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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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“The Encyclopedia Show” features wackiness from unconventional writers and comics

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LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12 >> Breaking news, blogs and more: dailytexanonline.com

TODAY Calendar Longhorn Tennis The men’s team plays SMU this afternoon from 3-5 p.m. at the Penick-Allison Tennis Center. Admission is free.

‘Truth will prevail’ Alamo Drafthouse Ritz is screening “Sons of Perdition,” a documentary about teens exiled from the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Tickets are $5 and the film starts tonight at 7:15 p.m.

‘No one to help us’

The Center for European Studies is showing “Eastern Plays,” a Bulgarian film that examines modern Eastern Europe through. The film begins tonight at 6:30 p.m. in Mezes Basement, B0.306.

Jazz appreciation Renowned jazz ensemble Ethnic Heritage Ensemble is performing tonight at ND at 501. The show starts at 8 p.m.

Today in history In 1944 Alice Walker, author of The Color Purple, is born in Eatonton, Georgia.

Campus watch Ghost Hunter

W.C. Hogg Building A non-UT subject entered into the building and began asking students questions about the Tower incident as well as directions to PCL. He informed them he was intrigued by the events on the tower and had spoken to the spirit of the shooter to better understand his motives. Officers searched the area and located the subject on the PCL plaza. The subject was issued a written Criminal Trespass Warning and was escorted from the area.

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Quote to note “The IMF [International Monetary Fund] and World Bank’s policies accommodate, if not facilitate, the sex trade and sex labor.”

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

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UT President hospitalized for heart condition By Lena Price Daily Texan Staff

UT President William Powers Jr. is in stable condition after being hospitalized for a pulmonary embolism Tuesday. A doctor discovered the embolism during a medical examination Tuesday morning, according to the memo released to university leaders Tuesday. The president is at St. David’s South

Austin Medical Center and will remain there for observation and rest “for a few days,” according to the statement. University officials declined to comment outside of the statement. A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot that originates somewhere in the body — usually the leg — and blocks the passage of blood to the lungs, said Angela Clark, an associate professor in the School of Nursing who specializes in

cardiac disease. “For the most part, they are pretty serious,” Clark said. “They can be catastrophic if they aren’t identified quickly enough.” Extended periods of immobilization, such as sitting through long flights, can lead to blood clots that result in pulmonary embolisms. Leg injuries can also cause them. “He strikes me as someone who is in pretty good shape, so it’s possible that

he could have injured his leg while exercising,” Clark said. She said the clots are difficult to identify, and often people will not show any symptoms. If the clot forms in the leg, they might notice slight swelling in the calf or pain behind the knee. If the clot occurs in the chest, people could experience symptoms similar to a heart attack.

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William Powers Jr. UT president

Perry calls for low-cost degrees, tuition freeze Higher education changes also proposed as solution to looming budget deficit By Melissa Ayala Daily Texan Staff

Gov. Rick Perry proposed a four-year tuition freeze on higher education and challenged institutions to develop a $10,000 bachelor’s degree in his State of the State speech Tuesday. Perry addressed a joint session of the Texas Legislature and released his version of the 2012-13 budget before the speech. He recommended the freeze and the cheaper degree as a way to make higher education more affordable. “As leaders search for more lowcost pathways to a degree, it’s time for a bold, Texas-style solution to this challenge that I’m sure the brightest minds in our universities can devise,” he said. “Let’s leverage web-based instruction, innovative teaching techniques and aggressive efficiency measures to reach that goal. Imagine the potential impact on affordability and graduation rates and the number of skilled workers it would send into our economy.” Senate Finance Committee member Sen. Florence Shapiro, RPlano, said having an online option to higher education would alleviate budget expenses for additional facilities and faculty. “I think he had some very sincere concerns about tuition,” she said. “I am 100 percent in favor of as much online activity as we can

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Gov. Rick Perry gave his State of the State address at the Capitol Tuesday. In the hour-long speech, he addressed the Texas job market and the budget cuts facing colleges and universities.

do. We cannot continue to build buildings. This is the new reality. Money is not there.” Former Texas House representative and UT public affairs lecturer Sherri Greenberg said higher education will face extensive cuts because it makes up 40 percent — or

$2.4 billion of a budgeted $6.1 billion — of the state’s general revenue. In the his budget, Perry recommended cutting higher education by approximately $1.5 billion. “Higher education has already sustained cuts,” Greenberg said. “The leadership has said higher ed-

Senator selected as graduation speaker Three student governance presidents selected U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison to be the commencement speaker at the May 21 graduation ceremony.

— Jennifer Suchland Professor of Slavic studies and women’s studies at the Ohio State University NEWS PAGE 6

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Daily Texan File Photo

By Mary Ellen Knewtson Daily Texan Staff

The presidents of UT’s three student governance organizations selected U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison as the commencement speaker for the May 21 event on the Main Mall. The senator will speak at a UT graduation ceremony for the second time. Hutchison also addressed the graduating class of 1998. As an alumna of the class of 1962, law school graduate and former cheerleader, Hutchison agreed to speak to the University at no charge. “It is particularly gratifying to be able to speak to the graduates of my alma mater,” Hutchison said, in a statement. “Like so many generations of UT graduates, life’s challenges and poten-

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ucation will not be immune to the cuts [this session].” Perry said lawmakers should consider outcome-based funding, which would base undergraduate funding on the number of degrees awarded. “Change does not come easily or naturally to these big institutions,

but it is crucial to educational effectiveness and efficiency,” Perry said. Perry also encouraged lawmakers to suspend “non-mission-critical entities,” such as the Historical Commission and the Commis-

PERRY continues on PAGE 2

Film honors career, life of civil rights era opera star from UT By William James Daily Texan Staff

In 1957, UT alumna Barbara Smith Conrad thought she secured a lead role in a University opera production. Conrad was one of the first black students to attend UT in 1956 and possessed a natural talent for opera, music and theater. As a music major, Conrad was encouraged to audition for the leading role in the University’s 1957 production of “Dido and Aeneas.” But then she learned of conservative lawmakers’ threat to cut UT’s funding for

WHAT: “When I Rise” WHERE: Channel 9 — KLRU WHEN: Feb. 10 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 13 at 3 p.m.

allowing a black woman to perform a romantic role opposite a white man. With few options, UT’s thenpresident Logan Wilson caved under pressure and had Conrad removed from the production. The

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Wednesday, February 9, 2011

HUTCHISON continues from PAGE 1

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 111, Number 143

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Claire Cardona (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst greets attendees of the State of the State address following Gov. Perry’s speech Tuesday.

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

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Low

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We just want honey butter chicken biscuits.

PERRY continues from PAGE 1 sion on the Arts, until the economy improves. The Commission on the Arts released a study that showed the cultural sector in Austin contributes more than $2.2 billion to the economy annually and creates 44,000 permanent jobs. “The arts in general are losing support throughout, so many different cutbacks, so we’re needing more support of the private individuals,” said Edwin Rifkin, Blanton Museum of Art director. “This just emphasizes how much greater [art cutbacks] will be in the state of Texas.” Perry said the 5-percent state agency budget cuts in 2010 prepared the state to avoid facing a “budget Armageddon” and maintained his position that overcoming this budget will make state govern-

THE DAILY TEXAN

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Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lena Price Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Alsdorf, Aziza Musa, Audrey White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Melissa Ayala, Allison Kroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Ahsika Sanders Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Morgan, Austin Myers, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jake Rector, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Daniel Nuncio, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Heimsath Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Gerson, Danielle Villesana Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Gerald Rich Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allistair Pinsof, Maddie Crum, Francisco Marin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Anne Stroh, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Anderson Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy Lutz, Trey Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carolynn Cakabrese Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joshua Barajas Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Zimmerman Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janese Quitugua Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

PERRY’S TOP PRIORITIES

ment more effective. He was firm in his stance against raising taxes and using the Rainy Day Fund — a $9.4 • Imposing criminal billion state emergency fund that penalties for employers can be used during budget shortwho knowingly hire ilfalls — and added there were no legal immigrants “sacred cows” in the budget. “Fortunately, we saw this coming, that’s why we didn’t touch the • Requesting the fedRainy Day Fund last session,” he eral government pass said. “Balancing our budget witha balanced budget out raising taxes will keep us movamendment ing forward out of these though economic times, creating more jobs • Requiring students to and opportunity and leaving Texas be enrolled or working more competitive then ever.” toward a GED to hold a Members from Americans Disdriver’s license abled for Accessible Public Transit • Expanding virtual Texas, a disability advocacy group, high schools to allow stood outside the House chamber in raincoats, asking lawmakers to drop-out students to use all of the Rainy Day Fund to earn a diploma ease the impact of budget cuts for those who use social services, such • Maintaining efforts to as the 100,000 people with disrepeal the Patient Proabilities on waitlists for home and tection and Affordable community services. Care Act of 2010 “There is a $27 billion deficit, and these are ways we think the governor and the Legislature can take into account rather than cutting much needed services,” said lovitz. “If it’s not raining now, I don’t ADAPT Texas member Heiwa Sa- know what it’s doing.”

tial awaits them.” Student Government President Scott Parks, Graduate Student Assembly President Manny Gonzalez and Senate of College Councils President Chelsea Adler decided that Hutchison should speak at the ceremony because of her UT background and her career. Adler said the trio attended meetings in President William Powers’s office starting last summer to come to a decision. “It was an informal consensus,” Adler said. “Hutchison was on the list from the beginning.” While Parks, Adler and Gonzalez had the final say, Adler said the bodies of students that each president led suggested other potential commencement speakers. Powers also had oversight of the decision. Adler said Powers met Hutchison and said he was sure that there was no chance of the senator turning the opportunity into

POWERS continues from PAGE 1

NEWS BRIEFLY

Because Austin is a large city, Clark said Powers should have access to high quality medication and testing. Pulmonary embolisms are typically treated with blood thinners, she said. According to the University statement, Powers is currently receiving blood thinners. Powers was scheduled to testify in front of the Senate Finance Committee on Wednesday at a hearing regarding state funding allocations for the UT System. He was also set to appear in a joint interview with Texas A&M University President R. Bowen Loftin at The Texas Tribune to discuss higher education funding. The hearing has been tentatively rescheduled for later this month, and the Tribune will reschedule its interview at a later date. Powers, who is 64 years old, took office on Feb. 1, 2006, after serving as dean of the UT School of Law. He taught at the University of Washington Law School before coming to UT in 1977.

