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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

LONGHORN SHAKEUP

A GREAT SERIES OF TUBES

Mack Brown adds seven staff members to cope with disappointing 2010 season

Internet comprehension, literacy favors students as early as the second grade

TODAY Calendar K-12

The K-12 Educational Outreach Consortium will hold a brown bag luncheon for all campus entities that do outreach and programming for K-12 students. from noon-1 p.m. in the LBJ Library, Classroom A.

Seeing science

The Texas Advanced Computer Center presents a forum on how visualization data is changing the face of science at the AT&T Conference Center at 5:45 p.m.

Visual Arts Center unveils facility utilizing assembly line creativity

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

NEWS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 8 @thedailytexan

>> Breaking news, blogs and more: dailytexanonline.com

FACTORY OF IDEAS Tuesday, February 1, 2011

facebook.com/dailytexan

Constitutionality of health care reform challenged By Melissa Ayala Daily Texan Staff

A Florida district judge ruled the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act unconstitutional Monday because of its mandate requiring all Americans to purchase health insurance or face a penalty.

State attorney generals from 26 states, including Texas, filed a lawsuit shortly after President Barack Obama signed the law in March, which would require Americans to purchase health insurance by 2014. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott said if the law is upheld, it would open the door for the U.S. Congress to make other mandates.

“It looks like a brilliant decision,” Abbott said at a press conference Monday. Abbott said this is one step in the judicial process, and the federal government is expected to appeal the ruling. He anticipates the case to eventually reach the U.S. Supreme Court. “For the first time in American history, Congress created a requirement on all Americans

to go out and purchase a product,” Abbott said. “The judge saw through exactly what Congress was doing, struck down their actions, ending Obamacare across the country.” Roger Vinson, a U.S. district judge from Pensacola, Fla., wrote in his ruling the health care

LAWSUIT continues on PAGE 2

Defamatory flier causes discontent in activist group

SEVENTH HEAVEN TEXAS

A&M

Pub Run

By Ahsika Sanders Daily Texan Staff

The Paramount Theatre hosts a screening of “Run, Fat Boy, Run,” plus free beer and an optional 1 mile run down Congress Avenue. Tickets are $10. The event starts at 7:30 p.m.

A controversial flier depicting President William Powers Jr., and College of Liberal Arts Dean Randy Diehl as members of the Ku Klux Klan created a rift within student activist group The Students Speak. Several members of the organization created the flier last week without consent of the group in response to proposed cuts to the specialized ethnic and identity studies centers. There will be no administrative representation Tuesday at The Students Speak open forum to discuss the cuts because of insufficient notice and the flier passed out at last week’s question-and-answer session, the liberal arts deans said. Caitlin Eaves, a group member and religious studies senior, said the flier made her feel uncomfortable because it was inaccurate and did not represent the majority opinion. “For one, institutional racism and KKK terrorizing aren’t synonymous struggles, but the biggest problem was that there wasn’t consensus about the flier,” she said.

Tiny Furniture

South By Southwest offers a screening of “Tiny Furniture” at the Alamo Drafthouse Ritz. Tickets are $5 for students. The screening begins at 7 p.m.

Today in history In 1861

Texas seceded from the United States during the American Civil War.

FLIER continues on PAGE 10

Campus watch ‘Hello, occifer’

2100 block San Jacinto Blvd. A UT student was observed attempting to navigate through his navigational beacons, the sidewalk and curb. After missing his marks several times and ending up staggering in the street, the student was stopped. The officer detected a very strong odor of alcohol on the student’s breath and noted other signs of intoxication. The student informed the officer he had lost his ID card and was attempting to find it, he then changed his story and said he lost his debit card. His story changed a third time when he told the officer he had lost his phone. The student was taken into custody for Public Intoxication and was transported to Central Booking.

‘‘

Quote to note “We’re not going to continue to talk about 2005, when we won the national championship. We’re not going to talk about 2008, when we were third or 2009, when we were second. So we’re sure not going to talk about 2010. We are moving forward like it’s our first day.” — Mack Brown Texas head coach SPORTS PAGE 8

Texas guard J’Covan Brown drives to the basket for a layup during the Longhorns’ dismantling of Texas A&M in College Station. It was the first time since 2004 that Texas beat the Aggies on the road. Andrew Torrey Daily Texan Staff

Inside: Longhorns breeze past Aggies for seventh-straight win on page 7

Courtesy of The Student Speak

LBJ library director plans renovation to attract students By Marty McAndrews Daily Texan Staff

As one of his first major acts as director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, Mark Updegrove proposed renovations to the museum’s permanent exhibit to attract a wider and younger crowd. The renovation will update the museum’s permanent exhibit about former President Lyndon Baines Johnson to make it more interactive and relevant to students. The exhibit will incorporate computerized technology that was not available when it was originally installed. “We want people to leave the renovated library thinking that it’s state of the art,” Updegrove said. “We want them to believe that the experience they have here is on par with any experience at any library or any museum.” Updegrove, who became director after a career in media and as a presidential historian, took the position in October 2009. Anne Wheeler, LBJ Library and

Museum spokeswoman, said the renovations are firmly in the planning stages, without blueprints or a solidified budget to demonstrate what the renovations will look like and cost. However, Updegrove said the plan will cost approximately several million dollars and hopes the renovations will be completed by the Lady Bird Johnson Bicentennial in December 2012. “The exhibit hasn’t seen a marked change in over 20 years,” Updegrove said. “We want to make the president accessible to younger folks. What we want to do is to take a 21st century view of this president: looking at the accomplishments of LBJ through the lens of the present.” The National Archives, a federal organization responsible for historical preservation, built the LBJ Library on the UT campus in 1971. Although the library is on UT property, the National Archives

LIBRARY continues on PAGE 2

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

Government sophomore Robby Munez and members of campus GLBT organizations protested Chick-fil-A on Monday for its support of conservative political groups that will sponsor anti-gay marriage conferences.

Students protest Chick-fil-A sponsorship By Jody Serrano Daily Texan Staff

About a dozen protesters held signs in front of the Tower on Monday morning to demonstrate against fastfood chain Chick-fil-A’s sponsorship of a pro-“traditional family” organization, as well as its presence on campus.

Lauren Cozart, a women’s and gender studies senior, organized the event after reading about Chick-filA’s sponsorship of talks by the Pennsylvania Family Group, a conservative Christian organization that advocates traditional marriage. “I used to eat at Chick-fil-A, [and] other than being a Christian organi-

zation, I didn’t know anything about them,” said Cozart, who is openly gay. “It made me really mad because I like to be conscious of where my money goes.” Cozart said that Chick-fil-A’s status as a Christian corporation definitely played a role in their sponsorship.

PROTEST continues on PAGE 2


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2 NEWS

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

LIBRARY continues from PAGE 1 is responsible for the building’s upkeep. Kevin Hegarty, vice president of financial affairs and chief financial officer, said none of the funds for the renovation will come out of the UT budget, which is already strained. Updegrove said the fundraising body for the renovations is the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation, a nonprofit organization devoted exclusively to benefiting the LBJ Li-

brary and Museum and the LBJ School of Public Affairs. UT is not involved in raising the funds for the renovations, Updegrove said. The renovations will be handled by a Silver Springs, Md., design firm, but Updegrove said he hopes to collaborate with local architects to stimulate the local economy. “Times are tough, but because our economy has slowed, we shouldn’t put on hold projects that we deem important,” Updegrove said.

The Daily Texan

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lena Price Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Alsdorf, Aziza Musa, Audrey White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Melissa Ayala, Allison Kroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Ahsika Sanders Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Morgan, Austin Myers, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jake Rector, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Daniel Nuncio, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Heimsath Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Gerson, Danielle Villesana Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Gerald Rich Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allistair Pinsof, Maddie Crum, Francisco Marin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Anne Stroh, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Anderson Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy Lutz, Trey Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carolynn Cakabrese Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joshua Barajas Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Zimmerman Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janese Quitugua Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Katrina Tollin, Allison Harris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marty McAndrews, Jody Serano, Molly Moore Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melanie McDaniel, Patrick Yuen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brenna Cleeland, Ruben Mendoza Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danielle Wallace, Courtney Griffin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Suzanne Schulz, Marie-Louise Friedland Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristin Holcomb, Lili Honorato Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona

LAWSUIT continues from PAGE 1

law raises important issues about the constitutional role of the federal government. He wrote Congress did not have power under the Commerce Clause — which grants the federal government power to regulate interstate commerce — to pass the law. “In short, the defendants’ argument that people without health insurance are actively engaged in interstate commerce based on the purported “unique” features of the much broader health care market is neither factually convincing nor legally supportable,” Vinson wrote. In December, a federal district judge appointed under former President George W. Bush ruled the

law was unconstitutional. Two other federal district judges appointed under former President Bill Clinton upheld the constitutionality of the law. The rulings were split along party lines. “Regardless of how laudable its attempts may have been to accomplish these goals in passing the Act, Congress must operate within the bounds established by the Constitution,” Vinson wrote. “Because the individual mandate is unconstitutional and not severable, the entire Act must be declared void.” UT law professor Sanford Levinson said this ruling is not surprising because of the judges’ Republican party affiliation.

