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SPORTS PAGE 6

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

These boots are made for walking, that’s just what they’ll do

Unranked Longhorns topple No. 13 Illinois LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

Jay-Z’s life ‘Decoded’ in his autobiography

THE DAILY TEXAN Friday, November 19, 2010

WEEKEND

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

TOMORROW’S WEATHER

www.dailytexanonline.com

Resolution urges UT to clarify layoff policy By Collin Eaton Daily Texan Staff Staff Council passed a resolution on Thursday calling for Human Resource Services to provide comprehensive, easy-to-access information about the layoff process in response to repeated complaints of anxiety and confusion. As UT slashes budgets and departments continue to lay off employees, staff feel helpless against

the sea change, council representatives said. The resolution requests that UT’s Human Resource Services provide an online look at the steps departments have to follow to lay off an employee, an outline of benefits they can receive and information about how losing one’s job can influence an employee’s retirement plan. Erika Frahm, chairwoman of the job security ad hoc committee,

said when staff members feel there is information not being made available to them or that they cannot find, confusion can lead to stress and anxiety. Both the layoff process and the job evaluation process can create stress for workers, she said. “We felt that if people understood what information is there, then that would let them be more proactive and they wouldn’t feel

powerless,” Frahm said. Human Resource Services is on board with the resolution and will get started right away, said Julien Carter, associate vice president for the department. “We very much appreciate their advice and viewpoint of things they want to see highlighted on our website, so we’ll make it a priority to implement their suggestions,” Carter said.

‘Pink is my signature color’

Robert Harling’s play about wisecracking southern women in Shreveport, La., makes it back to the stage. A production of “Steel Magnolias” opens at the City Theatre at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $15.

Jhalak

The Indian Cultural Association hosts its signature fall event, “Jhalak: A Glimpse of India.” Starts at 6:30 p.m. at Hogg Auditorium.

SATURDAY Our Iran

The fourth annual Giving Thanks by Giving Back offers Austinites more than 30 community service projects around the city. Learn about the events at serviceaustin.org.

SUNDAY ‘L.G. FUAD’

Motion City Soundtrack performs at Stubb’s. Show starts at 6 p.m. and tickets cost $22.

‘Clumsy Sky’

San Antonio-based Girl in a Coma and the Dresden Dolls perform at La Zona Rosa. Show starts at 7 p.m. and tickets cost $20.

‘‘

The job security ad hoc committee aims to pass two more initiatives — one to create a guidebook for employees who get laid off and another to write a set of recommendations for UT President William Powers Jr. in regard to staff management. The committee is working faster than most, trying to get resolutions passed by early spring.

LAYOFFS continues on page 2

Organization seeks to help immigrants earn fair pay

FRIDAY

Service

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To read about Longhorn football, see Double Coverage

The Iranian Students’ Academic and Cultural Associations gives insight into cultural, historical and social aspects of Iran through music and dance. Tickets cost $7 for students and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. in the Texas Union Theatre.

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Photos by Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Taylor Winberry rereads the final Harry Potter book while waiting in line for the midnight premiere with boyfriend W. Ryan and Hedwig doll. Below, Political communication freshman Leslie Tisdale draws a Dark Mark, the tattoo of Voldemort’s followers, on her forearm.

HARRY POTTER

spellbinds fans Devotees to fantasy series wait expectantly at midnight showing for penultimate movie, revel in experience of continued journey

T

By Amy Thorton

he lines forming throughout Austin on Thursday afternoon had nothing to do with football games or music festivals. The people standing in line waved wands, shouted words like “expelliarmus” and displayed lightning-bolt scars on their foreheads. Austin joined cities around the world in catching Harry Potter fever, with midnight showings of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” bringing people to sold-out theaters around the city. “It’s a very exciting atmosphere at a midnight showing,” said English senior Madison Gardner as she stood in line at Regal Gateway 16 theater. “During the show, people will clap and cheer, and there is definitely a community feel in the theater that you don’t get during other showings.”

Based on the seventh book in the fictional series written by J.K. Rowling, “Deathly Hallows” was sectioned into two movies to fit all of the material from the 784-page book into the films. With one more film left in the series, fans turned out in force to take part in the Harry Potter experience, standing in line as early as 2 p.m. outside theaters. “Harry Potter is just magical,” Gardner said. “J.K. Rowling has created something that takes things that should be really cliche — like broomsticks, wizard hats and potions — and made them seem new and interesting. The expansive world she created has sucked us all in since the beginning.”

FILM continues on page 2

INSIDE: Read a review of “Deathly Hallows” on page 10

By Yvonne Marquez Daily Texan Staff Editor’s Note: Portions of interviews in this story were translated from Spanish. Felix Jimenez, an immigrant from Vera Cruz, Mexico, worked for an Austin roofing company for one year without receiving any pay. He and his wife, Brenda, sought the help of the Workers Defense Project to negotiate with the company to get earnings. Within a year, Jimenez obtained his wages, and he and his wife began working to help other families. “There are many times that we need to pay rent and pay bills, but there is no money to pay with,” Jimenez said. “It affects us because we can’t sleep without thinking, ‘How are we going to pay so we can live?’” The Workers Defense Project, a local organization that advocates for workers for fair employment, and St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church hosted a dinner Thursday to support immigrant families during the holiday season. Wage theft — not being paid the legal minimum wage or being paid less than promised — has increased over the last decade, said Cristina Tzintzun, the director of the Workers Defense Project. She said the cases the organization gets are mostly from construction workers but also come from the restaurant and landscaping industries. Tzintzun said the organization helps recover wages by negotiating with the employers and taking legal and community action to resolve a case. “Our long-term goal is not to get their wages back but give them the tools to advocate for themselves,” Tzintzun said. “We give them training that will increase their earning potential at work, that will give them better jobs. We also work on the weak laws that exist to ensure workers have more tools to better defend themselves.”

SALARY continues on page 2

Aerospace department Quote to note launches ‘nanosatellites’ “They used to have to open the windows. It was so cool though because they had these rollout bleachers that would go right up to the court. It was just a wonderful place to watch volleyball.” — Loel Graber 28-year UT volleyball fan SPORTS PAGE 6

By Shivam Purohit Daily Texan Staff The U.S. Air Force will launch two satellites from Alaska this evening constructed by the UT Satellite Design Lab after seven years of development. University graduate and undergraduate students designed the pair of “nanosatellites,” known as FASTRAC, to present more cost-effective hardware solutions to aeronautical agencies such as NASA. The satellites together cost $250,000 in hardware, paid for as part of an Air Force competition. While the Air Force will launch the satellites as one unit on Friday, they will split into two after a few weeks in space. Students will then collect data to study the relationship between the instruments in space by observing how the satel-

lites communicate with one another as they orbit around the earth. The launch of FASTRAC 1 and FASTRAC 2 will occur along with six satellites from other universities and agencies including NASA Ames and the Air Force Academy. Student project manager Sebastian Munoz, an aerospace engineering graduate student, said he has enjoyed watching the project grow from a concept to a functional unit as a FASTRAC member for five years. “It is an incredible experience getting to build something from the ground up and actually launching it in space,” he said. “It has been an extraordinary ride, giving us the opportunity to learn a lot of theories by experimentation.”

LAUNCH continues on page 2

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Sebastian Munoz, Peter Schulte and Philip Barcelon, along with other aerospace engineering students, designed and built two satellites, called FASTRAC, which are set to launch tonight.


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News

Friday, November 19, 2010

Through the looking glass

The Daily Texan Volume 111, Number 115 25 cents

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com

News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Photo Office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff

Dave McClinton gazes at a passer-by as he stirs his iced coffee at Halcyon on Fourth Street.

Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

Layoffs: Ex-employees

expect communication The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TODAY’S WEATHER Low

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Hairy Pooter.

From page 1 From September 2009 to June 2010, UT laid off 273 employees because of budgetary constraints, according to human resources data. With a possible 10-percent budget cut affecting the 2012-13 biennium and an additional 2- to 3-percent cut going into effect this biennium, the University will have to lay off hundreds of employees in the next few years. At Thursday’s meeting, the council also requested HRS provide online information about the performance evaluation process, including a simplified version of the evaluation policy, how to obtain evaluation records and how to contest discrepancies and guidelines for productive dialogue between employees and managers. All the information should be available in both English and Spanish, according to the request. Communication is essential in times of crisis, and the council’s efforts only bolster communication, said Staff Council

The Daily Texan

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Beherec Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous, Susannah Jacob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Kreighbaum Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes, Lena Price, Michelle Truong Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collin Eaton, Aziza Musa, Nolan Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audrey White Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cristina Herrera Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elyana Barrera, Sydney Fitzgerald, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Carr, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexa Hart, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Gerson Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Kang, Peyton McGee Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeff Heimsath, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich, Danielle Villasana Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Madeleine Crum Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Allistair Pinsof, Sarah Pressley, Francisco Marin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerald Rich, Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Anderson, Sameer Bhuchar, Jordan Godwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laken Litman, Andy Lutz, Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Murphy Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carlos Medina Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pierre Bertrand Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joanna Mendez Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Thornton, Shivam Purohit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Yvonne Marquez, Allie Kolechta, Allison Kroll Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexandra Carreno, Trey Scott, Shabab Siddiqui Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brandon Curl, Daley Epstein Editorial Cartoonists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Thomas Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benjamin Miller, Ashley Morgan, Austin Myers Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Riki Tsuji, Gabe Alvarez, Aron Fernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill, Michael Bowman, Brianne Klitgaard, Trish Do, Callie Parrish Web Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clarke Rahrig

Chairman Ben Bond. “Even for people who aren’t affected by layoffs, having the information helps prepare them, because it could happen,” Bond said. “Plus, odds are they know people who are being laid off. It helps them understand what they’re going through.” Anxiety among UT staff members is the council’s first priority, and the resolution will aid staff members if they do not fully understand the processes or have faith that department heads are cutting for the benefit of the entire University, said Jennifer McClain, a staff council member and senior administrative associate in the Division of Housing and Food Service. “Being able to outline how the procedure works will not only let people know that it is being looked at, but that we’re actually considering as many options as possible,” McClain said. “We’re not going to change the fact that the budget is a problem and that we don’t have enough money, but at least people won’t be so fearful.”

