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SPORTS PAGE 7

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

Devotees compete to become the best ‘Street Fighter’

Volleyball head coach makes plea to fill seats LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

Students invest despite the recession

THE DAILY TEXAN Tuesday, December 7, 2010

TODAY Calendar Science and technology Alfred Gilman, the chief scientific officer at the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, will talk about the challenges of funding and developing cancer research on the state level. AT&T Conference Center, 1900 University, Amphitheater, Room 204. 5:45 7:45 p.m. Free, RSVP required.

Qrank! Live Jo’s Coffee House hosts a night of competition for players of the popular trivia game. 7 - 9 p.m.

K-12 education outreach The UT K-12 Educational Outreach Consortium will host a brown bag luncheon for all University programs that provide support or training for K-12 instructors. LBJ Library, Sid Richardson Hall, Classroom A. Noon - 1 p.m.

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Brown confirms resignation of three UT coaches By Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff Head coach Mack Brown put an end to speculation Monday with an e-mailed statement announcing the resignation of embattled offensive coordinator Greg Davis and two other Texas coaches. “I’ve had a great 13 years here and enjoyed every minute of it,” Davis said.

Davis came to Texas with Brown in 1998 and was part of the school’s record nine consecutive 10-win seasons from 2001 to 2009. He drew criticism this year for running an offense that finished No. 59 in the country in total yardage, good enough for a spot between Central Florida and Duke. Texas went 5-7, its only losing season under Brown and first since 1997, and will

not appear in the postseason. Offensive line coach Mac McWhorter and defensive line coach Mike Tolleson also announced their retirements from coaching. McWhorter produced five current NFL players and two collegiate All-Americans during his nine years in Austin. Tolleson coached current pros Lamarr Houston and Roy Miller, plus four others, in his 13

years at Texas. “They are not only great coaches but men who handled themselves with tremendous integrity, class and dignity on and off the field

INSIDE: A look at possible ramifications after the staff changes on page 7

COACHES continues on page 8

STEPStoRECOVERY: Hitting bottom

Drug fixations become destructive habits By Audrey White Editor’s Note: This is the second in a three-part series about students involved in UT’s Center for Students in Recovery — their paths to addiction and how they achieved sobriety.

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roken relationships, failing academics and lost faith — these are just a few of the consequences students recovering from drug abuse and addiction identified from their years as users. But for many addicts, it can take months or years for the

consequences to build up enough to push a person toward recovery and long-term sobriety, they said. It’s difficult for Austin Community College student Wylie Walker to identify his rock bottom moment, he said, because his low point lasted for two years. In high school, he said he was a social drinker, and he experimented with marijuana and other drugs. But when he left for Oklahoma State University, he started using oxycodone to escape the feelings of anxiety and loneliness he was experiencing. When he started running out of money to buy pills,

things got out of control. “I started making Cs and Ds and Fs and Ws because I was just trying to figure out how to get money, trying to get in touch with a dealer, trying to get high,” Walker said. Ultimately, Walker said, it was his failing relationships with his parents and younger sister that pushed him to get clean. When his sister was a senior in high school — after his first failed stint in rehab and after he started using heroin — he pawned his mother’s camera to buy drugs, so she couldn’t take pictures at his sister’s prom.

“Before he started using, he was my hero,” said his sister, Ella Walker. “Even after, I wanted to deny it. Eventually he turned into someone I didn’t even know anymore, and it was the biggest let down.” Wylie Walker finally began recovery in May 2009. He said the people he met in recovery inspired him to commit to sobriety, especially friends in treatment and later at the UT Center for Students in Recovery, a self-funded program offered by University Health Services that gives recovering addicts at UT and in Austin a space to meet

other sober students and work on the 12 Step Program. Another student, who asked to remain anonymous because of the stigma surrounding addiction in her Muslim community, said her best friend helped push her to start recovery after four-and-a-half years of using narcotics every day. She first started using when a doctor prescribed medication after she injured her shoulder. She became dependent, taking five to six pills per day just to function. When she got to UT, the number

STEPS continues on page 2

‘Children of Nature’ Part of the Austin Film Society’s Iceland film series. Two old friends encounter each other in a retirement home and plan an escape to an island they knew as children. Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar. 7 p.m. $8.

Today in History In 1982 Charles Brooks in Texas is the first person executed by lethal injection in the United States.

Campus Watch Deck the halls

Jester West, 201 E. 21st St. Several UT police officers responded to Jester on a report of a highly intoxicated student who was going in out of consciousness and was acting violently in the hallway. The officers noted a very strong odor of alcohol on the subject’s person as well as evidence that she had an extreme physical reaction to the over consumption of alcohol in no less than seven different locations while in the hallway.

‘‘

Quote to note “Even before I went to Japan, I noticed the bad posture at American arcades and tournaments. I always thought that was really uncouth. It’s said if you have good posture you can concentrate better. I felt it was a good quality to have for fighting games anyway. We are trying to be focused.” — Ryan Harvey Owner of Arcade UFO LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

Anonymous

Wylie Walker

UT anthropology junior

ACC student

She first found narcotics when she was recovering from a shoulder injury in high school and quickly became a daily user. A nearly fatal withdrawal, the support of her best friend and involvement with the Center for Students in Recovery helped her find and maintain sobriety. She asked that The Daily Texan not use her name because of the stigma in the Muslim community surrounding addiction.

Wylie Walker used drugs in high school, but when he got to Oklahoma State University and began using oxycodone he became chemically dependent. In May 2009, Walker got sober to save his education and his relationship with his family. He hopes to attend UT and is active at the Center for Students in Recovery. Photos by Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

ON THE WEB: Check out an interactive documentary about students at the center @dailytexanonline.com

Lake Patrol brings service offshore Council questions provost By Aziza Musa Daily Texan Staff Unlike the Austin Police Department’s area command patrol, the agency’s Lake Patrol Unit takes a more service-oriented approach to enforcing the law. Austin Lake Patrol — comprised of one sergeant, one corporal and eight officers — began in the 1940s. Only recently did it become a part of the police department’s responsibilities, said APD Sgt. Louis Candoli. In 2008, APD consolidated other law enforcement agencies, acquiring park police, airport police and city marshals. Candoli and Cpl. Steve Scheurer transferred from SWAT to the boat patrol following the merger. “It’s slow, but it’s necessary,” Candoli said. “There’s not a lot of law enforcement out here, but a lot of city ordinance enforcement things. We’re like the AAA. Most of our calls come from stranded boaters, so we go out and tow their boats.” The Austin Lake Patrol Unit — one of about 425 units in Texas — look over the three major lakes in the city: Walter E. Long Lake, Lady Bird Lake and Lake Austin.

on academic centers’ cuts By Collin Eaton Daily Texan Staff Several members of the Faculty Council asked UT Provost Steven Leslie on Monday how the central administration would assist academic centers through the budget cuts and challenged him on the measurements used to determine the productivity of the centers.