PROTEST continues from PAGE 1 “There are a lot of Christian companies and organizations that back and use the Bible to defend their anti-gay policies, which is really offensive to me because I am a Christian, myself,” Cozart said. Cozart praised UT’s stringent anti-discrimination policy, which protects students from discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. She said the University shouldn’t allow businesses to violate its non-discrimination policy on campus. In a statement released last Saturday by Chick-fil-A, President and COO Dan Cathy said that the com-

pany has no agenda against anyone. “While my family and I believe in the biblical definition of marriage, we respect and love anyone who disagrees,” Cathy wrote. “As a result, we will not champion any political agendas on marriage or family.” Cathy added that Chick-fil-A would continue to offer resources to support traditional marriages and family, as doing anything different would be inconsistent with company core values and biblical principles. Around noon, the demonstration moved from the Tower to the Chick-fil-A at the newly opened Student Activity Center.

The Daily Texan “That simply reflects the fact that the opposition [of the law] is led by conservative Republicans in the judiciary,” Levinson said. “It’s no big surprise. [Vinson] is a conservative Republican who has signaled his skepticism of the bill.” In a statement he released in response to the ruling, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said the law taxes and spends too much without improving health care. “Instead of growing government, we must build on the legislation I passed out of the Texas Senate in 2009 to create private sector alternatives to Obamacare and prevent its unconstitutional infringement on Texans,” he said.

“We came to demonstrate that this is a cause which the queer community does not support,” said radio-television-film senior Ben Kruger-Robbins, co-director of UT queer political activist group StandOut. “We’re trying to urge UT to step behind that effort.” Kruger-Robbins said he used to visit Chick-fil-A frequently but has since stopped going to the restaurant when he learned of Chick-filA’s position. “[Students] have to recognize that with the variety of restaurants on campus, there are other places that they can spend their money that don’t support repressive ideologies.”

The Plan II Honors Program presents The 2011 Julius and Suzan Glickman Centennial Lecture Advertising

Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford, Meagan Gribbin Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Daniel Ruszkiewkz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Josh Phipps, Selen Flores, Patti Zhang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Hall, Maryanne Lee, Ian Payne Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Broadcast Sales Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aubrey Rodriguez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

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with writer Buzz Bissinger, winner of the Pulitzer Prize

LIGHTS The critical state of sports today

7:30PM THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3 AMPHITHEATER OF THE AT&T CENTER, 1900 UNIVERSITY AVE. This lecture is free and open to the public, although seating may be limited. Call 512-471-5787 or e-mail mvalentine@mail.utexas.edu for info. The Un iv ersit y of Te x as at Aus t in

Through july 31

Volume 112, Number 137

s n o D i t h a P c i l n p e p A Op

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTION Because of an editing error, Monday’s page-ten photo caption of Texas swimmer Leah Gingrich should have said the photo was taken on Saturday afternoon.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low

High

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I dont care as long as we can print page one.

SKI SPRING BREAK 2011! breckenridge

Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin

20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price. FROM ONLY

plus t/s

at LSU Health Sciences Center

School of Public Health in New Orleans Fellowship/assistantship stipends are available to qualified fulltime students. Becoming Tennessee Williams With his plays The Glass Menagerie (1945) and A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), the American playwright Tennessee Williams (1911– 1983) reinvented the theater. This centenary exhibition explores the idea, act, and process of artistic creation, illuminating how Thomas Lanier Williams became Tennessee Williams.

Culture Unbound: Collecting in the Twenty-First Century This exhibition commemorates the Ransom Center’s tireless hunt for archives that will capture the imagination, invigorate scholarly research, and deepen our understanding of culture. Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/ransomcenter and become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ransomcenter.

Corner of 21st and Guadalupe Streets The University of Texas Campus Free admission www.hrc.utexas.edu 512-471-8944

The Epidemiology PhD program is designed primarily for those who seek academic and other careers involving teaching and/or research. Its curriculum includes advanced coursework in epidemiologic theory, analytic and statistical methods, study design, data interpretation and research and instructional experience. Deadline: March 1, 2011 The Community Health Sciences PhD program prepares students to conduct research and design and evaluate interventions that focus on the multiple determinants of health at the individual, social, and population levels. Graduates serve as university faculty and executives in local, state, and federal governments, industries, and NGOs. Deadline: March 15, 2011 If you are interested in solving real-world problems in medicine, biology and public health, then a PhD in Biostatistics may be for you. We are seeking motivated science majors with good math skills for Fall 2011 admission. Deadline: March 15, 2011

See http://publichealth.lsuhsc.edu/ for full details.

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1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453

TSM BOARD MEETING Friday Feb. 4, 2011 1 p.m. College of Communication (CMA) Dean Keeton and Whitis Avenue. LBJ Conference Room #5.160 2600 Whitis Ave.

Visitors Welcome We encourage any community member who has any kind of temporary or permanent disability to contact Texas Student Media beforehand so that appropriate accommodations can be made. Anyone is welcome to attend.


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Tuesday, February 1, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Austin Myers, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

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Illinois recognizes civil unions, joins dozen other states By Tammy Webber The Associated Press

Lefteris Pitarakis | Associated Press

Anti-government protesters offer their evening prayers in front of an Egyptian army tank, during a protest in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Monday. Opposition groups called for a million people to take to Cairo’s streets Tuesday to demand the removal of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

Egyptian military ensures peaceful protest By Hamza Hendawl & Maggie Michael The Associated Press

CAIRO — Egypt’s military promised Monday not to fire on any peaceful protests and recognized “the legitimacy of the people’s demands,” a sign army support for President Hosni Mubarak may be unraveling. Protesters planned a major escalation, calling for a million people to take to the streets to push Mubarak out of power. More than 10,000 people beat drums, played music and chanted slogans in Tahrir Square, which has

become ground zero of seven days of protests demanding the ouster of the 82-year-old president who has ruled with an authoritarian hand for nearly three decades. With the organizers’ calling for a march by one million people Tuesday, the vibe in the sprawling plaza — whose name in Arabic means “Liberation” — was intensifying with the feeling that the upheaval was nearing a decisive point. “He only needs a push,” was one of the most frequent chants, and one leaflet circulated by some protesters said it was time for the military to choose between Mubarak and the people.

The military statement, aired on state TV, was the strongest sign yet that the army was willing to let the protests continue and even grow as long as they remain peaceful, even if that leads to the fall of Mubarak. If the president, a former air force commander, loses the support of the military, it would likely be a fatal blow to his rule. For days, army tanks and troops have surrounded Tahrir Square, keeping the protests confined but doing nothing to stop people from joining. Military spokesman Ismail Etman said the army realizes “the legitimacy of the people’s demands.”

He said the military “has not and will not use force against the public” and underlined that the “the freedom of peaceful expression is guaranteed for everyone.” He added the caveats, however, that protesters should not commit “any act that destabilizes security of the country” or damage property. The official death toll from the crisis stood at 97, with thousands injured, but reports from witnesses across the country indicated the actual toll was far higher.

CHICAGO — Gov. Pat Quinn, saying it was a “day of history,” signed legislation Monday legalizing civil unions for gay and lesbian couples, making Illinois one of about a dozen states that extend significant legal protections to same-sex couples. About 1,000 people crowded into the Chicago Cultural Center to watch Quinn, a Democrat, sign the measure that supporters call a matter of basic fairness and opponents decry as a threat to the sanctity of traditional marriage. The law, which takes effect June 1, gives gay and lesbian couples official recognition from the state and many of the rights that accompany traditional marriage, including the power to decide medical treatment for an ailing partner and the right to inherit a partner’s property. Five states already allow civil unions or their equivalent, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Five other states and Washington, D.C., let gay couples marry outright, as do some countries, including Canada, South Africa and the Netherlands. Illinois law will continue to limit marriage to one man and one woman, and civil unions still are not recognized by the federal government. Chicago residents Amanda Barlow, 43, and Mimi Reynolds, 47, said they will hold a civil union ceremony this summer. The couple, who have 4- and 5-year-old boys and have been together 14 years,

had considered traveling to other states that allowed same-sex civil unions or marriage, “but I kept telling her ‘No, it’s going to happen here in Illinois,’” Barlow said. “For us to witness and see it happen and to realize that we’re both living our dreams . . . it just solidifies who we are as a family,” Barlow said after the bill-signing. “So I’m speechless because I feel like I’m living in a dream come true.” Opponents, including some religious and conservative groups, said the law is a step toward legalized same-sex marriage. “Marriage was not created by man or governments,” David E. Smith, executive director of the Illinois Family Institute, said Monday. “It is an institution created by God. Governments merely recognize its nature and importance.” Some hope civil unions are a step toward full marriage for gay and lesbian couples, although sponsors of the civil union bill have said they don’t plan to push for legalizing same-sex marriages, which have limited support. Cardinal Francis George and other Catholic leaders also vigorously fought passage of the law. The measure doesn’t require churches to recognize civil unions or perform any kind of ceremony, but critics fear it will lead to other requirements, such as including same-sex couples in adoption programs run by religious groups or granting benefits to employees’ partners. The legislation, sent to Quinn in December, passed 61-52 in the Illinois House and 32-24 in the Senate.

