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THE DAILY TEXAN

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

www.dailytexanonline.com

ELECTION 2010

Four more years of Rick Perry

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Gov. Rick Perry greets supporters after his acceptance speech at Texas Disposal Systems’ Exotic Game Ranch in Buda. Perry’s victory marks his third consecutive four-year term as governor, making him the longest-serving governor of Texas.

Voters’ attitude disappoints White By Nolan Hicks Daily Texan Staff BUDA — Former Houston Mayor Bill White was supposed to offer the Democrats their best chance to beat the GOP in 15 years. Partial voting returns from across the state show he lost to Perry by 13 percent in a midterm election that turned into a Republican landslide. “The citizens of our state have sent a very clear message with their votes — they’re optimistic about the future of our country and they believe that Texas is headed in the right direction,”

said Perry, in a speech marking his reelection to a historic third term as governor. “Things are better here than they are almost anywhere else in the country.” With a budget shortfall that has been reported to be as high as $25 billion, which is proportionally larger than the budget deficit California faced, Perry promised to veto any tax increase aimed at helping to close the gap. He said those who thought the budget crisis was so bad that tax increases needed to be considered were “doom and gloomers.”

Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Bill White, right, hugs his daughter Elena as his son Will looks on after he conceded the race to incumbent Rick Perry Tuesday in Houston.

Perry plugged his new book titled “Fed Up!,” saying that Texans were “fed up” with Washington, but never acknowledged his Democratic opponent in his victory speech. In the end, the White campaign couldn’t keep up with increased turnout for Republican candidates across the state, especially in suburban and rural counties. “We challenge Texas to support Gov. Perry and others moving our state forward,” White said in his concession

Pat Sullivan Associated Press

WHITE continues on page 2

GOP reclaims House, fails to secure Senate

Election Results Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst 61.89%

L. Chavez-Thompson 34.72%

By Aziza Musa Daily Texan Staff As Republicans trounced Democrats nationwide on Tuesday night — reclaiming control of the U.S. House of Representatives — two Texas Democratic incumbents also lost their bids for re-election. But Democrats maintained a narrow majority in the U.S. Senate. With 98 percent of the votes reported, San Antonio Republican Francisco Canseco led the race for U.S. Congressional District 23, which spans from El Paso to San

Attorney General Greg Abbot 64.26%

Barbara Ann Radnofsky 33.46%

Railroad Commissioner David Porter 59.51% Jeff Weems 36.13%

Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples 60.93% Hank Gilbert 35.68%

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson 61.77% Hector Uribe 35.17%

SBOE District 10 Marsha Farney 55.85% Judy Jennings 40.02%

Texas CD-17 Bill Flores 61.79%

Chet Edwards 39.58%

Blake Medley waits to cross Guadalupe Street with a Bill White campaign sign in a last-ditch effort to remind the UT community to vote in their precinct Tuesday afternoon.

Students react to election results By Allison Kroll Daily Texan Staff After Gov. Rick Perry’s successful bid for re-election was announced Tuesday, some students across campus were disappointed, but felt the outcome was expected. Many students who lined

WORLD&NATION PAGE 3 Marijuana legalization goes up in smoke

up to vote outside the Flawn Academic Center expressed support for Democratic candidates. Out of 853 total votes cast at Precinct 148, the FAC, 570 votes went to Bill White, while 240 went to Perry, 23 to Green Party candidate Deb Shafto and 20 to Libertarian

NEWS PAGE 5

Transportation bond passed by Austinites

Democrats

183 seats

Undecided

13

Antonio, by 5.1 percent. Canseco ousted Democratic incumbent Ciro Rodriguez, a Democrat who served two terms. UT public affairs lecturer Sherri Greenberg said the district is more marginal, but leans Republican because of its large, varied demographic. President Barack Obama won 51 percent of the district’s vote during the 2008 presidential election, while 57 percent voted for former President

CONGRESS continues on page 2 Republicans

239 seats

Kathie Glass. Plan II freshman Arsalan Eftekhar said although the campus may have gone to Democratic candidate Bill White, Perry won because Texas as a whole is a conservative state.

REACTION continues on page 2

NEWS PAGE 6

Precinct confusion leads to rejected voters

ON THE WEB:

For a map outlining election results by county, go to @dailytexanonline.com


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News

whITE: Negative advertising led to candidate’s demise

The Daily Texan Volume 111, Number 103 25 cents

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speech. White urged his supporters to remain active in politics, likening them to “a pendulum that swings politics.” Cheers erupted throughout the room when White conceded the election to Perry, but the cheering stopped when White said that every public official, including federal officials, deserves respect. The only cheering that could be heard at Perry’s party for that line was from the speakers broadcasting the audio from White’s party. When the event organizers at the Republican election party turned off the live feed from the White campaign, the crowd that had gathered to watch White’s concession speech started chanting “Nah, nah, nah, hey, hey, hey, goodbye.” The last few days of the gubernatorial campaign had centered on a controversial advertisement released by the Perry campaign that revived previously disproved claims that Houston is a sanctuary city, arguing that immigration policies led to the death of a Houston police officer. In the ad, the officer ’s widow Joslyn Johnson said, “In the past, Bill White supported sanctuary city policies that made it difficult for officers to safely do their jobs.” The assertion that Houston was a sanctuary city or that White supported such policies isn’t true, according to the Austin American-Statesman’s PolitiFact Texas, who rated the claim as false in February. However, the ad was effective in setting off a media firestorm and the White campaign quickly countered with its own ad at-

Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Sean Beherec (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Photo Office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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FREEDOM!

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Gov Rick Perry pauses during his acceptance speech Tuesday night. tacking Perry on border security issues. “It’s effective if the press is obsessed by it,” said radio-television-film professor Paul Stelker. “Negative advertising works because it gets your attention.” Still, Stekler said he didn’t think the ad would be the dominant focus on the election and warned that most of advertisements like this are only effective on the margins.

The race between Perry and White appeared to be closing during the summer months — White had managed to cut Perry’s lead to an average of about 6 percent, with a Public Policy Polling poll even showing the race tied. However, the lead began to expand in the fall, even as The Dallas Morning News and The Associated Press published stories highlighting connections be-

CONgREss: Expensive midterm election sets precedent for presidential race From page 1 George W. Bush in 2004. Voters in District 17, which includes Waco and Bryan, removed 10-term Rep. Chet Edwards in favor of Republican challenger Bill Flores by 44,000 votes. Greenberg said the Waco-based seat has been a difficult one for a Democrat to retain since the middecade redistricting in 2004, which gave Republicans an advantage in the district. “When redistricting was done again, the seat was drawn for a Republican,” she said. “Through work and will, Edwards has held on to it, but it wasn’t enough for him this time. I think the Republican tide combined with the Repub-

lican district is too much to overcome for Edwards.” Saint Mary’s University government professor Henry Flores said the anti-incumbent atmosphere and voters’ frustrations could have led to Edward’s demise. Henry Flores said he expects congressional gridlock and the new Republican leadership to elect a Republican president in 2012. “In the bigger picture of things, I don’t think much is going to happen in Washington,” he said. “With a fairly activist Republican House, because of new Tea Party settlers, they’re going to be putting proposals in that counter Obama’s agenda. Obama is going to start putting forth policies, forcing the Republi-

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Veronica Carr, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexa Hart, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Gerson Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Kang, Peyton McGee Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeff Heimsath, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich, Danielle Villasana Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Madeleine Crum Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Layne Lynch, Allistair Pinsof, Sarah Pressley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Francisco Marin, Gerald Rich, Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Anderson, Sameer Bhuchar, Jordan Godwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laken Litman, Andy Lutz, Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Murphy Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carlos Medina Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allie Kolechta, Allison Kroll, Yvonne Marquez, Ahsika Sanders Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shereen Ayub, Michael Baldon, Ryan Smith Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erin Gleim, Marc Nestenius Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brittney Martin, Hollis O'Hara Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .William "Pizza" Alsdorf, Melanie McDaniel, Austin Myers Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Thomas Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emery Furgeson, Connor Shea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji, Betsy Cooper, John Massingill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabe Alvarez, Gillian Rhodes, Brianne Klitgaard Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oliver Callund

Advertising

Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford, Meagan Gribbin Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Daniel Ruszkiewkz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Josh Phipps, Josh Valdez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Hall, Maryanne Lee, Ian Payne Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Broadcast Sales Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aubrey Rodriguez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