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

APD Officer Jose Delgado, who has worked for the Lake Patrol Unit for four years, patrols Lake Austin on Saturday afternoon. “Ninety-eight percent of what we do is out here,” Scheurer said. “We just have two people on duty at any time, so it’s kind of hard to spread out and cover everything.” The unit possesses two jet skis and seven boats, three of which are defunct, said Officer John Scott. But they acquired two new “unsinkable” boats, made mostly of steel, before the 2010

Labor Day holiday. “I feel like I’m running for office every time I get in the boat,” said Officer Jose Delgado. “Everyone usually waves at you even though they don’t know you.” The boating season begins on Memorial Day and ends on Labor Day, and the unit’s officers

LAKE continues on page 2

The College of Liberal Arts, faced with a reduction in expected funding from tuition, decided to form the faculty-led Academic Policy and Advisory Committee to determine from where the budget should be cut. In early November, the committee recommended a total $1 million budget

CENTER continues on page 6

Special court for veterans first of its kind in county By Joshua Barajas Daily Texan Staff After his March 2003 deployment to Iraq, Lance Cpl. Domitilo Ponce III faced psychological injuries within the confines of his home despite being far from the dangers of combat. Suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, Ponce made a habit of thrill-seeking and

eventually turned to self-medication. His drug and alcohol abuse led to several arrests in Travis County. “I created an atmosphere of constant conflict, having to always be on your toes, having to be vigilant ... and having to engage in some form of fighting,” Ponce said.

IRAQ continues on page 2


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The Daily Texan Volume 111, Number 125 25 cents

CONTACT US

Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Sean Beherec (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Photo Office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTION Because of a reporting error, StumbleUpon.com spokeswoman Katie Gray was misquoted in a page-five Dec. 1 news story. Gray did not say she expected the site to get off to a slow start.

At least 20 percent of soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from PTSD or other mental health issues. Coupled with substance abuse, service-related trauma prompted Travis County officials to consider adopting a veterans court program last year. In lieu of incarceration, veterans facing misdemeanor charges are diverted to treatment and counseling services. Travis County held its first special veterans court session on Nov. 11, Veteran’s Day, making it the fifth Texas county to do so. “Veterans have a unique set of needs that set them apart from citizens in general,” said Jackson Glass, the county’s veterans court manager. “They come out of the military so used to having a structure in their life, and when they’re released from the military, they’re missing that.” Modeled after county drug courts, the Travis County veterans court only accepts nonviolent misdemeanor offenders, but Glass hopes the court can help veterans charged with felonies in the future. Until then, nonviolent misdemeanors — such as criminal trespass, first- and second-time DWI offenses and resisting arrest — are currently under review. The court secured funding from the state and the Texas Veterans Commission. The courtordered treatment plans are on a case-by-case basis, and Travis County’s program remains open to changes. The federal Department of Veterans Affairs provides most of the services to veterans in the program. The agency conducts treatment for PTSD and other related disorders linked to combat experience with several counseling and housing services available. “The more that is being learned

about PTSD, the better the VA is in incorporating the best practices,” Glass said. “The understanding and treatment of PTSD is evolving.” Upon completion of the program, the charges against the defendant will be dropped. Nicholas Hawkins, president of the UT Student Veterans Association and a global policy studies graduate student, said a veterans court gives returning soldiers another resource to help readjust to civilian life. “Sometimes you’re not completely knowledgeable of these changes until you come back to reintegrate,” he said. “[The programs] provide veterans with a second chance, with courts deciding how to better reintegrate them.” Despite a hero’s welcome, Ponce did not consider himself a veteran. He said the celebratory tributes and parades on Veterans Day belong to Vietnam veterans who did not receive the same open embrace as he did. Ponce also said his struggle with PTSD is something less significant than the trauma Vietnam veterans suffered. Unlike physical wounds, psychological conditions are “hidden injuries” that have gone unrecognized by veterans themselves, Glass said. “[Veterans] don’t talk about the war. They don’t talk about their experiences,” said Travis County Constable Maria Canchola. “They’re taught and trained to ‘man up’ and not complain ... Many times, many of them lose the war at home.” Ponce did not have a veterans court to help him after his arrests, but he hopes to volunteer as a mentor in the county’s court. It wasn’t until he sought help that the night sweats began to dwindle, he said. “The thing that’s not expected is the aftermath,” he said.

steps: UT recovery center helps reinforce sobriety From page 1 increased to 10 to 12. Eventually, she could not go more than a few hours without experiencing withdrawals. At the end of July 2009, she did not have access to pills for 24 hours and ended up in the hospital, but she still didn’t believe she was addicted. “I thought I was just a person who needed pills to function, but hello, that’s an addict,” she said. “My friends and my sister were like, ‘You need to go to the Center for Students in Recovery,’ but I was like, ‘No, I’m not like that, I’m different.’” She relapsed within a week of her hospital visit, but her best friend helped wean her off pills by forcing her to confront her desperation and commit to sobriety. She stopped using on Sept. 9, 2009 and has rebuilt her relationships with friends and family and reconnected with her faith. Social work and psychology junior Kate Millichamp started drinking her freshman year of high school and was soon binge drinking and using cocaine regularly. As soon as she started driving at 16, she would drive while blackout drunk. During her senior year, when she realized that she might not graduate from high school, she went to rehab for the first time. After graduation, she chose to go to McDaniel College, a small liberal arts school in Maryland, hoping

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Social work and psychology junior Kate Millichamp, who is a recovering alcoholic, came to UT because of the Center for Students in Recovery. the environment would help her maintain sobriety. It didn’t. “I wasn’t able to get to very many [Alcoholics Anonymous] meetings and I didn’t know anyone on campus who was sober,” Millichamp said. She applied to transfer to UT because she knew about the center. However, in her second semester at McDaniel, she relapsed after 18 months of sobriety. During summer 2010, Millichamp went to outpatient rehab but kept using alcohol and cocaine by using other people’s urine and scheduling her use around her drug tests. It took two drunken driving accidents to push her into recovery. “Even though I haven’t been

Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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among most dangerous on water

“They constituted most of our accident statistics — collisee about 200 boats on Lake sions, personal injuries either Austin during summer week- by themselves or against an ends. During the winter off- object,” Delgado said. “I tend season, officers in the Lake Pa- to equate or compare them to trol Unit prepare the equip- motorcycles because quite a ment for the upcoming season few of the riders will tend to and often assist in the depart- take unnecessary risks that are ment’s other units. impossible in a boat.” Delgado said he used to see A boat collision is never the a lot of personal watercrafts, or same as a car accident because jet skis, but little by little, their there is a greater chance of fanumbers have dwindled. tality, Delgado said.