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR

DAILY TEXAN EDITOR QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Candidates must be registered students at The University of Texas at Austin in the semester the election is held. 2. Candidates must have a minimum grade point average of 2.50 on all work undertaken at The University. 3. Candidates must have: — Completed at least one semester as a permanent staff member of The Daily Texan in news, sports or on the copy desk. — Completed at least one semester as an issue staff member of The DailyTexan in an area other than the one covered above. — Completed J360 (Media Law) before taking office or demonstrate competency in media law as determined by the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees. — Obtained signatures from at least five members of the Texan staff supporting the candidate for editor. It is a goal of Texas Student Media and The Daily Texan to encourage staff to run for editor. It is preferable to have at least two certified candidates.

Any student desiring to run with one of the above qualifications waived, must complete a waiver form and present evidence supporting waiver. Waiver Forms available in HSM 3.304.

GENERAL PROVISIONS: 1. The editor shall be a registered student in accordance with UT institutional rules. The editor may take no more than 12 semester hours as an undergraduate or 9 semester hours as a graduate or law student, but no fewer than 3 semester hours, during each long term. The editor need not enroll for classes during the summer session. 2. The term of office shall be June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2012. 3. Any member of the Board of Operating Trustees of Texas Student Media who becomes an applicant for editor shall resign from the Board at the time he or she applies. 4. Any person who shall have served a regular full term as editor shall be ineligible for a second term.

The TSM Election is held concurrently with the Student Government Election.

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Applications must be picked up and returned to the Office of the Director of Texas Student Media, HSM 3.304, or you may download the application from our web site: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/media/texan/. The Board will certify applicants at their next meeting at 1 p.m. on Friday, February 4, 2011, in the College of Communication (CMA), LBJ Room #5.160, 2600 Whitis Avenue.

LEIGHTON MEESTER SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A VERTIGO ENTERTMUSIC AINMENT PRODUCTION “THE ROOMMATE” MINKA KELLY CAM GIGANDET ALPRODUCED Y MICHALKA DANNEEL HARRIS EXECUTIVE MUSIC FRANCES FISHER AND BIL Y ZANE SUPERVISION BY MIWRITTEN CHAEL FRIEDMAN BYDIRECTED JOHN FRIZZELL PRODUCERS BEAU MARKS SONNY MALLHI BY DOUG DAVISON AND ROY LEE BY CHRISTIAN E. CHRISTIANSEN BY SONNY MALLHI


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Tuesday, February 1, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Lauren Winchester, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

QUOTes TO NOTe:

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“We saved these monies to be used on a ‘rainy day.’ Most of us would agree this is one of those rainy days.” — State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Simonton, on the necessity of tapping into the $9.4 billion Rainy Day Fund, according to the San Antonio Express-News.

“[The situation in Egypt] shows what ordinary people are capable of doing when they demand democratic rights for themselves in protest of the conditions they live in.”

— Snehal Shingavi, a UT assistant English professor on the rebellion in Egypt, according to The Daily Texan.

“We can’t afford to give up the good fight until the day Roe v. Wade is nothing but a shameful footnote in our nation’s history books.”

— Perry on the “emergency” item requiring women seeking abortions to first receive a sonogram, as reported by the Texas Tribune.

“The government has no place in a doctor’s office.”

— Sara Cleveland, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Texas, rejecting the sonogram legislation, according to the Austin American-Statesman.

THe FIrINg lINe

Support concealed carry on campus

Have a little pride I would like to respond to Trey Scott’s Monday article, “Student spirit challenged by lack of ‘O-Zone’ seats.” First off, I would like to thank Mr. Scott for bringing to attention the fact that the student sections at Texas basketball games need some work, but the problem is not the seat locations or the Erwin Center but the students themselves. Sure, people were turned away for the last two games or relegated to the mezzanine, but where were all of these people the rest of the season? Where were you for Arkansas? Where were you for Texas State? Heck, we couldn’t even fill up the O-Zone for Oklahoma, one of our most hated rivals. Until students consistently show to games, nothing will change. I say this as a fifth-year student who’s been sitting in the front row of the south side of the O-Zone for the last three years. Even during Kevin Durant’s year it was bad, and he was one of the greatest college basketball players of all time. This also goes deeper than simply student attendance. We need more student participation. Standing with your arms crossed making no noise just doesn’t cut it. We need to create an environment suitable for a top-5 team. When the other team has the ball, jump around and make noise. It’s very simple. This Saturday, we play Texas Tech here in Austin. I would love to see the students get rowdy like we do down in the front, but I’m not getting my hopes up.

— Sean Quillman Aerospace engineering senior

Write for the Texan

By Kory Zipperer Daily Texan Guest Columnist

One of the most newsworthy pieces of legislation this session is the bill which would legalize concealed handguns on campus. Unfortunately, the discussion is rife with blatant misconceptions, red herrings and outright lies about what is at stake. The bill will permit any student, staff or faculty member who has a Texas Concealed Handgun License to carry firearms inside a campus building. Currently, licensees are allowed to carry almost anywhere off-campus (including the streets and sidewalks of a college campus, as long as they do not enter a building). To obtain a CHL, the applicant must complete a 10-hour course and pass a written test, a live-fire qualification test and both federal and state background checks, along with other requirements. Many argue the training and qualification standards are insufficient and concealed handgun licensees should be subjected to equal or greater training than law enforcement officers. The reason police officers spend so many hours training is simple: Their regimen consists of preparing for duties and responsibilities besides the use of lethal force, which constitutes a minor part of the complete curriculum. Additionally, the legal duties and limits for use of deadly force are completely different between police and CHL holders. A concealed handgun licens-

ee can only legally reveal his firearm and/ or use deadly force for self-preservation, as shown in Texas Penal Code Sections 9.31 and 9.32. There are many provisions and limits as to how a licensee must conduct himself or herself in a defensive situation, and they are outlined in the 10-hour CHL course. In an emergency situation, the duty of law enforcement is to run into the chaos, whereas a CHL holder is obligated to run away if possible. Licensees have no power to perform the duties of police, and you would be hard-pressed to find any incidents where a CHL holder ran around acting like a vigilante. It is also important to note that the livefire CHL qualification is nearly identical to the police qualification. Unfortunately, there can never be enough training to fully prepare for a deadly encounter no matter how rigid the requirements are, and anyone who claims otherwise is wrong. However, the Texas CHL requirements present a reasonable minimum standard of competency for citizens to effectively deal with the most common self-defense situations. In fact, the Texas CHL requirements are among the strictest in the nation. The primary purpose of the campus carry bill is not to serve as a deterrent or weapon against school shootings like Virginia Tech; it’s to help prevent law-abiding citizens from becoming victims. We all know that campus is a statistically safe place. Unfortunately, the area surrounding campus is a

different story. Those who live off-campus and must walk or bus through relatively unsafe areas in order to get to school will benefit greatly from this bill. The anti-carry lobbyists can skirt around the issue all they want, but they will never concede to the uncomfortable truth that “Gun Free Zones” are flawed by nature. While such imaginary borders make people feel safe, there is a distinct difference between feeling safe and actually being safe. Did a zero-tolerance weapons policy dissuade Colton Tooley from bringing his rifle into the PCL last semester? Anyone who was on campus Sept. 28th knows the answer to that question. While there is no magic solution to improving campus safety, campus carry provides members of the UT family with an option for individual protection while on campus. In support of this proposition, no peer reviewed study has found campus carry detrimental to public safety. If these conclusions aren’t enough, you can draw your own using many publicly-available government statistics on the subject, such as the DPS CHL conviction reports, university Clery Act crime reports and FBI Uniform Crime Reports. Perhaps if concerned citizens compared the campus crime rates between the 71 schools that permit campus carry and those that don’t, their ruffled feathers would be soothed a bit. Zipperer is a psychology senior.