The UT System Board of Regents elected new chairs Tuesday in a special meeting via telephone. The nine-member board chose San Antonio real estate developer Eugene Powell to replace Colleen McHugh as its chairman. McHugh’s appointment to the board expired this month and Gov. Rick Perry did not re-appoint her. Paul Foster, Steve Hicks and James Dannenbaum will serve as vice chairmen. The board’s regulations state only two vice chairmen should be elected, but UT System spokesman Matt Flores said the board sometimes chooses to elect three. “It’s not unprecedented,” Flores said. Perry appointed the new chairman Powell in 2009. Powell graduated from UT with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in finance. He played football for the University on full scholarship for Coach Darrell K Royal. Appointed in 2007, Foster has served as a vice chairman of the board since 2009. He earned an accounting degree from Baylor University. He is also chairman of the board of directors of The University of Texas Investment Management Co., the nonprofit investment corporation that handles the UT and Texas A&M Systems’ investments. In 2009, Perry appointed Hicks, who earned a government degree from UT. He is also the board’s athletics liaison and owns a private investment firm. Dannenbaum is a member of the Board for Lease of University Lands and has served on the board since 2007. He earned a civil engineering degree from UT and is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Issue Staff Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marty McAndrews, Jody Serrano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William James Gerlich, Mary Ellen Knewtson, Shamoyita Dasgupta Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Danielle Wallace, Lara Berendt, Kaine Korzekwa Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kaitlyn Teige, Maria Vlahova, Michelle Wainwright Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexandra Carreno Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucy Griswold Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danielle Wallace, Christopher Nguyen Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emery Ferguson, Tyler Suder, Gillian Rhodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Callie Parrish, Sammy Martinez, Brianne Klitguarde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connor Shea., John Massingill Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ihwa Cheng, Fanny Trang, Ryan Smith

Attending the LSAT seminar:

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

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Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryanne Lee Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Daniel Ruszkiewkz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Samantha Chavez, Selen Flores, Patti Zhang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato, Sarah Hall, Ian Payne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leah Feigel, Rachel Huey Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Broadcast Sales Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aubrey Rodriguez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

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a political situation. “We see her as a Longhorn first and a Republican second,” Adler said. “She’s not quite as polarizing as other politicians.” Notable speakers from past commencements include President Lyndon B. Johnson and computer pioneer Michael Dell. Actress Marcia Gay Harden spoke last year. College Republicans President Justin May said he thinks Hutchison is the best choice for speaker in his four years at UT. May said he thinks Hutchison is one of the more bipartisan politicians. University Democrats President Billy Calve said he looks forward to hearing Hutchison’s remarks. “Commencement is a time to celebrate the achievements of UT graduates and put partisan politics aside,” Calve said.

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Explosive plastic bottle may be cause of on-campus blast A plastic bottle likely exploded Tuesday afternoon on the South Mall near Homer Rainey Hall on the southwest side of the Six Pack, said a University Operations spokeswoman. Cindy Posey said someone reported a loud noise coming from the South Mall on Tuesday afternoon. She said the UT Police Department and Environmental Health and Safety are currently investigating a water bottle recovered from the area to determine its contents and confirm if it caused the explosion. Both groups are also working to determine who placed the bottle there, she said. The explosion caused no injuries, Posey said. The investigation is still under way, and no determination has been made on whether the bottle was intended as a prank. Posey said UT police and University officials hope students and others realize the potential for harm with this type of explosive. “The University would like to emphasize that these devices are very dangerous,” Posey said. “It could actually hurt somebody. It’s not just a funny joke.” She said if anyone sees a suspicious bottle, they should not touch it, back away and call the police immediately.

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3

Mubarak orders election reform changes By Colleen Long The Associated Press

Emilio Morenatti | Associated Press

Anti-Mubarak protesters take part in a demonstration at Tahrir square in Cairo on Tuesday.

Snowy woes mean trouble, mass cleanup in Northeast By Colleen Long The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The mountains of snow that have covered the Northeastern landscape for the past month and a half are finally melting, revealing oozing lumps of garbage, gaping potholes, bicycles, rat-infested sofas, discarded Christmas trees — even bodies. More than 57 inches of snow has fallen on New York City this winter, its snowiest January ever, and the story is similar elsewhere around the Northeast. Residents welcomed warmer weather this week before an expected plunge back into the freezer, but they weren’t so thrilled about the side effects. “This is disgusting. I can’t tell if it’s snow or garbage or some sick other thing,” said Karen James, 34, finding discarded bills, paper cups and sludge in the shrinking mound of snow and ice covering her car. “This stinks.” Since a post-Christmas blizzard dumped more than 2 feet of snow on parts of the city, the snow piles have become as familiar as taxis to New Yorkers, forcing pedestrians to weave single-file through snowpacked sidewalks. Two bodies were found in vehicles last week. In both cases, a passer-by spotted someone slumped over the wheel after snow melted away from the windows. One man was found dead Feb. 1 of an apparent gunshot wound; he had been reported missing a week earlier. And on Friday, a day after he was reported missing, Argent Dyryzi’s body was found in the driver’s seat of a BMW. Authorities believe he may have died of carbon monoxide poisoning. At least one other body was discovered in the New York area in late January, in a parking lot in West Nyack. The man had been dead of hypothermia for several days before anyone noticed, police said. The city Sanitation Department is responsible for plowing streets and crosswalks, while residents and businesses are expected to clear sidewalks. After grousing for weeks about the city’s failure to plow enough snow, many New Yorkers are now griping about the garbage piles and big pieces of furniture, some crawling with rats. During the many snowstorms to hit the city, the Sanitation Department suspended garbage collection for days at a time in order to use trucks for snow removal, which meant about 11,000 tons of trash per day didn’t get collected. Garbage collection has since resumed, but it’s not proceeding fast enough for some New Yorkers. “It’s like we’ve replaced the snow walls with garbage walls,” said Brooklyn resident Jill Coniglario, 38. “Even the parks are covered in mud and filthy snow. My kids are not playing in this stuff, that’s for sure.” Granted, the mess has been caused by more than just missed collections. People have been tossing loose trash onto the bags, and it’s winding up on the sidewalks and streets. Plastic McDonald’s cups. Broken bottles of Budweiser and empty cans of Four Loko. Cigarette butts. Soggy gloves. Old newspapers. And damp, dirty sofas — all left out in the open, as if they, too, will just melt away.

CAIRO — President Hosni Mubarak set up a committee Tuesday to recommend constitutional amendments to relax presidential eligibility rules and impose term limits — seeking to meet longtime popular demands as a standoff with protesters seeking his ouster enters its third week. Mubarak’s decrees were announced on state television by Vice President Omar Suleiman, who also said that Mubarak will set up a separate committee to monitor the implementa-

tion of all proposed reforms. The two committees will start working immediately, he said. The government has promised several concessions since the uprising began on Jan. 25 but has refused the protesters’ main demand that Mubarak step down immediately instead of staying on through September elections. Tuesday’s decision was the first concrete step taken by the longtime authoritarian ruler to implement promised reforms. Mubarak’s efforts to stay in office got a boost from the Obama administration, which conceded that it will not endorse calls for the president’s

immediate departure, saying a precipitous exit could set back the country’s democratic transition. After several days of mixed messages about whether it wants to see Mubarak stay or go, Washington stepped up calls for a faster, more inclusive national dialogue on reform in Egypt. Under Egypt’s constitution, Mubarak’s resignation would trigger an election in 60 days. U.S. officials said that is not enough time to prepare. “A question that that would pose is whether Egypt today is prepared to have a competitive, open election,” said State Department spokesman

P.J. Crowley. “Given the recent past, where, quite honestly, elections were less than free and fair, there’s a lot of work that has to be done to get to a point where you can have free and fair elections.” Mubarak also ordered a probe into last week’s clashes between the protesters and government supporters. The committee will refer its findings to the attorney general, Suleiman said. “The youth of Egypt deserve national appreciation,” he quoted the president as saying. “They should not be detained, harassed or denied their freedom of expression.”