From page 1

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Beherec Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous, Susannah Jacob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Audrey White Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cristina Herrera Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elyana Barrera, Sydney Fitzgerald, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Carr, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexa Hart, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Gerson Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Kang, Peyton McGee Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeff Heimsath, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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hurt and I haven’t hurt anyone else, I knew I would at some point,” she said. “The way that I was going, I was so destructive and I couldn’t not drink and drive.” All three students said they had to have extremely low points before they could enter a period of healthy and hopefully permanent recovery. Now the center gives them the space they need to keep growing and putting their addictions behind them. “You have to take that addict part of you and make a sober person by going through the 12 Steps,” the student who asked to remain anonymous said. “Addiction is still part of my identity — it’s part of who I am ­— but it no longer defines me.”

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Tuesday, December 7, 2010

OPINION

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Viviana Aldous Susannah Jacob Doug Luippold Dave Player

T HE DAILY T EXAN

OVERVIEW:

GALLERY

We’re 26! We’re 26! We’re 26! Not your traditional cheer, but it is something to cheer about. Austin was ranked 26th in a report issued by the Brookings Institute last week detailing how well the world’s largest cities are coping with the current recession. The number is notable because Austin was the highest ranked American city; numbers one through 25 were all located in Asia, Australia and South America. Austin has been a mainstay in various rankings of U.S. cities this past year, making top 10 lists for greenest cities, job growth, technology and resident fitness, just to name a few. But here at UT, this past year has been about a different set of numbers. This paper’s headlines have been dominated by budget reductions, state funding cuts and shortfalls. While the direct impact of these cuts may not yet be evident, there will be an inevitable strain on the University’s academic mission as faculty positions and college funding are reduced or eliminated. To combat the ongoing cuts, University president William Powers Jr. teamed up with Texas A&M President Bowen Loftin as part of Together for Texans, an initiative designed to encourage the Legislature not to continue reducing state funding for higher education. Powers and Loftin point to several economic reasons why the state should fully fund the two universities, not just in spite of the current recession, but because of it. According to the two presidents, UT and A&M attracted more than $1.3 billion in external research grants for 2009-10. By comparison, UT’s 2010-11 budget is based on only $318 million in general state revenue. However, one statistic in particular blows the others away. According to Powers, for every dollar spent on UT, $18 are generated for the state economy. Powers’ number seems incredible, but it’s been frequently repeated since his State of the University speech last September and in subsequent appeals as part of Together for Texans. By hamstringing our state’s best universities, the Legislature is severing one of our only lifelines out of this recession. Yes, Texas has fared better than most states in the current economy, but in no way have we been completely sheltered from the recession. The previously mentioned Brookings Institute report included a metro performance profile for the city of Austin, which cited how the city had been buoyed by jobs in education and government services, and in particular cited Austin’s “continued attraction and retention of high-skilled human capital” as a main reason for its speedy economic recovery. Tax incentives and a business-friendly political environment have brought economic growth to cities such as Austin, but it’s now up to the Legislature to translate that success into programs that will work for the long-term benefit of all Texans. There is no better incubator for that growth than first-class universities such as UT and Texas A&M. While home for winter break, take the time to call your local state representative or senator, or better yet, drop by their local office and remind them to support Texas higher education. — Dave Player for the editorial board.

Volunteer during winter break By Charlie Saginaw Daily Texan Columnist As finals begin and the semester ends, thousands of students will leave discussions in classrooms and gatherings in the West Mall to head home for winter break, free from academic responsibilities. But what will they do after sleeping until dinner time and catching up with a full season of “Mad Men?” Usually, nothing memorable. But this break does not have to be that way. Instead, volunteer for just a few hours at local food banks or soup kitchens. It can not only enrich your winter break, but also make a difference to those living with less in your hometown. Students tend to think of their lives as two different worlds. There is the world of daily to-do lists and responsibilities — the classes you must take and career goals you want to achieve. Then, there is the story of what’s happening in the wider world about which you learn in those classes — a story seen on websites, headlines and televised images of inequality. During winter break, tear down that mental barrier and make just a few of your actions part of the solution to the larger issue of hunger in Texas. Finding volunteer opportunities is easier than ever. By simply Googling “soup kitchen,” dozens of reputable nonprofits looking for volunteers flash onto the comput-

While students can’t afford to frequently donate money to causes that help alleviate hunger and poverty, winter break allows many to contribute an important asset: their time. While the holidays are relaxing for most students, as temperatures drop below freezing, soup kitchens and homeWhile students can’t less shelters become strained as they quickly reach capacity. In December, the help of afford to frequently volunteers becomes crucial. donate money to Who benefits from the work of these nonprofits? Amelia Vasquez is one such person; causes that help a 27-year-old single mother who lives with alleviate hunger her 5-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son in Kelly, Texas. She earned her associate’s and poverty, winter degree but, but because of the current rebreak allows many cession, cannot find full-time work. So, she to contribute an lives off $360 per month from a part-time hospital job and $340 per month from Temimportant asset: porary Assistance to Needy Families. their time. Volunteering at a food bank or soup kitchen over the break may never be as easy as sitting on the couch and driving to another part of town may never be as comfortable as the warm confines of your own worked to provide nutritious meals and home. However, in 10 years you will most support for the homeless since 1975, serv- likely forget what TV show you watched or ing 1,500 to 2,000 meals per day, seven days how long you slept in, you will remember a week. Or, if you’re one of the many UT something you were proud of: serving the students hailing from San Antonio, volun- hungry. teer at the San Antonio Food Bank, which Saginaw is a history junior. currently seeks volunteers to organize, distribute and deliver food. er screen. The Stewpot in Dallas, for example, has

GALLERY

Longhorn of the year The Daily Texan Editorial Board is seeking suggestions for “Longhorn of the Year.” The “Longhorn of the Year” is an individual or group that had the most positive impact on the UT community throughout 2010. You can suggest a candidate by e-mailing the name of the nominee and a short explanation to firingline@dailytexanonline.com, writing on the wall of the Facebook event page, “Longhorn of the Year” or tweeting us @DTeditorial. We will announce our selection on Dec. 8 in the last paper of the semester.

RECYCLE Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.


6

News

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

center: Professor disputes decreases From page 1

main top priorities of the University. He said the college will try cut to the college’s 15 area studies to use nonrecurring funds to recenters, and the cuts were based place recurring budget gaps in on the productivity of the centers. the next few years. Associate “It is probEnglish profesably more imsor Susan HeinCenters, especially portant than zelman, director ever that we in the humanities of the Center for adopt a policy and social sciences, Women’s and for our centers Gender Studare systematically that they need ies, asked Leslie to work hard to disadvantaged when how the admintry to generate compared to their istration would revenues and support the censisters in the sciences external fundters given that ing to support of the various kinds.” they serve the their own opentire University erations,” Les— Philip Doty and not just the lie said. College of LiberPhilip Doty, Associate professor al Arts. an associate in the School of Leslie said p ro f e s s o r i n Information the University the School of expects deeper Information, budget cuts in said he unthe next legislative session and derstands the argument to fund has had to weather the financial each center across campus in the crisis for longer than anticipat- same way — through college suped. Leslie said the areas of gen- port and heavy reliance on exterder and diversity are and will re- nal grants. But the relative youth

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of the humanities centers in the college preclude them from being able to generate the grants and external support that science centers can get. “Centers, especially in the humanities and social sciences, are systematically disadvantaged when compared to their sisters in the sciences of the various kinds,” Doty said. “The administration of the University [may need to] recognize that not everybody starts at the same place.” The standards the committee used to measure the productivity of the centers are too similar to the accountability measures used by Texas A&M in evaluating the value of faculty members, said Ted Gordon, chairman of the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. In September, Texas A&M released a report on the productivity of their faculty that offered a profit-and-loss look at faculty members. The report weighed a faculty’s number of students versus salary and research grants. “I have a real preoccupation

Radiotelevisionfilm representative Janet Staiger speaks at the faculty meeting on Monday that primarily discussed effects of budget cuts.