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By you Daily Texan columnist

Have something to say? Say it in print — and to the entire campus. The Daily Texan Editorial Board is currently accepting applications for columnists and cartoonists. We’re looking for talented writers and artists to provide as much diversity of opinion as possible. Anyone and everyone is encouraged to apply. Writing for the Texan is a great way to get your voice heard. Our columnists’ and reporters’ work is often syndicated nationwide, and every issue of the Texan is a historical document archived at the Center for American History. Barack Obama may not be a frequent reader, but a copy of the Texan runs across UT President William Powers Jr.’s desk each day, and the opinions on this page have great potential to affect University policy. If interested, please come to the Texan office at 25th and Whitis streets to complete an application form and sign up for an interview time. If you have any additional questions, please contact Lauren Winchester at (512) 232-2212 or editor@dailytexanonline.com. You can be a Daily Texan columnist or cartoonist.

reCyCle Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

legalese Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.


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Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Training facility honors late ex-mayor By Tamir Kalifa Daily Texan Staff

Fifteen months after the death of Roy Butler, Austin’s first voter-elected mayor, Austin’s Public Safety Training Campus opened Monday morning in honor of his dedication to keeping Austin safe. Members of the Austin Fire Department, Austin Police Department and Austin-Travis County Emergency Medical Services joined Mayor Lee Leffingwell, Austin officials and Ann Butler, widow of the former mayor, to inaugurate the facilities by cutting yellow caution tape. “I remember hearing the vision of this campus to be a fullfledged higher education campus for public safety, literally like a public safety university,” said Mayor Pro Tem Mike Martinez, who was an Austin firefighter for 13 years. The expanded campus includes the Roy Butler Building, a 50,000sq. foot facility that houses a gym,

a weight room, classrooms and state-of-the-art computers and technology to serve the modern training demands of Austin’s emergency responders. With energy-efficient building infrastructure, city officials expect a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design from the U.S. Green Building Council. Other improvements to the 40acre campus include a 40,300sq. foot indoor shooting complex that replaced the previous outdoor range, a 3,350-sq. foot burn building, outdoor training facilities, a driving track, an emergency vehicle operating course and a SWAT obstacle course. The $20 million in additions, renovations and environmental considerations were funded by 2006 bond funds and emphasize what Leffingwell believes is “the city’s commitment to being the safest city in the nation.” As part of the Art in Public Places program, the City of Aus-

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Members of the Austin Police Department Honor Guard march into the opening ceremony for the new City of Austin Public Safety Training Campus, which includes an environmentally-friendly shooting range, training facilities and an outdoor art piece.

tin commissioned New York artist Chris Doyle to produce “Showershade,” an outdoor pavilion with silhouettes of training cadets cut out of the roof to create animated shadows during the day.

“Public safety is the cornerstone and foundation of a world class city,” Martinez said. “Without public safety, you don’t have education, you don’t have jobs, you don’t have quality of life.”

Academic success of minorities resides in families By Allison Harris Daily Texan Staff

Strong family and ethnic identification can motivate students from Latino and Asian immigrant backgrounds to try to succeed academically despite many challenges, said Andrew Fuligni, a University of California, Los Angeles researcher, in a speech Monday. The Department of Human Development and Family Sciences sponsored the event because the Latino and Asian populations are growing in the U.S., said Su Yeong Kim, UT assistant professor in the department. The Latino population increased from 12.5 to 15.1 percent of the total U.S. population between 2000 and 2009, according to the American Community Survey. The Asian population increased from 3.6 to

4.4 percent in the same period. She said this trend is particularly relevant in Texas. “Texas is one of the top six destinations for new immigrants, so we’re definitely impacted by the issues he talked about,” she said. Fuligni said children from immigrant backgrounds face challenges including economic distress, substandard schools, health care, cultural differences and negative stereotypes. He said these challenges could harm these children psychologically and reduce their resources. “If you are feeling as if you are being excluded or devalued, that’s perhaps one of the most threatening consequential social stressors that has significant implications for physical health, mental health and one’s ability to engage productively in institutions,” he said.

Fuligni said students from Chinese and Mexican backgrounds had a stronger identification with their ethnicity than their EuropeanAmerican counterparts across three generations. He said immigrants from Asian and Latin American backgrounds had stronger feelings of obligation to assist their families as adults and spent more time helping their families than their European-American counterparts, even when economic differences were controlled for. He said a high sense of family obligation was correlated with a stronger belief in the usefulness of education. However, strong family identification did not erase disparities in achievement and could create academic problems. He showed a diary entry from a 14-year-old Mexican-American student who had to watch her younger siblings and

was forced to do her homework the morning before class. “She still is doing her homework,” Fuligni said. “She’s still trying to make it work, but the question is, can she do that, how long can she keep doing that?” Cyndy Karras, a UT graduate student in human development and family sciences, said she attended the talk because she knew the department was considering hiring Fuligni. She said his research reflected her experiences as a Mexican-American. “I can understand what it’s like to have to juggle both being Mexican and American and how to input those two identities together,” she said. “I think it’s important to understand how youth from these [immigrant] backgrounds can excel academically and personally in face of challenges.”

NEWS BRIEFLY Former APD officer pleads guilty, faces four misdemeanor charges Former Austin Police Department Officer Leonardo Quintana pled guilty to drunk driving Monday, after his January 2010 arrest in Williamson County. The jury trial, set to begin Monday, did not take place after Quintana pled guilty to Williamson County prosecutors the same day. The sentencing is scheduled for March 7 and gives more time for preinvestigation into the case, Quintana’s DWI lawyer Jamie Balagia said. “We’ve cut a deal on plea bargain for one year of probation, a $400 fine and the standard condition of probation for a DWI — the judge will of course add any other additional requirements that will benefit the case,” Balagia said.

Quintana became a center of controversy after the May 2009 shooting of 18-year-old Nathaniel Sanders II. Quintana, who hasn’t consumed alcohol since his January arrest, attempted to go to APD for help when he realized the extent of his problem, Balagia said. Quintana faces four misdemeanor charges, including two counts of assault, one count of criminal trespass and one count of criminal mischief in two separate altercations with his former fiancee, Lori Noriega, who is also an APD officer. Pre-trial for these charges is scheduled to begin after the DWI sentencing. “We are looking for a good sentencing,” Balagia said. “Leonard would like to move forward with his life and resume his career as an Austin police officer.” — Allison Kroll


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Tuesday, February 1, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Will Anderson, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

SIDELINE

MEN’S BASKETBALL

TEXAS

NBA

TEXAS A&M

WIZARDS

Horns handle A&M second time around in easy road victory from field. In doing so, they did not allow A&M’s leading scorer Khris Middleton to score. COLLEGE STATION — As “One thing we tried to do is take the few Longhorn fans at Reed away the opposing team’s leadArena snuck down to seats di- ing scorer,” said Texas head coach rectly beRick Barnes. hind the Texas “When you bench, senior do that, you Gary Johnare going to son turned have to have around with a te am e f a hu g e s m i l e fort.” and responded The Agto the “ Texas gies were Fig ht” che ers unable to that echoed rally at any throughout p o i nt . T h e the arena. — Mark Turgeon, Texas A&M Head Coach f e w t i m e s The joy of that they did Johnson and score a field ot her s eniors goal, the Dogus BalLonghorns bay and Matt would imHi l l re s on at mediately go ed throughout the bench as the down court and score. No. 3 Longhorns (19-3, 7-0) fiJordan Hamilton, w ho was nally got over the hump and a l s o Te x a s’ l e a d i n g s c o r e r beat No. 16 Texas A&M (17- w it h 2 0 p oi nt s , w as resp on 4, 4-3) on the road for the first sible for guarding Middleton time since 2004. the majority of the game. The Longhorns did not trail “I said to myself, ‘I’m just going throughout the entire game as to come out here and try to guard they managed to outplay the Ag- him the hardest I ever guarded gies in every facet en route to a someone before,’” Hamilton said. 69-49 win. “And I did that tonight.” “I’ve been doing this 24 years, In addition, the Longhorns and I haven’t seen as many teams had strong defensive producas good as Texas,” said Texas tion from Hill, Hamilton, BalA&M head coach Mark Turgeon. bay and Alexis Wangmene, who “I thought they were fantastic.” helped Texas’ leading blocker Texas’ effort once again was Tristan Thompson combine for led on the defensive side of the all nine of Texas’ blocked shots. ball where the Longhorns held the Aggies to 30 percent shooting BLOWOUT continues on PAGE 8

Texas freshman forward Tristan Thompson soars for the ball during the Longhorn’s rout of Texas A&M, Monday in College Station. Thompson anchored the Texas defense, finishing with three of the team’s nine blocks to go along with his 10 points. Texas beat the Aggies by more than 20 points for the second time this season.