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OpiniOn

Wednesday, February 9, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Lauren Winchester, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

gaLLERY OvERviEws Endorsement: Vote in the special election today On Wednesday and Thursday, students can vote for a referendum to drastically reform Student Government. We endorse the reforms because they strengthen the student assembly and increase scrutiny upon SG. The establishment of a chairperson to arbitrate assembly meetings is a centerpiece of the reforms. The chairperson is a positive step because it separates the assembly and executive branches, and it has the potential to empower the assembly with a strong figurehead. Currently, there is a perverse separation of powers in that the vice president, part of the executive branch, oversees the assembly, a theoretically equal and separate branch within SG. With a chairperson taking those duties, there can be a clear distinction between the two branches. While the chairperson’s official duties are resigned to adjudicating assembly actions, the position can be much more. For the first time, the assembly will have one of its own to symbolically represent itself to administrators and other campus leaders. Not using the position to its fullest potential would be a waste and disservice to students. Another benefit of the reforms is increased scrutiny via a Supreme Court. While we are unsure how many constitutional crises the assembly and executive branch will face, in a time when appearing before the election supervisory board is virtually a rite of passage for SG candidates, a clear and cogent judicial structure is prudent. We disagree with some of the reforms. Positions for Freshman representatives are to be created that are supposed to lend new insight to Student Government. However, we believe the assembly could obtain the same unique perspective simply by reaching out to freshman. The West Wingification of several executive board position titles is also a bit odd and somewhat indulgent, but inconsequential nonetheless. Ultimately, the reforms are impressive in scope, long overdue and should be approved by the student body. You may vote anytime today or tomorrow by visiting www. utexas.edu/studentgov. Illustration by Lucy Griswold

No love for “Scrubs” Thanks to $70,000 in student fees, “Scrubs” star Zach Braff and hip-hop artists Common and Chuck D are helping the University celebrate the Student Activity Center’s grand opening this week. Meanwhile, the potential $1-million cut from ethnic studies programs is just one example of the threat that budget cuts present. Despite the “challenging times” which UT President William Powers Jr. refers to so often in his e-mails and Tower Talk blog entries, the University can somehow still afford to attract high-profile actors and musicians to speak to the student body. Though $70,000 seems like a small sum when University officials are making decisions to cut millions from various academic areas, it is ridiculous to spend tens of thousands of dollars on entertainment that provides relatively little educational value for students. Moreover, while every student contributed money to attract the celebrities, less than 1 percent of students can attend “An Evening with Zach Braff ” or “Hip Hop: Then & Now Featuring Common and Chuck D,” as the capacity for each event is 450. Budgets and programming are determined months in advance, and while academics are supported by tuition and other revenue streams, events such as these come from separate student fees. However, spending so much to provide only a few hundred students with about an hour of entertainment while simultaneously imploring the state Legislature to preserve our funding sends conflicting messages.

A new Student Government By Muneezeh Kabir Daily Texan Guest Columnist

Today you have the power to change the way you are represented on this campus. The Student Government Reform Task Force — comprised of 11 members whose SG experience ranged from highly involved to entirely removed — spent more than seven months studying everything from language in the governing documents to big picture ideas about cost reduction and leadership opportunities. What you will see on today’s ballot is a result of their due diligence and the scrutiny of your elected representatives. Some have criticized attempts to reform SG and its relevance to students. We addressed the concern of lengthy, unnecessary debate at SG meetings by asking that all internal rules proposals be addressed by the task force and that all debate be had away from Tuesday nights while still open to the public. The task force’s final product

is not a collection of grammatical edits or a result of trivial quibbling; rather, it is a comprehensive recommendation detailing structural and ideological changes that will begin to fix a broken system. In many ways, criticisms of SG’s job performance are warranted and in fact, SG President Scott Parks and I were some of the most vocal about them last election cycle. And now we’re trying to fix Student Government. The truth is that the current structure in place is a bureaucratic nightmare that wastes funds and reifies the illusion that the only position worth aspiring to is president. In the new structure, we reduced the number of agencies from 34 to 14 and created a cabinet of policy directors who serve as think tanks and advisors to the newly consolidated set of agencies where things like civic engagement, advocacy and service are institutionalized priorities and not at the whim of executive leadership. Within the assembly, positions have been created specifically for first-year

students whose interests have often been systemically excluded. And where the Student Body Vice President has long presided over the assembly’s meetings, the new structure empowers the assembly by allowing them to elect their own leadership, including a parliamentarian and even the coveted position of Chair. The practically defunct judicial branch can now have a new and real identity where a Chief Justice presides over four associate justices and the entire Election Supervisory Board to ensure fair elections and a true balance of power for what has traditionally been an executive-heavy organization. The people who represent you have done their homework, and now it is up to you to approve their decision to fix a broken structure and empower students in a time when it is needed most. Vote in favor of a new Student Government that can finally work for you. Kabir is vice president of SG.

THE FiRiNg LiNE University’s priorities are misplaced I like Jimmy Talarico. Despite our political differences, we’ve worked together on various issues for the good of the students. That’s why it’s disheartening to see that Jimmy still doesn’t understand the root of problems. It is simply naïve to lay the blame at the feet of the Legislature. The problem is not a lack of spending on the state’s part. The problem is out-of-control spending by UT. This university needs to learn to live within its means, and it needs to be reminded that undergraduate teaching is its core function. In 2003, the last time there was a budget crisis, the University feared it would have its spending cut. Its spending was not cut — not one dime. The University used the budget crisis as an excuse to increase tuition nearly 50 percent over the next few years. When the founders of our state demanded a “university of the first class,” they understood what that meant. That meant a university that effectively carried knowledge forward to the next generation. Unfortunately, universities are declared great by fellow academics who look at the amount of research that is churned out, student-to-professor ratios, spending and special interest programs. No one considers whether the research which ends up in some obscure academic journal is actually read by anyone. No one ever looks to see what actual class sizes are or how many hours per week the average professor spends with her or his students.

The process of declaring a university “great” amounts to a circular firing squad in which universities are tasked to see who can throw the most money away the fastest. The quality of undergraduate teaching is largely forgotten in this sad competition. The greater spending that Talarico and this University demand from our state government will go to waste if the Legislature does not do something to ensure that the universities again realize that their core function is to provide a high-quality undergraduate education. The problem is simply not about money — it’s about priorities.

— Tony McDonald Second-year law student Senior Vice Chairman Young Conservatives of Texas

Voter ID is redundant Justin May’s Firing Line, “The most egalitarian of times”, featured a passionate and extravagantly worded battle cry for Senate Bill 14, also known as the “voter ID bill.” I appreciate any effort to keep justice in today’s government but can’t quite understand what S.B. 14 is fighting for. The current system already requires a person seeking a voter registration card to provide a Texas driver’s license number or a social security number. When neither is listed on the registration card, one currently is required to provide a valid ID when casting a ballot. So,

what’s new about S.B. 14? The need to show a government-issued ID in addition to the voter registration card. Since government-issued IDs are not free, this bill comes very close to violating the Voting Rights Act in that it acts as a poll tax but avoids it by stating that anyone who cannot afford a state-issued ID will be provided with one free of charge. By the 2012 election, there will be nearly 3 million impoverished adult Texans. That’s a lot of free ID cards. It’s a bit odd that the GOP administration determined to cut the budget and lower the deficit would add more duties to the already fragile government. Most of the cases of voter fraud that I could find dealt with either mail-in ballots or the actual registration process, typically one person registering for a card or voting by mail more than once. The solution to this problem seems so simple: Use a computer algorithm to check that names match driver’s license or social security numbers and that each name is only listed once in the official registry, therefore each name is given only one voter registration card. To avoid ID fraud at the time of voting, how will we afford a license scanner for each polling location or pay to educate every volunteer at the polls on identifying a fake driver’s license? The solution that S.B. 14 presents only alters the broken system without fixing the flaws in the broken system.

— Kathryn Sieverman, 2010 graduate and Research Assistant at UT’s Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology

sUBMiT a FiRiNg LiNE E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

LEgaLEsE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

RECYCLE Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.


5 UNIV

NEWS 5

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

FREE WHEELIN’

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Chris Sinclair jumps a series of dirt mounds at the 9th Street Duncan Park BMX Trails on Tuesday afternoon.