By Hope Yen The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Is marriage becoming obsolete? As families gather for Thanksgiving this year, nearly one in three American children is living with a parent who is divorced, separated or never-married. More people are accepting the view that wedding bells aren’t needed to have a family. A study by the Pew Research Center, in association with Time

TEXAS STUDENT MEDIA BOARD MEETING

12:30 p.m. Advertising

Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford, Meagan Gribbin Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Daniel Ruszkiewkz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Josh Phipps, Selen Flores, Patti Zhang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Hall, Maryanne Lee, Ian Payne Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Broadcast Sales Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aubrey Rodriguez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

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Aerospace engineering senior Philip Barcelon said the experience provided them with a strong engineering foundation because of the work done with radio-frequency and satellite communication. “It is a profound understanding that the classroom could not give us,” he said. “These are the skills we will be using in the workforce.” Barcelon said he encourages younger students to get involved in the engineering field. “If another such project comes up in the future, we don’t want to lack people,” he said. “Aeronautics is a field that will always need innovative engineers.” Aerospace engineering professor Glenn Lightsey, the faculty adviser who submitted the project proposal, said this shows building a satellite isn’t as abstract as it may seem. “It is really exciting to know that you don’t necessarily need 20 years of experience to build a satellite,” he said.

fiLm: Alamo Drafthouse hosts ‘Yule Ball’ From page 1 Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar added to the already-festive experience by transforming the lobby into a forest scene with live owls, witches, wizards and foaming cauldrons. “We go to greater lengths for Harry Potter than other midnight showings,” said Kristen Bell, the theater’s general manager. “The fans drive us to be more creative and fun because they’re sitting out at 2 for a midnight screening. Their passion makes us want to entertain them.” Bell said the South Lamar loca-

tion sold out within 47 minutes of putting the tickets up for sale on Oct. 11. Along with the regular midnight showings, South Lamar hosted a Yule Ball, inspired by the white and silver-themed dance in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” the fourth novel in the series. Between the Yule Ball and regular showings, the theater maximized its capacity in all six theaters with 815 people. Bell estimated that across the Alamo Drafthouse franchises, the sold-out theaters housed approximately 2,000 fans. Barton Creek Square theater also sold all of the seats in its 14

theaters, a total of approximately 2,500 seats. While the theaters do not raise ticket prices, the increase in concessions raises the per capita revenue. This is particularly true for Alamo Drafthouse, which sells Harry Potter-themed food and drinks such as Butterbeer. “Our generation has grown up with Harry Potter. I read my first book in fourth grade,” said public relations senior Phoebe Francis. “We all waited for the books and movies to be released, and it brings out the child in all of us. In a way, Harry Potter to us is like ‘Star Wars’ to our parents.”

saLary: Church leader discusses poverty From page 1 St. Andrew’s Rev. Jim Rigby said his congregation has worked with the organization for the past two years. His church is currently collecting Christmas gifts for the families’ children. Although, in the past, community members asked for gaming systems or other expensive gifts, families from the

organization ask for more common items such as socks. He said working with the families was a rewarding experience. “These families are working really hard to try to turn things around, but they have a really hard life,” Rigby said. “So it’s very rewarding to respond to that sincere effort.” American culture is often defined by possessions, Rigby said.

He said although these families are experiencing physical poverty, our society experiences spiritual poverty because people don’t like to share what they have with the world. “I think an organization like the Workers Defense Project gives us an opportunity to move past that,” Rigby said. “By feeding people physically, we are fed spiritually.”

Study shows changing ideas of marriage, family

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

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magazine, highlights rapidly changing notions of the American family. The Census Bureau, too, is planning to incorporate broader definitions of family when measuring poverty, a shift caused partly by recent jumps in unmarried couples living together. About 29 percent of children under 18 now live with a parent or parents who are unwed or no longer married, a fivefold increase from 1960, according to the Pew report being released Thursday. Broken down further, about 15 percent have parents who are divorced or separated and 14 percent have parents who were never married. Within those two groups, a sizable chunk — 6 percent — have parents who are live-in couples who opted to raise kids together without getting married. Indeed, about 39 percent of Americans said marriage was becoming obsolete. That sentiment follows U.S. census data released in September that showed marriages hit an all-time low of 52 percent for adults 18 and over. In 1978, just 28 percent believed marriage was becoming obsolete. When asked what constitutes a family, the vast majority of Americans agree that a married couple, with or without children, fits that description. But four of five surveyed pointed also to an unmarried, opposite-sex couple with children or a single parent. Three of five people said a same-sex couple with children was a family. “Marriage is still very important in this country, but it doesn’t dominate family life like it used to,” said Andrew Cherlin, a professor of sociology and public policy at Johns Hopkins University. “Now there are several ways to have a successful family life, and more people ac-

cept them.” The broadening views of family are expected to have an impact at Thanksgiving. About nine in 10 Americans say they will share a Thanksgiving meal next week with family, sitting at a table with 12 people on average. About onefourth of respondents said there will be 20 or more family members. “More Americans are living in these new families, so it seems safe to assume that there will be more of them around the Thanksgiving dinner table,” said Paul Taylor, executive vice president of the Pew Research Center. The changing views of family are being driven largely by young adults ages 18-29, who are more likely than older generations to have an unmarried or divorced parent or have friends who do. Young adults also tend to have more liberal attitudes when it comes to spousal roles and living together before marriage, the survey found. But economic factors, too, are playing a role. The Census Bureau recently reported that opposite-sex unmarried couples living together jumped 13 percent this year to 7.5 million. It was a sharp one-year increase that analysts largely attributed to people unwilling to make long-term marriage commitments in the face of persistent unemployment. Beginning next year, the Census Bureau will publish new, supplemental poverty figures that move away from the traditional concept of family as a husband and wife with two children. It will broaden the definition to include unmarried couples, such as same-sex partners, as well as foster children who are not related by blood or adoption. Officials say such a move will

reduce the number of families and children who are considered poor based on the new supplemental measure, which will be used as a guide for federal and state agencies to set anti-poverty policies.

other findings: • About 34 percent of Americans called the growing variety of family living arrangements good for society, while 32 percent said it didn’t make a difference and 29 percent said it was troubling. • About 44 percent of people say they have lived with a partner without being married; for 30-to49-year-olds, that share rose to 57 percent. In most cases, those couples said they considered cohabitation as a step toward marriage. • About 62 percent say that the best marriage is one where the husband and wife both work and both take care of the household and children. That’s up from 48 percent who held that view in 1977. • The Pew study was based on interviews with 2,691 adults by cell phone or landline from Oct. 1-21. The survey has a total margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points, larger for subgroups. Pew also analyzed 2008 census data, and used surveys conducted by Time magazine to identify trends from earlier decades. Source: pewsocialtrends.org


W/N P3

Wire Editor: Nolan Hicks www.dailytexanonline.com

World&NatioN

3

Friday, November 19, 2010

T he Daily T exan

Palestinian militants release tape By Ian Deitch The Associated Press JERUSALEM — Palestinian militants inspired by alQaida posted a Hebrew-language threat on a radical Islamic website Thursday, vowing revenge for the deaths of two Gaza militants in an Israeli airstrike. It appeared to be the first time that one of the murky, al-Qaida-inspired groups in Gaza have issued a threat in Hebrew, though larger militant organizations, including Gaza’s Hamas rulers and The Associated Press Hezbollah guerrillas in LebaIn this file photo, members of militant Islamic group Jund Ansar Allah non, have done so before. The recording, posted by a stand guard by their leader Abdel-Latif Moussa, right. group identifying itself as Ansar al-Sunna, came a day after The Israeli military had no kill Israelis” in the Sinai peninan Israeli airstrike hit two senior comment on the audio recording. sula, a popular tourist spot. members of the Army of Islam. In a statement, it said the men The voice speaks in broken Both groups are believed to be targeted were “part of a terror and heavily accented Hebrew closely linked. cell that planned to kidnap and and is full of echoes, making

it hard to decipher at times. A version of the message also appeared on the popular web video site YouTube juxtaposed over a picture of an assault rifle with Hebrew lettering. Boaz Ganor, executive director of The International Policy Institute for Counter-Terrorism, said the Army of Islam’s capability to retaliate is limited, but should not be underestimated by Israel. “Terrorism is a psychological warfare and terrorists are trying to maximize their threats and spread fear and anxiety in any possible matter,” he said. “This is the reason for transmitting these threats in Hebrew. Threats in the spoken language of the victim is meant to be more frightening then threats which are being translated and reported from other languages.”