Allen Otto Daily Texan Staff

about using these kind of basic metrics to evaluate anything,” Gordon said. Leslie responded that he has not delved deeply into the committee process, but he said the committee worked hard to follow through the suggested process. “They came out with a recommendation, and now we all need to work together to take that recommendation and follow through

with what best serves the institution,” Leslie said. Heinzelman said it’s hard to imagine that the ethnic studies centers in the College of Liberal Arts are so unproductive that they need to be cut by 40 percent each. The committee collected data from the centers without their understanding of what APAC would use the information for, and then the committee turned it into sta-

tistical information, she said. “The statistical data cannot access and properly report on the qualitative issues,” she said. “What is it worth to educate undergraduates into an understanding of gender and justice? If the premises upon which all of these data were collected is inaccurate or does not reflect what we do, then obviously the results are invalid.”

Activists promote clean energy

UT alumnus’ study links sulfur dioxide emissions to death of pecan crops

By Anna Fata Daily Texan Staff Harvey Hayek, the owner of a pecan orchard that has been in his family since 1898, has lost about two-thirds of his crop since the Fayette Power Plant moved into town in 1979. He said he had to start another business to sustain his family and expects his entire crop will be wiped out within five years. Hayek is one of many pecan farmers around the state losing crops because of what environmental advocates and pecan growers believe can be fixed by using cleaner energy sources.

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To encourage the Austin City Council to move toward cleaner energy methods, activists and pecan farmers delivered pecan pies to council members Monday. The pies may become more rare as pecan crops diminish in Texas because of what they believe is caused by pollution from coal power plants. Ryan Rittenhouse, an organizer for Public Citizen, a consumer advocacy group, said carcinogens and toxins in the air emitted from coal plants lead to health risks for the general public. UT alumnus Neil Carman wrote a study on the pecan tree deaths in the Fayette area, located about 60 miles southeast of Austin, near La Grange. He said the 30-year accumulation of sulfur dioxide the Fayette

Power Plant emitted caused the decline of pecan yields in the area. Carman said the Lower Colorado River Authority, which manages energy in Texas, and the city of Austin, which owns part of the power plants, have already decided to build scrubbers to reduce coal emissions. A scrubber is a device that acts like a shower to clean 95 percent of the sulfur oxide, he said. “That doesn’t take into account the sensitivity of the pecan trees, and so I am concerned there still will be some injury to the pecan trees from the sulfur oxide emissions from the power plant,” he said. The Texas Pecan Growers Alliance wrote a letter to the LCRA addressing their grievances, and the LCRA respond-

ed with a letter that said the group is working to reduce emissions. According to these letters, the scrubbers will reduce emissions of the pollutants, but they “cannot make commitments for unlimited compensation” to the pecan growers “based on unfounded claims.” But they will review Carman’s report for better understanding of the pecan growers’ complaints. Rittenhouse said coal plants have hidden costs. “We don’t pay for it when we pay our electricity bill, but this coal plant is costing these pecan growers their livelihood,” he said. “That should be considered when Austin Energy and the City Council make their decision about what kind of energy to use.”

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SPORTS

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

7

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

SIDELINE

VOLLEYBALL NOTEBOOK

Attendance faltering going into Regionals By Shabab Siddiqui Daily Texan Staff The Longhorns have won 17 matches in a row, toppled ranked opponents in Nebraska, UCLA and Iowa State and have not lost at home since Sept. 3. Yet somehow, fans remain a little reluctant to pack Gregory Gym. The Longhorns’ average attendance through the season was 2,483 fans per home game, down from the 3,035 fans per game last year and 2,502 from 2007. The team’s only sold-out crowd was the last game of the season against Texas A&M. In comparison, Nebraska, which was second behind Hawaii in average attendance last year, sells out almost a game per week. “It’s going to be a great regional,” said head coach Jerritt Elliott after the team’s victory over UCLA on Saturday. “I’m a little disappointed by the attendance tonight. Obviously, we’d like to sell this place out and we’ve done that through the years.” Part of the lower sales this year can be attributed to the team’s slow start. Texas is seeded ninth in the tournament though ranked sixth by the American Volleyball Coaches Association poll. Last year, the team was favored to make the NCAA Championships from the beginning of the season. Saturday’s second round playoff game had an abysmal turnout of 1,963 in the 4,000-seat Gregory Gym, despite moderate student turnout. UCLA head coach Mike Sealy admitted the noise may have gotten to some of his younger players, especially when Texas went on two six-point runs in the third set. With the NCAA Regionals in Austin, the team could use help

Setter Michelle Kocher passes the ball in Saturday’s second round win over UCLA. Kocher and the Longhorns are set to take on Illinois in the Sweet 16 on Friday at Gregory Gym.

Danielle Villasana Daily Texan Staff

from the crowd as it faces eighthseeded Illinois on Friday and could face top-seeded Florida on Saturday. “We need the city of Austin to come out and support us. We’ve got to have a big crowd,” Elliott said. “It’s going to be some fun volleyball. We need to pack this place and represent the University of Texas well.”

A tale of two setters

One could make the argument that the biggest battle for setters Hannah Allison and Michelle Kocher happens in the practice gym. The duo, while constantly competing for a starting spot, remains forever supportive of each other. Allison, a freshman from Siloam Springs, Ark., is the taller and more athletic of the two, making her one of the best blocking setters the Longhorns have had in several years. Kocher, a junior from Wheaton, Ill., and the team’s assistant co-captain, is the more experienced and fundamentally sound. She is also a better backline player, consistently putting up near double-digit digs. Allison won the starting spot to begin the season but went down with an ankle injury in mid-October. Kocher stepped in, and the team has not lost since. The UCLA match featured a little bit of both setters. Elliott inserted Allison in the game in the third set, which almost immediately sparked a turnaround. Elliott described Allison as a “gamer” whose competitiveness brings the best out of her in tight situations.

REGIONAL continues on page 8

Jets

Patriots

59

28

THIS DAY IN HISTORY DEC. 7, 1996

Texas football upsets No. 3 Nebraska 37-27 in the first ever Big 12 Championship.