By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff

I’ve been doing this 24 years and I haven’t seen as many teams as good as Texas

MAVERICKS

LONGHORNS IN THE NBA D.J. AUGUSTIN, Point guard 20 points, 8 rebounds, 7 assists

NCAA LOUISVILLE

GEORGETOWN

WHAT TO WATCH Rockets @ Lakers

Date: Tuesday Time: 9:30 p.m. On air: FS Houston

Spurs @ Blazers

Andrew Torrey Daily Texan Staff

Date:: Tuesday Time: 9 p.m. On air: FS Southwest

Hill leads charge off bench, reserves secure win for another rout of Aggies By Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff

All the usual stars showed up for Texas on Monday night — Jordan Hamilton scored a game-high 20 points, Tristan Thompson added 10 points and five boards and Cory Joseph scored 11 — but for the Longhorns to win by 20, it took some atypical contributions from the team’s role players. Matt Hill, Jai Lucas, J’Covan Brown and Alexis Wangmene all logged significant minutes as other players sat with foul trouble. “We always trust our bench,” said start-

ing guard Dogus Balbay. “Tonight was one of those nights, you know, they came in and changed the game.” Hill was first off the bench in both halves. His first touch of the ball was a putback minutes into the game that he immediately followed up with a defensive rebound on the other end. “What Matt Hill does doesn’t really show up on the stat sheet,” Hamilton said. “He’s a great defender, and he’s a force inside.” Hill and fellow reserve forward Wangmene helped defend A&M’s David Loubeau, Ray Turner and Keith Davis inside after starters

Thompson and Gary Johnson were pulled for accumulating early fouls. “Matt Hill came in and rebounded his tail off,” Thompson said. “He was really impressive inside and gave their big men a tough time.” Hill also converted two field goals, including a mid-range jumper, an unusual shot for the 6-foot-10 post player. “When he hit the little jump shot in the lane,” said A&M head coach Mark Turgeon. “It was kind of their night.” The senior hadn’t played much in recent games — just 11 minutes against Missouri

on Saturday and three versus Oklahoma State on Jan. 26. But head coach Rick Barnes turned to him for relief and leadership on Monday and the senior responded with a season-high eight rebounds. “He’s one of those guys on the offensive end that just keeps things gong,” Barnes said about Hill. “But he came up with some big rebounds on the defensive end.” Lucas and Brown effectively ran the point when Balbay was out. Brown played 24 minutes, the most he’s played since a Jan. 22 win at

BENCH continues on PAGE 8

NBA DLEAGUE

Toros eye postseason run Former college teammates reunited with new acquisitions By Trey Scott Daily Texan Staff

Just a few minutes into Saturday’s game against New Mexico, and the Austin Toros were already down big. Maybe it was the early noon start time, or maybe the Toros were tired from the beating they took at the hands of the same New Mexico team on Thursday, a televised 93-104 loss. Whatever the cause, the Thunderbirds had already jumped out to a 10-0 lead against the Toros. But then, Austin began to claw their way back into it. Thanks to a couple of small scoring spurts, the Toros cut a 14-point deficit down to three at halftime. The second half started at the Cedar Park Center and saw much of the same — the Toros keeping it close. Close enough — and buoyed by 80-percent free throw shooting and a staunch defense — that a Kevin Palmer layup with 44 seconds left in the fourth quarter tied the game at 99. The game went into overtime, and the Toros managed to pull out a gutsy, come-from-behind 105-103 win. And that, you could say, has been the tale of their season so far. “For some reason, this team

likes to start slow and come from behind,” said forward Leo Lyons. “We’re still working on that, but we’re trying to fix it.” On Saturday, the Toros were able to close the gap. The rest of the season, however, has been a different story. They currently sit second-to-last in the West Conference standings at 12-15, just one year after advancing to the semifinals of the NBA Developmental League playoffs. But things are looking up. Half of the season remains to be played, and if Austin can avoid any more major tumbles (they lost six straight games earlier in the season), they could play their way into playoff contention. “I f e e l l i k e w e’re a t ou g h team, but sometimes we just have our laps es w here we’re not as sharp as we need to be,” said for ward L ance Thomas. “But I think we’re figuring it out. We realize that we have to give our best ever y game, so we’re making strides.” A couple of mid-season acquisitions should continue to give the team an extra boost. Lyons and guard Aubrey Coleman, the NCAA scoring leader a year ago at Houston, both came to the

TOROS continues on PAGE 8

Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan Staff

Austin Toros guard Aubrey Coleman passes the ball during the Toros’ 105-103 overtime victory over New Mexico Saturday. Coleman and former Houston teammate Marcus Cousin both play for Austin. By Nick Cremona Daily Texan Staff

As he waited for his former college roommate Marcus Cousin to finish showering after Saturday’s 105-103 overtime win against New Mexico, newly acquired Austin Toros guard Aubrey Coleman stressed the importance of their relationship. “When I got picked up, it was comforting to see that I knew someone here,” he said. “In this

league, guys are always moving from team to team, and it was nice to see a familiar face.” As Cousin stepped out of the locker room, the pair shared a smile and a handshake, congratulating each other on the win. Their friendship dates back two years, when the two roomed together as teammates at the University of Houston. Cousin and Coleman both landed with the Cougars after short stints with Seton Hall and

Southwest Mississippi Community College, respectively. The two played different roles while in college, with Coleman leading the team in scoring during his two years there, even winning an NCAA scoring title for the 2009-2010 season. Cousin helped out by leading the team in rebounds and being a presence down low.

COUGARS continues on PAGE 8

AP RANKINGS MEN’S BASKETBALL 1

Ohio State

2

Kansas

3

Texas

4

Pittsburgh

5

Duke

6

Connecticut

7

San Diego State

8

Brigham Young

9

Notre Dame

10

Kentucky

11

Purdue

12

Villanova

13

Georgetown

14

Missouri

15

Louisville

16

Texas A&M

17

Syracuse

18

Minnesota

19

Wisconsin

20

Washington

21

Arizona

22

Utah State

23

Vanderbilt

24

North Carolina

25

West Virginia

TRY OUT THE DAILY TEXAN JAN. 18  FEB. 3

We are currently hiring in all departments. Come sign up in the basement of HSM. Questions? E-mail us at managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com


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Tuesday, February 1, 2011

FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Brown, revamped coaching staff eager to return to gridiron with rebuilt Longhorn squad By Jon Parrett Daily Texan Staff

Superhero movies have been a growing trend in Hollywood the past decade. Some of the more popular franchises — Batman, Superman and Spiderman — have recently been rebooted; furnished with a fresh cast of actors, writers and directors to give the fans the best experience possible. This offseason, Texas went

through a similar process with its coaching staff. Seven new faces will join head coach Mack Brown on the sidelines next year. They will work to reboot a team that went 5-7 and to re-energize a fan base that wasn’t used to watching such mediocrity. “I told the players that I’d never been more excited and that I was starting over,” Brown said during a press conference Monday. “Thirteen years ago, I didn’t know what

BLOWOUT continues from PAGE 7

BENCH continues from PAGE 7

“Everyone’s following,” Thompson said. “Now when the scouting report comes in, it doesn’t just say, ‘Tristan Thompson blocks shots.’ You got to worry about all the big guys. That gets the offensive players scared that they might get their shots blocked.” Thoug h only a f reshman, Thompson calls himself the “captain” of blocking shots. “Someone has to lead the block party,” Thompson said. Despite the Longhorns success in limiting Big 12 opponents to new lows, there is an agreement amongst the team that there is room for improvement. “We got a long way to go,” Thompson said. “Even though we won this game by a large margin, we still got improvements to make and areas to get better at.” The Longhorns have become accustomed to winning by large margins. Texas has won its first seven conference games by an average of 18 points. “I told Rick [Barnes], if they keep working hard and getting better that they can win a national championship,” Turgeon said. “And I don’t say that very much.” The Longhorns have now defeated four ranked teams in its last five games. After a stretch of two games in three days, Texas finally has some time off before they face Texas Tech on Saturday. “I need to get some extra sleep and be a student for a little bit,” Thompson said.

Kansas, and scored eight points. Overall, the Texas reserves outscored their Aggie counterparts 19-10. “There wasn’t any drop off tonight,” Turgeon said. “I thought Wangmene played well and [Matt] Hill really played well.” Brown, Lucas and Wangmene all scored during a crucial 14-0 run by Texas halfway through the first period while three starters sat with foul trouble. The scoring streak helped Texas build a 25-point halftime lead, its largest of the season.