Harry Hamburg | Associated Press

Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., arrives to appear before the House Ethics Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

House committee suggests censure for Rep. Rangel’s ethics violations

By Larry Margasak The Associated Press WA S H I N G T O N — T h e House ethics committee on Thursday recommended censure for longtime Rep. Charles Rangel, suggesting that the New York Democrat suffer the embarrassment of standing before his colleagues while receiving an oral rebuke by the speaker for financial and fundraising misconduct. Censure is the most serious congressional discipline short of expulsion. The House, which could change the recommended discipline by making it more serious or less serious, probably will consider the recommendation after Thanksgiving. The ethics committee voted 9-1 to recommend censure and that Rangel pay any taxes he owes on income from a vacation villa in the Dominican Republic. The five Democrats and five Republicans on the panel deliberated for about three hours behind closed doors. Earlier, at a sanctions hearing, the 20-term congressman apologized for his misconduct but said he was not a crooked politician out for personal gain. He was in the House hearing room when the ethics committee chairman, Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California, announced the recommendation. Rangel said, “I hope you can see your way clear to indicate any action taken by me was not with the intention of bringing any disgrace on the House or enriching myself personally.” The ethics committee’s chief counsel, Blake Chisam, had recommended censure for Rangel. The ethics committee could

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have opted for lighter punishments, such as a reprimand, a fine or a report deploring the congressman’s behavior. Rangel, 80, ended the sanctions hearing with an emotional plea to salvage his reputation. Before speaking, Rangel sat for several minutes trying to compose himself. He placed his hands over his eyes and then his chin, before he slowly stood up and said in a gravelly voice that was barely audible: “I don’t know how much longer I have to live.” Facing the committee members, he asked them to “see your way clear to say, ‘This member was not corrupt.’” He continued: “There’s no excuse for my behavior and no intent to go beyond what has been given to me as a salary. I apologize for any embarrassment I’ve caused you individually and collectively as a member of the greatest institution in the world.” In the most dramatic clash of the proceeding, Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, questioned the assertion of Rangel — the former chairman of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee — that he wasn’t corrupt. “Failure to pay taxes for 17 years. What is that?” McCaul asked, referring to Rangel’s shortchanging the Internal Revenue Service on rental income from his villa in the Dominican Republic. McCaul also noted the committee’s finding that Rangel solicited donors for the Charles B. Rangel Center at City College of New York from donors who had business before the Ways and Means Committee.

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Airports may ditch TSA agents Congress quarrels over tax cuts for privately contracted screeners ATLANTA — In a climate of Inas jobless benefits set to expire ternet campaigns to shun airport

WASHINGTON — Jobless benefits will run out for 2 million people during the holiday season unless they are renewed by a Congress that’s focusing more attention on a quarrel over preserving tax cuts for people making more than $200,000 a year. It’s looking iffy at best whether Congress will renew jobless benefits averaging $310 per week nationwide that are presently claimed by almost 5 million people who have been out of work for more than six months. An extension of jobless benefits enacted this summer expires Dec. 1, and on Thursday, a bill to extend them for three months failed in the House. Democrats brought the bill to the floor under fasttrack rules that required a twothirds vote to pass. Republicans opposed the legislation because they were denied a chance to attach spending cuts, so the measure fell despite winning a 258154 majority.

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pat-downs and veteran pilots suing over their treatment by government screeners, some airports are considering another way to show dissatisfaction: ditching TSA agents altogether. Federal law allows airports to opt for screeners from the private sector instead. The push is being led by a powerful Florida congressman who’s a longtime critic of the Transportation Security Administration and counts among his campaign contributors some of the companies who might take the TSA’s place. Furor over airline passenger checks has grown as more airports have installed scanners that produce digital images of the body’s contours, and the anger intensified when TSA added a more intrusive style of pat-down recently for those who opt out of the full-body scans. Some travelers are using the Internet to organize protests aimed at the busy travel days next week surrounding Thanksgiving.

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OPINION

4

Friday, November 19, 2010

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Viviana Aldous Susannah Jacob Doug Luippold Dave Player

T HE DAILY T EXAN

VIEWPOINT

Consult students Facing a $3.75 million deficit, the College of Liberal Arts announced last week that 15 centers and institutes may lose a total of $1 million in funds from the college, based on recommendations from the Academic Planning and Advisory Committee. In particular, the committee recommends that the college cut all of its funding for the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies and the Center for East Asian Studies. It also recommends a 40-percent cut for the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies and the Center for Mexican American Studies. Exposure to and increased understanding of other cultures allows students to better understand the world around them. Cutting funding for ethnic studies programs reduces the quality of education students can receive from the University. Moreover, when a college reduces or eliminates funding for a center or department, it suggests the center and its mission are not priorities. Consequently, other potential national sources of funding will be less inclined to fund the centers, leading to an overall reduction in funding. Eventually, with little support, the centers may not be able to sustain themselves, and they may be eliminated entirely. The committee assessed the financial needs of various departments and centers in the College of Liberal Arts and based its recommendations on several factors, such as the number of semester credit hours offered within each center and the total number of students in the respective major. However, the college should also take student input into consideration. Gauging student feedback may show that students truly care about ethnic studies. Furthermore, students could possibly identify other ways to distribute the cuts. While administrators can contribute their perspectives on the budget, students are in a unique position to point out inefficiencies in various departments. After all, we are the ones attending classes daily. The Senate of College Councils passed a resolution in September creating the College Tuition and Budget Advisory Councils to provide student input to college deans and administrators who are charged with the responsibility of making budget cuts. All but two colleges — the Graduate School and the Division of Continuing Education — will have an advisory council composed of students from the respective colleges. Senate hopes to launch the advisory council for the College of Liberal Arts by the end of the semester, according to The Daily Texan. The college’s deficit will provide the advisory council with its first challenge. Council members will be responsible for representing their constituents when meeting with college administrators, and hopefully the college will consider student feedback before making any cuts. — Viviana Aldous for the editorial board

The ‘A’ game By Daley Epstein Daily Texan Columnist When the last week in October rolls around, upperclassmen squeal in anticipation for registration. The time has come to carefully craft a spring schedule from the plethora of classes the University offers. Sifting through the course schedule, these eager students have only one key problem — how can I narrow my selection? This process is relatively stressfree for upperclassmen because they are almost certain to enroll in the classes of their choice. But this carefree process isn’t accessible to everyone. While it is understandable that upperclassmen receive priority when it comes to registration, there are many inherent problems with the registration system. Before students can declare a major, they must enroll in certain classes and maintain a minimum GPA. Most savvy students research basic information about potential classes and professors to plan out an ideal schedule, complete with multiple back-up options in case their top choices are filled. But when registration finally arrives, many students are left in a panic. All of the origi-

nal options may be filled, including introductory classes needed to stay on track for a major. The hours spent researching grade distribution and students’ levels of overall satisfaction with the course are all for naught. Students may need to enroll in an introductory course, and there is only one class still open. However, the professor in whose class a student originally intended to enroll gives 71 percent of the class A’s, while the professor whose class is not yet filled only awards A’s to 18 percent of the class. In such a case, the student’s spring GPA is partially determined, or at the very least predictable, before the fall semester even ends, all because the student is still in the early stages of his or her educational career. Another major factor that skews the enrollment system is that a student’s timeslot is assigned according to his or her last name. How is it fair that a student is penalized simply because his surname pops up in an unfortunate place in the alphabet? In a feeble attempt at fairness, each semester alternates between alphabetical and reverse alphabetical orders, meaning those whose names fall in the middle are always given middle-of–the road registration times, and those who fall elsewhere

Texas is embarrassing for other reasons I do love Jonathan Rienstra’s comment in his Wednesday column, “It might come as a shock, but most of the country does not share the same affinity for Texas that most Texans do.” I do, however, doubt that it’s sufficient to blame “Walker, Texas Ranger,” “Dallas,” or “King of the Hill.” It might be more on-the-mark to consider George W. Bush or Gov. Perry, the stats in an article of the same edition concerning gun sales in Texas, our rush to murder prisoners while claiming “value of life,” ultra-conservatives who claim they want freedom from regulation but want to use their religious views to distort Texas textbooks, a failing educational system — the list goes on. Having lived outside Texas for a decade, I can promise we are much more often the butt of jokes than taken seriously. But yeah, “Friday Night Lights” has been a great show, yet fails to reflect much of the sociological truths about Texas/football/money/ power which are revealed in the book on which it is based. — Sandy Clabaugh UT alum

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Epstein is a Plan II and business freshman.