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FOOTBALL COLUMN

Loss to USC puts Horns in familiar predicament 5 from the free-throw line. The sophomore from Port Arthur was averaging just 7.7 points per contest prior to facing USC but showed some of the spark that made him one of the team’s top three-point shooters last season. The most recent AP poll was released on Sunday prior to the game, meaning Texas will keep its No. 19 ranking for at least another week. The Longhorns face Texas State this Saturday but don’t get another shot at a marquee team on national television until playing at North Carolina on Dec. 18. “It’s the details,” said Texas head coach Rick Barnes. “Guys come out, they get caught up in the game as opposed to coming out [and] playing with the purpose we need to play with.” Barnes now has a full week to correct the team’s offensive slump before the Bobcats come to the Frank Erwin Center. Texas’ field-goal percentage has decreased in each of the past four games, during which time the squad has focused primarily on defense during practice. Against Southern Cal, the Longhorns scored a seasonlow 56 points while allowing an opponent to break 70 points for the second time all year. “We’re a better offensive team, but we’re not if we don’t execute,” Barnes said. “Our offense has hurt our defense in the last three games.”

Jason Redmond | Associated Press

Head coach Rick Barnes yells at point guard Cory Joseph from the sideline during Texas’ 17-point loss to USC on Sunday.

Oklahoma State

Arizona

Insight Bowl Dec. 28

Missouri

Iowa

Bridgeport Education Holiday Bowl Dec. 30

Nebraska

Washington

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan file photo

Quarterback Garrett Gilbert gets tackled in Texas’ Thanksgiving loss to Texas A&M. Former Texas offensive coordinator Greg Davis saw little success this season with Gilbert leading the offense.

Davis’ departure means fresh start By Austin Laymance Daily Texan Columnist Christmas came early for many Longhorn fans Monday who finally got what they had been wishing for — the end of the Greg Davis era. It’s official. The Texas offensive coordinator has stepped down, resigning under intense pressure from the hordes of Texas fans who have been calling for his head for several years now. And it didn’t help that Davis’ sudden — and rather bizarre — switch to a prostyle offense in 2010 went belly up as the Longhorns finished a disappointing year with just five wins. But Davis isn’t the only coach who will not return for the 2011 season. Joining him are associate head coach and offensive line coach Mac McWhorter as well as defensive line and special teams coach Mike Tolleson, who both retired. This could be the change that Texas needs as the Longhorns search for answers after one of the school’s worst seasons in recent memory. The last time Texas failed to reach a bowl game was 13 years ago — Mack Brown and Davis’ first year in Austin. Davis’ biggest failure in 2010 was his decision to drastically change the direction of the Long-

horn offense, totally rewiring the spread-offense attack that had worked wonders for Texas when dual-threat quarterbacks Vince Young and Colt McCoy roamed the 40 Acres. But with first-year starter — and Davis’ handpicked prodigy — Garrett Gilbert running the show in 2010, Davis saw fit to change the Longhorns’ offense. Forget that Texas’ roster had no — count them, zero — dominant running backs and an offensive line that hadn’t consistently run-blocked in four years. It looked like a poor decision at the time, and it certainly was on Davis’ part. The proof is in the pudding. Consider that in 2010, the offense averaged an abysmal 23.8 points per game. Compare that with the nearly 40 points Texas scored on average in the previous seven seasons — during which the spread offense thrived — and it’s clear that the pro-style attack had no business in a Texas huddle in the first place. Davis even misread the talent and skill of his own prized recruit. He figured Gilbert couldn’t run a lick and wasn’t as mobile as Young or McCoy — part of the reason he decided to change philosophies. But watching Gilbert play all year — look no further than the Nebraska game — it became clear the sophomore signal caller had the legs and athleticism to make plays on his feet, much

like his predecessors. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. It doesn’t get much simpler than that unless, of course, you’re Davis. Two National Championship appearances in five years using a spread attack? Sure, lets just change that right quick. Well, Davis made his changes and forced Brown to make his own tough decisions after the season, costing Davis his job and ending his 16 years coaching alongside Brown. Davis’ departure opens the door for running backs coach and former Texas quarterback Major Applewhite to step in as the new offensive coordinator. It makes sense for Texas to promote someone in-house rather than searching for someone from another program, and Applewhite should be a welcome choice to the boosters, fans, media, coaches and players. Texas fans can breathe a sigh of relief now that Davis will not be up in the booth calling the shots on game day, but simply jettisoning the offensive coordinator is not the one and only solution to Texas’ issues. The Longhorns still need to find a go-to receiver, one who won’t drop easy first-down catches, and a workhorse out of the backfield. Davis wasn’t the only problem but he was a huge part of it, and it’s up to Brown and most importantly, the players, to restore Texas football to elite status in 2011.

New Era Pinstripe Bowl Dec. 30

Kansas State

Syracuse

Texas Bowl Dec. 29

Illinois

Baylor

Ticketcity Bowl Jan. 1

Northwester

Texas Tech

TRIVIA TUESDAY Who was Texas’ offensive coordinator prior to Greg Davis’ tenure?

Gene Dahlquist

MEN’S BASKETBALL

By Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff A double-digit road loss to an unranked nonconference opponent early in the season? Looks like a case of different season, same story for Texas, which dropped its second game of the 2010-11 campaign on Sunday. Eleven months ago, Texas lost at Connecticut 88-74; part of a 3-6 skid that saw the Longhorns fall from No. 1 in the nation to out of The Associated Press poll. This time it happened at Southern California by a 17-point margin. The similarities don’t stop there. Just like last season, the Longhorns’ troubles came at both ends of the court as they allowed the Trojans to shoot nearly 50 percent from the field while converting only 18 of their 56 shots. Texas swingman Jordan Hamilton, a native of nearby Compton, Calif., had said he wouldn’t get caught up in the excitement of playing 15 minutes away from his hometown in front of friends and family but admitted late Sunday night that the hype affected him. Hamilton, the team’s leading scorer, was held to just 12 points by an aggressive USC defense. Reserve guard J’Covan Brown led Texas in scoring on Sunday, finishing with 17 points. It was a showcase for Brown’s offensive skills as he drove to the basket, hit long threes and went a perfect 5-of-

NFL


8

Sports

Tuesday, Decemeber 7, 2010

Regional: Opposing teams looking to exploit Texas’ ball control From page 7

an injury herself when she started donning the black jersey, has had to learn a lot on the job. Sophomore utility player Sha’Dare McNeal and junior Amber Roberson are both first-time starters. McNeal was converted from a middle blocker to a backline player over the spring. Both players had relatively little back row experience before coming to Texas. While passing and ball control have not cost the Longhorns a match, it may prove to be a challenge against more physical teams such as Nebraska in the coming matches.