COUGARS

I was doing, and now I’ve got 13 years of experience with new energy and a restart.” Brown said he didn’t know what went wrong last season, only that it was his responsibility. “I do know that I felt like I had a hangover after the national championship game,” he said. “And I don’t know if I’ve ever taken a loss as hard. I think part of it was Colt McCoy, part of it was it’s just too hard to get there. I just pouted for

a while, and when you’re pouting cide where to play. The Longhorns were able to hold on to most of at 13-1, that’s pretty stupid.” their prospects amid the offseason turmoil that saw much turnover in Recruits sticking with Texas the football program. “For all those recruits to hang in Wednesday is national signing there with the media and opposing day, when high school recruits fi- coaches calling them, talking about nalize their decisions on where all the negatives of staff change — to play. Texas already has one of they’ve hung in there for Texas,” the top-rated recruiting classes, Brown said. “They trusted my staff and three of the top-five rated re- and I to hire the right guys, and cruits in the nation have yet to de- most of them didn’t even waiver.” A&M fans wave game day issues of the school’s paper The Battallion to intimidate UT’s team as they come on the court. Despite such tactics, UT pulled off a 69-49 victory over the Aggies.

Andrew Torrey Daily Texan Staff

continues from PAGE 7

“He was king out there,” Cousin said of Coleman. “I was just trying to crash the boards and get what I could.” They provided an effective onetwo punch, with Cousin controlling the paint and erasing opponent’s shots, while Coleman would either drive to the basket or drain open looks. In all of their time together, the two have meshed as friends on and off the court. “We know each other’s moves,” Coleman said. “I know he’s going to go inside and fight for position, and I can look for him to screen for me, too, so I can get open.”

They share a rare connection in the NBA Developmental League, which is full of journeymen and rehabbing big-leaguers. “[Coleman] is a driver, and I know he likes to shoot, so we help each other out a lot,” Cousin said. “It’s easy for us to think ahead and figure out what the other is going to do.” Coleman and Cousin also became close with each other’s families while they played at Houston. Coleman’s family was merely minutes away in the Fort Bend area, while Cousin’s mother, Toni, visited regularly from Cousin’s hometown of Baltimore, Md.

Outstanding Student and Cactus Goodfellow Awards The Cactus Yearbook is soliciting nominations for their Outstanding Student and Cactus Goodfellow Awards. For your convenience, we have placed the nomination forms on the Cactus web page: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/media/cactus/ All rules and instructions are included, so all you have to do is either print the nomination form or pick up one at the William Randolph Hearst Building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Avenue, Room 3.304.

Toni Cousin, along with her husband Marcus Sr., were in attendance Saturday, sitting right behind the Toros bench and occasionally offering praise or instruction to the two. “They did everything together in college,” she said. “I would come and stay with them for three weeks at a time, and I can’t tell you how much banana pudding I made for those boys. Both of them have really big hearts and are great kids.” Now that the two friends are back on the same team, they are hoping to build on the rapport they shared in college. Coleman and Cousin have both quickly become key contributors for the Toros, each averaging around 15 points

a contest. Cousin is a force in the paint, grabbing timely rebounds and making huge defensive plays, like his block on New Mexico’s final shot attempt with two seconds left in regulation over the weekend. On the other hand, Coleman is learning that he can make an impact in the game with his new role, which sees him coming off the bench and providing a spark. “I had to do all the scoring in college,” he said. “I’m still new to this team, so I have to find my spot.” As the pair walked off to meet Cousin’s family for lunch, it was apparent that their relationship was deeper than just playing basketball together. And with the two reunited, it has no signs of diminishing.

Texas had an awful year in 2010, but it’s now 2011 and in order to look forward it cannot look to its past. “We’re not going to continue to talk about 2005, when we won the national championship,” Brown said. “We’re not going to talk about 2008, when we were third or 2009, when we were second. So we’re sure not going to talk about 2010. We are moving forward like it’s our first day.”

TOROS continues from PAGE 7 team in early January after stints overseas. Both have been upgrades for the Toros, as Coleman is scoring 16 points per game and Lyons is displaying the wellrounded overall game that got him noticed in college at Missouri, averaging 10 points and nearly six rebounds per contest. But both have had to make adjustments to fit in with their new team, learning the schemes and fitting in to their expected roles. “I’ve been learning on the fly, trying to get used to the new system,” Coleman said. “In college, they ran the plays through me and now I’m coming off the bench. I don’t just worry about scoring now. I have to play defense and rebound and do the little things to help the team win.” Head coach Brad Jones has been able to find a nice rotation on a team stacked with young and improving players. Lance Thomas, a NCAA champion last year at Duke, has put in hours of work on his jump shot and continues to improve. Starting center Marcus Cousin might be the most NBA-ready player on the team, averaging almost 15 points and nine rebounds per game. Point guard Carldell Johnson, a fan favorite and Toros veteran of four years, paces the team with six assists per game. The Toros have their eyes on the playoffs. The climb will be steep, but they’re used to that.

TEXAS STUDENT MEDIA BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPLY THIS SEMESTER The Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has an opening for four student board members. One student from the College of Communication (2-year term) and one for a 1-year, unexpired term. There are also two student At-Large positions which are 2-year terms from June 2011 to May 2013.

This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States. Your job as a board member?

• Adopt annual budget • Review monthly income and expenses • Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Texas Travesty and Cactus yearbook editors, The Daily Texan managing editor • Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for The Daily Texan editor • Review major purchase requests • Time commitment? About five hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work).

Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/board/ The Board will certify applicants at their next meeting at 1 p.m. on Friday, February 4, 2011, in the College of Communication (CMA), LBJ Room #5.160, 2600 Whitis Avenue.

Deadline is noon on Tuesday, February 1, 2011.

The deadline for nominations is Feb. 25th. Send us your applications today! If you have any questions, please call 471-1084 for more information. Recognizing extraordinary UT students for over 75 years.

Brown focused solely on 2011

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9 COMICS

COMICS 9

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

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FLIER continues from PAGE 1 Eaves said the group’s diversity of ideas are much needed and appreciated, but members must be able to understand each other and their beliefs. “We need the organizers who will create a mission statement, but we also need the sit-ins and the walk-outs,” she said. “Most importantly, we need mutual respect for each other within our movement.” The group’s Facebook page, intended to be a public channel of conversation for members and interested students, was the medium for a series of heated exchanges between group members. The flier was one of many issues concerning activism the group disagreed on, including means of protest and communication. Tatiana Young, a women’s and gender studies graduate student and member of the organization, said the Facebook disagreement was a teachable moment that everyone in the organization could learn from. “It has made us sit down and hammer out some organizational stuff and to be mindful of the challenges of organizing,” Young said. “We’ve restructured TSS to work more as a community assembly and to work on a modified consensus.” Young said although the flier

For

was divisive, she does not believe that is the sole reason the liberal arts deans are refusing to attend the forum. Young said even if there was no flier, she doesn’t think Associate Dean Richard Flores would have attended. Leticia Silva, a Latin American studies senior and member of the organization, said she did not feel the cartoon was as controversial as it was made out to be because it was intended to make students think. “It’s a political cartoon, it’s supposed to be thought-provoking,” Silva said. “Maybe they don’t go out in the streets wearing white hoods, but they are still affecting people of color in a real way.” Although College of Liberal Arts administrators will not be present at the forum Tuesday, Diehl said he is committed to having student input as he considers the budget cut proposal. “As I make my decisions about the college budget, I will continue to meet with registered student organizations and leaders who have demonstrated a willingness to have a serious and respectful discussion,” Diehl said. “They are an important part of this consultative process.” Diehl did not mention the flier, and Powers could not be reached for comment.