High school teachers impart creationism over evolution about each theory or stress that that can be troublesome and conthey are only teaching evolu- troversial,� Berkman said. tion because it is mandated by Berkman and Plutzer said they would like to increase the percentA high percentage of public their curricula. age of teachers who teach evoluhigh school biology teachers are tion-based biology because it is choosing to teach creationism inbased on facts. The professors sugstead of evidence for evolution in gested screening out creationist their classrooms, according to a teachers who would be averse to survey published in the Jan. 28 teaching evolution. issue of “Science.� At UT, many professors focus Michael B. Berkman and Eric more on evolution. Plutzer, political science profes“Evolution is a general theme sors at Pennsylvania State Unithat really underlies and conversity, anonymously surveyed nects every other thing in biolbiology teachers at more than ogy,� said biology lecturer John 900 public high schools across Batterton. “What I try to convey the nation in order to compile to the students is that they don’t the information. have to believe what I’m present“We were curious about what ing to them, but they certainly was going on in the classrooms,� have to understand what I’m preBerkman said. “We knew that senting to them.� court decisions had regularly said Several UT students said they that creationism could not be have not encountered creationist taught, but we didn’t know how theories in their classes. that was translating into class“I’ve taken all the introductoroom behavior.� ry biology and genetics courses,� The survey found that 13 persaid biology sophomore Kylee cent of high school teachers — Walter. “I haven’t even heard a about 117 out of the 900 surveyed mention of creationism at all. It’s — spend much of their class perievolution. That’s the way it is.� ods strictly emphasizing creationPrior to attending UT, stuism. In 2005, a federal judge ruled dents had varied instruction in that teaching intelligent design, biology. Human biology junior or creationism, violated the First — John Batterton, Biology lecturer Chad Whitley learned biology on Amendment of the U.S. Constia molecular level, while public tution. The distribution of these health sophomore Veronica Perparticular teachers is relatively ry learned both creationist and even throughout the nation, Berkevolutionary theories. man said. “I understand why there is an Berkman and Plutzer found About 28 percent actually follow the curriculum that teach- that in most cases, teachers who equal balance in school where es evolution, while 60 percent took courses on evolution in col- you have to teach both, but I feel remain neutral and avoid advo- lege were more likely to teach it like it’s outdated,� Perry said. “If students in high school want to cating either perspective. Those rigorously to their students. “We think this is because they learn about things that have to do who chose to remain neutral tend to either encourage stu- have much more confidence in with religion, that’s what church dents to make up their own mind their abilities to take on a subject is there for.� By Shamoyita DasGupta Daily Texan Staff

“

Evolution is a general theme that really underlies and connects every other thing in biology. What I try to convey to the students is that they don’t have to believe what I’m presenting to them, but they certainly have to understand what I’m presenting to them.

“

♲

R E C YC L E YOUR COPY OF THE DAILY TEXAN

The Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has reopened their search for two At-Large student board members. These are 2-year terms from June 2011 to May 2013.

This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States. Your job as a board member?

• Adopt annual budget • Review monthly income and expenses • Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Texas Travesty and Cactus yearbook editors, The Daily Texan managing editor • Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for The Daily Texan editor • Review major purchase requests • Time commitment? About ďŹ ve hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work).

Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/board/ The Board will certify applicants at their next meeting.

Deadline is noon on Wednesday, February 9, 2011

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6 S/L

6 NEWS

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

CONRAD continues from PAGE 1

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Jessica Suchland, assistant professor at the Ohio State University, speaks with UT students Xinxin Wang, Giao Nguyen and Jaclyn Nguyen about sex and job trafficking on Tuesday.

Sex trafficking talk examines global policy By Marty McAndrews Daily Texan Staff

Local feminist groups filtered transnational sex trafficking through an economic lens at a Tuesday lecture, providing local, national and global frameworks for the issue. The Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and the Rapoport Center Research Cluster on Women, Gender, and Human Rights hosted the lecture. The organizations invited Jennifer Suchland, assistant pro-

fessor of Slavic studies and women’s studies at the Ohio State University, citing her knowledge of the sex trafficking industry.

“The [International Monetary Fund] and World Bank’s policies accommodate, if not facilitate, the sex

trade and sex labor,” Suchland said. “Geopolitical and macroeconomic policies are integral to understanding why sex trafficking exists.” Suchland said historical context when discussing sex trafficking allows people to examine the challenges of stopping the slave trade from blossoming further. “The current discourse surrounding sex trafficking is a rights-based approach,” Suchland said. “But ‘rights’ is a word like ‘democracy’ with no meaning until it is applied to action in the real world.” Students debated how to best prevent sex trafficking in the future, whether to pass specific legislation or to circulate more information about the problem. “Questions of policy are prema-

ture,” said associate radio-televisionfilm professor Kathleen Tyner. “There needs to be more discourse surrounding these enormous issues before we can even point to any answers.” Suchland said Ohio is a hotbed of sex trafficking in the United States and that she succeeded in convincing the legislature to pass a Senate bill in Ohio to increase law enforcement’s ability to crack down on sex trafficking. “Texas also suffers greatly from sex trafficking and sex slavery,” said Natalie San Luis, a Plan II honors junior and secretary of Texas Feminists. “Where it’s situated, it serves as a gateway from Mexico into the United States.” Educational psychology graduate student Emily Wade said femi-

nist organizations often find unlikely allies when trying to tackle the issue of sex trafficking. “These progressive groups are finding odd bedfellows with these conservative organizations like churches that see sex trafficking as a moral issue or even amongst governments that want to increase security at their borders,” Wade said. San Luis said many Austin-area religious organizations prioritize the issue of sex trafficking. Globally, Suchland said, violence against women is a transnational problem because of its impact on immigration. “The sex trafficking issue is synonymous with the immigration issue,” she said.

controversy immediately gained national attention, and Conrad was offered the opportunity to transfer to a number of other schools around the country. She decided to stay and finish her degree. That moment and her struggles to graduate from the University and become an internationally recognized mezzo-soprano have spawned a new PBS documentary. “Getting a good education was a dream, and I was not about to have my dream destroyed,” Conrad said in the documentary. She graduated with a music degree in 1958. The documentary that profiles Conrad’s life, “When I Rise,” premiered on PBS on Tuesday. It will air again on Thursday and Feb. 13. The documentary originally debuted during the annual film, music and interactive festival South By Southwest last year at the Paramount Theatre, where Conrad would have performed “Dido and Aeneas” in 1957. “Because of the initial response at SXSW, the documentary was accepted into 12 other film festivals and received Best Social Justice Documentary this past month,” said executive producer Don Carleton. Carleton said it was marvelous working with Conrad, and they

have all been thrilled with the documentary’s tremendous success. UT history professor Robert Abzug helped fact-check the documentary during its final stages and said it is a terrific movie. “[Conrad] came to the University at a time when the campus was tightly bound by the state Legislature.” Abzug said. “Despite the amount of liberalism at the University, the conservative tension of the state overruled and because of this incident, we were able to see the vulnerabilities of the University at that time.” Conrad, who now lives in New York City, has performed with the Metropolitan Opera. Her career as a mezzo-soprano opera singer has earned her numerous accolades and international fame among opera critics and fans alike. Math senior Ariel Taylor, president of UT black women’s organization Umoja, congratulated Conrad for her powerful story being broadcast around the nation. “Her endurance, motivation and hard work have qualified her to be an icon among the University, and her strength and determination have qualified her to be an icon among AfricanAmerican women around the world,” Taylor said.

Courtesy of Barbara Conrad

UT alumna and acclaimed opera singer Barbara Conrad is the subject of a new PBS documentary.

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Wednesday, February 9, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Will Anderson, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

SIDELINE

MEN’S BASKETBALL

No. 3 TEXAS at OKLAHOMA

Texas finding groove as favorable schedule nears

NBA SPURS

By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff

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Texas began the season outside The Associated Press Top 25. The Longhorns were picked to finish third in the Big 12 preseason poll. In short, neither the media nor league coaches expected Texas to be where it is now — 8-0 in conference play and sitting atop the Big 12 standings. In addition, it is No. 3 in both national polls behind undefeated Ohio State and No. 2 Kansas, whose only loss came to the Longhorns in January. The Longhorns haven’t just won their first eight games of Big 12 play, they have dominated, winning each by double-digit points, which included a stretch in which they played four ranked opponents in five games. Texas has never been undefeated this far into Big 12 competition. The best Big 12 record that the Longhorns have finished with is 13-3, which they have done five times. The most difficult part of Texas’ schedule is out of the way. No ranked teams remain on the schedule. But that doesn’t mean

DETROIT

89 TIMBERWOLVES

112 ROCKETS

108 LONGHORNS IN THE NBA Maurice Evans 7 points, 1 block, 3 rebounds

Kevin Durant Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Texas players Jai Lucas, left, and Jordan Hamilton get ready for a game against Texas A&M on Jan. 20. The Longhorns are 8-0 for the first HOOPS continues on PAGE 8 time ever in Big 12 competition and now face eight unranked teams to finish their regular season.

BIG 12 MEN’S BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK

FOOTBALL

Nebraska hits wall in final Big 12 season

Rebuilt Longhorns bring in top recruit, Gray’s future unsure

By Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff

In their final Big 12 season, the Cornhuskers are third to last in the conference and have lost three of their last four games. Nebraska started the season 13-2 until stumbling into league competition. “I think our team’s better than its ever been, but it’s not good enough to just show up,” head coach Doc Sadler said on Jan. 24. Sadler’s team started off with a single-digit defeat against Missouri, which was then ranked No. 15 in the nation, before losing to Kansas 63-60 in Lawrence. Nebraska appeared to be a contender for the second or third spot in the North division in mid-January. But the Huskers kept sliding and have not been able to string together consecutive victories since that loss to the Tigers. Their most recent games were a defeat at Kansas State on Feb. 2 and then a 20-point blowout loss against Kansas at home over the weekend. “Right now, when we’re so far removed ... we better not start looking beyond today’s practice at 1:30 or we’ll be in trouble,” Sadler said.