Meanwhile, Kocher’s technical proficiency and high IQ allows her to make the most out of errant passes on a team that has struggled in that area. Both setters finished with 24 assists in the match. Assistant coach Salima Rockwell, who was an All-American setter back in her playing days at Penn State and on the U.S. National Team, said having both setters is a major boon for the team. “I think it’s awesome,” Rockwell said. “They constantly push each other, and both sides of the net in practice are really good. It’s a huge advantage for our program on hav- The year of the ACL While studies show that female ing two great setters in any given point. One can sub in for the other. athletes are eight times more likely We could flip into a 6-2. It just gives to injure their ACL than male athletes and knee injuries are the secus so many options.” ond most common type of injury in volleyball, the unprecedentYa dig? ed number of ACL tears in this In the press conference fol- year’s volleyball season has coachlowing his team’s loss to Texas es scrapping playbooks, scratching on Saturday, UCLA head coach heads and re-adjusting. Mike Sealy pointed to Texas’ ball The trend started in the spring control as a weaker point in the when Penn State lost its sophoLonghorns’ arsenal. more outside hitter phenom Darcy Elliott has repeatedly said im- Dorton. The Longhorns lost sophproved passing, the serve-receive omore outside hitter and assistant game and confidence are the big- co-captain Bailey Webster a little gest differences between the begin- more than a week before the seaning of the year and now. son started. Texas’ weakness likely has less Among Texas’ opponents, to do with inability and more to UCLA lost junior middle blockdo with a lack of experience. True er Katie Camp last month and Illifreshman libero Sarah Palmer nois lost freshman middle blocker was thrust into the fire after ju- Anna Dorn at the beginning of the nior Sydney Yogi’s injury. Palm- season. Perhaps the bigger concern er, who was just coming off of for the Illini is the loss of senior

Senior Juliann Faucette attempts to block a spike from a UCLA player in the second round of the NCAA Tournament.

Danielle Villasana Daily Texan Staff

All-American outside hitter Laura DeBruler in mid-October, who torched the Longhorns for 17 kills in their earlier matchup. Other teams in the tournament that have had to make adjustments for ACL tears include Creighton, Mississippi and North Carolina.

Kocher connection

As the Longhorns prepare to

battle it out against Illinois on Friday, they will need to find a way to slow down the Fighting Illini’s junior outside hitter Colleen Ward. Ward has taken over the reins of the team and put up 27 kills and 15 digs in the team’s second round matchup against Cincinnati. Kocher knows that better than anyone, teaming up with Ward on a club team when the two were in high school.

“[Ward] is a really talented player,” Kocher said earlier this year. “I loved playing with her the couple of years I got a chance to, and I played against her in high school, so I know what it feels like to receive one of her hits. She’s just an all-around player and I’m excited to see how she does.”

Conference breakdowns

Three conferences dominate

the Sweet 16. The Pac-10 has four representatives in Stanford, USC, Cal and Washington. The Big 12 is also surprisingly well represented with Texas, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Missouri all advancing. The Big Ten wins the power conference award, as it boasts Penn State, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio State and Purdue. The final two teams are Florida (SEC) and Duke (ACC).

Coaches: Offensive coordinator had plenty of success despite poor final season From page 1 during their time here,” Brown said. “I want to say thank you and wish them well, because they will be missed.” The outgoing coaches have experienced the highest of highs and lowest of lows while at Texas, from the BCS National Championship in 2005 to this

year’s seven-loss season. Davis was especially successful, as he led some of the most prolific offenses in school history. In 2005, the Texas offense scored a then-record 652 points in a single season, and he was given the Broyles Award as the nation’s top assistant coach. Davis also served as quarterbacks coach, where he presid-

ed over two runners-up for the Heisman Trophy — Vince Young in 2005 and Colt McCoy last year. He was coordinator when Ricky Williams won the award in 1998. “It’s been a pleasure working with not only all of the great quarterbacks I’ve been fortunate enough to coach but all of the terrific young men on both sides

of the ball,” Davis said. “I will miss all of the players, coaches and staff, but I will always have great memories of the success the players and the teams I was part of were able to achieve.” Davis’ resignation does not take effect until Aug. 31, 2011, but Brown said the search for a replacement would begin immediately. McWhorter, who has coached

football for 37 years, is thankful for all of the memories he has had at Texas. “I feel blessed to have worked with some of the best coaches and men in the profession,” McWhorter said. “Lastly, I have a deep love and appreciation for the players that I have coached and been associated with at Texas. They are a special group.”

Tolleson has been responsible for putting together and maintaining a rush defense that was ranked in the top six from 2006 to 2009, when the Longhorns allowed the fewest rushing yards in the nation. “It’s been the ultimate for me as a football coach to be at a place like The University of Texas,” Tolleson said.


Tuesday, December 7, 2010

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Life&Arts

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Iconic arcade hosts ‘Fighter’ tourney, draws community

By Allistair Pinsof Daily Texan Staff After escaping his opponent’s grasp and defeating him with three ninja stars to the head, Ryan Harvey sat quietly as his avatar posed for her fourth victory in a row. It was just another friendly match with tournament player Stephen Wong on a quiet afternoon at Austin’s Arcade UFO. But during last Sunday’s tournament, with 80 spectators cheering and reputation on the line, victory meant everything to the players of this tightly knit community, who gather every night for one reason: to see who’s the best of the best at “Super Street Fighter IV.” When Harvey opened Arcade UFO in August 2008, it held one of the few arcade cabinets of “Street Fighter IV” in the U.S. (it has since upgraded to the series’ current iteration). The arcade, located on Speedway and 31st Street next to Fricano’s Deli, became the center of Austin’s fighting game scene. It has brought together the best players from out of town and has turned bored UT students into tournament players who have placed in Japan’s Super Battle Opera tournament, one of the most prestigious invite-only events for arcade fighting games in the world. “I wanted to do this arcade my way,” Harvey said. After spending a year studying abroad in Japan through UT’s direct exchange program, he fell in love with the country’s minimalist,

intimate arcades. If it weren’t for the absence of cigarette smoke and Japanese salarymen, Arcade UFO could very well exist a block away from where Harvey once attended school in Tokyo. Its walls are bare, painted in a deep coat of blue, and the machines are loud — each cabinet drowns out the sound of the one beside it, creating a strange but hypnotic ambiance. A row of fighting games facing each other, positioned in a way so that opponents remain anonymous, take up the majority of the space, but shooter, rhythm and puzzle games occupy the rest of the crowded building. “Arcade UFO is built upon a community of people who care about games. That’s supplemented by people who find out about it and want to do something fun, and that’s great, too,” Harvey said. “But the heart of Arcade UFO is in the community.” Sunday marks the end of the Ranbats, a series of six tournaments spread across two months that will decide who is the best “Super Street Fighter IV” player in Austin. With Jesse “JDR” Richmond taking the lead by 11 points over long-standing champion Viet Vo — points are allocated to top positions at every event (first place: 10, second place: 7, etc.) — this is a player base that is constantly changing along with the franchise (later this month the arcade will adopt the latest edition of the game, featuring two new