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Computer literacy is key, professor urges Reading comprehension styles must change to meet future Internet growth By Molly Moore Daily Texan Staff

Emphasis should be placed on online, not offline, reading comprehension, said an education professor who specializes in computer literacy. Early education in Internet literacy may hold the key to maintaining the United States’ standing as a global power, educators learned at a lecture during the 2011 Texas Association of School Administrators Midwinter Conference on Monday. Donald J. Leu, education professor at the University of Connecticut, focused on the need for students to be efficient at solving problems through Internet use, a project he said should begin as early as second grade, when students are first introduced to reading comprehension. “Students do more reading online than they do offline these days, so it follows that we would change our curriculum to reflect that,” Leu said. Teachers should teach skills such as building websites, differentiating between reliable and possibly misleading search results and engaging students with their peers on a global level, Leu said. But before students can connect to their peers worldwide, teachers must first need to learn basic Internet literacy skills. To do this, Leu recommended his own initiative, the Internet Reciprocal Teaching Study. The

Photo illustration by Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

Donald J. Leu, University of Connecticut education professor, explained that higher emphasis needs to be placed on Internet literacy in early education as well as computer literacy amongst educators.

study is a two-month program that takes 100 educators through the ins and outs of computer literacy. “I was glad to hear him speak about educating teachers about c omputer us e,” s aid L ind a Crownover, the executive director of curriculum and instruction for the Weatherford school district. “How long it takes for teachers to become proficient in leading classrooms in Internet literacy has been our biggest challenge.” Along with a strong educating force, Leu suggests every student should have a laptop. Shelly Blank, a counselor at Westlake High School, said she was skep-

tical of this policy, citing recent talks about budget cuts in public education. “It would of course be nice to be able to have a 1-1 laptop ratio in schools, but it hardly seems like a feasible goal, especially the way spending is being discussed these days,” she said. According to a set of recommendations from the Legislative Budget Board — a joint legislative committee that recommends funding for state agencies — the state could cut up to $10 billion from public education funding for the next biennium. But even if teachers have the information and tools, their pri-

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mary job is to prepare students for assessment testing, Leu said. And although computer literacy is included in what English teachers should cover in preparation for the TEKS test, the state has yet to include any measure of comprehension within the test itself. Still, the interest in focusing on Internet mobility remains strong. “It’s worth it, just to see kids be able to reach out to countries where they couldn’t before due to language barriers,” Crownover said. “The Internet has changed that, connecting students intellectually as well as socially.”

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Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Critically acclaimed album gets synthesized overhaul HUMAN continues from PAGE 12 13 tracks with Scott-Heron’s trademark slurring and half-mumbled ruminations on life coupled with Smith’s masterful production. We’re New Here is essentially what I’m New Here would have sounded if The xx and Scott-Heron had collaborated in the first place: a smoky, urban pastiche of dubstepinformed synths-and-beats. Tracks such as “Running” and “NY Is Killing Me” are indicative of the latest wave of dubstep; gone are the wonky bass lines and lowfrequency oscillations that typified artists such as Rusko and BAR9, and in their place are minimal — but no less effective — manipulations of negative space between beats. Squishy bass and understated snare rolls are omnipresent throughout the album. Album opener “I’m New Here” recalls the spaced-out sound of Animal Collective’s 2009 opus

By Francisco Marin Daily Texan Staff

Nearly a year ago, American musician and spoken-word poet Gil Scott-Heron released I’m New Here, his first full-length album in 16 years. Reflective, intense and burning with Scott-Heron’s moody incantations about the state of the world, the album was well received by critics and heralded as a new direction in Scott-Heron’s art. Although Scott-Heron’s work in his earlier releases bordered on the frenetic sonics of acid jazz and protorap, the latest album ventured into new territory — one where sparse, minimalist electronic beats provided the backdrop. Fast-forward to a year later: Jamie Smith, the sonic architect of the wildly popular band The xx, wants to remix Scott-Heron’s album. The result is astonishing —

“We’re New Here”

Gil Scott-Heron and Jamie xx Genre: Alternative, Soul-trance Tracks: 13 For those who like: Four Tet, The xx, MF Doom

Grade: AMerriweather Post Pavilion for two long minutes before jumping headfirst into a pool of swirling synth, drawn-out bass drops and pitchbent vocals punctuating throughout the song. Songs such as “My Cloud” are soft electronic lullabies where Scott-Heron sing-speaks along to Smith’s warm, fuzzy backdrop of ambient electro and recalls Dntl or even Boards of Canada. For the casual electronic music fan, this album might serve

as a perfect introduction to the world of post-dubstep — not as wild as the dubstep currently being served up at house parties and not as alienating as dubstep from the earlier part of the last decade, where 2-step and breakbeat played a bigger role in tracks than the dub itself. But for the initiated, this album is a precursor for things to come — a natural evolution in the sound of electronic music.

Band blends epic imagery with soulful style By Marie-Louise Friedland Daily Texan Staff

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like outbursts) or even be seen by anyone but her new housemates. Furthermore, parts of the first episode’s script were painfully similar to that of the original. The cast and crew, however, emphasized in interviews on the Syfy channel’s website that this version will deviate from the original. Huntington even states that he has refrained from watching any of the original to help ensure that he develops Josh independently. Efforts to recreate the fast-paced sarcasm and humor of the original have had moments of success in the first few episodes, but many of the attempts by the actors to show the pain of their characters seem contrived. The 13 episodes Syfy is planning to air for the first season give the show time to sort out these kinks that stand as potential setbacks to an otherwise promising take on the rich potential of the original.

TUNES continues from PAGE 12 support. Tickets will be available beginning this Thursday at Waterloo Records or at ACL-live.com

Daniel Johnston and his “Infinite” comic book

If you’re one of the uninitiated, I’ll let you in on a not-so-secret secret: That strange frog creature painted on the side of Crave at the corner of 21st and Guadalupe streets was painted in 1993 by legendary singON THE WEB: er-s ong wr itDonate to the er Daniel Johnproject ston. Johnston played an im@ http://j.mp/ promptu set for DT-Johnston. dozens of fans there last Saturday, and now he’s looking to his fans to help fund his next project, the “Infinite Comic Book of Musical Greatness.” The response has been more than overwhelming: In only a week, 308 fans pledged $19,384 to his Kickstarter.com fundraising page.

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harmonies. Their singles, “Down by the Water” and “Don’t Carry It All”, keep things light, breezy and rocking, never sacrificing creativity for simplicity. “The King is Dead” flexes The Decemberists’ musical talents without making listeners reach for a dictionary because of their elaborate lyrics. In this album, you can connect with the imagery rather than strain to conceive their intricate 1 worlds. Unlike their previous work, this one tugs at your heart, not just your imagination.

sche, impressed parents and teachers alike with his academic prowess and thrived on manipulating those who cared for him the most through the power that his good looks and wit lent him. The U.S. Tony is neither likable nor a considerable threat. He’s the popped-collar, loudmouth that you ignored in high school — defined solely by his sexual appetite. Each character has been stripped down to their most reprehensible traits in similar ways. Sid, the bumbling virgin with a good heart, has transformed into Stanley, a hopeless pervert. The amount of cleavage on display is the only thing consistent with Michelle. The rest of the cast don’t fare much better, forming a troupe of go-nowhere, benothing party animals. The problem isn’t that there are no good, inexperienced actors or writers in America. The problem is that MTV is out of touch.

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problem comes when the actors have to speak lines that don’t come from the minds of British youth but instead from a boardroom of out-of-touch MTV producers, who would sooner fabricate teenage culture than hire a staff of young writers who live in it. In the U.S. debut, the characters have embraced only the ugliest, vainest characteristics of their U.K. counterparts. Tony, Sid (Tony’s best friend and verbal punching bag), Michelle (Tony’s airheaded girlfriend) and the rest of the cast of the U.K. series were complex characters with fears, passions and dreams that weren’t immediately unveiled upon their introduction. Each episode of the series puts the magnifying glass on each character’s personal life. These are teenagers as unbelievable as they are vapid. Tony, in the original, was a conniving prick who read Nietz-

The Decemberists

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SKINS continues from PAGE 12

“The King is Dead”

Recorded in a barn to give it that stripped-down sound, The Decemberists’ latest album, The King is Dead, is a departure in all the right directions. The Portland-based band sheds their ties to the United Kingdom to rediscover their American roots in this album, focusing on the sounds and landscapes of traditional American folk music. Their previous albums, such as Castaways and Cutouts and The Hazards of Love, harken back to a darker, dingier time in the back-alleys of Sweeney Todd’s Bleecker Street with elaborate orchestral, almost operatic, instrumentation and lyrics. But singer Colin Meloy has not lost his distinct, singsong, narratoresque voice and neither do the lyrics skimp on conjuring up imagery of fantastical stories. The main difference is that now he’s opted for more traditional American pastoral settings, rather than man-eating

leading roles. The male leads seem well suited for their characters; Sam Witwer lends a tortured guilt-ridden nature to the vampire Aidan, strongly reminiscent of his previous role on “Smallville” as another medic with a murderous secret. Sam Huntington, who made his acting debut as extremely boyish and somewhat naive Mimi-Siku in “Jungle 2 Jungle” alongside Tim Allen, creates a fittingly quirky persona for Josh the werewolf, which expands upon the morally pure British counterpart who struggles against his vicious other side. Less can be said of Sally, played by Meaghan Rath. While Josh and Aidan go about making new relationships with humans, her character is reduced to a spectre still unable to leave the boundaries of the house, move or affect the objects around her (aside from the occasional uncontrolled poltergeist-