Changing the world — now By Brandon Curl Daily Texan Columnist

THE FIRING LINE

are rewarded and penalized correspondingly. If I had thought about it, I would have changed my last name accordingly prior to registration. University of Michigan solves the surname issue by opening enrollment to students according to their precise credit hours beginning with those who have the most. This offers a further distinction between students in the same graduating classes and rewards students for their work, operating according to academics, not chance. While this is an improvement upon our system, it is still not ideal. There must be a system that solves the grade distribution issue. But, I admit, I am unsure what that solution may be. The problem isn’t that the caliber of students in one of the classes is simply higher, as the empirical evidence reflects a pattern with little deviation from year to year. But something needs to change. Students shouldn’t have a better chance at getting bad grades just because of their last names. There are 50,000 intelligent students on this campus — surely someone can come up with a solution.

As denizens of the University of Texas at Austin, we are told frequently, in television commercials and on passing peers’ Tshirts, “What starts here changes the world.” Surely, fellow students, they are talking about us, right? No doubt future Walter Cronkites, Michael Dells or at least Matthew McConaugheys walk in our midst. But too easily we may overlook the significant contributions of university research that is changing our world right now. Each of us, as representatives of our community, has a responsibility to be more aware of its continual impact. And that impact is financially remarkable. Currently, the University maintains more than 100 research units responsible for more than $500 million in annual funding. And since its inception, researchers at UT have presided over 400 patents and currently earn more than $10 million per year in licensing. Here are three recent examples of research conducted at UT deserving of your attention. 1. Language Style Matching Can you predict the success of a romantic relationship by listening to patterns of similarity in how a couple speaks to each other? That’s what psychology professor James Pennebaker has been trying to prove possible through an investigation into Language Style Matching (LSM). Pennebaker specifically analyzes use of “function” words, generally pronouns and articles with little meaning outside the context of the sentence. Using LSM, Pennebaker measures how closely couples nonconsciously match speaking styles. Through transcripts of speed-daters and IM conversations of couples, Pennebaker was able to determine that LSM is key to attracting and keeping a partner. Higher LSM indicated speed-daters were three times more likely to mutually express interest in dating and that couples already together were twice as likely to stay together after three months. Please keep in mind, this does not mean you should now copy everything that cute girl you’ve had your eye on says. 2. Evolution of Stalking Remember your middle school science fair project? How your

teacher encouraged you to develop your own observation-based questions instead of picking one out of the “101 Science Fair Projects for Kids!” book? “The scientific method can be used to test virtually anything,“ she said. Take stalking, for example. Psychology professor David Buss has suggested analyzing stalking from an evolutionary perspective. Stalking, both overt and covert, persists because, though illegal in its most aggressive forms, it can succeed in attracting, retaining and recapturing mates. Buss points to “the number of times couples break up and get back together” as an indicator of “milder” forms of stalking. Again, I’m not advocating stalking. But it’s an interesting read that I encourage you to find online — especially if you enjoy terms like “mate poachers.” It’s more interesting than, say, your project on “Peanut Butter & Germs: The effectiveness of hand sanitizer in the cafeteria at Thomas Jefferson Middle School.” 3. Evolutionary Forensics Finally, I would be remiss not to include the story printed on the front page of Thursday’s edition of The Daily Texan involving integrative biology professor David Hillis. Hillis, along with Michael Metzker from Baylor College of Medicine, used evolutionary biology to provide evidence supporting the convictions of men accused of deliberately infecting women with HIV. Despite the fact that the HIV genome changes rapidly within carriers, Hillis was able to map the virus’ genome in both the accused and his victims, confirming transmission through a phylogenetic tree for federal prosecutors. Through his work, Hillis has strengthened the position of evolutionary analysis in forensics as well as in mapping the spread of disease. Of course, these three stories are a fraction of the research being done and by no means objectively more compelling than any other. I like people, so I tend to find research through the departments of psychology and sociology most interesting. But perhaps you like dinosaurs. I recommend geological sciences professor Tim Rowe’s recent discovery of the Sarahsaurus. (And yes, it’s named after someone with the first name “Sarah.”) What starts here may change the world. But what is here is already doing it. Curl is an advertising graduate student.


UNIV P5

5

News

Friday, November 19, 2010

Photographers explore variety of life in Texas bringing of young people in By Allison Kroll these communities, from how Daily Texan Staff Penny De Los Santos has they gain an education to their moved in her photography from style of dress — all of which are documenting diverse aspects of governed by a sense of modesSouth Texas, from prison and ty and simplicity. She said her purpose of photogang lifestyles to family life degraphing this group was to learn picted in “Quinceaneras.” “I realized photography had about how her ancestors lived. In his book, “Home Field,” a voice and you could actually say something,” De Los San- Wilson portrays the importos said. “I wanted to define and tance of high school football understand what it meant to be by photographing diverse staa Hispanic Latino. For me, it was diums throughout Texas. “I wanted to use repetition about finding my identity.” to describe how She served on different these a panel of four stadiums are — photographers to catalogue and Thursday expreserve them,” ploring the diWilson said. “I verse perspecalso like to point tives of young out how they can people growing They all had their be [a] really imup in Texas. own unique approach portant part of “Growing Up their childhood In Texas” is the to the oddity that is and memory to first of a series Texas. Texas isn’t the people who of panel discuswhat people should occupy them.” sions hosted by The final prethe Plan II Honconsider normal — sentation showors program their photography cased the Weepand the Austin represented little ing Mary commuCenter for Phonity, a small Aftography. slices of life.” rican-American “All the pho— Spencer neighborhood in tographers are very accomSelvidge Cherokee County. Rufus Lovett plished and have Photojournalism captured their evhad their photos graduate student eryday lives in in major newspahis Alfred Eisenspers and magataedt Award-winzines,” said Ausning book titled tin photographer “Weeping Mary.” Matthew ValenThe photogratine. “There are anthropological and historical as phers each brought a different well as journalistic values in this perspective into the descripphotography, and it will appeal to tions of their projects, which left room for students to ina wide variety of students.” The event showcased the terpret the images in different photography of Susan Gaetz ways. “They all had their own Duarte, Jeff Wilson, Penny De unique approach to the oddity Los Santos and Rufus Lovett. Duarte presented her depic- that is Texas,” said Spencer Seltion of Beachy Amish Menno- vidge, a photojournalism gradnites in Lott, a group that sep- uate student. “Texas isn’t what arates themselves cultural- people should consider norly from society. In her photog- mal — their photography repraphy, she documents the up- resented little slices of life.”

‘‘

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

Micaela Hernández Meza, a member of the Jolom Maya’etik weaving cooperative based in Chiapas, Mexico, speaks to students about the groups’ efforts to lift women out of poverty and provide them with resources for success.

Weavers tell cooperative’s story

of Mexican women Ball’Union subsist through sharing

of economic skills, profits

By Allie Kolechta Daily Texan Staff Women in the southeastern Mexican state of Chiapas have begun to make a living for themselves by weaving clothes and creating a way to break through social barriers, said a weaver from a women’s cooperative Thursday. The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies hosted weavers Micaela Hernández Meza and Celerina Ruiz Núñez to discuss their cooperative, Jolom Maya’etik. With more than 300 Mayan weavers creating

clothes, cloths and other goods, Maya’etik is based in San Cristóbal de las Casas in Chiapas. The site was also one of four cities targeted by the Zapatista National Liberation Army during its 1994 uprising. The cooperative provides a place for the women to break gender barriers and support themselves, and they work with other women to teach them how to weave, Núñez said. “It’s especially important with the women that aren’t in the co-op,” she said. “The women in the co-op have already created a lot of change, and the men don’t involve themselves as much in the business of the women. It’s important to work with them to help break some

barriers and provide them with new opportunities.” Meza and Núñez speak traditional Mayan languages but learned Spanish and some English from classes at the cooperative. Learning English is important because it provides opportunities for the women to expand their horizons and work with people outside of their local area, Meza said. Charles Hale, director of the Lozano Long Institute, has made an effort to bring in more indigenous speakers, said Gail Sanders, an administrative assistant at the institute. The program was more likely in the past to bring in people from Mexican universities to speak than those who fell under a different socioeconomic status, she said.

Legendary jazz innovator plays at Bass Concert Hall By Andrew Kreighbaum Daily Texan Staff Saxophonist Ornette Coleman made his name in the late 1950s by defying traditional jazz forms and embracing collective improvisation as part of the “free jazz” movement. He didn’t fail to surprise audience members at the Bass Concert Hall last night during the only Texas stop of his current tour. Coleman plays with a quartet, and in the first song — a nearly 10-minute surge of sound — he alternately took up a saxophone, a trumpet and finally, a violin, the last of which he played with quick, frenzied strokes. The quartet — Coleman’s son Denardo on drums, Tony Falanga on acoustic bass and Al McDowell on electric bass

— then played a rendition of a musical standard, Igor Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring.” Other band members pushed the limit themselves with McDowell playing the bass at times like a classical guitar. The set challenged the audience much like Coleman has done throughout a career that’s spanned five decades. “The Shape of Jazz to Come,” released in 1959, received criticism even from fellow jazz greats such as Miles Davis and Max Roach. But many of his innovations are considered tame today, said Austin-based saxophonist Elias Haslanger. “The concept that Ornette brought to the floor was that there’s no need for a formal structure as far as a song form,” Haslanger said.