Jamaal Felix | Daily Texan Staff

Demarcus Moore, a regular tournament competitor, focuses on defeating his opponent in the final round at Arcade UFO’s “Super Street Fighter IV” tournament on Sunday night. characters, imported from Japan.) “I focus on everything, really,” said Demarcus Moore, one of the Ranbats’ ranking tournament players. “Lately, I’ve been focusing on reading people and how they think. I even took psychology to help.” Moore is a high school senior from Killeen and catches a ride up to Austin with other players. He grew up in Okinawa, Japan, and said Arcade UFO reminds him of home. Moore, like other players at the arcade, is beyond the point of

button-mashing and memorizing characters’ moves. “Street Fighter” is equal parts thumb war, chess and poker when played by seasoned players. The set of moves, time limit and character traits remain the same, but the timing (top players are able to spot specific frames of animation) and pacing relies on the style of the player. “You have to think like a top player. It’s not about having the biggest combos or whether or not you can do this fancy trick,” said John Ramirez, an Arcade

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movement as necessary. “Even before I went to Japan, I noticed the bad posture at American arcades and tournaments. I always thought that was really uncouth,” Harvey said. “It’s said if you have good posture you can concentrate better. I felt it was a good quality to have for fighting games anyway. We are trying to be focused.” WHERE: 3101 Speedway WEb: arcadeufo.com

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Shows shake up traditions, abandon cliche story lines

MOVIE REVIEW

TV TUESDAY

By Alex Williams

Courtesy of Fox Searchlight

Psychological thriller “Black Swan” engages the audience with its suspenseful plot and stellar performances.

‘Black Swan’ boasts Oscar potential Alex Williams Daily Texan Staff Darren Aronofsky’s “Black Swan” is many things at once. It’s a masterful psychological thriller, an intense backstage drama about ballet and a character study detailing the mental collapse of a ballerina. It’s something entirely new for Aronofsky, saving the gritty devastation he exhibited in “The Wrestler” until the final third, when the film transforms into a hallucinogenic nightmare that would feel at home in the final act of “Requiem for a Dream.” It also features a flawless quartet of career-best performances from Natalie Portman, Vincent Cassel, Mila Kunis and Winona Ryder. In short, “Black Swan” is not a film to be missed. Drawing from many of the same pages of Aronofsky’s last film, “The Wrestler,” “Black Swan” is mostly concerned with how far a performer will go to have that perfect show, to wow their audience and their peers. In the case of “Black Swan,” the performance in question is Nina Sayers’ (Portman) titular role in her dance company’s production of “Swan Lake.” Her sleazy director, played by

Cassel, knows Nina can portray the innocence and purity of the White Swan, but takes a personal interest in making sure she can sell the seductive qualities of the Black Swan. Aronofsky has always been able to coax stunning performances out of his actors, but Portman’s transformation here is unprecedented. In previous roles, Portman has been mostly hit-or-miss, disappointing as often as she dazzles. This material, about a self-critical ballerina’s attempts to live up to her director’s expectations, fits Portman perfectly. She more than delivers, giving not only her best performance ever, but possibly the best performance of 2010. Portman is utterly fearless, disappearing into Nina and effortlessly selling her metamorphosis. Her dedication to the role comes across in every frame, and Portman is the best part of this fantastic film. The rest of the cast is equally as impressive. Cassel’s smarmy director deftly toes the line between repulsive and seductive, rotten to his core but oddly charming nonetheless. Kunis shines as Nina’s alternate whose motivations are never quite clear, and Barbara Hershey’s portrayal of one of cinema’s most insane screen mothers

is magnetic and intense. Aronofsky’s direction has never been better. The film feels like an odd blend of the best of Cronenberg and Lynch; a dark, twisted character study dealing in sex, shame and sick, controlling relationships. The film is presented with confident bravado. Aronofsky never wavers, making the film’s quiet, dramatic confrontations just as arresting as the jarring, often terrifying scenes where Nina’s psyche begins to collapse. These scenes take over the film in its third act, which is both a hellish fever dream and a perfect finale, presenting a fully immersed, disturbing and unstable alternate reality as Nina completely breaks down. “Black Swan” isn’t the kind of film you see once. It’s the kind of film that reminds moviegoers why they love movies; the kind of film that leaves the audience breathless, dazed and clamoring to see the film again. It will be dissected and discussed with the best of Kubrick and Hitchcock for years to come, and may well earn Portman her first Oscar. “Black Swan” is this holiday season’s film to beat.

1

11

LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

As the holiday season looms, the airwaves are often saturated with a wave of animated specials. Whether it’s “Charlie Brown” or “The Grinch,” these specials are as much a part of the holidays as Santa Claus, family gatherings and rampant consumerism. However, for those looking for an off-the-beaten-path Christmas Eve viewing, the Texan has assembled a short list of holiday-themed episodes of modern television programs. These may not be holiday mainstays broadcast yearly such as “Rudolph the RedNosed Reindeer” or “Frosty the Snowman,” but they’re just as entertaining, if not more.

The Office (UK), “Christmas Special” Considered by many to be superior to its American remake, the original incarnation of “The Office” ended its two-season run with a Christmas special that brought closure to many of the series’ big storylines while still maintaining its acidic wit and knack for squirm-in-your-seat uncomfortable humor. With this final special, the series gets in the holiday spirit, granting most of its main characters the happy

T

endings they’ve been chasing that defined the early days of the entire series and ending “The Simpsons.” things on what may be the series’ first hopeful note ever.

The Office (US), “A Benihana Christmas” Where the original “Office” mostly retained its bleak spirit until its final moments, the U.S. remake went unabashedly sentimental for its third-season holiday special, which features Steve Carell’s Michael Scott reeling from a brutal breakup and trying to find new love with a teenage Benihana’s waitress. Mixing some of the series’ funniest moments (a scene where Michael forgets which waitress he’s hitting on is a comedic goldmine) and some of its sweetest, “A Benihana Christmas” is a prime example of why the U.S. “Office” has been as successful as it has.