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cans to take some very dramatic stands on issues that they will look so bad to the American public.” Henry Flores said Republicans are likely to raise the issues of extending the Bush tax cuts and to reduce government spending, while the Democrats, under Obama, will push for immigration reform. “There is going to be a lot of drama and attacking and counterattacking,” he said. “The American people are going to suffer because things just won’t get done.” The 2010 midterm election season has been the most expensive to date, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, a research organization that studies the role of money in U.S. politics. District 17 was the ninth most costly race, with Edwards and Flores raising about a total of $6 million and spending about $5 million. “Both of the candidates are well above the average mark for money spent,” said the center’s spokes-

man David Levinthal. “The average winner of a House race in 2008 spent about $1.4 million in victory. Both of these guys, through Oct. 15, had spent more than $2.5 million.” The District 17 race also ranked high among the House races that have attracted outside spending, such as from American Crossroads, a political organization former Bush political adviser Karl Rove created to support conservative candidates and issues, Levinthal said. According to the center’s website, Flores raised a total of nearly $644,000 from outside spending, and Edwards nearly $892,000. “If Republicans can pick [Edwards] off, they’ve scored a major moral and political victory for themselves, in addition to the very practical victory of getting another House seat in an election year where every single vote counts,” he said. — Additional reporting contributed by Andrew Kreighbaum

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tween companies that received investments and grants from state organizations and key Perry donors. The attacks didn’t stick because Perry’s actions haven’t been all that different from the actions of past administrations, and people see it as part of the political game, said Andrew Wheat, research director at Citizens for Public Justice. “People think this is busi-

ness as usual and they might be right,” Wheat said. “People have a dim view of politicians, and it’s usually richly deserved.” Instead, voters focused their attention and anger on Washington, D.C., said long-time state Rep. Jim McReynolds, D-Trinity County, a conservative Democrat from East Texas who lost by more than 15 percent. “Washington is beating us. It’s a tide,” McReynolds said.

REACTION: Dewhurt’s success

attributed to incumbency From page 1 “But here on campus, students are overly Democratic,” he said. “If White won, I think kids would be taught to think critically and analytically versus just being taught what’s on the test. Perry’s main focus is teaching what’s on the test, White’s more in it for education.” Incumbent Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst also defeated challenger Linda Chavez-Thompson handily, but students were more focused on the gubernatorial race. They felt that Democratic candidates offered more helpful suggestions for issues that relate directly to them, such as education. “I expected the election to go mostly in the Republican direction,” said math freshman Gabe Earle. “I voted for White because the issue that I was wellinformed on was making college affordable, and that might lead to increased grants or loans, and I thought that would be helpful.” Students said educational assistance was a big concern as they cast their votes. “I’m disappointed that Texans stuck with the same governor,” said mechanical engineering freshman Vineet Raman. “Perry has been governor for the past 10 years and we don’t

have much to show for it. I think White was a better candidate because he was willing to tackle the deficit and focus on education because Texas is falling behind other states.” John Chapman, advertising senior and spokesman of College Republicans, said that job creation and the economy are the issues voters have focused on lately. “For students especially, we’re about to graduate and want to be certain that we have secure and stable jobs waiting for us,” Chapman said. “People are seeing that Texas is a great place to work, do business and raise a family. Four out of five private sector jobs in the nation have been created in Texas since 2005, and we are the number one state to do business. A lot of that has to do with both leadership of governor Perry and the state of Texas as a whole.” Even for students who support White, some feel that Perry’s victory was inevitable. “Even if a stronger Democratic candidate would come in, Perry would still beat him,” said Leilani Kelley, a government and political communications junior. “People love his policies and what they perceive as his character. He has a very strong base and I think he will continue to win until he stops running.”

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Wire Editor: Cristina Herrera www.dailytexanonline.com

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Wednesday, November 3, 2010

T he Daily T exan

California rejects legal cannabis

Senate Races Arkansas John Boozman (R)

Blanche Lincoln (D)

California Barbara Boxer (D) Carly Fiorina (R)

Delware Chris Coons (D)

Christine O’Donnell (R)

Florida Marco Rubio (R)

Charlie Christ (I) Kendrick Meek (D)

Kentucky

Rand Paul (R) Jack Conway (D)

Nevada Harry Reid (D)

Sharron Angle (R)

Paul Sakuma | Associated Press

Supporter Kainoa Ignacio, from Honolulu, holds up a sign as he makes a Hawaiian greeting during a rally for the legalization of marijuana in California at Sproul Plaza at the University of California, Berkeley. The rally was sponsored by the Students for Sensible Drug Policy, UC-Berkeley Chapter. SAN FRANCISCO — Warned of dangers and legal chaos, California voters Tuesday rejected a measure that would have made their state the first to legalize the use and sale of marijuana. The spirited campaign over Proposition 19 had pitted the state’s political and law enforcement establishment against determined activists seeking to end the prohibition of pot. It was by far the highest-pro-

file of the 160 ballot measures being decided in 37 states. Other measures dealt with abortion, tax cuts and health care reform. On a night of conservative advances in much of the country, Massachusetts voters spurned a chance to cut their taxes — rejecting a proposal to lower the state sales tax from 6.25 percent to 3 percent. Critics said the cut would have forced the state to slash $2.5 billion in services, in-

cluding local aid to cities and towns. In Oklahoma, voters overwhelmingly passed three measures that had dismayed some progressive and immigrantsrights groups. One makes English the state’s “common and unifying language,” another requires a government-issued photo ID in order to vote, and the third prohibits state courts from considering international law or Islamic

law when deciding cases. California’s marijuana proposal — titled the Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act — would have allowed adults 21 and over to possess up to an ounce of pot, consume it in nonpublic places as long as no children were present, and grow it in small private plots. Proposition 19 also would have authorized local governments to permit commercial pot cultiva-

tion, as well as the sale and use of marijuana at licensed establishments. Proponents pitched it as a sensible, though unprecedented, experiment that would provide much-needed revenue for the cash-strapped state, dent the drug-related violence in Mexico by causing pot prices to plummet, and reduce marijuana arrests that they say disproportionately target minority youth.

Tea Party hopefuls lose in Delaware, win Florida battle

Rob Carr | Associated Press

Delaware Republican U.S. Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell waves after voting Tuesday in Wilmington, Del. O’Donnell lost the race to Democrat Chris Coons. WASHINGTON — Christine O’Donnell has been defeated in her Senate bid from Delaware. But another Tea Party hopeful, Marco Rubio, is the winner in Florida. O’Donnell lost to Democrat Chris Coons in the battle for the seat that had been held by Vice President Joe Biden. She had been criticized for her lack of experience and spotty financial history, and was plagued by a videotape from years ago in which she said she “dabbled” in

witchcraft. Rubio defeated independent Gov. Charlie Crist and Democrat Kendrick Meek. New Hampshire Republican Kelly Ayotte, in her first run for office, took the Senate seat that was held by retiring Republican Judd Gregg. Republican Richard Shelby of Alabama and Democrat Barbara Mikulski in Maryland have each won a fifth Senate term. New Hampshire Democrat Gov. John Lynch has won a fourth term.

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New York Charles E. Schumer (D) Jay Townsend (R)

West Virginia

Joe Manchin (D) John Raese (R)

Wisconsin Ron Johnson (R)

Russ Fiengold (D)


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Wednesday, November 3, 2010

OPINION

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Viviana Aldous Susannah Jacob Doug Luippold Dave Player

T HE DAILY T EXAN

OVERVIEW

GALLERY

Texas needs term limits Question: Does Texas have gubernatorial term limits in Texas? Answer: No. While Perry’s victory last night may be fresh, the candidate himself is decidedly not, having served as governor for exactly one decade. Not to be perceived as sore losers or anything, but we’d like to address an issue we’ve been thinking about for some time: term limits. Consider this our first disagreement with the newly re-elected and long-serving governor, whose spokesman said in August that Perry felt the issue of term limits was up to voters’ judgment and that he had no problem with the current system. Bill White called for term limits in August when he said incumbents can lose accountability after they have been entrenched in the political arena for too long. He asserted that unlimited terms constrict competition and new ideas as long-serving public officials become increasingly mired in the current political culture. Furthermore, he noted that term limits make the political process more competitive. White’s argument addresses accountability — and reality. We agree with White and feel, especially looking forward, that Gov. Perry’s stance on term limits squeezes the mechanisms of democracy that were put in place to achieve balance. During the primary, the Austin American-Statesman asked Gov. Perry whether he was planning to run for a fourth term. “I think that is a totally inappropriate question from the standpoint of I have no idea what I want to be doing past November, other than getting to be the governor of the greatest state in the nation,” Perry said. “I’ll let you ask that some other time when it’s more appropriate.” How about now, governor?