Bebop pioneers like Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk pushed jazz further, but the genre still mostly stuck to a form based on the blues and the standard meter. “What Ornette did was say we don’t need that,” Haslanger said. “We’re just going to use melody. It’s kind of a basic concept now, but it basically defined a monumental change in direction at the time.” Haslanger said Coleman has influenced him not just as a fellow saxophone player but as an innovator. “Ornette kind of became one of the signature guys that did it his way and had a vision and a sound, so of course that’s going to influence me,” he said. “That’s what we all strive to be.”

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

Pioneering jazz musician Ornette Coleman celebrates his 80th birthday with a performance in Bass Concert Hall on Thursday evening. He is one of few remaining legends of the 1950s American jazz scene.

Recycle your copy of the Texan!

“We want people to see the range of diversity that Mexico holds and expand their concept of Mexico, because it’s this big amazing country,” she said. The women help illustrate the benefits of shared knowledge and a cooperative lifestyle, said international relations and global studies junior Billy Yates, a member of United Students Against Sweatshops who works with Austin Tan Cerca de la Frontera. “I live in a cooperative house, and I was interested to see how their labor conditions compare to typical factories,” he said in an e-mail. “The women share knowledge in everything from medicinal plants to finance skills to help better their lives and help them succeed.”


SPTS P6

SPORTS

6

Friday, November 19, 2010

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

SIDELINE

MEN’S BASKETBALL

TEXAS 90

ILLINOIS 84

Scoring barrage lifts Texas in overtime Texas’ Gary Johnson, left, shoots over Illinois’ Mike Davis, right, in the first half during the championship rounds of the 2K Sports Classic tournament Thursday, in New York.

tle, started as a high scoring slugBy Dan Hurwitz fest. Daily Texan Staff The scoring barrage started for Texas scored on its first four possessions early in overtime to Texas with Hamilton contributgo up eight and gain a lead that ing for 11 of the Longhorns’ first they would not let go in beating 13 points. Hamilton both attacked the No. 16 Illinois 90-84 on Thursday basket and converted from beat Madison Square Garden. Two baskets from Texas’ lead- hind the three-point line to rack ing scorer Jordan Hamilton and up 15 first-half points off of six defensive stops led by Dogus for eight shooting. While Hamilton began the Balbay propelled the Longhorns in overtime to a big early season game hot, Thompson was the one who stole the show to close win. Led by Hamilton’s 25 points the first half. Thompson, who received the and freshman Tristan Thompson’s 20, the Longhorns did not first start of his young career, got his first two points falter after letting of the game by taka nine-point secing the ball from ond-half lead slip. the top of the key After scorWith the win, the and around a deing the first nine fender to the baspoints in the secLonghorns advance ond half, the to play fourth-ranked ket for a dunk as the shot clock ran Longhorns were Pittsburgh tonight down. unable to hit a All 12 of the field goal durin the finals of the f r eshman’s ing a seven-min2k Sports Classic first-half points ute stretch late at Madison Square came within the in regulation. 10-minute mark The drought was Garden. as he continsnapped with ued to post up Cory Joseph against the taller making a shot Illini defenders from the left elbow with 24 seconds remaining and find a way to score. Behind Hamilton and Thompin regulation to give Texas a twoson, the Longhorns were up eight point lead. Illinois quickly responded with points, but the Illini answered an inside basket from freshman with seven three-pointers to tie Jereme Richmond, which forced the game entering the break. In addition to Thompson’s the overtime period after Joseph was unable to make the last sec- 20 points, he racked up nine rebounds, three assists, six blocks ond attempt. The Illini were able to creep and two steals. With the win, the Longhorns back into the game with the Longhorns making only 25 of 44 advance to play fourth-ranked Pittsburgh tonight in the finals of free throw attempts. The game, which ended in a the 2k Sports Classic at Madison hard-fought free throw-filled bat- Square Garden.

Veteran Johnson hopes to foster winning mindset, create long-term success By Trey Scott Daily Texan Staff Inside jokes, video games, NBA basketball and upcoming road trips, all discussed over Chick-fil-A chicken sandwiches, set the scene for the Austin Toros’ first media day. Meetings like these would be fitting for an AAU or high school team, but not for a team where guys are competing against each other for potential big-league roster spots, and where the competition for minutes becomes crucial to the achievement of dreams. But as the members of the Austin Toros prepare for their season opener tonight in Maine, they are concerned with one thing: their team.

Boston University vs. Texas

Date: Sunday Time: 1 p.m. Where: Frank Erwin Center

VOLLEYBALL Frank Franklin II Associated Press

Not their stats, nor their minutes. Because, as seasoned DLeaguer and local fan favorite Carldell “Squeaky” Johnson will tell you, winning is what matters. “Ultimately, you want to be a part of a championship team,” he said. “That’s the goal here. I’m happy here. For me, just being able to play basketball is my dream. It’s a lot better than a 9-5 job.” His new coach, Brad Jones, echoed his statement. “I know people think that D-League is made up of selfish players who just want to get out and move on,” he said. “But from my experiences, that is a myth. Guys like playing together and like having structure. The players have figured out that if they want to make it somewhere, whether it be the NBA or someplace

TOROS continues on page 7

ah, when you are done with tennis, you should try out for basketball. Just try.’ And I was always like, ‘Yeah guys, ha-ha, that’s funny.’” To the fifth-year senior, what at first seemed like a joke began evolving into a reality as she recalled her love for the sport she played during high school. “So when I was done with tennis I was like ‘Hmm, maybe I should give it a shot.’ I played in high school and I’ve always really enjoyed playing basketball,” Lancaster said. “I thought it would be a really cool thing to do, not a lot of people get to play two sports in college or play a different sport in their fifth year. And I decided why not at least try and see what

happens.” So Lancaster decided to take a chance and try out for the team. Tennis head coach Patty FendickMcCain put in a call to women’s basketball head coach Gail Goestenkors. In addition to the words of support from Fendick-McCain, she sent Goestenkors a short video to her cell phone of Lancaster shooting some hoops. “You don’t hear about many tennis players who also play basketball,” Goestenkors said. “I was surprised, but I was also very open to the idea.” One of the senior leaders on the tennis team, Lancaster finished her career last spring with an im-

Kansas vs. Texas

Date: Friday Time: 6:30 p.m. Where: Gregory Gym

BIG 12 MEN’S BASKETBALL SCORES Presbyterian vs. No. 3 Kansas St

67

Western Illinois vs. No. 14 Missouri

61

Jackson State vs. No. 17 Baylor

49

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SWITCH continues on page 7

VOLLEYBALL Loel Graber shows a familiar hand signal to celebrate a point. Graber, Texas’ “superfan” has a whole list of hand signals to celebrate different plays.

63

JOKE OF THE WEEK Q. Why is basketball such a messy sport? A. Because they dribble all over the court.

Austin Toros plan to approach year with team focus

FOOTBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

By Alexandra Carreno Daily Texan Staff Sarah Lancaster may be a fresh face to the women’s basketball squad, but she lacks no experience in representing the Longhorns on the athletic stage. A four-year women’s tennis player, Lancaster decided to retire her racquet last spring and replace it with a basketball. But her final decision to try out for the basketball team did not come without some pestering from her old teammates. “Whenever it rained for tennis we would sometimes go over to the recreation center where I would always get a basketball,” Lancaster said. “But all the girls on tennis were always like, ‘Sar-

NBA DLEAGUE

Date: Today Time: 6 p.m. Where: Madison Square Garden- New York On Air: ESPN 2

Date: Saturday Time: 2:30 p.m. Where: Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium

Fifth-year retires racquet for hoops

Caleb Bryant Miller Daily Texan file photo

2K Sports Championship Game

Florida Atlantic vs. Texas

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Former Longhorn tennis star Sarah Lancaster sets up for a free throw against Mississippi Valley State University.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Danielle Villasana Daily Texan Staff

Fan finds home at Gregory Gym By Shabab Siddiqui Daily Texan Staff The most defining feature may be his signature fist pump. It’s neither a pre-scandal Tiger Woods’ how-do-you-likeme-now celebratory motion, nor a Zac Efron “Bet On It” pump from “High School Musical 2.” Instead, it can be best described as a distinct, unrelenting tomahawk fist pump, usually three or four at a time, sepa-

rated by a few hard claps. In a gym of back-flipping cheerleaders and shirtless Hellraisers, it may be hard to notice arguably the team’s biggest fan. But game-in and game-out for the greater part of the last three decades, Loel Graber has loyally stood on the west-side, floorlevel stands with his horns up. “I was playing [volleyball] with my friends and they said, ‘UT’s pretty good, let’s go

down and watch them,’” Graber said. “I’ve been coming ever since.” Graber, a computer scientist, moved to Austin from Ohio in 1978 fresh out of graduate school and took an interest in playing volleyball after his arrival. His friends dragged him to his first game in 1982, which was the year Texas joined the