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12 LIFE

12

LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, February 1, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Amber Genuske, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexanonline@gmail.com

Artist’s assembly line exhibit draws in audience participation By Suzanne Schulz Daily Texan Staff

The idea of a factory producing art is not new. Andy Warhol mass-produced silk screens and lithographs in his 1960s New York studio, “The Factory,” famous for its connection to musicians and downtown divas. Like Warhol’s studio, Los Angeles artist Amanda Ross-Ho’s “UN TITLED NOTHING FACTORY” — this spring’s headlining show at UT’s Visual Arts Center — uses assembly line techniques. But here, students and curious members of the public play an active part in the artistic environment. The show launched Friday night and gallery-goers were willing to experiment. Starting off slow, about an hour into the evening the trio of activities — paper-making, ceramic vessel molding and canvas stretching — were underway beneath the two-story ceiling of the gallery. Work tables with tubs of paper pulp, kitchen blenders, wooden stretchers and slabs of clay transformed the place into a buzzing factory of production. Transforming the center’s main gallery into a workspace, students and the public can stretch blank canvases over wooden stretchers, mold basic ceramic vessels and produce handmade paper from recycled paper. She describes this as participation in the production of negative space — the empty space surrounding a figure or object in a work of art. Once finished, the products will be distributed throughout the gallery. Over the next couple of weeks, “UNTITLED NOTHING FAC TORY” will crystallize into a static installation that will remain on view at the center until mid-March. Ross-Ho will be present in the gallery during museum hours to guide visitors through demonstrations and anticipates a good degree of social interaction. Saturday, Feb. 5 is set aside as an “Invitation to Participate.” On Friday, Feb. 11, the final day that Ross-

Bands to play with big-name breakthroughs tote Austin ties

Lizzie Chen | Daily Texan Staff

Marsha Hendrix, along with second graders Lisa Hendrix and Samantha Wilson, discover how to make paper at Amanda Ross-Ho’s on-site exhibition, UNTITLED NOTHING FACTORY, which invites the public to examine the ongoing process of creative expression.

Ho will be on-site, there will be a reception and discussion by the artist. This will be the “opening” of the finished piece and a chance to witness the results of the collaboration between the artist and the public. As the objects created by participants accumulate and alter the landscape over time, the gallery will be worth visiting multiple times just to see how the piece develops. Ross-Ho describes the work as

organic — growing naturally out of its environment. “I am interested in leaving holes in the process, to release control, while being still incredibly controlling,” Ross-Ho explained. “[This paradox] is the work of the artist. Structure is important, but I am also interested in the unknown, in what limits people are interested in testing,” Ross-Ho was invited for this

show as part of the center’s mission to program more interactive works, said Visual Arts Center director Jade Walker. Walker also found in Ross-Ho an artist with past experience in interactive works, who also worked in a textile factory in the early ’90s and an open, approachable attitude toward working with her audience. In the past, she has exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the 2008

Whitney Biennial, a contemporary art show in New York. Ross-Ho is known for including residues of the creative process in her finished work — seen in the worked-over walls from her L.A. studio into museum shows in Los Angeles and Chicago. In 2009, she and participants created and deconstructed an enormous wall painting at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.

WHAT: Amanda RossHo’s “UNTITLED NOTHING FACTORY” WHERE: Vaulted Gallery at UT Visual Arts Center, 23rd and Trinity streets WHEN: Through March 12, Tuesday-Thursday 10 a.m. -7 p.m., Friday & Saturday 11 a.m.5 p.m.

Prepare your British accents, we have more UK TV ‘Skins’ comes to MTV: stripped to its reprehensible and vain core TV TUESDAY By Allistair Pinsof

By Francisco Marin

Yann Tiersen + Mother Falcon It wasn’t until Yann Tiersen scored “Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain” — also known as “Amélie” — in 2001 that the French composer received widespread acclaim for his minimalist folk music. Now, with six fulllength albums and a slew of sound tracks, collaborations and EPs under his ON THE WEB: belt, Tiersen has never been betTickets will ter. It makes be available sense that one of Austin’s best @MohawkAustin. up-and-coming com bands, the chamber pop group Mother Falcon, would be paired with him for Thursday night’s show at the Mohawk. Both acts have a refined taste of the somber and the ecstatic, with songs that harken back to a different time and a different place. Doors open at 8 p.m. at the Mohawk and tickets are available at MohawkAustin.com.

Devo makes good on its Austin promise Fun Fun Fun Fest last November, like all previous Fun Fest festivals before it, set the bar a little higher for headliners. Unfortunately, Devo, one of the most anticipated acts headlining the festival, was forced to cancel their appearance after lead guitarist and vocalist Bob Mothersbaugh injured his hand. The band, however, is making good on its promise to play in Austin: On March 28, Devo will play for Austin City Limits live at Moody Theater, with local electronic mavens The Octopus Project for

TUNES continues on PAGE 11

Courtesy of MTV

The U.S. version of the popular British show “Skins” has caused controversy with critics because of its racy plot lines and discontent among fans of the original.

Beyond the indie soundtrack, cast of inexperienced but nonetheless compelling actors and experimental directing, it is the collection of young, clever writers — most are barely out of high school — that has given British teen drama “Skins” its identity and fan base. After being broadcast on BBC America and streamed on Netflix, the show found a new fan base overseas. MTV noticed. The producers behind MTV series such as “The Hills” and “16 and Pregnant” took it upon themselves to Americanize a series deeply steeped in British slang and culture. Now, we must differentiate by calling it

“U.S. Skins.” Without the context of British slang, the name summons an image of a grungy, sleazy strip club rather than the rolling paper for a joint — one of the original meanings behind the show’s namesake. The first episode of the U.S. series is a near identical remake of the original U.K. pilot, give or take a couple of outlandish scenes placed for comedic effect. In both versions, we open with a shot of Tony, an arrogant and manipulative, but nonetheless beloved, high school student. He gets out of bed to distract his red-faced, shouting father as his younger sister sneaks into the house after a night of partying. It’s a faithful recreation of a memorable opening. The

SKINS continues on PAGE 11

Supernatural cast prove it’s not easy ‘Being Human’ TV TUESDAY

By Danielle Walllace

Reincarnations of shows from across the pond have been making their mark on American television for decades, from “All in the Family” to “The Office.” But this year, a whole new wave of imported British shows are invading the U.S. as U.K.inspired productions permeate the American television scene. MTV’s remake of the provocative teen drama “Skins” has taken the spotlight — and the heat — in much of the British-turnedAmerican debate, but another refreshed version of a series still on air in the U.K. is itching for attention: “Being Human.” Centered around a household of three supernatural roommates struggling to hold on to a connection with

their humanity and lead normal lives, the Syfy channel remake appears, at a glance, to be an attempt by another company looking to cash in on the recent vampire trend. The reality is, however, that the characters in “Being Human,” from the very beginning, delve much deeper into the potential symbolism behind vampires, werewolves and ghosts than the glittering shells of those in the “Twilight” saga. The symbolic clash between morality and animalistic urges that such monster lore has to offer is explored in a thoroughly entertaining and involved fashion. Additionally, the British original gained much of its large fan following from its sharp, quick-paced humor and dark, emotional undertones presented by a talented cast of actors. The Syfy version hasn’t deviated from following in the footsteps of its

British counterpart. The first episode, which was split into two parts for the show’s premiere, introduces paranormal brosfor-life Josh, a werewolf, and Aidan, a vampire, who are still adjusting to life as they work side-by-side at a regular Boston hospital. Aidan struggles against his urge to feed on the people around him as Josh — who abandoned his family in the face of his dangerous new “wild side” — becomes even more of an outsider than his former quirky, somewhat neurotic human self. Proposing a plan to “keep each other clean” by living together, the two move into a well-worn house haunted by the ghost of the landlord’s recently deceased fiancee, Sally. Unlike in the British series, however, the three aren’t already friends — only Josh and Aidan have a connection from the start. As a result, Sally is brought in as what feels like

Courtesy of Syfy Channel

Aidan, played by Sam Witwer, gives into his inner vampiric temptations with a prostitute, despite his struggle to be a normal human in the Syfy Channel’s latest remake of a British series, “Being Human.”

more of a supporting character to accompany their bromance. That being said, this remake of the series is truly refreshing. The special effects have been significantly stepped up and the shots and de-

sign of the show are cleaner, creating an appealing cinematic style that extends to the characters themselves, as a trio of attractive actors fill the

HUMAN continues on PAGE 11


The Daily Texan 2-1-2011