Prop 1 passes Proposition 1 passed, but not by a landslide. The issue was a classic example of a universally agreed-upon problem and an enormous disagreement on how to solve it. We can safely say there are a lot of walkers, bikers and drivers in Austin. We could also agree that inadequate roads and sidewalks and traffic are just as universally disliked. Less certain, however, was the number of Travis County residents that supported Prop 1, a divisive proposal that gives the city permission to use $90 million in bonds to improve conditions for city commuters of all three varieties. But, as we pointed out in our endorsement of the proposition on Monday, the defining feature of Prop 1 is that it was all or nothing. With its passage, even in the face of heightened criticism that the proposal doesn’t appropriately address Austin’s wide range of infrastructure issues effectively, we stand by our opinion that the proposition’s benefits — job creation and city improvements — cash in on low recession interest rates, and these benefits outweigh Prop 1’s disadvantages. We encourage those who may not have warmed up to the proposition’s details to embrace its overall aims and support the less divisive goals of decongested traffic, more bikerfriendly roads and an outdoor environment that is appealing to everyone. We can all agree those contributions will improve Austin.

Keep Austin thriving dustry, but the current state of affairs does provide me some comfort. Like most students, I have no idea where my diploma will In the recent cheesy action flick “Machete,” take me, but I won’t complain if I don’t need director Robert Rodriguez offers an interest- to look very far for opportunities. ing glimpse of downtown Austin. The movie Consider the local gaming industry, for exis filled with armed hit men running around ample. More than 130 video game developthe city and racist politicians giving speeches in front of the Capitol, bringing our city’s infamous weirdness to a whole new level. But as improbable as it is to come across a scantily-clad Jessica Alba on Sixth Street, “Machete” does accurately depict one aspect “Thanks to a of Austin: its relatively robust economy. lax business Thanks to a lax business environment and free-spirited culture, Austin has been a magenvironment net for businesses in numerous industries. and free-spirited Rodriguez’s filming of both “Machete” and “Sin City” here gives reason behind Moviculture, Austin emaker Magazine’s regular listing of Aushas been a magnet tin as one of the top five cities for filmmakers. The multitude of high-profile events, for businesses such as the South By Southwest Film Festiin numerous val, Fantastic Fest and the Austin Film Festiindustries.” val, bring central Texas recognition and bigname premieres. With help from the Texas Legislature, which enacted a program that offers tax incentives to production companies, Austin has become a mini-Hollywood. Austin’s economic efficacy is not limited ers contribute $177 million to the Texas econto the entertainment industry either. Even omy annually and provide 3,700 jobs, accordin the current state of the national econo- ing to the Texas Film Commission. Austin is my, businesses are thriving in Austin. And in the vanguard of this boom, and not many who could benefit more from these successes students would have guessed that Electronthan young UT students who will soon grad- ic Arts, Sony and Disney Interactive all have uate and enter the workforce? studios here, making us one of the country’s Now, I don’t have the expertise of radio- hottest gaming areas. It’s interesting to think television-film majors or the good looks of that game you play on your phone during Danny Trejo to land a top job in the film in- your 8 a.m. class was probably developed By Marc Nestenius Daily Texan Columnist

GALLERY

Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Nestenius is a mechanical engineering sophomore.

Require community service By Erin Gleim Daily Texan Columnist

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just down the street. Not surprisingly, the talent our University produces is one of the main draws for businesses. UT graduates are attractive to companies in industries ranging from semiconductors to alternative energy to entertainment. I’m always flattered to read that companies are moving to Austin because of me (and, of course, 50,000 others). It’s true that times are still tough, and finding a job isn’t done while reclining in a La-ZBoy. The Texas economy is facing a projected $25 billion budget deficit, state unemployment is at 8.1 percent and University funding seems like it’s cut by 5 percent every semester. But the damage could be a lot worse, and students should feel confident knowing that their best opportunities could be in and around Austin. To best understand the economic trend that we all can benefit from, just notice biotech company Pain Therapeutics Inc.’s decision to move headquarters from California to Austin. It is just one of 47 companies shifting bases to Austin from California. This type of corporate decision is now a recurring theme in the Austin American-Statesman business section. With graying alumni always reminding me how they wish they would’ve stayed in Austin, I tend to wonder what drove many of them away. I guess factors such as family matters and relocation offers come into play. But at least for our generation of students, a strong local economy is one more reason to keep it weird even after we graduate.

Because the Rangers lost the World Series, Arlington Mayor Robert Cluck will send San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom a gift basket from Spring Creek Barbecue, upholding the traditional wager between the mayors of the cities competing for a championship — usually the loser sends the winner a basket of local delicacies. But this year, the mayors decided to up the ante by adding a community service requirement. If the Rangers had won, Newsom would have come to Texas to work with the Ranger’s youth program, the Miracle League, and Mission Arlington, an Arlington charity. The community service addition to the traditional mayoral wager is just one example of the rising popularity of community service in entertainment and sports. It seems that every celebrity and athlete these days has a foundation, cause or project they have started or support. People follow Angelina Jolie’s activism and service projects, and the projects Michelle Obama supports are very influential. Even Lindsay Lohan has attempted philanthropy, though one of her latest attempts was raising money by auctioning off a signed ketchup bottle. Obviously, our culture values community service and respects those who participate in it. There’s really no argument that community service is not beneficial to both parties involved; both those who give and those who benefit are happier, and voluntarism can transform a community. But how does community service relate to education? Many school districts believe community service has a place in education. The only real point of contention is whether or not community service should be mandatory and if not, the question is how to incorporate it into a school’s curriculum. More and more high schools have mandatory community service requirements in graduation plans. Some schools require a certain number of hours and others require active participation in a service organization or project over the years. Some schools, mostly private, have programs where students perform community service as a part of a class or are given time for service during school hours.

Many question the effectiveness of mandatory community service. Since the projects are not done of the individual’s own volition, some claim that the service becomes a chore and students miss the point. Those who do not support the requirement contend “mandatory voluntarism” is a contradiction in terms and argue that it’s easy to adopt the mindset of “getting hours” instead of serving or helping others. At UT, there is no community service requirement for graduation, but there is plenty of student involvement in the community, as anyone walking through the West Mall can see. We have more than 150 student groups officially listed as “service organizations,” and these organizations make a visible difference on campus and in the community. But it would be possible to graduate from UT with no exposure to community involvement, and that shouldn’t be an option. I’m not an advocate for having to collect and log service hours, but there are ways the University can help all of its graduates become involved in the community. A service learning requirement or even a mandatory seminar on how a students’ major and interest can translate into service to the community would be enough. It could even be a part of the required freshman signature courses students. Community service is important, and the University should be doing something to encourage community participation from students. It’s one of the best ways to contribute to and learn about your community, and there is a project or cause for everyone. Service is also a means of learning about yourself. It’s a shame it’s not expected of all students. And sure, things like that can be a drag — especially since there would be a time commitment and there are already a million things to do before we graduate. But if Longhorns can rectify taking core classes in subjects they dislike to learn information or skills they’ll almost certainly never use again, all with the end goal of being a more well-rounded student, some sort of community service requirement isn’t asking much and will certainly make us all more well-rounded people. If Lindsay can handle it, I think we Longhorns can, too. Gleim is a journalism freshman.


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ElEction 2010

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Austinites pass bond to improve transportation By Yvonne Marquez Daily Texan Staff Austin residents passed a $90 million bond to improve roadways and construct bike lanes and sidewalks on Tuesday. Get Austin Moving, a political action committee in favor of the Strategic Mobility Bond, or Proposition 1, celebrated at Shoal Creek Saloon on Tuesday evening. “It’s a smart decision for a smart city,” said committee treasurer Ted Siff. “Transportation solutions will happen faster, cheaper and better because the voters and the majority have passed Proposition 1.” Mayor Lee Leffingwell said the City Council’s messages got across to voters that something needed to be done now to alleviate mobility issues. “We have to make progress. This is the first step. Traffic is not going to be better than when it was this morning,” Leffingwell said. “We are already planning the next step. Gradually we’re going to get a handle on this thing.” Leah Fillion, spokeswoman for the city’s transportation department, said they determined what projects should be prioritized through community input from different methods of outreach and surveys. “We figured out a priority list with the highest wants in the community,” Fillion said. Target start dates for construction depends on each individual

project, Fillion said. “Some of them are ready to go, shovel at the ready,” she said. “These projects would be immediately funded. Some projects are still ideas that need developing. All the projects would be in different stages.” The most expensive project on the Strategic Mobility Plan will be spent on roadway reconstruction, with a proposed bond funding of $19.5 million. A boardwalk trail on Lady Bird Lake is budgeted for a proposed amount of $14.4 million. Tom Wald, the executive director of League of Bicycling Voters, said with any growing city, officials need to pay more attention to different modes of transportation. He said people want more choices and safer routes. “The idea of completing the bicycle network is to not just serve the needs of bicyclists but to serve the needs of more Austinites who want to bike but can’t because there’s not a complete and safe network,” Wald said. “The conditions right now are pretty poor. It’s going to take some time to complete the bike network.” Transportation engineering professor Chandra Bhat said improving transportation issues would not be as effective as reducing demand on the roads. “Investing money in simply improving roadways is a catch-22,” Bhat said. “You widen roadways and you design new roadways and more people want travel, and it gets congested again. That is

Ryan Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Mayor Lee Leffingwell answers questions at Shoal Creek Saloon on Tuesday evening about Proposition 1, a $90 million bond package that seeks to improve transportation around Austin. an issue with pumping in money Bhat said he doesn’t think the and only improving the supply proposition is going to relieve side of it and not doing anything traffic congestion right away but to reduce the demand.” has the potential to help in the

long term. “The improvements are a bit isolated, and can help relieve some congestion in certain ar-

eas,” he said. “But for a region as a whole, I don’t think it’s any kind of magic bullet that will relieve congestion tomorrow.”