FAN continues on page 7

To read about Longhorn football, see Double Coverage


SPTS P7

toroS: D-league team starts

year with fresh faces, arena

who played college ball at Missouri and has some NBA experielse, they need to be a part of a ence, including a few preseason winning team.” starts for the Chicago Bulls durJones is fresh off his three-year ing the 2007 season, the highstint as head coach of the Utah light of which was a monster of Flash, the Atlanta Hawks’ and a dunk on Yi Jianlian, as seen Utah Jazz’s D-League affiliate. on YouTube. Named as the Toros’ head coach “The speed of the game in the less than two months ago, Jones NBA is a little bit quicker and expects to bring an energy to a more organized,” Gardner said. team that is, in almost every way “Here, we have a lot of different possible, new. players each year. There isn’t a While the Toros still call Ausset of players returning each year, tin their official like you see in home, they have the NBA.” moved to two new When asked facilities in nearby how he felt Cedar Park. One is I know people think about playing the Cedar Park Rec as a member of that D-League is Center, a commuthe Spurs organity space where made up of selfish nization, known they conduct their players who just want for putting unpractices. They der-the-radar to get out and move play their games players on the at the Cedar Park on. But from my court, Gardner Center (no “Rec”), experiences, that is a gave his stamp a sparkling faciliof approval. myth.” ty they share with “I’ve always the Texas Stars said that I feel — Brad Jones hockey team. like San AntoA c c o rd i n g t o Head coach nio is one of Rick Pych, the the best profesSpurs’ Sports and sional teams in Entertainment the league,” he president of busisaid. “With their ness operations, the move out of the Austin Con- structure and their organization, vention Center, which was an- it is one of the better organizanounced Aug. 9, will enable tions to be a part of.” The plan is for the veterans them to “improve the fan experience beyond what we have been like Johnson and Gardner to help bring along young talent like Doable to offer in the past years.” Even the roster is new, as D- minique Archie, Marcus Cousin League rosters always are. Con- and Lance Thomas. Avid fans of stant trades, cuts, a sort of college basketball will recognize “brain drain” to overseas bas- Thomas, who started for Duke ketball leagues, and the arrival in last year’s national championof fresh talent each year ensure ship win against Butler. Thomas that hardly any team will re- is adjusting to the toned-down turn its core nucleus. The studs atmosphere, and feels like he has from last year are gone. Former the tools to get him to the big Toros such as Alonzo Gee, Cur- leagues. “Playing at Duke was probably tis Jerrells and Malik Hairston have found callings elsewhere. the best experience of my life,” he Johnson remains, and the team said. “But it also trained me to be has many promising players a professional. It instilled a lot of assigned to them from the San professional habits in me. I want Antonio Spurs, their one and to play in the NBA, and I know I only NBA affiliate. One of those can play at the next level. This is players is Thomas Gardner, my chance to prove it.”

From page 6

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Switch: Oldest player learns from freshmen From page 6 pressive collegiate singles match record of 89-38. But with her switch from the tennis courts to the hardwood, she found herself in an unusual situation. As an experienced Texas athlete, Lancaster is the oldest on the basketball team. The six new faces the team welcomed this year included Lancaster and five freshmen. “Because I haven’t played for four years, some of the freshmen help me out and told me if I am doing something wrong,” Lancaster said. “But I do have experience representing Texas. I can help them a little more, I’ve been in pressure situations myself.” But for Lancaster, being the oldest hasn’t fazed her. Her shift from one sport to another has been an experience. In an almost seamless transition, her teammates readily offer advice and have become good friends — a bond between Lancaster and fellow senior teammate Kathleen Nash has begun to develop. “We knew each other before. But we’ve built a good friendship through this experience,” Lancaster said. “Our personalities seem to get along really well. We like to have a lot of fun and joke around.” Being on the tennis team pro-

Eric Ou | Daily Texan file photo

Lancaster prepares to strike a backhand over the net in a match last season. Lancaster, a fifth-year senior, switched sports to basketball this year and plans to go to law school after she graduates. vided Lancaster with both discipline and drive, something she readily exhibits in her practice and play with the basketball team. “I’ve been very pleased. She’s in great shape,” Goestenkors said. “She beat everyone in all the sprints. Because of tennis she has

got quick hands and feet. She anticipates very, very well. She just fits in great with the team.” With the hopes of attending law school in 2011, Lancaster remains focused. She regularly keeps in touch with her old tennis coaches and teammates. But as her December gradua-

fan: Graber has seen Texas highs, lows for three decades From page 6 NCAA after former UT head coach Mick Haley led the team to an AIAW National Championship the previous season. Back then, Gregory Gym was far from the well-ventilated, air-conditioned atmosphere it is now. “They used to have to open the windows,” Graber said. “It was so cool though because they had these roll-out bleachers that would go right up to the court. It was just a wonderful place to watch volleyball.” Through his tenure as a fan, the Longhorns won the NCAA National Championship in 1988 and lost in the championship match to Nebraska in 1995. Graber went to Texas’ finals heartbreaker last year in Tampa Bay, Fla. “It still hurts,” Graber said. “I’ve been to Final Four like 10 times over the years, but this 1 was the first time that I was there when Texas was there.” Along with a patented fist

pump, Graber also makes other hand motions. His passion appears to be setting — likely because of the fact that the Longhorns have produced seven AllAmerican setters since he started watching — and he seeks out the team’s setting numbers after the game. Graber can often be seen standing and fistpumping to rally the team during slumps or celebrating a big play long after others have sat back down. Graber said although he attends almost every game, he does miss a few per year. “I took a European vacation [this year] and had to miss a few,” Graber said, in a tone often reserved for babysitting, physics tests and root canals. “It wasn’t my choice.” Graber said he has really enjoyed watching the progression of athletes in women’s sports, as well as the constant family atmosphere. “When I first came, they had good athletes, but women’s sports weren’t the power sports

that they are now,” Graber said. “It’s just so amazing how incredibly awesome the athletes are. Our players are real role models for the younger kids, and I think that’s great, I like to be part of that too. We have players with really good character and you can see it.” Junior middle blocker Rachael Adams said Graber approached the team during the Longhorns’ preseason meet and greet. “He’s awesome,” Adams said. “He says certain hand motions mean different things and he has a reason for every hand motion. That’s crazy. He must know what’s going on.” Graber said the coaches over the years — and even some of the players — remember him. “They know I’m that crazy guy in the stands,” he said. Despite never attending UT, Graber ’s unfailing commitment and loyalty all the time is what many leave-at-halftime Longhorns wish they could show half the time. He said although he loves the atmosphere,

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he wishes more fans came to volleyball games. “It’s too bad because they [sell out] every week in Nebraska,” Graber said. “I’d love it if we could get enough people to fill up the room and have the energy with it.” Head coach Jerritt Elliott said he has interacted with Graber during pregame Point Texas Club talks. “It’s nice to have those kinds of fans who are very knowledgeable and that are passionate about our sport,” Elliott said. “We need more fans to come in and we hope we can get people like that to continue to grow our fan base, because when it’s crowded, it’s a fun place to play.” Graber will more than likely be at today’s match against Kansas at Gregory Gym starting at 6:30 p.m., in his usual seat under the Chick-fil-A sign. “It’s great athletics, great athletes, a family atmosphere, a fun place,” Graber said. “It’s just awesome.”

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Life&Arts

Friday, November 19, 2010

Comedian to perform in Austin ‘Daily Show’ entertainer discusses stand-up tour, upcoming TV projects

By Sarah Pressley Daily Texan Staff With final exams beginning to loom over us, many students may benefit from a break and a night of laughter. Comedian John Oliver ’s performance this weekend may help. According to Oliver, the show will be him standing on stage, holding a microphone and saying things, and there might be a group of Tuvan throat singers behind him. “To be honest, I’m leaning towards not at the moment,” Oliver said. “It’s a really long flight to Austin for them, and the air conditioning on planes gives them a sore throat, which kind of defeats the whole point.” Whether he is accompanied by an exotic musical act or not, Oliver just hopes that the Austin audience finds his jokes funny or, at the very least, is really forgiving. However, Oliver is confident that the student population will enjoy his show, thanks to his background on the popular television show, “The Daily Show.” “College kids are one of the largest demographics of the ‘Daily Show’ audience, so frankly, if they don’t like my standup, no one will,” Oliver said. “Also, if you’ll excuse me, I’ve just used the word demographics in a sentence, so I’m going to have to go to a quiet room and shoot myself.” After spending so much time working on the television shows that have made him famous, Oliver said he is happy to be back on a stand-up tour. “I love doing stand-up,” Oliver said. “There’s a freedom to it that you just don’t get with working in television. The only drawback is that when people scream things at you on TV, you can’t hear them; when they’re in the same room as you, you can.” In addition to his stand-up tour, Oliver is also currently working on a weekly podcast with Andy Zaltzman called “The Bugle,” as well as preparing to do a series of “John Oliver ’s New York Stand-Up

classes at UT and is a personal trainer, said it is one form of training that has been shown to improve muscular strength and muscular endurance, though it is hard to determine immediate results. “Because you’re always working against your body weight, it’s a little harder to monitor improvement or to get much feedback about how hard you’re working other than muscles shaking,” Stanforth said. High-energy music pulses through the room throughout the 55-minute workout, so staying focused on the music keeps the mind off of your shaking arms and legs. Over the span