The Simpsons, “Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire” Sometimes billed as “The Simpsons Christmas Special,” “Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire” was the first episode broadcast in the landmark series. Besides giving us our first glimpse of Springfield, this episode is as heartwarming a Christmas story as you’re going to find this holiday season and displays the mix of sentimentality, working-class hopelessness and sharp humor

South Park, “Woodland Critter Christmas”

Easily the funniest (and most offensive) episode on this list, “Woodland Critter Christmas” brutally parodies holiday specials. In telling the heartwarm-U ing tale of an adorable gang ofp Disney-esque animals who alsoH happen to be Satanic harbingersC of the apocalypse, South Parkt blends its trademark irreverencem with the holiday spirit, makingg for one of its most memorable a and hilarious episodes. f r a Supernatural, “A Very m Supernatural Christmas” M The paranormal horror showi “Supernatural” seems like theh last show that would do a holi-t day episode, but it bucked expectations in its third season andk delivered a sad, funny and goryC Christmas extravaganza. Pittingw the demon-hunting Winchesterh brothers (Jensen Ackles and Jar-t ed Padalecki) against a mass-i murdering Santa Claus, this epi-j sode showcases the offbeat sensef of humor and effective scaresf that put “Supernatural” milesc ahead of anything else airing ons the CW and makes for a great episode to put on when you’re sickt of heartwarming shows based ont u Christmas carols. i

Grade: A

ROGUE: Release highlights growth as a writer From page 12 it down and distill it down to a textbox or a text,” Metzger said. “Back then, my artistic integrity could not be compromised. I was just arrogant. I thought they would back down. Then they said they wouldn’t publish it. Years later, I’m older and day, month day, 2008

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wiser, and Sourcebooks said they wanted to make formatting changes, which I found to be constructive and I made. I had this thought bubble of myself at 19 saying, ‘Absolutely not! I will not change a word.’” Now, after that exhausting three-year process, “The Rogue’s Handbook” has finally

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Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Life&Arts Editor: Amber Genuske E-mail: lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T he  Daily T exan

UT alumnus’ manual mirrors own suave life Author gives instructions on how to properly behave like the ‘gentleman rogue’

By Christopher Nguyen Daily Texan Staff Austin-based writer and 1999 UT graduate Jeff Metzger’s first published book, “The Rogue’s Handbook: A Concise Guide to Conduct for the Aspiring Gentleman Rogue,” details how male readers can become better gentleman rogues. He dissects historical examples of “g-rogue,” a term a friend coined, from Jack Sparrow of “Pirates of the Caribbean” to Lord Byron, noting their mix of stealth and suaveness. Metzger could very well have included himself, considering how he has smoothly continued to include writing in his life. Although he received a marketing degree from the McCombs School of Business, writing has always interested him, and eventually he decided to minor in English. After taking a job in phone sales at a major corporation after college, he found himself in a warped “Office Space” nightmare and decided to pursue a career with a small business. However, as he strode into the interview room of an Austin-area spa with absolutely no understanding of the mechanics of spa treatment, his knowledge of literature and writing came in handy. “I noticed my interviewer had a British accent,” Metzger said. “I asked her where she was from. She said the U.K., and I asked what part. She answers, ‘Swansea,’ and I go, ‘Where Dylan Thomas is from?’

And she gets all excited, and I begin to recite Dylan Thomas’ ‘Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night.’ I was then offered the position, even though I was grossly unqualified.” Now he works with a student housing real estate company but regularly keeps a block of time on Saturdays just to write whatever inspires him. Three years ago, that inspiration came as he was flipping through a book at a friend’s house on how to be a gentleman. He felt that the book was too serious and decided to write his own handbook. Instead of the serious tone, he would inject some playfulness, and instead of simply the gentleman, he would describe the gentleman rogue, an archetype made distinctive in the intrigue he possesses and that had interested him for years in books and movies. Although he has written two manuscripts before, “The Rogue’s Handbook” is his first to be published by a major publishing house, Sourcebooks. It has been a long process of editing, revising and publicizing. The experience also showed him how much growth he has made as a writer since his time as a UT student. When Sourcebooks returned his manuscript to him with formatting revisions, Metzger was more than willing to make the changes; a stark contrast from his 19-year-old self. During his sophomore year at UT, he and a friend sent an article to thenfledgling Maxim magazine. Maxim wanted to publish it but with some slight changes. “To me, they wanted to dumb

ROGUE continues on page 11

Allen Otto | Daily Texan Staff

UT alumnus Jeff Metzger just published his first novel, “The Rogue’s Handbook.” The book is a comedic guide to life for the modern man.

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Allen Otto | Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore Ali Mavrakis and junior Forrest Wilkinson, founders of the University Security Investment Teams, offer small lectures and workshops through their group that give students hands-on experience with investing.

Group invests in students’ futures By Lindsey Cherner Daily Texan Staff When the economic crisis hit in 2008, Wachovia lost $8.9 billion, but finance and Plan II junior Forrest Wilkinson didn’t panic. Instead, Wilkinson made a 600-percent return at a time when the analysts were making comparisons to The Great Depression. “People were really frightened,” Wilkinson said. “I remember watching CNN and seeing the numbers dip down to under a dollar a share. It really sparked my interest in finance.” Wilkinson is one of six co-founders of University Investment Security Teams, an organization that strives to give students hands-on experience with all levels of knowledge in business. “There are no barriers. We’re not looking for requirements,” Wilkinson said. “It’s like a language in that, sure you can learn the grammar from a couple of years in a classroom, but that’s not the same as spending a few months in a Spanish-speaking country.” At the beginning of the semester, $40 in dues are taken from each member and pooled into a pot that students then use as their

investment capital. Teams of up to eight then collaborate and agree on the best way to invest their dues and have friendly competition. “It takes the pressure off of them [when they talk] in small groups,” Wilkinson said. “Not to mention, employers are increasingly looking for experience with teamwork.” Wilkinson and co-founder and business sophomore Ali Mavrakis, along with the rest of the board of directors, rely on a collaborative teamwork environment. The team also believes in rewarding those that make wise decisions in the market by awarding the groups that have the highest returns on investment. “When it comes to our ventures, we want people to be excited. We want people to be as comfortable as they can be within our organization, whether that be by taking a passive stance or constantly standing up and expressing opinions,” Mavrakis said. The team prides itself on its range in level of experience with finance and also acknowledges that online economic resources can be overwhelming. The team wants to give experience to students regardless of prior

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When it comes to our ventures, we want people to be excited.” — Ali Mavrakis Co-founder

there was a need for a club that actively trades. “There are lots of students interested in investment, but they don’t have the money,” Wilkinson said. “The great thing about [the team] is that it pulls together money, it allows for democratic decisions and is unique in that it’s interactive based on what the students decide to do. Nothing is hierarchy.” The team is looking to expand

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experience in investment. “Mark Rodriguez is a philosophy major and has zero investment experience, but he is still able to manage our accounts,” Mavrakis said. When the board began to notice the amount of students that lacked economic expertise, they knew

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nationally and has started branches at The University of Pennsylvania, The University of Chicago and at other UT campuses to create a diverse set of contacts. “This growth enables students not just networking opportunities at UT but networking at schools across the U.S.,” Wilkinson said. Wilkinson acknowledged that everyone is going to contribute, yet feels there’s an overwhelming number of individuals that don’t know where their money is going. “Just having a little knowledge about the economic sector will allow you to make more of your money, even for people who aren’t going to be finance majors,” Wilkinson said. Wilkinson and Mavrakis said they want their members to begin to think of their actions from an economic standpoint. They want them to have the ability to understand the market and know what’s happening at all times in order to make wise choices. “Economics is all around us in every decision, in every transaction we make,” Mavrakis said. “You have to understand the principles behind it. Once you do, you can change the way you think.”

The Daily Texan 12/07/10  

The December 7, 2010 edition of The Daily Texan