GOP expands control of Texas House of Representatives By Audrey White Daily Texan Staff Republicans widened their majority in the Texas House of Representatives, taking 22 seats from Democrats Tuesday night. The 99 Republicans and 51 Democrats in the new state house must balance the budget, bearing the burden of a deficit that could be as high as $25 million. Texas Republican Party spokesman Chris Elam said the “seismic” shift is even more dramatic than what the U.S. saw in the national house. “It’s a shift that is historic not just in Texas but in national history,” Elam said. “It’s hard to over appreciate the gravitas of this situation. With a 100-50 in the house, conservative principles are the name of the game now.” Republicans and Democrats disagreed on the reasons for the massive gains. Republicans tout-

ed grassroots campaigning and strong conservative Texas values, while Democrats suggested that Republicans simply rode the wave of anti-Washington sentiment that has swept the country in the past few months. “From the top to the bottom of the ballot, Texas Republicans have run against Obama,” said Texas Democratic Party spokeswoman Kirsten Gray. “They have talked about Obama and Pelosi. We don’t know a thing about their priorities in Texas or their plans for the $25 billion deficit.” Central Texas saw several Republicans take seats from Democrats, including Valinda Bolton’s loss to Paul Workman in District 47, Jason Isaac’s victory over Patrick Rose in District 45 and Larry Gonzales’ 20-point win over freshman incumbent Diana Maldonado in District 52. Democrat Donna

Howard kept her seat in District 48 by only 15 votes. “In the Texas house, Republicans had a better night than many were predicting,” said UT public affairs lecturer Sherri Greenberg. “There were a lot of races in play in the Texas house, up to 25 or so. Some of these seats in Travis County and Central Texas were Republican seats that Democrats held onto, and those Democrats like Patrick Rose had real opponents in a big Republican year.” Rose, a seven-year incumbent, said he is proud of his work in the house during his terms, and he hopes Isaac continues to prioritize District 45. Isaac said his top priorities include balancing the budget to cut spending without raising taxes, improving benefits for public school teachers and hot legislative issues such as promoting concealed carry on

college campuses. “It’s about getting back to fiscal responsibility, working with budget problems we have and cutting spending,” Isaac said. “I want us to be the model. I want businesses to aspire to be as efficient as the Texas state government.” Legislative topics such as concealed carry and immigration are likely to see much more time on

the house floor with such a strong conservative majority, Greenberg said. However, she, like Republican and Democratic candidates and representatives, said tackling the state’s budget deficit must be a top priority. “It’s going to be a tough budget year, there has never been any doubt about that,” Greenberg said. “But there is certainly going to be

much more pressure on not raising taxes because that’s the platform people were running on. That’s a tough situation when you’re looking at more than $21 billion in the hole.” Texas Republicans recognize the responsibility they have to the Texans who elected them and will act on that mandate to return Texas to conservative principles, Elam said.

APPLICATIONS are being accepted for the following student position with Texas Student Media:

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Managing Editor, Spring 2011 Application forms and a list of qualifications are available from the office of the Director, William Randolph Hearst Building (HSM) 2500 Whitis Avenue, Room 3.304. Jason Isaac R, District 45

Donna Howard D, District 48

Larry Gonzales R, District 52

The TSM Board of Operating Trustees will interview applicants and appoint a Managing Editor for Spring 2011 at the November 19, 2010, Board Meeting.

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ElEction 2010

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Lt. Gov. re-elect David Dewhurst gives his victory speech Tuesday night alongside his wife and daughter at the Texas Disposal Systems’ Exotic Game Ranch in Buda.

StatewideRaces U

nderneath the chandeliers of the Driskill Hotel, a mass of dreary Democratic candidates and supporters watched Tuesday night’s election results as Republicans kept their hold on every statewide office. While the U.S. House of Representatives shifted control from Democratic to Republican lawmakers in a wave of anti-incumbent sentiments, Texas will see many of the same faces in its executive positions. Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Attorney General Greg Abbott, State Comptroller Susan Combs, as well as the Texas land and agriculture commissioners, won re-election over their Democratic and Libertarian challengers. David Porter, the Republican candidate for railroad commissioner, defeated incumbent Victor Carrillo in the Republican primary.

Bill Minutaglio, a UT clinical professor of journalism and long-time investigative reporter for The Dallas Morning News, said he originally thought the “down-ballot” races in Texas would be closer, but Democrats inherited a tide of ill will directed at President Barack Obama. Minutaglio said the Tea Party movement equated Obama’s message of change with socialism, which meant Democrats had to change their message. “The Democrats had their one ace pulled out of their hands,” he said. Shortly after declaring victory, Dewhurst said the election will ultimately determine who will govern — Washington, D.C. or American citizens. He said without raising taxes, Texas will protect its essential services, create jobs and secure the borders. “Tomorrow, we will start taking

power away from Washington and put it back in the hands of the people where it belongs,” Dewhurst said. “We’ll start right here in Texas, by passing a resolution out of the Texas Senate, insisting that Washington pass a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution.” James Aldrete, spokesman for Democratic lieutenant governor candidate Linda Chavez-Thompson, said the fallacy of the Texas policy of balancing budgets is that it means shifting costs to families in the future rather than eliminating budget holes through cuts. “Just because you recognize a bill on the table and don’t pay it doesn’t mean you’re being fiscally conservative or balancing a budget,” Aldrete said. Overall, the Republican candidates boasted more financial firepower throughout the election season. Abbott

Republicans keep hold of executive seats despite wave of anti-incumbent sentiments By Collin Eaton

had $9.3 million in cash on hand while his Democratic opponent, Barbara Ann Radnofsky, had $354,000. After his win, Abbott said he would fight the Environmental Protection Agency on its takeover of state pollution permits. “We will fight the EPA with the twin principles of jurisprudence — that they should get out and stay out,” Abbot said. Radnofsky said she hopes her campaign has shown Abbott reasons to legally combat Wall Street corruption. “Wall Street fraud has cost Texas taxpayers billions and billions of dollars,” Radnofsky said. Democrat Hank Gilbert lost to Republican Todd Staples for the second consecutive election cycle for agriculture commissioner, a position that regulates pesticide use, exports of livestock and checks the accuracy of gas station and grocery store

weights and measures. Incumbent Republican Jerry Patterson defeated his challenger, Democratic candidate Hector Uribe, for land commissioner. Harold Cook, a Democratic strategist, said Texas Democrats could not have done anything to prevent a nationwide tidal wave of Republican victories. “Republicans did everything they could to make state elections national, and they succeeded in state after state, including Texas,” Cook said. “Perry is positioning to run for president, and both Abbott and Dewhurst want to run for the ON THE WEB: U.S. Senate, which makes me wonCheck out a video of the Democratic der who’s mindwatch party ing the store as Texas deals with a @dailytexan online.com $25 billion deficit.”