Courtesy of John Oliver

Comedian John Oliver will be performing his stand-up comedy act at the Paramount Theatre on Saturday night. Show” for Comedy Central. He is also getting ready for the holiday episode of the television show “Community” which will be filmed in stop-animation. “I’m planning to try sleeping some time soon as well,” Oliver said. “I’ve heard a lot about this sleep thing. I think I might like it.” Oliver ’s advice for aspiring young comedians is to just get

out and make people laugh. “You just have to do it,” Oliver said. “It’s one of the only jobs that you can’t really train or prepare for. You just have to start doing it, and as time goes by, try to fail less and less. The best advice for aspiring comedians is the same as Nikes chilling mantra for humanity; just do it.”

WHO: John Oliver WHERE: Paramount Theatre WHEN: Saturday at 8 and 10:30 p.m. WEB: austintheatre.org

of the class you will target your abs, seat, thighs and arms with no real rests. At first it feels like stretching, but then you start to feel your muscles burning as you hold your body stable in different positions and as you do small movements using the core, back, seat, thigh and/or arm muscles. The instructors and Pure Barre’s website emphasize the way you will look after doing Pure Barre for a while — dropping inches, burning fat and changing the body. Although it sounds great, some may have unrealistic expectations going into the workout. “For the person who doesn’t have a body type that’s going to respond well to this par-

ticular form of training, they may get discouraged and give up,” Stanforth said. “I feel like the best exercise is the one that you’ll [actually] do. And if you will do it and you enjoy it, it’s wonderful!” Education senior Marti Baker has taken 12 classes since she started Pure Barre nearly a month ago. She said she expected the class to be more like ballet when she went for the first time but she was pleasantly surprised. “It was hard,” Baker said. “I didn’t know what to expect so I was kind of nervous. I left feeling really good because it was a hard work out. My legs were shaking and I was exhausted.” Baker says that after 12 class-

es, her clothes are feeling looser. She loves going to Pure Barre and wants to continue, but the only problem is the hefty price of each class for a college student. A single class is $23, and a month of unlimited Pure Barre classes is $225. Moss-Lowry says that she will provide a student special at the beginning of the spring semester. “Pure Barre is where you really can come in and get serious results,” Moss-Lowry said. “Even if you are a runner or there’s something that you absolutely love to do, coupling it with Pure Barre makes you better in that sport also. It makes you stronger; it makes you more flexible.”

Potter: Split into two movies allows ‘compelling character moments’ Hermione. Rupert Grint as Ron has easiH e re , t o o , “ D e athly Hal- ly shed the class clown act and Rowling’s complex plot twists lows” is a standout among taken on his more serious role as possible. As a result, most past installments. Each young with grace. of the series’ incredibly nu- actor has exceeded all expec“Deathly Hallows” is undeanced and fully formed char- tations and is finally perform- niably a road movie. The three acters — Sirius Black, Remus ing on par with the adult Brit- young heroes are often adrift Lupin, Severus Snape and yes, ish acting legends — Helena and aimless in the wilderness, even the crucial figure of eminent headmaster Albus Dumbledore — are reduced to twodimensional cardboard cutouts that merely serve to help Harry defeat whatever manifestation of Lord Voldemort faces him that year. Comedy is juxtaposed expertly with tragedy, “Deathly Hallows” brilliantmaking “Deathly Hallows” the franchise’s most ly breaks this tiresome patemotionally dynamic film. tern. Yates dedicates most of his generous time allotment fleshing out central characters, most notably the iconic trio of Potter, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. It’s a brave move, considering the young actors that have portrayed the Bonham Carter, Gary Oldman, passively buffeted along their trio since before they hit pu- Bill Nighy and Alan Rickman, path by various dark forces at berty haven’t always delivered among others — they work work as they attempt to seek the most consistently convinc- alongside. “Deathly Hallows” and destroy the elusive horing performances. In partic- is the first film in which all cruxes, each containing a porular, Daniel Radcliffe as Pot- three leads truly embody their tion of Voldemort’s soul. Their ter sometimes appeared awk- counterparts from the books. destruction will render Voldeward and unnatural in his R a d c l i f f e s e e m s i n f i n i t e l y mort mortal and defeatable. more emotional scenes, and more comfortable on camera, Adventures at Hogwarts are Emma Watson had an unfor- Watson tones down her per- a thing of the past; the three tunate tendency to overact as formance to great effect, and don’t even step foot in the

From page 10

hustling as his former vice From page 10

excercise: Training targets muscles to help students burn fat From page 10

DecoDeD: Artist identifies

iconic castle this time around, a considerable departure from Rowling’s previous formula. The installment cuts down o n t h e c l u n k y, a w k w a rd l y rushed transitions of previous films and allows for some incredibly compelling character moments. A quietly poignant scene invented by Kloves for the movie in which a hopelessly lost Harry and Hermione share an emotionally charged dance is especially affecting. The humor of Harry Potter is also at its best here — no longer do gags feel forced as they occasionally have in the past. Comedy is juxtaposed expertly with tragedy, making “Deathly Hallows” the franchise’s most emotionally dynamic film. As confusing as “Deathly Hallows’” plot may be for the average viewer, casual fans and super-fans alike will appreciate the film’s emotional and visual flow, outstanding performances and arresting landscapes. The tragic cliffhanger ending will leave audiences desperate for part two of “Deathly Hallows.”

Grade: A

output. The story starts of illustrating the days of a nine-year-old in the Marcy Houses housing project in Brooklyn, a little section of Brooklyn, discovering the magical burgeoning world of hip hop and rapping that was developing on the streets of New York. Very quickly, though, crack cocaine made it’s infiltration into his community and it wasn’t long before he, like everyone that surrounded him was hustlin’ and dealing coke to get by. “I went straight,” he said, “[I] stopped selling drugs — but I also didn’t accept the false choice between poverty and breaking the law.” So often celebrities write in their memoirs of vice’s they often get over for the sake of their career. It can be minor like in Kelly Slater ’s scenario, junk food, or extreme like Anthony Kiedis’s longstanding addiction to heroine. Jay-Z’s main vice oddly enough was hustling. Throughout much of the early portion of his life he sold drugs, something that would scar him and strengthen him for the years to come. He wrote about the intens i t y a n d h a r ro w i n g e x p e riencing of having friends die and constantly watching your back to the point of near mental breakdown and paranoia and how despite that, he was consumed by the lifestyle. There was always the hopes of achieving something better. As he illustrates, though, hustling is an integral part of street culture and often a problem that often is overlooked or severely mishandled. Though an interseting part of the book, this where JayZ crosses over into messy territory. Throughout the book, his arguments range from racism amongst police, to government policies designed

to perpetuate social disparities amongst difference races of people in America, with the word “nigger” spattered throughout. While these arguments are all interesting, philosophically engaging, and sound, some, especially the latter feature concrete warrants. In this sense, Decoded has the opportunity to be much more intellectually fulfilling but blows it as Jay-Z makes overarching statements about the state of things in the government in comparison with the “hood,” without concrete evidence. Despite this he does provide an interesting springboard of social and political ideas that the reader can assess in their own time, he’s simply and perhaps unnecessarily passing the work of research to the reader though. Jay-Z also makes compelling points outside intense controversy. Towards the end, he starts to break himself down theologically and philosophically on a deeper level than anywhere else in the book, making an already entertaining and insightful read, into something even more. “Decoded” also features lyrical breakdowns at the end of every chapter, in which he describes many different aspects, inspirations, and motivations behind his words and the poetry he creates with them. While usually intriguing and unique, the breakdowns can become burdensome and annoying as they break the flow of the narrative. Ultimately the experience is subjective and up to the reader in that sense. “Decoded” is in many ways just that — a look inside Jay-Z’s head and the world he lives in and has lived in decoded, and made sense of, for anyone to take a look at.

