days for different sexual orientations and we fight for marriage equal-

ity, at the end of the day, we do it because we are all humans who deserve equal rights and respect. Through education, open discussions and sex-positive mindsets, we can celebrate, as Queen said, “sexual diversity, differing desires and relationship structures and individual choices based on consent.”

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Wednesday, October 3, 2012

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Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

LITERATURE | CITY

Local literary publication rising Foxing Quarterly staff seeks to promote reading community By Hannah Smothers The metaphorical tug-ofwar between print literature enthusiasts and tech-savvy ereader junkies is an especially concerning issue for Daniel Mejia, the founder and editorin-chief of Foxing Quarterly. Foxing Quarterly is the peculiar name of Austin’s newest literary journal, due to publish its first issue in early November. Mejia chose the name because of his deep appreciation for print literature. “The name ‘Foxing’ comes from a term used for books when they’ve aged,” Mejia said. “Books get these red, fox-like spots on them when they become old.” Mejia has made it his priority to offer the first issue of Foxing Quarterly in physical paper copies only, out of his antiquated love and respect for the printed word. He said this endangered appreciation for the physicality of literature has also been instilled in Mejia’s unpaid team of volunteer editorial staff. Foxing Quarterly’s editorial board is concerned that its ambitious goal to produce a printed publication will fall short in terms of fundraising. Unfortunately for the group of renaissance, print-loving editors, there’s more to producing a 152page, perfectly bound journal than merely throwing a few short stories on the Internet so that they can disappear into the blogosphere.

Fanny Trang | Daily Texan Staff UT alumnus Chase Weinacht, English junior Jane Robbins Mize and Daniel Mejia founded Foxing Quarterly, a literary journal based in Austin. The publication is raising money through Kickstarter and various events to finance its production.

Foxing Quarterly has a donation page on Kickstarter, a site dedicated to helping small projects raise money, to aid the journal in reaching its pledge amount of $8,000. But the publication is still considerably low on funds. The deadline for pledging is Oct. 11, and the journal has only managed to raise by press time around $3,200.

“If we don’t raise the money, we’ll still try our best to release something,” Mejia said. “[We’ll] do whatever we can to make it happen.” Money may be dangerously low, but awareness certainly is not. Foxing Quarterly has hosted several book swaps as well as more eclectic events, such as a Wes Anderson-themed cos-

CAMPUS

tume party and book reading, to draw attention to the publication. The events have been successful thus far, especially the Wes Anderson party recently held at deputy editor Jane Robbins Mize’s home. Mize, an English junior, opened her North Campus home to quirky guests emulating the even quirkier characters from Anderson’s iconic films.

Party attendees were encouraged to swap books as well as allow themselves to be entertained by the book readers and bands that gave performances. Chase Weinacht, managing editor and UT alumnus, believes that inviting the public into the homes of the editors is beneficial in establishing an intimate connection with potential readers.

“I think reading is kind of a solitary activity,” he said. “But when you get people together who have read the same author’s work or the same journal, it’s a really personal connection.” Aside from breathing life into the isolated act of reading, Foxing Quarterly has several other goals already in place.

FOXING continues on page

8

SEX

Leaders foster sex-positivity HUMP

DAY

By Milla Impola

Ricky Llamas | Daily Texan Staff Computer science freshman Reid McKenzie breaks out of handcuffs using only a hairpin. He was initially attracted to the hobby because of the mechanical problem-solving involved.