Moderates, two Democrats Precinct turns away unaware voters elected to education board Judge encourages early voting By Allie Kolechta Daily Texan Staff The influence of the State Board of Education’s conservative bloc, which has dominated the board’s politics for two years, may have taken a hit Tuesday night, after a group of six more moderate Republicans and two Democrats were elected to the 15-member board. Republican Marsha Farney won her bid for District 10, which includes most of Central Texas, against Democrat Judy Jennings, 55 to 40 percent. Libertarian candidate Jessica Dreesen garnered about 4 percent of the vote. The board’s focus should shift from politics to the students’ best interest by focusing on evidence-based research instead of ideology, Farney said. “Practical experience in the field of education will add a valuable voice and perspective,” said Farney, a former elementary school teacher and middle and high school counselor. “Having the input of someone with my background and experience will strengthen the board.” She said she has already started compiling a list of people who she considers experts in curriculum and instruction, drawing from the 16 counties in her district. Her plans include narrowing the achievement gap in math classes for minorities and females, she said. “The decisions made by the State Board of Education should not be based on ideology, but on the best interest of our children,” she said. “Politics should not be a part of the discussion, and it never has been

for me. It’s always been about making Texas public schools the best they can be.” Democratic challenger Jennings could not be reached for comment. The board’s recent debates about global warming, evolution and history text book revisions drew negative attention to Texas and its education system, said Ryan Valentine, deputy director of the Texas Freedom Network, a progressive grassroots organization. “We’ve just come off two very contentious curriculum debates in science,” he said. “They brought international scorn and derision to Texas, so a heightened attention has been brought to the board and this elecJudy Jennings tion.” Since 2007, Cynthia Dunbar, a Republican from Richmond, has represented District 10. She championed the social conservative bloc’s proposed social studies textbook revisions, which included sidelining Thomas Jefferson and the state’s prominent role in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Dunbar announced in December that Marsha Farney she was not seeking re-election for a second term. The Texas Association of School Boards, a nonprofit group representing Texas school districts, worked this election cycle to educate voters on the board’s mission and importance, said Dominic Giarratani, the group’s assistant director. “Regardless of who sits [on the board], we have to work with them on a daily basis,” Giarratani said. “It’s an important election and we hope the new board members be open to collaboration.”

People line up to vote at Ridgetop Elementary School in Hyde Park on Tuesday afternoon before polls close. The GOP swept the state in wins.

after students attempt to cast ballots at incorrect location

By Ahsika Sanders Daily Texan Staff More than half of the students who attempted to vote at the Flawn Academic Center were not aware that on Election Day, ballots can only be cast at the precinct in which voters live. Out of the more than 2,000 voters who showed up at the FAC to cast their ballots on Tuesday, only 853 were actually allowed to vote. Precinct 148, the FAC location, is restricted to those who live on campus and surrounding areas. By 2 p.m., more than 1,200 people were turned away, said voting judge John McEvoy. “Sorry, but you have to go to your own precinct to cast your ballot,” McEvoy repeatedly told voters. “You could have gone anywhere during early voting, folks. That’s one more reason to get out before Election Day.” The biggest problem at the polls is voters who are unaware of the precinct restrictions, he said, leaving him and fellow judges to act as bearers of bad news. “Most of them have no idea which precinct they fall under,” he said. “So when they show up, I get to tell them they can’t vote here after they’ve waited in line for 30 minutes.” McEvoy said much of students’ confusion stems from the fact that they either saw crowds voting early at the FAC or voted there during the 2008 elections. “A solution would be to do early voting some place else so people will actually have to look for their precinct instead of assuming it’s here,” he said. “But that would cause an inconvenience, so we’re kind of stuck.” Undeclared freshman Paige Brown said she hoped to vote for the first time

Shereen Ayub Daily Texan Staff

but was turned away, putting a damper on her first voting experience. “I was pretty frustrated. I thought you could just show up, vote and go,” she said. “People were annoyed because you hear ‘You can go vote at the FAC,’ but that wasn’t the case for everyone.” Brown, who lives in the Town Lake apartments off Riverside, did not vote this year because she had no means of getting to her correct precinct, she said. Early voting eliminates the problem of precinct confusion because voters can cast their ballot at any polling place

in the county, said Mary Fero, spokeswoman for the Travis County Clerk’s Office. Early voting totals for 2010 indicate a marginal increase over 2006 in overall voter turnout in Travis County, she said. About 22 percent of registered voters cast their ballot during early voting, which ran from Oct. 21 to Oct. 29, according to county voting records. “We also have mobile voting, where we change early voting locations so more people can access different poll sites and chose the one that’s most convenient,” she said.


7 SPTS

SPORTS

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

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ENTER NOW 5–ON–5 BASKETBALL TEAMWORK STARTS HERE www.utrecsports.org

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

WOMAN’S SOCCER

Horns open tournament against Sooners

SIDELINE SOCCER BIG 12 TOURNAMENT VS.

Texas vs. Oklahoma Date: Today Time: 11:30 a.m. Where: San Antonio

WHAT TO WATCH VS.

NCAA Football Rutgers Scarlet Knights vs. South Florida Bulls Date: Tonight Time: 6 p.m. Where: Tampa, FL Watch: ESPN2

SPORTS BRIEFLY Big East looking to expand to 10 teams in football

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan file photo

Junior midfielder Kylie Doniak celebrates with her teammates after scoring against Oklahoma earlier this season. Doniak leads Texas with six goals this season. By Lauren Giudice Daily Texan Staff In their final three matches of the season, the 25th-ranked Longhorns had well fought matches against three of the top four seeds in the Big 12 Tournament. They have the ability to play with anyone.

“Our whole mindset this season has been to start strong, finish stronger,” said Big 12 second team member Kylie Doniak. “We’re ready for tournament, we’re ready to finish the season strong and go out with a championship.” Texas will be playing OU in its first match of the Big 12 playoffs. Earli-

er this season, the Longhorns lost to them 2-1 in double overtime — a game UT should have won. “One game at a time. We want a ring, we want a championship. We’re here to win, and I think we have a great chance to do so,” Doniak said. Head coach Chris Petrucelli said the

BIG 12 TOURNAMENT PREVIEW

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With the second lowest goals against average in the Big 12, the Aggies will be difficult to score on. Though their defense is stellar, they are not a one-sided team and are tied for second in goals for in the Big 12.

2

The Cowgirls have given up only eight goals all season and first team all-Big 12 goalkeeper Adrianna Franch has four shutouts and a .80 goals against average. This team is far from lacking offensively with forwards Krista Lopez and Kyndall Treadwell leading the attack.

3

Sophomore forward Morgan Marlborough leads the conference with 16 goals, but the Cornhuskers need to find a way to get better on the defensive end — they have the fourth highest goals against average and are tied for eighth in shutouts in the Big 12.

4

Led by forward Whitney Palmer, the Sooners hope to perform well in their first postseason appearance since 2006. The fourth seed is the team’s best in program history. Oklahoma is 1-5 when surrendering the game’s first goal and Texas will look to capitalize on that today.

team needs to stay healthy and that the players have continued to improve throughout the season. “We’re going in there with the thought of winning it,” Petrucelli said. “You go into a tournament to try to win the championship, so that is our mindset.”

By Lauren Guidice | Daily Texan Staff

VS.

The Buffs, who finished eighth in the Big 12 regular season are also eighth in points, goals and shutouts. The team has the lowest amount of saves and the second lowest amount of shutouts. Junior Kate Russell leads the Buffs with 11 points on three goals and five assists.

8

VS.

Jessica Fuston, named Big 12 Conference Rookie of the Year, is tied for second in points and goals in the Big 12. They have other strong offensive threats in Taylor Lytle and Jessica Disabella, but the team has the second most goals allowed this season with 20.

7

VS.

Last season’s Big 12 regular season title winners are tied for second in most goals scored in the Big 12 but have allowed the most with 21. Senior forward Alysha Bonnick leads the attack and is tied for 10th in points and eighth in goals in the Big 12.

VS.

Tied for first in most shutouts, tied for first in lowest goals allowed and the lowest goals against average makes Texas the best defense in the Big 12. Led by goalie Alexa Gaul and senior Erica Campanelli the defense has been strong and countered the team’s low scoring offense.

FOOTBALL

6 5

COLUMN

forward to this season’s nightmare, and they’ve reached the red zone 36 times but only scored 15 touchdowns. “We’ve been able to move the ball down the field pretty well,” said left tackle Kyle Hix. “We just have to be more productive in the red zone and get touchdowns instead of field goals.” While kicker Justin Tucker racks it up and leads the team in scoring, the rest of Texas’ offense fails miserably. Nearly ev-

Wide receiver Malcolm Williams lines up against Baylor on Saturday.

1

Missouri 7-1 (3-1)

2

Nebraska 7-1 (3-1)

3

Iowa State 5-4 (3-2)

4

Kansas State 5-3 (2-3)

5

Colorado 3-5 (0-4)

6

Kansas 2-6 (0-4)

1

Baylor 7-2 (4-1)

2

Oklahoma 7-1 (3-1)

3

Oklahoma State 7-1 (3-1)

4

Texas A&M 5-3 (2-2)

5

Texas 4-4 (2-3)

6

Texas Tech 4-4 (2-4)

Photo courtesy of Greg Shipman

A sign displayed during Saturday’s loss to Baylor shows Texas fans’ frustration with the football team this season.