By Trey Scott & Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff

Nati Harnik | Associated Press

Nebraska head coach Doc Sadler argues a call during a game against Kansas on Saturday. Sadler’s Cornhuskers are third from last place in their final year in the Big 12.

Nebraska plays at Baylor on game last Tuesday,” said Kansas coach Bill Self. “It became more Wednesday. sore after that.” X-ray and MRI results were Selby still sidelined negative but team doctors remain The preseason conference worried about a “hotspot” on the freshman of the year Josh Selby bottom of Selby’s foot, which missed his second straight game Self explained, “means he could for Kansas on Monday with a play on it but if he were to roll foot injury. it or something there could be a Selby hurt his right foot in chance [that] there could become practice a week ago and then ag- a line there, or a fracture.” gravated that injury versus Texas Self expects Selby to be back in Tech on Feb. 1. “We’re talking about minor stuff going into our Texas Tech HUSKERS continues on PAGE 8

WOMEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

Tuesday provided mixed news out of the Longhorn football program. Earlier in the week, Austin American-Statesman columnist Kirk Bohls wrote that Texas defensive backs coach Jerry Gray was a leading candidate for the defensive coordinator position with the NFL’s Tennessee Titans. Then on Tuesday morning, Hookem.com reported that new Titans head coach Mike Munchak contacted Gray to offer him the job. Gray and Munchak coached together in Tennessee for four seasons from 1997 to 2000. There has been no official word from Gray, who came to Texas just three weeks ago. But there was also some good news for Longhorns fans this week. A week after inking one of the top recruiting classes in the nation, the program received its first verbal commit of the 2012 class. On Monday, Scottsdale, Ariz.,

quarterback Connor Brewer called head coach Mack Brown to commit. The pro-style quarterback is thought of as one of the best prospects in the nation and his announcement comes just prior to the University’s Junior Day this Saturday, when other recruits in his class will visit campus to meet with coaches and staff. Brewer is the first recruit brought in by new cooffensive coorJerry Gray dinator Bryan Harsin. Then, on Tuesday, the NCAA finally cleared Tevin Jackson to enroll at Texas. The linebacker was regarded as one of the top players in Texas’ 2010 recruiting class but was unable to play this past fall because of a transcript issue with the NCAA

CHANGES continues on PAGE 8

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

UT peaking, Young guard leads Horns into tough road stretch streak on line against Cougs in Houston By Alexandra Carreno Daily Texan Staff

By Stefan Scrafield Daily Texan Staff

Fresh off of a dominant performance Saturday against visiting SMU, Texas looks to continue its winning ways at the University of Houston’s CRWC Natatorium tonight. The Longhorns head into Wednesday’s Sprint for the Cure meet looking to extend their winning streak, which extends back to a win against Arizona on Jan. 29. Their consecutive victories have moved them up two spots to No. 4 in the latest College Swimming Coaches of America poll. The team shares the spot with California while Stanford remains top dog. Not only have the Longhorns been able to win as a group, but they have

STREAK continues on PAGE 8

To cope with this season’s struggles, Texas has compartmentalized its schedule into smaller segments to avoid looking too far ahead. “We talked about how we were going to run this [season] with segments,” said Texas coach Gail Goestenkors. “Now, for the second segment, we wanted to go 4-0. We are rebounding better. I am very pleased. Now we start the next segment.” The team started Big 12 competition 0-4, so Goestenkors and her staff got creative to keep the Longhorns’ (15-7, 4-4 Big 12) spirits up. “I’ve never used the segment technique before, but when you lose you have to become very creative as a coach and just as a staff Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff to help us move forward,” Goestenkors said. Longhorn guard Chassidy Fussell drives to the basket against Kansas on Saturday. The freshman scored 25 points against the Jayhawks, her fifth-straight game of at least 20 points. Ending the second segment last Saturday with a win over Kansas 12 Conference Freshman of the on the map as the first Longhorn put Texas at the .500 mark for the straps has not gone unnoticed. Freshman Chassidy Fussell was Week. The guard has reached the freshman since the 2006 season to conference season. Texas’ hard work and determi- tabbed Monday, for the third time 20-point mark 12 times this seaFUSSEL continues on PAGE 8 nation to pull itself up by its boot- in her career, as the Phillips 66 Big son. Fussell’s efforts have put her

31 points, 10 rebounds, 3 assists

WHAT TO WATCH Spurs @ Raptors

Date: Tonight Time: 6 p.m. On air: Fox Sports SW

Macericks @ Kings

Date: Tonight Time: 9 p.m. On air: KTXA

SPORTS BRIEFLY Former Longhorns Kevin Durant and Daniel Gibson will compete in the NBA 3-point contest during AllStar Weekend in Los Angeles Feb. 19. The pair of former Texas stars will join reigning 3-point champion Paul Pierce and Ray Allen of the Boston Celtics, James Jones of the Miami Heat and Dorell Wright of the Golden State Warriors in the competition, which is part of NBA All-Star Saturday Night. Durant leads the league in scoring with 29 points per game and Gibson is shooting 43 percent from beyond the arch. Allen needs just two more 3-pointers to break Reggie Miller’s all-time record. No Longhorn has won the 3-point contest in the event’s 24-year history. — Austin Laymance

BIG 12 MEN’S BASKETBALL 1

Texas 20-3, 8-0

2

Kansas 23-1, 8-1

3

Baylor 15-7, 5-4

4

Texas A&M 17-5, 4-4

5

Oklahoma 12-10, 4-4

6

Colorado 15-9, 4-5

7

Oklahoma St. 16-7, 4-5

8

Missouri 18-6, 4-5

9

Kansas State 16-8, 4-5

10

Nebraska 15-7, 3-5

11

Texas Tech 11-13, 3-6

12

Iowa State 14-10, 1-8


8 SPTS

8 SPORTS

Wednesday, February 9 , 2011

FUSSELL continues from PAGE 7 score 20-plus points or more in five consecutive games. “I’ve been a little surprised by her consistency, she was unranked when the season began,” Goestenkors said. “Her numbers have all gone up since we’ve hit conference play.” Also recently recognized for their efforts both on and off the court were senior Kathleen Nash and juniors Yvonne Anderson and Ashleigh Fontenette, as all three were named to the Capital One Academic All-District team. Tonight, the Longhorns open a two-game road stretch with a game at Kansas State. The Wildcats (16-5, 6-2 Big 12) have yet to lose a game at home this season. But Texas, which went into hostile Texas Tech territory earlier this season and emerged victorious, knows a thing or two about maintaining its composure. With a defense that ranks 11th in

the nation and second in the Big 12, Kansas State is led by junior Branshea Brown — she leads the squad on the boards with 6.1 rebounds per game. The Wildcats have held their opponents this season to 53 points on average. “They’re really smart. If a kid can’t shoot, they’re not out there guarding them,” Goestenkors said of Kansas State. “They keep you a little bit off balance because they are constantly changing their defenses.” For KSU head coach Deb Patterson, preparing for tonight’s game has included taking a better look at what Texas has to offer. Patterson’s squad will be keeping an eye on Fussell. “She is extremely aggressive and versatile. She can score in a variety of ways and she can score with intensity and aggressiveness,” Patterson said in Tuesday’s Big 12 teleconference. “She plays with a fearlessness that’s very

HUSKERS continues from PAGE 7 practice this Thursday. “We are erring on the side of caution in this particular case,” the coach added.

Paralyzing parity With Missouri’s loss to Kansas on Monday night, there are now six Big 12 teams with a conference record of either 4-4 or 4-5, creating an extensive logjam in the middle of the standings. “It’s all mumble-jumbled right now,” Missouri coach Mike Anderson said on Monday. “I’ll think you’ll start seeing the truer picture in probably the next two weeks.” Texas A&M and Oklahoma each sit at .500 in conference play while Missouri, Oklahoma State, Kansas State and Colorado are 4-5. “Parity sometimes gives the appearance of mediocrity and that’s not the case at all,” Self said. “There’s good teams and certainly winning on the road is a bare.” Only Texas (8-0 Big 12), Kansas (8-1), and Baylor (5-4) have winning league records.

PREVIEW VS. Date: Tonight Time: 7 p.m. Place: Bramlage Coliseum (Manhattan, Kansas)

important in this league. She can hurt you with a great three and she can get to the rim.” But for the Longhorns, remaining focused and tough is the most important factor as they start a new segment of their season in Kansas at 7 p.m. “They’re an outstanding team, especially at home,” Goestenkors said. “So we need to go in there and be both mentally and physically tough because to go on someone’s home court you’ve got to be both of those things to be successful.”