Lock picking club encourages security By Rene Castro “There are bike locks you can open with a cheap Bic pen,” Reid McKenzie, Longhorn Lockpicking Club officer, said just before breaking out of a pair of regulation Smith & Wesson handcuffs with nothing more than a hairpin. A computer science freshman, McKenzie credited his involvement in lock picking to his interest in computer hacking. McKenzie said lock picking culture goes hand-inhand with hacking, attracting the same audience of people. “It’s a mechanical problem we enjoy solving,” he said. Longhorn Lockpicking is a student group on campus that introduces people to the hobbies of picking locks, deconstructing locks, making keys and improving security. The officers of the club hope that by teaching people about the weaknesses of their security, they can take better steps to protect themselves. “You have to make a deci-

sion about how much you want to invest in security,” McKenzie said. “Locks are meant to deter, not keep people out.” In other words, there is no sense in securing a door with many different locks if someone can simply go through an unsecured window. Longhorn Lockpicking is by no means the only way someone can learn how to crack a safe. Websites like deviating.net offer instructions for picking all sorts of locks and many have online stores for lock picking equipment. Longhorn Lockpicking sells a lock picking kit for $20 after a $20 membership fee. “People are going to do it. It might as well be people who will use it honestly,” McKenzie said. “I trust everyone at our meetings.” Despite the focus on security, some don’t see why such a club is even necessary on campus, especially when bike theft is the most prevalent crime at UT. “I can see how they would justify it, but it’s not necessary to have a club like that,”

You have to make a decision about how much you want to invest in security. Locks are meant to deter, not keep people out. — Reid McKenzie Longhorn Lockpicking Club Officer

advertising senior Brent Bulger said. Bulger had his bicycle stolen earlier this year. He said that in order to prove to the lock company that the lock was broken through, the broken lock had to be mailed back to the company. If the lock is picked or if the thief takes

LOCKS continues on page

8

“Sex-positive” is a term that celebrates our sexualities, passions and private parts. Dr. Carol Queen, sociologist, sexologist, pleasure activist, founding director of Center for Sex & Culture and author of life-changing books such as “Real Live Nude Girl: Chronicles of Sex-Positive Culture,” defines the term as follows: “It’s the cultural philosophy that understands sexuality as a potentially positive force in one’s life, and it can, of course, be contrasted with sex-negativity, which sees sex as problematic, disruptive, dangerous.” Sex-positivity is the affirmation and understanding that every individual has the right to express his or her sexuality in the way that incorporates his or her personal values and desires. With whom, where, why, how and when an individual chooses to engage in sexual activity does not make one person’s sex more “right” or “moral” than another’s sex as long as all parties involved have consented to the sexual adventures at hand. Whether it’s on the couch, in a plane, with multiple partners or in a bathtub full of Skittles, those are sexual decisions everyone is entitled to make with his or her sexual partners. When we begin to realize the meaning of sexuality and the impact incorporating sex-positive thinking in our lives can have, we understand how important education and open discussions are to fostering equal rights for all individuals, regardless of their sexual preferences.

Illustration by Alyssa Creagh | Daily Texan Staff

Even in conservative Texas, Austin made news last Thursday when the City Council became the first group of city leaders in Texas to support same-sex marriage. “Texas is not different than the rest of the country in terms of its evolution on the freedom to marry,” Chuck Smith, interim director of Equality Texas, told Raw Story. Earlier in September, the city of Berkeley, Calif., officially declared Sept. 23 Bisexual Pride and Bi Visibility Day, becoming one of the first cities in the nation to do so. “Increasing bisexual visibility is a way of saying, yes, they do exist, and they deserve our support and acceptance,” Berkeley councilman Kriss Worthington, who introduced the resolution, told the San Francisco Chronicle. When it comes to bully-

ing in our education system, the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network released a report Sept. 5 that found that eight out of 10 LGBTQ students experience harassment but that support programs in schools are making a difference. As communities become more accepting of gender-variant youth, they can foster an understanding society that celebrates its differences. Evidence of progress for the acceptance of the LGBTQ community comes from Rutgers University as well. Two years ago, Rutgers University received national criticism after student Tyler Clementi, who was gay, died by suicide days after his roommate secretly broadcast a sexual encounter Clementi had with

LGBTQ continues on page

8

The Daily Texan 2012-10-03  

The Oct. 3, 2012 issue of The Daily Texan

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