Texas’ rough season not easy for fans to witness

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

BIG 12 STANDINGS

SOUTH

ery regular starter has been responsible for at least one blown touchdown. Whether it’s an interception, a dropped pass, a false start or a bad run, everybody hurts. “I don’t think it’s one particular reason,” said running back Tre’ Newton. “We’ve just been making mistakes and not executing. I feel like we’ve been hurting ourselves more than

HORNS continues on page 8

FOOTBALL NORTH

Longhorn red zone woes continue By Jordan Godwin Daily Texan Staff The Longhorn offense has been deathly ill this season, but the good news is the coaches think they’ve finally found the diagnosis — they’re not scoring enough. But it’s not quite that simple. The Longhorns are moving the ball down the field, but when they get inside the 20-yard line, they choke. So why can’t they score in the red zone? “I think there are a couple of things,” said offensive coordinator Greg Davis. “One, I think I’ve been a little conservative in the red zone trying to get points. I think there are some opportunities that we had that we didn’t come up with. So we’re going to look at a few things and see if we can give our guys some better chances.” The truly curious thing is the fact that they’re getting enough yards to score. Texas ranks a mediocre 69th in the nation in yards and a distant 82nd in scoring. At this point last year, the Longhorns had reached the red zone 38 times, scoring 24 touchdowns. Fast-

PHILADELPHIA — The Big East conference is set to expand its football roster. Big East presidents unanimously agreed to expand the number of football-playing schools to 10 at Tuesday’s board of directors meeting in Philadelphia. Commissioner John Marinatto said in a statement potential expansion candidates will start to be evaluated. The 16-member Big East, where all members play basketball, has eight teams playing football. There was no timetable announced for a decision. One obvious candidate to join is Villanova. Other potential expansion targets include TCU from the Mountain West Conference, and Central Florida, Houston from Conference USA. While Texas schools seem like an odd fit geographically, it would allow the Big East to tap into huge television markets, as well as fertile recruiting territory. — The Associated Press

By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Columnist Some teams make scoring points look too easy. It’s contagious. They can’t stop. Texas is not one of these teams. For the Longhorns, getting touchdowns is like pulling teeth. And as difficult as it is for them to score touchdowns, it is just as difficult for fans to watch them try.

Football is usually fun and entertaining to watch, but when it comes to watching the Longhorns, it is the exact opposite. It is painful. It hurts the eyes. It is handoff after handoff being stopped for little to no yards. And then, before you know it, it’s third-and-long — a perfect time to change the channel or if

FANS continues on page 8

Check out: Interviews from Basketball Media Day

@dailytexanonline.com


8 SPTS

8

SportS

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

VolleybAll NoTebook

Kocher at home back in starting lineup

point, players must take onus From page 7

Junior setter, co-captain retains starting position, Horns haven’t lost since By Shabab Siddiqui Daily Texan Staff When freshman setter Hannah Allison went down, the Longhorns spent very little time in a panic. After all, junior setter Michelle Kocher — the team’s “backup” — may be one of the best setters in the conference, regardless of whether she is starting or not. Kocher’s tenure at Texas has been nothing short of unconventional. The Wheaton, Ill.native came to the 40 Acres at the heels of the departure of All-American and Texas’ alltime assists leader Michelle Moriarty. Kocher stepped right in and delivered, starting 31 out of 33 games and garnering Big 12 Freshman of the Year honors. In last year ’s championship runner-up season, Kocher was asked to step down as the lone setter and split time with former Longhorn and All-American Ashley Engle. Head coach Jerritt Elliott often employed a two-setter rotation, so Kocher still saw time on the court. This season started off differently as Kocher, despite being named the team’s assistant co-captain, started off on the bench, as the team opted for a 5-1 rotation with Allison as the setter. Kocher mostly played at the end of blowout matches. Kocher got the starting nod against Texas Tech after Allison went down with an injury, and the Longhorns have not looked back. The team has dropped one set in going 5-0, including an upset of then-second-ranked Nebraska at home, in which Cornhuskers head coach John Cook credited Kocher as the primary difference between the Longhorns’ win in Austin and their loss in Lincoln. Junior outside hitter Amber Roberson and senior middle blocker Jennifer Doris have

horns: At some

Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan file photo

Junior Michelle Kocher has been in and out of the starting lineup during her career at Texas but has remained solid, whatever her role.

seen major statistical increases in kills and hitting percentage. Kocher, who along with her assists nearly averages doubledigit digs, said it has been an interesting ride. “It’s been a rollercoaster experience, but in the same aspect, I’m in the gym every day, so in my eyes, it hasn’t totally affected how I’ve played because every day you’ve still got to put in the time, put in the effort,” said Kocher, who won Big 12 Player of the Week accolades two weeks ago. “I’m still a part of the team whether I’m on the court or not.It’s been different, but fun.”

The Silver Cloud of Injuries While battling with injuries played a part in the Longhorns’ early-season struggles with consistency and continuity, they have also made some tough coaching decisions easier. The team has fought its way back to a top-10 ranking despite many of its top players recovering, which serves as an indication of Texas’ depth. “It’s easy, we stay the same,” Elliott said on maintaining continuity. “We don’t have any other options. Who we have is what we have right now, so I really can’t mess up the lineup right now.”

At the conclusion of the season, the Longhorns will have to part ways with Doris and senior outside hitters Juliann Faucette and Lauren Dickson. But the team will also be welcoming back Allison, junior libero Sydney Yogi, freshman outside hitter Ashley Bannister and sophomore outside hitter Bailey Webster. Throw in the incoming freshmen class and other role players, and the sheer numbers will likely lead to competitive position battles. With the rest of the season and a potentially-deep playoff run still ahead for the team, it may be too early to be thinking about next season.

Longhorns Statistically in the Conference With powerful hitting backing the Longhorns’ current eightgame winning streak, the team leads the conference in hitting percentage (.293) and fourth in kills per set (13.6). It also stands second in blocks per set and service aces per set. Among individuals, Texas’ pair of middle blockers are first and third respectively in hitting percentage with Doris at .439 and junior Rachael Adams at .435. Facette is the team’s top point scorer, averaging 3.81 points per set, which is seventh in the conference.

anything. We just need to focus more and try to come away with touchdowns.” It doesn’t matter how much the players and coaches focus on it week in and week out, the Longhorns somehow find a way to come up short. Many have blamed the lack of scoring on Davis’ play-calling, but at some point, the players have to take some of the responsibility. “The coaches have put a big emphasis on finding the end zone and scoring more touchdowns, especially in the red zone,” Newton said. “I’m sure they’ll have a great game plan for us, and it’s our job to execute that game plan which will hopefully lead to more touchdowns.” Some have suggested the Longhorns simply place too much pressure on themselves when they’re threatening. Most of their struggles have come at home in Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium when 100,000 rowdy fans are on edge, waiting to erupt at a score. Even the Texas Cowboys have prematurely fired Smokey the Cannon several times this season in anticipation of a score that didn’t happen. “We just need to relax, have fun and execute,” said receiver Malcolm Williams. “It seems like sometimes we get in the red zone and start to get tight. We just really need to go in there and keep pushing forward.” The toughest part about the lack of red zone scoring is the fact that no one entity is at fault. It’s everyone and anyone near the playing field. But it won’t get much easier this weekend in Kansas State against a defense that has allowed just 11 touchdowns in 25 trips for opponents. They rank 104th in yards allowed and 66th in points allowed. But regardless of how many yards the Longhorns can get, the only number that matters is the score. “For the last couple of weeks, we have said that there is an area that we need to improve,” Davis said. “We’re just not getting touchdowns.”