STREAK continues from PAGE 7 also received some of solid individual performances of late. A week ago, junior swimmer Karlee Bispo became just the second Longhorn women’s swimmer to be named “National Swimmer of the Week.” She won seven events in one meet during the team’s victory over Arizona. More recently, freshman Ellen Lobb was able to win both the 50-yard freestyle and the 200 butterfly in the SMU meet. But a change in the format of s ome races could c r e at e p r o b l e m s f o r t h e fourth-ranked Longhorns. The annual Sprint for the Cure event features many events at non-traditional distances,

such as the 300-yard freestyle and the 75-yard breaststroke. The two programs last met on Feb. 10, 2010, in last year’s edition of the tournament. Texas was able to come away with the 18-point win by a score of 80-62. Tonight’s meet is the last of the regular season for Texas and will be the final chance for the UT women to improve their national ranking heading into the Big 12 Championships, which begins on Feb. 23. A win would ensure Texas the highest ranking in the conference and make it the favorite to win the championship. The only other Top 25 program in the conference is Texas A&M.

HOOPS continues from PAGE 7 the Longhorns will be able to breeze through February and into March Madness. “I don’t think you really have a chance to feel good one way or the other until after the season,” head coach Rick Barnes said Monday. “There’s a lot of basketball left to play when you really think about it.” Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Here’s a look at the Long- Texas swingman Jordan Hamilton attacks the basket during the Longhorn’s 76-60 win over visiting Texas Tech on Saturday. horns’ remaining schedule. @ Oklahoma: Tonight at 8 p.m. on ESPN2

The Sooners lost by 20 points when they came to Austin in January. After losing its first three conference games, Oklahoma has won four of its last five games. All of the wins came in Norman. The Sooners have won the last two matchups with Texas in Norman. Vs. Baylor: Saturday

The Bears had high expectations this year, after reaching the Elite Eight in Houston 11 months ago. At 5-4 in conference play, which places them third in the Big 12, the Bears have had the Longhorns’ number recently winning the last four matchups dating back to March 2009. Prior to that, Texas had not fallen to the Bears since 1998. Vs. Oklahoma State: Feb. 16

Texas took care of the Cowboys with ease in January at Stillwater and should have little trouble with them at home. After back-to-back wins over Missouri and Oklahoma, the Cowboys are one of four teams in the Big 12 currently at 4-5 and among the nine teams that are within two games of each other. @ Nebraska: Feb. 19

This is one of those scary games for the Longhorns. Nebraska lost by 40 points to Texas last season and will be looking for revenge in their final regular season Big 12 matchup. The Longhorns have struggled their last two times in Lincoln, losing by four in 2009 and stealing a one-point win in 2007. The Huskers have impressive wins against Texas A&M and Colorado. They also nearly upset Kansas last month. Vs. Iowa State: Feb 22

If there is one game that the Longhorns should have no trouble with, it is Iowa State. The Cyclones have lost their last six games. They will probably be even more beaten up when they come to Austin as it will be their last of four straight games against ranked opponents. @ Colorado: Feb 26

This will be another trap game for the Longhorns. It is never easy to play in the high altitude of Boulder and to make things ever more difficult, the Buffaloes are pretty good this season. Colorado has won three of four home Big 12 games this year with the only loss coming down to the final minute against Kansas. Vs. Kansas State: Feb 28

CHANGES continues from PAGE 7 Eligibility Center. Jackson will enroll in June. Even if Gray decides to leave, the early commitment by Brewer

goes a long way to show that Texas is still a popular commodity, while Jackson’s clearance is a boost to a defense that regressed in 2010.

The Wildcats have had the Longhorns in almost every sport the last couple of years and men’s basketball is no different. Kansas State has won the last two meetings with Texas. The Wildcats have struggled this year though as they have been one of the most disappointing teams in college basketball. @ Baylor: March 5

Senior day in Waco could cause some trouble for the Longhorns.

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9 COMICS

COMICS 9

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

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10 CLASS/SPTS/ENT

10 NEWS

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

HOW MANY DOES IT TAKE?

Deep cuts to student aid would reduce availability By Melissa Ayala Daily Texan Staff

Ryan Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Craig Weitzman repairs a light bulb in front of Littlefield House at the corner of 24th Street and Whitis Avenue on Tuesday afternoon.

By Betsy Blaney The Associated Press

LUBBOCK — A youth prison administrator gave inmates special treatment, candy and promises of financial aid before sexually abusing them in closets and classrooms, a prosecutor told jurors Tuesday, while the man’s defense attorney said the boys made up allegations of assault so they would be released. Former West Texas State School principal John Paul Hernandez is charged with two counts of sexual assault and nine counts of improper relationship between an educator and a student. His trial may be the last criminal matter to come from a sex scandal that shook the Texas Youth Commission and its school in Pyote. Authorities believe at least 13 boys were sexually abused at the school, which closed last summer. The scandal led to allegations of a coverup and reports exposing lax medical care and beatings in the youth prison system. Several top state officials responsible for jailing the

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state’s juvenile criminals resigned or were fired, and lawmakers eventually ordered the system overhauled. Hernandez, 45, was one of two prison officials to face criminal charges. Former assistant superintendent Ray Edward Brookins was sentenced last April to 10 years in prison. The Texas attorney general’s office took over the prosecution of the men amid accusations that the Ward County district attorney had not acted quickly enough. Widespread publicity surrounding the case prompted officials to move Hernandez’s trial from Monahans near Pyote to Lubbock at the defense’s request. The attorneys gave their opening statements Tuesday morning before Texas Ranger Brian Burzynski testified about being called to the prison in February 2005 and speaking with two of thwe boys who made allegations. Prosecutor Adrienne McFarland told jurors in her opening statement that Hernandez was warned by teachers and staff against going behind closed doors with students.

Financial aid offices fall short on staff By Jody Serrano Daily Texan Staff

More than two-thirds of college and university financial aid administrators faced a moderate or severe resource shortage, according to a recent survey by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. Such shortages affect universities’ abilities to provide face-toface counseling, outreach efforts and attention to target populations, according to the study. At UT, shortages have mostly come in the form of state and federal budget cuts and limited human resources at the Office of Student Financial Services. “If you’re trying to counsel someone about debt, it’s best to see them face-to-face,” said the office’s director Tom Melecki. “Trying to counsel people in an e-mail or on the phone is not the best way to do it.” Currently, the office operates with a staff of 58 employees, 26 of whom are financial aid counselors. Last year, staff members received approximately 702,000

hits on the office’s website, 107,000 phone calls, 27,532 visits to the office and about 6,000 emails from students. On average, the office receives about 140 visits per day. Mary Knight, associate vice president for the Budget Office, said that UT budgeted a total of $238.4 million in scholarship and

nancial aid distribution, students families applying for financial aid. benefitted from the introduction Freshman Charles Graham reof the year-round Pell grant. cently visited the office after his The office was not affected by parents divorced last December. the recent 5-percent statewide bud- The divorce left his mother as the get cut, but Melecki said they still only person paying for his tuition. do not have enough staff to meet An adviser told Graham to fill out the demand of students and help a Special Circumstances Appeal them make informed decisions. Form and a FAFSA. “Some of the biggest com“Before, my mom and I would just do [financial aid] online,” Graham said. “This is definitely better than online. I’m going to come back and ask a lot of questions.” For students experiencing trouble with their financial aid office, the association recommended that students be patient — Haley Chitty, Spokeswoman for NASFAA and persistent, check online for answers to common questions and read and comprehend all financial aid funds for the 2010- plaints we get from students are consumer information. “The financial aid office works 2011 fiscal year. that we’re slow to answer phones overtime to ensure all students While the office did experience and that we’re overly bureaucratget the help they need,” said Hathe staff shortages, it did not face ic,” Melecki said. ley Chitty, a spokeswoman for the problems with the introduction They also cut back on the of the year-round Pell grant and amount of student outreach, such association. “Unfortunately, this increased federal regulations dis- as staffing Financial Aid Satur- can sometimes mean long lines, cussed in the survey. Melecki said days, community events the Aus- but students shouldn’t be discouralthough the office verified more tin Chamber of Commerce hosts aged. Students that are persistent individual cases to determine fi- that offer application support for will get the help they need.”

Juvenile school’s principal accused of sexual assaults

The commissioner of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board told the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday that lawmakers must make conservative cuts to higher education grants and funding. The board’s main responsibility is to coordinate state-funded scholarships and grants. The board responded to a proposed 41-percent reduction in the grants, which would make funding available to only half of the current amount of students in the next biennium and no new students. “If we cut off that financial aid, a lot of kids that are in high school now are going to give up on their college dreams,” said Raymund Paredes, the board’s commissioner. “We will suffer the repercussions of those decisions for generations.” Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano, said one option to spare the board from cuts is to restructure scholarship and financial aid awards so that more money can be given in subsequent years. “I’m hoping we can put some more money in there,” she said.

The financial aid office works overtime to ensure all students get the help they need.”