Grade: A

Boots: Prices kept low

with Istanbul craftsmen From page 10 “I don’t hold a dime against my brothers though,” he said. “He has hundreds and hundreds.” It was inevitable that the brothers’ passion and love for shoes and boots would lead them to make a career of it. After graduating high school from his hometown of Norman, Okla., moving to Hollywood to pursue a music career, moving back to home and back again to California, Bingaman and his brother opened the Subterranean shoe room in San Francisco. “That was my business crash course 101,” he said. The shoe room was extremely successful, Bingaman said. Having to learn how to do books, inventory and management on the whim and the stress of running a business, though, soon caught up with him and no later, he was burnt out, so he and his wife make the move to Texas, where his wife grew up. Initially, Bingaman didn’t have a game plan for what he wanted to do next. While in San Francisco, he wanted to open a coffee shop and given the time and opportunity in Texas, Bingaman opened the multifaceted Progress Café in East Austin and soon after ventured into a coffee roasting business, Owl Tree. As if running businesses and a family of four was not enough for Bingaman, he said he always had in mind opening a shoe store in Austin like the one in San Fransisco once Progress was established. Bingaman got that final push about a year and a half ago when his aunt, who lives in Istanbul, Turkey and is in the textile business there, said she knows of a couple of noteworthy handmade shoemakers. Bingaman flew to Istanbul and his aunt introduced him to Ibrahim, a shoemaker whose family have been in the business for generations and who, Bingaman said, has handcrafted shoes for princes, head of states and even, Don-

ald Trump. What sealed the deal for Bingaman, though, was Ibrahim had access to imports like leathers from Spain, Italy, and Australia. “That was gold mine for me,” he said. Without Ibrahim, there was no way he could create such caliber of work without a price tag of a $1000 plus if the production was in fashion capitals like Spain and Italy. Instead, the average price for Helm boots are $350 to $400. Under the hands of skilled artisan workers, all production of Helm boots is in Istanbul. Bingaman draws the design in Austin, edits it with other designers, and sends it to the factory. From there, the print of Helm boots is hand drawn onto fine leather, hand cut and hand-stitched. The process of hand making one Helm boot can take up to 5 days or a full week, which are then worn as a test drive. “They travel the hell out of them and wear the hell out of them and make sure it’s functional,” he said. “We have had defects that we’ve had to work with.” Despite not having a background in design or drawing, Bingaman is driven and stands strong in his vision. One of his most recent designs for next season’s boot collection was inspired from an old shoe he saw in a vintage advertising book he picked up from a bookstore. “The Rally” will have a high shaft that can be folded down and clasped to the bottom of the bottom. The inside of it will have different color leather than from the outer and will give a nice contrast, he said. In the works is also a women’s line of leather boots and shoes, which Bingaman says will be released around February. “I‘ll have multiple artists who work with me where I say okay there’s these six boots, I want this heel with this toe cap with this midsole with this shaft and we draw it,” he said. “I’ll draw it and it’ll look like a kindergarten drawing.”


ENT P10

10

Friday, November 19, 2010

Life&Arts

Life&Arts Editor: Amber Genuske E-mail: lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T he Daily T exan

Book REviEW

DecoDeD

Memoir by Jay-Z examines rapper’s beliefs, childhood

Erika Rich | Daily Texan Staff

Josh Bingaman is the founder of Helm Handmade, an Austin-based boot company that recently celebrated its first year of business. Bingaman names all of the handmade mensware boots after family and friends, and is currently designing a line of women’s boots.

By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff From even before its release, rapper Jay-Z made it apparent that his new memoir, “Decoded” was going to be an ambitious piece of work through its extremely unique marketing campaign. HiphopDX, reported that in efforts to create buzz about the book, excerpts were to be featured in random places ranging from the bottom of hotel pools, to the sides of buildings, to subways, to pool tables. In typical Jay-Z fashion, the product ends up living up to the hype. Decoded itself reads more uniquely than most memoirs. Jay-Z still maintains a focus

on his own story, but instead of keeping his narrative singular, Decoded comes off as several things: a social statement, a chronicling of hiphop’s rise, and, of course, the personal recollections. The unique variance of styles and intentions woven throughout. In that fashion of jumping from tangent to tangent to create an interwoven story line, Jay-Z also he even admits to being non-linear and instead prefers to jump around in his story telling, creating whatever image he desires as the product of the chopped up elements he puts into his work, creating a beautiful flowing

DECODED continues on page 9

Austinite steps into shoe industry Longtime footwear lover realizes goal of opening trendy artisan boot line

By Julie Rene Tran Daily Texan Staff The afternoon sun hammers onto the tannish storage unit that’s sits next to Helm’s business office as owner Joshua Bingaman carries meter-high stacks of cardboard shoeboxes from it and loads them onto the bed of a vintage, light blue GMC truck. The boxes hold Bingaman’s prized handmade men leather boots and shoes and were on their way to Stag, a lo-

cal, men’s apparel and lifestyle brand and store. Just a month ago at Stag, Helm celebrated its one-year anniversary. Though Helm has just dipped its toes into the shoe industry, already this local product has soared into stardom, literally. Celebrity Helm owners includes Nick Cave, Terrel Owen, Ray Lamontagne, and Robert Downey Jr. and on the waiting list are Ben Harper and his band, as well as the musicians Robert Plant and Patti Griffin. Everything surrounding Bingaman’s life has an intricate story from the name Helm

after his son Samuel Helm, to how each boot is named — the Dapper Dane, similar to a hiking boot in a off-white colored calf skin for instance, is inspired by the vast snow scenes on “Star Wars.” The amount of details in stories only reiterates that Bingaman studied poetry, literature and writing in the various community colleges he attended. Since childhood, Bingaman had a thing for shoes, beginning with collecting older versions of Pumas, Nikes and Adidas. Around 14 to 16 though, Bingaman started to wear different hiking boots. He found his

dad’s hunting boots and wolverine boots and soon after, his brother and him got into Red Wings working boots. That’s when his boots became an overloading obsession. Now, Bingaman said his collection has dwindled to a few dozen of work boots and a pair of fine leather dress shoe here and there. Though Bingaman recently spring cleaned his collection to a few every day favorites, he has a storage unit that holds the rest of his shoes, still not comparable to his brother’s collection.

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“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” the first of the two-part volume released today, allows for more attention to detail from the book left out in the previous films in the series. as the most faithful and the most stylistically stunning of the franchise. Warner Bros.’ decision to split the final installment into two separate films is surely a factor in the noticeable increase in quality. Many cynically regard the move as a marketing ploy designed to milk as much money from the finale as possible, as it may well have been. However, splitting the film into two volumes has creatively liberated Kloves and director Da-

vid Yates. No longer pressured to pack an entire book’s worth of complex plotting, intense characterization and bewitching visuals into a single film, Yates has seized the opportunity to make part one of “Deathly Hallows” a contemplative character study. The film is considerably more leisurely than its predecessors, which all sacrificed character development in favor of cramming in as many of Sign up for our daily e-mail and we’ll send you amazing deals at places you’ll love!

POTTER continues on page 9

Ballet barre workouts gain popularity HEALTHY HOOK

By Addie Anderson Barres are becoming more and more popular across the country as a tool for exercise. Not the drinking kind of bars, but the ballet barre, which is now being used for workout classes that claim to create a more toned and trim physique. Rashanna Moss-Lowry opened Pure Barre, an exercise studio, in late August off of Bee Caves Road. The classes use a technique that incorporates el-

ements of yoga, Pilates and dance to tighten your thighs, seat, abs and arms using the ballet barre, light weights, a stretch band and a small rubber ball. Moss-Lowry said the “Pure Barre Technique” used in the class is claimed to be “the fastest, most effective, yet safest way to change your body,” and that people who take her classes see results after as few as 10 classes. Moss-Lowry has been active throughout her life — playing tennis, running, doing boot camps and trying all different activities. About a year ago, a friend of Moss-Lowry’s and co-owner of Pure Barre in Nashville told her

Courtesy of Random House

BOOTS continues on page 9

Film REviEW

By Katie Stroh Daily Texan Staff The Harry Potter movie franchise has always been flawed, both for casual viewers and die-hard, ultra-critical fans of the book. Screenwriter Steve Kloves usually manages to anger the die-hards by watering down plot points, misattributing character motivations and inventing his own uninspired dialogue where J.K. Rowling’s would have served infinitely better. At the same time, Kloves often confuses casual moviegoers by providing abysmally muddled plot exposition. Similarly, when watching “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” — part one in a twopart volume — average viewers with little experience with the book’s intricate plot will often find themselves lost. It’s clear the filmmakers have assumed audiences are familiar enough with Harry’s story and done away with some of the trickier exposition. However, seasoned Potter fans will not only be able to follow the story, they will finally fully recognize the spirit of Rowling’s beloved characters embodied on film. For fans, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” will certainly be lauded both

Rapper Jay-Z gets personal with his new memoir, “Decoded,” which is in bookstores now.

to come in and try a class. “I was skeptical,” Moss-Lowry said. “You know, I don’t do girly work outs, I do boot camps and I go run and I do stuff like that ... I said, whatever, it’s just like any other work out. I’ll get immune to it within like two to three weeks. I stuck with it and it never happened.“ During the class, you use the ballet barre to perform small isometric movements, a contraction where you hold a position for an extended period of time, over the course of an hour. Professor Dixie Stanforth, who teaches kinesiology

EXERCISE continues on page 9

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The Daily Texan 10-19-10  

The Nov. 19, 2010 edition of The Daily Texan.

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