Fans: Football team borderline

boring, looks to avoid toilet bowl From page 7

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you are at the game, go to the bathroom, get a corndog or even head back to your tailgate and snag a couple beers. It is understandable that fans don’t want to watch this team. Many aren’t. Many who choose to come or watch the game on TV do it for the sole purpose of booing and being negative Nancies. Some bring signs (including the one that accompanies this column) showing their disgust. The sign, which real fans were holding last week against Baylor, reflects dissatisfaction with offensive coordinator Greg Davis. A few are staying until the end, and head coach Mack Brown is hoping that they continue to show

up and support the Longhorns. “I know it’s hard to do when we’re not playing very well,” Brown said. “It’s unusual. I ask you to do that for the next four weeks for these kids. They are trying. The coaches are trying. I appreciated you hanging in there and helping us as much as you could.” Things sure do change quickly. A year ago, vacations were already being planned to Pasadena a month before it was certain Texas was going to the National Championship. Now, it is unclear if the Longhorns will even make a bowl. Who would have thought? If they do, the destination won’t be as nice as Pasadena. A return trip to Houston is possible in the Texas Bowl. Or the Alamo Bowl in San Antonio could be nice. El

Paso’s Sun Bowl may be a bit of a reach. Last year, a five-loss Oklahoma team was in the Sun Bowl. This year’s Texas team is being compared to those Sooners. But they are far from it. The Sooners’ struggles all came on the road and happened largely because of multiple major injuries including Heisman Trophy winner Sam Bradford. The Sooners lost to good teams on the road last season. And we all laughed. Now it’s their turn. You can see the smiles and hear the laughter of Sooners all the way from Norman. Maybe it’s all a nightmare. Maybe that alarm is about to go off and all of a sudden everything will be better. If so, don’t hit the snooze.

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TONIGHT USA NETWORK INVITES YOU TO AN EXCLUSIVE ADVANCE SCREENING OF AN ALL-NEW EPISODE OF PSYCH Wednesday, November 3, 2010 Doors Open 6:00 PM Texas Union Theatre

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YOU MUST HAVE A TICKET TO ENTER THE SCREENING. LIMITED SEATING. ARRIVE EARLY. FIRST COME FIRST SERVED. VALID SCHOOL ID REQUIRED. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. Open only to students and faculty who are 18 years of age or older. LIMITED SEATING. ARRIVE EARLY. Seating is on a first come, first seated basis. Tickets will only be available while supplies last and DO NOT guarantee admission. Admission is only open to the first 373 students or faculty who arrive with a valid ticket. Tickets must be surrendered upon entrance. NO RECORDING DEVICES ARE ALLOWED INTO THIS SCREENING. Apple® iPad Giveaway: NO PURCHASE NECESSARY Void where prohibited Limit one entry per person Open only to students and faculty attending the Psych screening who are 18 years of age or older and permanent legal residents of the 50 US states or DC Must be present to win Begins on


11 ENT/CLASS

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Life&Arts

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Dog: ‘Show One’ is first

vIDEO GAME REvIEW

Super meat boy, kirby’S epic yarn

installment of nine parts From page 12 relations. In this regard, it feels like the best of science fiction instead of fantasy. “Dog” is planned to be a ninevolume series, and the scope of the project is immediately palpable. The 400-page “Show One,” which is about as dense as a Thomas Pynchon novel, has introduced dozens of human and animal characters in locals all over the world and across decades of time. The title page occurs after a 46-page prologue partially set in the 1950s. “Show One” ends with a definitive “to be continued,” and the titular Duncan isn’t introduced to the reader yet. “If I were a more patient man, I would’ve just spent 50 years making the whole thing,” Hines said. “I just prefer to have one big story and so that’s the kind of comic I’m

most interested in making.” Hines was introduced to comics from an early age. His father, a journalist, originally had intentions of being a newspaper cartoonist, and would bring home strip collections of “Peanuts,” “Krazy Kat” and other classic comics. So it was not surprising that Hines became infatuated with the medium, and started drawing comics as a child. “A confluence of events came together at the right time: We had got a dog, Duncan, who I was enamored with. I had started reading super hero comics and I could draw well enough that you could now understand the difference between a person and a mailbox, so I started making ‘Duncan the Wonder Dog.’” That was when I was 6, and I’ve just continued making those books since.”

SKiNNY: Recipes aim to expand

readers’ diets, promote health From page 12 rely on fake meats. That is just a baby step.” Fearing that America has taken a permanent step out of the kitchen, Barnouin decided to create a vegan cookbook that reflected seasonality and sustainability while still maintaining her skinny bitch sass. She hopes the book is a testament to how innovative,

simple and easy vegan meals are to prepare. “For me, food has a capacity to affect your life in so many ways. It is the soul of the house. It’s such a way to gather people together,” Barnouin said. “I wanted to keep sassiness and humor in the book. That is what ‘Skinny Bitch’ is about. It’s like a best friend who is going to tell it to you straight and honest.”

fooD: Dishes mix comfort, flavor From page 12 taste to the Korean barbecued beef, it literally melts in your mouth. The acid from the pickled daikons and onions was also a nice contrast to the sweetness of the meat. Despite the dish being mainly of tongue, a type of meat not eaten on a daily basis, Chadwick said the beef tongue is the most popular dish on the menu. Another customer favorite, Chadwick said, is the Korean-style, deep fried crispy chicken. This dish is so popular that it usually sells out by the time dinner starts and on this night, it was sold-out. However, the steak sliders are thinly cut and cooked until moist and soft and the steak is served between buttery toasted buns. A deep-fried ball of chicken-fried steak gravy, wedged on top of day, month day, 2008

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“Super Meat Boy” (Xbox 360, Wii, PC, Mac) If “Super Meat Boy” doesn’t give you an aneurysm, at the very least it will give you post-traumatic stress disorder. In what has to be one of the most difficult games commercially released in years, “Super Meat Boy” is a strangely addictive, minimalist platformer. Its creators, Team Meat, are sadistic pranksters. Their heart belongs to the ’80s — the game’s worlds open with cinematics parodying intros from classic games, and some levels imitate

el design and disjointed structure keep it from being elevated to the level of “VVVVVV,” a very similar game released earlier this year. As it stands, “Super Meat Boy” is a flawed love letter to all things retro and indie. It’s a tough love that will leave your thumbs sore for days.

Grade: B “Kirby’s Epic Yarn” (Wii) Kirby is for the children and it’s not because he is an adorable, pink amorphous blob. The “Kirby” series has always been easy to a fault, with the exception of the brilliant “Kirby: Canvas Curse.” The latest entry in the series is as amiable and harmless as ever. All is not right in Patch Land. Kirby has been turned into yarn, and as a result, remains impossibly cute, leaving you wanting to

hug the screen. The yarn aesthetic gives the game a unique look. Even more impressive is how the game embraces the concept, letting Kirby traverse behind fabric, swing on buttons and unweave enemies. Like a perfectly cooked meal without seasoning, the lack of challenge has ruined what is an excellently designed game. You cannot die; instead of feeling tension, you are taking a leisurely stroll to collect gems and other collectibles. This wouldn’t be so bad if the collectibles weren’t obviously placed, feeling like busy work rather than the brain-twisters of “New Super Mario Bros. Wii.” With no reasonable incentive to play beyond its cheerful, creative visuals, I have to conclude this is a game for stoners and your little sister.

Grade: C

movie: Weak characters plague strong comedy plot departure from what came before it, as the team finally embarks the characters. Lindsay is fantas- on their terrorist attack. While tic, all bluster and self-conviction,1 Morris keeps the laughs comeven as it becomes clear that his ing, they’re uncomfortable, nerplans are beyond awful. vous chuckles, and the film transThe film’s final act is a marked forms into something of a trage-

From page 12

CLASSIFIEDS

dy. The poignancy of the ending came as a surprise relative to the film’s first hour, but the ending feels honest to what came before it, and is chilling and effective. “Four Lions” is a film with weak characters populating a

strong story. It’s a triumph with more on its mind than cheap laughs — the rare comedy that reaches for a surprisingly social relevance and sticks the landing.

Grade: B-

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Game Boy and Atari 2600 visuals — but the game’s clever, refined design suggests they aren’t stuck in the past. In fact, the game includes 12 playable characters from recent indie hits, such as “Braid” and “Bit. Trip Runner.” “Super Meat Boy” is a sequel to the 2-year-old Newgrounds flash game “Meat Boy.” The spirit and mechanics remain the same: You run and jump across 350+ stages that are typically beat in under 30 seconds. Above all, you die a lot. A whole lot. One of the most amusing additions is the replay video you are shown at the end of completing a stage. In it, you see every attempt you made overlapping each other. It’s a cathartic moment of victory as you watch 30 or more failed attempts running into buzz saws, as one determined Meat Boy makes it to the end. As charming and well designed as the game is, the game’s rapid-fire lev-

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the steak, is a surprising touch to the slider. When popped, the gravy smoothly melts into the slider and adds a rich, comforting taste. The pommes frites, or French fries, like the steak slider, was a taste of comfort. Thinly cut, crisped to perfection and slightly salted, the frites was served with a cool sauce that’s mainly composed of Sriracha sauce and mayonnaise. The sauce paired with the frites changes each day, Chadwick said. Earlier in the morning, he had served a fresh blend of cucumber with it. Chadwick’s refined palate shines through and through in his genius creations. Though appearing simple and comforting, Not Your Mama’s lives up to its name.