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“I think the Higher Education Coordinating Board is looking at not just saying everyone can get financial aid, but maybe they’ll be looking at merit and financial need in the future.” The initial proposal shows a 25-percent cut in programs under the board’s direction, but the Senate and House finance committees will determine the board’s final budget. Reductions should occur in a need-only basis after analyzing the effectiveness of individual programs, not across-the-board cuts, Shapiro said. “We’re evaluating the Higher Education Coordinating Board — they took some very severe cuts,” she said. “They decided to include all of their programs and just cut everyone 25 percent.” Sen. Eddie Lucio Jr., D-Brownsville, said Gov. Rick Perry should use a portion of the Rainy Day Fund, a $9 billion emergency fund available to lawmakers, to avoid higher education cuts. “I respectfully disagree with our governor on the usage of the Rainy Day Fund,” Lucio said. “I think we should take a billion dollars and take care of higher education in our state.”

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11 ENT

Life&Arts 11

Wednesday, february 9, 2011

Ryan Smith | Daily texan staff

“The Encyclopedia Show” is a spin-off of the original, which began in Chicago, and aims to create a vibrant performance community in Austin.

LIKE continues from PAGE 12 relationships in the strongest sense: potential partners for marriage. In a university setting, Kreager said, websites such as Likealittle might instead serve as an outlet for women to make the first move without being considered too aggressive while still searching for romantic partners in a setting where, statistically, there is a larger proportion of females than males. At the same time, online romances have their setbacks. There is always the possibility that someone is lying about their traits, connections and even identities, and there is the everpresent question of how legitimate of a relationship online dating can actually provide. “It makes it easier for you to find people, which is really convenient,” said sociology senior Travis Wan. “The disadvantage is that it’s not the same social stuff, where you would see people in person ... A lot of it has been replaced by people on the Internet.” While online dating turns the traditional idea of meeting a potential partner on its head and may increase chances for a compatible romantic relationship because of the sheer number of contacts that can be quickly and easily made, one of the key ingredients for meaningful and successful relationships can get lost in translation. “We know, as sociologists, that the best relationships are based on commonality — there is an almost biological connection,” Kreager said. “Those, you can’t simulate online.” You can’t create that chemistry just by looking at someone’s profile.”

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REARMED continues from PAGE 12

Nance Riffe read a piece on how comparing Newton and Goethe’s color theories helped her cope with her father’s suicide. “During some acts, I’m laughing until my face hurts ... but that was one where I was crying on stage,” Hardesty said. It is this spectrum of enlightening stories and dark humor that makes “The Encyclopedia Show” a unique form of information gathering. “We’re not pretending to be the best source for facts,” Graupmann said. “But we have some ways of winking at the audience, pointing out the silliness. We have a ‘fact checker’ on staff that adds up all the truths and untruths ... The ratio is always close.” In keeping with the antiquated concept of thumbing through the dusty pages of a hard cover encyclopedia, the next installment of the show will be about obsolete diseases. “Because what’s funnier than oldtimey diseases?” Hardesty said. The show will feature several guest presenters, including Jill Meyers of American Short Fiction and Lesley Clayton, an obituary writer for the Austin American-Statesman. Diseases such as dandy fever, scurvy and the vapors will be rediscovered just in time for Valentine’s Day. “I’m so, so excited this is happening close to Valentine’s Day. Maybe it’ll

No longer following the blueprint of a 20-year-old title, this sequel’s levels are often sprawling. The levels are filled with grapple points leading you upward, downward and forward as you head toward the exit, throwing barrels and bullets at any soldier that gets in Rad Spencer’s way. The ability to jump and redefined controls adds some speed to this new caterpillar-moustache-wearing Spencer that the levels don’t complement. You’ll find yourself grappling quickly only to hit a literal wall. Like a bad “Sonic the Hedgehog” level, having your momentum halted sours the experience. Even worse, the camera does a poor job of informing the player of their surroundings. I often found myself falling to my death because I had no clue what lied below. The stages themselves are visually rich with detailed backdrops. Lush, green jungles and cityscapes lit with 1950s-inspired neon lights are welcomed visual tweaks. Unfortunately, all of this eye candy comes with a price. The background clutter can easily be mistaken for grapple points, leading to many frustrating deaths. The original “Rearmed” was true to the original and simplistic in its design. The player only acquired a handful of weapons

PIZZA continues from PAGE 12 dough pieces. For those living in a dorm, the preparation of the two items provides a nice, domestic comfort. Rather than a microwave, the product requires the use of an oven. All those feelings of home, however, disappear once the timer beeps after 18 minutes and the pizza is taken out in all of its awkwardly burnt-bottom crust, flourcolored top crust and hardened cheese glory. There’s veracity in DiGiorno’s tagline “It’s not delivery, it’s DiGiorno” because this sure as hell is not delivery. As the cookies bake in the oven, the first bite provides proof that appearance can tell a lot about something. That plastic look of the cheese? Yep, that’s just about the same way to describe its taste. Also, DiGiorno has found a way to make a crust that is both tough and undercooked at the same time. The least said about the breadsticks, the better. But what keeps the pizza going is the wonderfully sweet and spicy sauce. It’s the addictive drug that keeps the mediocre cheese and crust together. On the other hand, Nestlé has jam-packed its cookie dough to the brim with so much sugar that any sense of doughiness is forgotten after a couple of bites. After the consumption of a quarter of the pizza and six cookies (990 calories and 48.25 grams of fat) and with a queasy stomach, the real-

ization hits that the sense of fullness after a truly delicious meal still eludes. Eating Pizza & Cookies became like getting that toy you pined for as child: Countless nights have been spent dreaming about finally coming face-to-face with this illusive toy. When the time finally comes years later, nostalgia and giddiness initially take over but not actual fulfillment. Then, you think, “This is what the fuss was about?” There’s something to be said about living without the toy or, in this case, eating healthy, because if we are what we eat, then what does it say when you’ve just eaten hundreds of calories worth of grated cheese blend and cellulose powder? The convenience of food may have reached its limit when all you can do is just stick all of those things in a box and call it a new product. We’ve become the parody of those lazy, cheap, obese Americans, who, on the Facebook page for Pizza & Cookies, complain that, though made for more than four people, $7 is too much to pay. We’ve become the Americans who have genuine excitement for this near-unholy mixture and will eat anything in a box as long as it has enough sodium and sugar to stop thoughts of where our food is from. But, of course, after all of those thoughts form, the stomach growls again and the lights of Wendy’s call out.

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make people, you know, think twice,” Graupmann said. “[Hardesty and I] have got to get red and pink suits. Why have we not done that yet?” The duo’s enthusiasm is also a result of the upcoming anniversary of “The Encyclopedia Show” in Austin. Although just a year ago they were worried about gathering even a handful of interested attendees, Graupmann and Hardesty now have high hopes for the future, and for good reason. In the past year the show has spread like a not-so-extinct pandemic, expanding to include 11 locations, including one in Seoul, South Korea. Eventually, the creators of the show hope to turn it into a television or radio series. The bubbly, theatrical nature of the SNL-like hosts makes this a feasible dream. “We’re like those college professors that run out of [material] at the end of class and make a ‘Jeopardy’ review game to kill time,” Graupmann said. “We [also] have these little segments, like with the ‘Serial Killers’ episode we played ‘Hot or Not’ ... Count Chocula was the winner.” Hardesty agrees that the dynamic, quirky nature of their project could foster further growth and possibly land them on a station such as HBO. “It’d be like Russell Simmons meets ‘The Muppet Show,’” he said.

TECH continues from PAGE 12 ments on the video’s page are any indication, local businesses and corporations alike are anticipating the ad’s launch later this year. “It’s your friend saying, ‘I did this and I want to tell you about it,’” says Phil, one of the engineers in the video (no last names are displayed). User comments on the video point out that “checking in” isn’t the same as approving, and “liking” isn’t the same as agreeing to promote a business. It is disingenuous for Facebook to turn their Places feature, which has let users track their friends’ lo-

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The Daily, the first iPad-only news publication, launches While AOL buying The Huffington Post for $315 million shook the news world this week, The Daily, the first news publication exclusively for the iPad,

launched with barely a whimper. The app, designed by Austin’s Chaotic Moon Studios, seamlessly works video, interactive content and other multimedia into articles that can be browsed via a news feed resembling a website or a carousel, like iTune’s Cover Flow browser. “It’s probably the best iPad newspaper/magazine/multimedia experience/whatever to date,” Gizmodo wrote in their review last week. iPad owners can access it for two weeks free. After the trial period, it costs 99-cents a week or $49.99 for a year’s subscription.

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by the game’s end; each carried a unique feel and purpose. In contrast, “Rearmed 2” is chock-full of so many perks, abilities and weapons that your arsenal feels overwhelming. You will grow to hate their presence, if only because they make menu management cumbersome. It’s unbelievable that with so many unused buttons (including the directional-pad) abilities and perks have to be chosen through a menu screen that pauses the action. I found myself constantly switching between weapons, via the controller’s triggers, to suit the right occasion and wish I could have done the same with the rest of the game’s offerings. In this sequel, bosses have become tests in patience, the soundtrack — once tuneful 8-bit remixes — has turned into dull dubstep, and the game’s story gets in the way of the action — it’s not charming, just irritable. When the game gives you a long spread to grapple across or a challenging area to traverse, it stands as the best of the series. The refined controls and jump give Spencer mobility and speed missing from previous iterations, but the poorly implemented menu, unreliable camera and inconsistent level design halt the momentum of what could have been a great game.