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12 LIFE

LIFE&ARTS

12

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Life&Arts Editor: Amber Genuske E-mail: lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

FOOD REVIEW

COMIC BOOK REVIEW

NOT YOUR MAMA’S

DUNCAN THE WONDER DOG

Trailer creates Asian sensation ‘Duncan’ displays

alternate, militant animal’s lifestyles

By Ao Meng Daily Texan Staff Coming out of nowhere with “Duncan the Wonder Dog,” a postmodern epic about talking and reasoning animals, Adam Hines has taken the comics world by storm with his richly dense art. The first volume in the Chicago-based artist’s series, “Show One,“ is a veritable tome that grandly exhibits Hines’ singular and extensive vision. “Duncan was always going to be a book,” Hines said. “Even if I had to steal money to do it.” To use a very sophomoric expression, ”Duncan the Wonder Dog” is like Chris Ware’s architectural experimentalism by way of Henry Darger’s mixed-media art. Animals around the world are sentient and can communicate both with each other and with humans. They philosophize, they have feelings and they hurt. And when they realized their disenfranchised state,

some become militant. The graphic novel opens in the present day — an animal rights organization led by a macaque monkey named Pompeii has fertilizer truck-bombed a small southern ON THE WEB: California university. Check out Adam Wi t h i n Hines’ website tensely de@genevastreet.com tailed, almost baroque visual style that combines everything from newspaper clippings and computer text to children’s books and textile patterns with the cartoonist’s simple, sketchy character designs, the scope of Hines’ debut work is staggering. Hines creates a whole world that is easily recognizable, almost historical, but is alien in respect to human/animal (and animal/human)

DOG continues on page 11

Michael Baldon | Daily Texan Staff

Ron Chadwick, owner of Not Your Mama’s Food Truck, presents his BBQ beef tongue which consists of rice, tongue, caramelized onions and chives. Chadwick opened Not Your Mama’s Food Truck on East Cesar Chavez approximately two months ago.

Austin street food vendor redesigns American classics with Korean twist By Julie Rene Tran Daily Texan Staff Every week, it appears as though there’s a new food trailer popping up somewhere around town, offering the city a creative twist on street food. While several have been hit-or-miss in the ways of taste, the ones that do succeed have gone on to national acclaim (such as Odd Duck, Chi’Lantro and Gourdough’s). Up on board to become a competitor to these predecessors: Not Your Mama’s Food Truck. Nestled in a dark corner of an empty trailer food lot across from Juan in a Million on East Cesar Chavez Street, is Not Your Mama’s, a new, shiny and unpainted white truck that serves up a fusion of Asian and Ameri-

can cuisine on paper trays. Though the truck has only been open for about two months, half of the lot was packed with

fried, crispy chicken to beef sliders, Not Your Mama’s menu is heavily influenced by Southeast Asian cuisine. Still, owner

tweaked to accommodate the onthe-go nature of street food. As a native from Maine, Chadwick said he eventually wants to incorporate lobster and East Coast staples such as clam chowder into his menu. Currently, he is working on a fried peanut butter and jelly popper. cars. A small crowd hovers in and chef Ron Chadwick said he The slow-cooked beef tongue front of the menu board, eyeing cooks what he likes and is not served on a bed of soft, sticky white the mouthwatering selection, all limited to a certain taste. rice was a stellar dish, and though around $5, that’s written in pasThe quality of his meals would there was a slight gamey smell and tel-colored chalk. be fitting for a five-star restaurant, FOOD continues on page 11 From Korean style, deep but every item on the menu is

The quality of his meals would be fitting for a five-star restaurant ...

Past literary success leads writer to create culinary guide for a meatless life

Kim Barnouin, author of “Skinny Bitch” diet books, added to her series with the vegan-focused “Skinny Bitch: Ultimate Everyday Cookbook.”

Courtesy of Running Press

Curried Chickpea Cakes 1 (15-ounce/430 g) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 1/3 cup (20 g) sliced green onions, both white and light green parts 1/3 cup (75 ml) light coconut milk 2 teaspoons evaporated cane sugar 2/3 cup (75 g) breadcrumbs, plus 1/4 cup (30 g) for coating 1 teaspoon curry powder 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon cumin 2/3 cup (130 g) brown rice, cooked 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup (60 ml) grapeseed oil or toasted sesame oil, for pan searing

WHERE: 2209 E. Cesar Chavez St. WHEN: Tuesday-Friday, 5-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, noon-10 p.m.

Author adds another ‘Skinny Bitch’

Ingredients

WHAT: Not Your Mama’s Food Truck

Directions • In a large food processor, combine the chickpeas and green onions. Pulse until combined. • Transfer to a large mixing bowl. Add the coconut milk, sugar, 2/3 cup (75 g) of the breadcrumbs, curry powder, nutmeg, and cumin. Stir together with a wooden spoon until well combined. • Stir in the brown rice and the salt. Mold into 10 mini patties. • In a large sauté pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the chickpea cakes to the pan and sauté until there’s a nice golden sear on the bottom. • Flip and sear the other side as well. Continue with the remaining cakes. Transfer to a papertowel-lined plate to drain. Serves 10.

By Layne Lynch Daily Texan Staff Ten years ago, Kim Barnouin was suffering from anxiety, panic attacks and depression. To boot, she couldn’t afford medical insurance to find out what was plaguing her. At the end of her rope, Barnouin decided to take matters into her own hand and use health research to find a solution. What she discovered not only changed her life, but the lives of millions of others: the vegan diet. “I was naive about how food affected me mentally and physically,” Barnouin said. “I changed my diet and immediately started feeling better. I couldn’t believe food had that kind of power.” In 2005, she published the blunt diet book and number one New York Times best seller “Skinny Bitch” with Rory Freedman advocating the benefits of living a vegan life. The sassy, no-nonsense guide to being vegan also spoke out against sugar substitutes, additive chemicals and animal cruelty. Now, years after the success of “Skinny Bitch,” Barnouin is releasing her own cookbook, “Skinny Bitch: Ultimate Everyday Cookbook” that expands upon the many options and flavors of vegan cuisine outside of traditional meat substitutes. Even though the “Skinny Bitch” released a cookbook companion, “Skinny Bitch in the Kitch,” Barnouin said the book was merely a guide on how to transition to becoming a vegan. It didn’t explore upon cooking vegan, she said. “It was a diet for transitioning meat eaters to vegans,” she said. “It was so they wouldn’t think they have to eat just lettuce and raw vegetables. You don’t have to

SKINNY continues on page 11

Self-portrait courtesy of Adam Hines

“Duncan the Wonder Dog” is the story of a world where animals talk and some people listen.

MOVIE REVIEW

FOUR LIONS

Islamic suicide bombers topic of dark, satirical film By Alex Williams Daily Texan Staff An outrageously dark comedy, “Four Lions” makes light of one of today’s most prominent and pervasive cultural phobias: Islamic suicide bombers. However, the film’s smart, restrained writing and unexpectedly heartfelt ending keeps it from being exploitative. Focusing on a motley crew of suicide bombers, “Four Lions” is co-written by director Chris Morris (who shares the writing credit with Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong). The script is a potent mix of non-sequiturs, hilarious bits of dark comedy and moments of sharp satire. However, the script is marred by some weak character work.

Morris, faced with the challenge of making jihadists relatable characters, gives his lead, Omar (perfectly played by Riz Ahmed), a three-dimensional role and casts those around him as a hilariously inept group of misfits who give the Three Stooges a run for their money. While the other characters are entertaining, the lack of humanity to them gives the film a soulless quality, creating a sharp contrast to the handful of scenes Omar shares with his family, which are among the best in the film. Morris tackles the material with an enthusiastic aplomb, creating several effective set pieces that manage to be both funny and tense, often dealing with the sensitive nature of bomb-making.

Morris also handles the dark subject matter diplomatically, keeping things tasteful and sanitized while managing to work in a few pointed jabs at Islamic culture. The acting is admirable, with Riz Ahmed saddled with the unenviable task of making the audience care about and sympathize with a jihadist and pulling it off with flying colors. The supporting cast makes the most of their flat characters, with everyone displaying perfect comedic timing and even pulling off the film’s handful of dramatic moments. Highlight Nigel Lindsay is a consistent scene stealer as Barry, the sole white bomber and the most deluded out of all

MOVIE continues on page 11

Courtesy of Drafthouse Films

“Four Lions,” a dark comedy about suicide bombers, features strong writing but weak characters.

The Daily Texan 11-3-10  

The November 3, 2010 Edition of The Daily Texan.