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12 LIFE

12

Life&Arts

Wednesday, February 9, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Amber Genuske, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Variety show excites audience with prose, performance artists LOCAL

By Madeleine Crum Editor’s Note: This is the fourth installment of a column exploring the literary world in Austin. A UT graduate student donned with glasses, a librarian-style updo and a focus on folklore and public culture presents a PowerPoint thoroughly outlining the issues of inequality in Rainbow Brite’s hometown, Rainbow Land. “Its beauty simply does not mask the socioeconomic problems that Rainbow Land has faced since becoming a nation-state in 1983,” she jests in deadpan, and the audience roars. Blurring the lines between hard facts and humorous fiction, this is just one installment of “The Encyclopedia Show,” a growing variety show and reading event in Austin. Hosted by Michael Graupmann and Ralph Hardesty, the series invites writers, poets, stand-up comedians and musicians to present their take on a monthly topic, such as “The Visible Spectrum of Color,” “Vice-Presidents,” or “Hockey.” Graupmann and Hardesty’s ver-

WHAT: “The Encyclopedia Show” WHERE: ND @ 501 Studios WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WEb: encyclopediashowaustin.com TICKETS: $6

sion of “The Encyclopedia Show” is a spin-off of the original, which began in Chicago. The goal of both locations is to foster a new performance community, “cultivating accidental knowledge,” according to their website. “A lot of great writers can be the dullest readers,” Hardesty said. “We want to create an environment that’s more fun, relaxed. We want them to open up. I think people respond better to that.” Though most presenters aim to amuse, for others, opening up means divulging personal, touching stories related to the topic. During the “Visible Spectrum of Light” edition, shortly after the anthropological analysis of Rainbow Land, communication studies specialist

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Ryan Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Michael Graupmann and Ralph Hardesty host the monthly “Encyclopedia Show,” a variety show that commissions local and touring artists to creatively present a verbal encyclopedia entry.

Photo Illustration by Fanny Trang | Daily Texan Staff

Likealittle.com allows students to write flirtacious, anonymous missed connection posts in hopes that they might rendezvous again.

Site opens realm of anonymous love by Danielle Wallace Daily Texan Staff

If it were not already obvious, lives are going digital. From Facebook to Twitter to Tumblr and beyond, the rapid sharing of thoughts, stories and selves has become a quick and easy substitute for day-to-day interaction. But with the recent boom of a website that startup-profiling blog TechCrunch reported to have hit 20 million page views in six weeks, networking trends may be hinting that even more than the social lives of college students are about to hit the web — so are our romantic ones. In October 2010, a site sprung up that has rapidly become a major source for online dating between students attending universities across America, with branches stretching out as far as Dublin: Likealittle. Founded by Stanford students Evan Reas, Shubham Mittal and Prasanna Sankaranarayanan, the site provides a platform for students to post anonymous com-

GAmE REvIEW

Bionic commando rearmed 2

pliments and messages to potential ing has become more prevalent in romantic partners in their vicinity. mainstream society, how effective are “We like to think of the site as a the promises of such sites, and what flirting-facilitator,” reads the compa- this could mean for the University’s ny’s description page on technology dating scene? database, Crunch“One of the Base. “The site’s biggest things purpose is to alabout online low you to comdating that has pliment and chat been happenabout your crushing in the last es around you or 20 years is that otherwise bemoan the stigma asyour missed ensociated with counters from it is gone,” said the safety of your Derek Kreatrusty screen.” ger, a UT HarWith thousands rington Faculof Facebook “likes” — Derek Kreager, Professor at Penn State ty Fellow and and a multitude of University an adolescent the Twitter-remisocial develniscent short posts opment proon the UT Ausfessor at Penn tin Likealittle page State Universialone, it is safe to ty. “It’s not seen say that the site has, to some degree, as something just for people who are already worked itself into the social desperate or deviant.” scene. But in a time when online datLikealittle is thorough in keep-

ing secret the identities of those who choose to post and comment on the website, through the use of unattributed posts as well as a random fruit name assigned to visitors during every session in which they view the site. A recently implemented chat bar on the bottom of the screen, however, allows the complimented and potential suitors to communicate and exchange contact information if they so wish. “The main reason that a site like this takes off and is used a lot is because it reduces the risk of rejection,” Kreager said. “If the person doesn’t reply or respond to your initiation of contact, you don’t necessarily feel like you’re rejected because the person may have never saw it, or you forgot about the post yourself.” While studies have shown that a majority of online dating users are often college graduates between the ages of 25 and 40, these numbers are often for people looking for serious

DiGiorno combines pizza, cookie treats into unhealthy eats

Users become unpaid agents in Facebook’s ad campaign

The main reason that a site like this takes off and is used a lot is because it reduces the risk of rejection.

by Christopher Nguyen Daily Texan Staff

Image courtesy of Capcom

Although “Bionic Commando Rearmed 2” includes an option to swing around with a friend, it is best played alone.

Retro game remake misses the jump by Allistair Pinsof Daily Texan Staff

The thrill of latching onto objects and swinging across chasms in video games never gets old. From “Super Metroid” to “LittleBigPlanet 2,” the grappling hook has proven to be a sure way to improve a sequel. In 1988, “Bionic Commando” stood out in arcades and on the Nintendo home entertainment system for replacing jumping with the ability to grapple across levels via a robotic arm. So, it’s hard to imagine the boardroom meeting that devised what has become “Bionic Commando Rearmed 2’s” defining characteristic: the ability to jump. The chiptune remixes of classic 8-bit anthems, 3-D face-lift and Saturday morning cartoon dialogue breathed much life into

Bionic Commando Rearmed 2 Fatshark

Genre: 2D action-platformer Platform: PS3, Xbox 360 For those who like: Super Castlevania IV, Contra and grappling hooks

Grade: C “Bionic Commando Rearmed” (2008), a remake of the Nintendo release. But behind these changes to the aesthetics of the Nintendo original, “Rearmed” stubbornly kept the elements that aged poorly. Pointless top-down shooter stages, an awkward level select screen, and repeating bosses made the 20th anniversary remake feel nonessential and dated.

By the time the player mastered the momentum and timing of the hook-arm, they did not lament the absence of a jump button. Nevertheless, its inclusion in this direct, download-only sequel does not ruin the series either. If anything gets in the way, it is the level and boss design.

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Pizza and cookies: Children at dinner tables across America are longingly dreaming about them while their parents nag them for the fiftieth time to eat their spinach or no Justin Bieber movie tickets for them. Adults with the taste buds of a five-year old, too, pine for the indulgent mix of fat and sugar that is pizza and cookies. Apparently sensing the profitability of this untapped market, DiGiorno, of frozen pizza fame, has answered the calls of children, lazy babysitters and junk food junkies with its latest in a line of frozen products: Pizza & Cookies. It’s a first aid kit for the hungry set. As its name seems to suggest, Pizza & Cookies features a foot-long pizza (available in Supreme, Four Cheese and Pepperoni) and 12 Nestlé Toll

READ

House chocolate chip cookie dough pieces in the same box. Why take those extra 100 steps between the frozen food aisle and refrigerated cookie dough when that time and effort could be better spent chowing down on a good ‘ole, all-American product? Though, note unfortunately that the mad masterminds at DiGiorno have yet to concoct frozen pizza and cookie dough that can be cooked in the oven in the same time and temperature, so there still exists the exertion it takes to replace the pizza with the cookies in the oven. Alas, stores in Austin have yet to start carrying the item. To simulate the experience of Pizza & Cookies as closely as possible, I bought a box of DiGiorno & Breadsticks along with a pack of refrigerated Nestlé Toll House chocolate chip cookie

pIZZA continues on pAGE 11 DiGiorno’s new creation for family meals, Pizza & Cookies, has the convenience of a oneaisle stop, but with the calories and laziness common in American’s appetites.

Photo Courtesy of DiGiorno

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C

NNECTED

By Allistair Pinsof

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a new column exploring news in technology, hardware and websites that affect students’ lives. Facebook’s Sponsored Stories ad unit turns users into unpaid spokespersons. Remember when you used Facebook’s Places feature to tell your friends you were at Starbucks? Remember when you lent your image to advertise Starbucks? In a video posted Jan. 25 on the marketing page, Facebook announced they are planning to make these two actions one and the same with their new Sponsored Stories ad integration. Page posts, “likes,” “checkins” and acON THE WEB: tions withTo check out the in custom new iPad app go to applications that show up dailytexanonin your news line.com feed can now be integrated into the ads your friends see, according to Mashable.com. An example shown in the marketing video shows a user “checking-in” at Starbucks. The post then shows up in a friend’s advertisement feed as a sponsored story. The advertisement is the friend’s original post along with the post’s comments and “likes” by other friends. Businesses will have to pay extra for this new ad type. If the com-

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The Daily Texan 2-9-11  

The Feb. 9, 2011 issue of The Daily Texan

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