Page 1

The Daily Texan

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

facebook.com/dailytexan

INSIDE

Friday, October 19, 2012

dailytexanonline.com

Texas opens up fall ball against Sam Houston State

UT fine arts grad student Will Davis directs “The Cataract.”

4

SPORTS PAGE 6

LIFE&ARTS

OPINiON

The tuition survey: Student Government should finished what it started.

5 NEWS

Senate of College Councils adopted a proposal for a new University honor code.

6 SPORTS

Vegas leads Horns as only senior, hopes for another National Title.

CRIME

SG warns students of property crimes By Bobby Blanchard & David Maly

After evaluating the property crime situation in West Campus, Student Government is working to remind students to be more aware of the threat of theft. Carson Jones, University Area Partners’ external appointee, said SG will be using social media to remind

students to lock their car and home doors and keep their valuables out of plain sight. University Area Partners is a partnership between the city of Austin, UT and University-area businesses that focuses on neighborhood planning and crime prevention. Jones said there are simple steps people can take that can go a long way to preventing property crime. “People become too trust-

ing, and they forget that we are living in the heart of the city and others have an incentive to steal your belongings,” Jones said. Gary Griffin, Austin Police Department district representative for the West Campus area, said he does not think students are careful enough in the area because they are not used to a

2011 property crime rate comparison Property crime is defined as burglary, theft, motor-vehicle theft and arson

4 INCIDENTS PER 100 PEOPLE 78705 West, Northwest and North of campus

5 INCIDENTS PER 100 PEOPLE

UT

THEFT continues on page 2

FOOTBALL

CAMPUS

UT students visit Mexico, advocate for worker rights

10 LIFE & ARTS

By David Maly

The most promising movies screening at Austin Film Festival.

TODAY Salsa Fest

Join the Longhorn Sala for two nights starting tonight from 7 - 11:45 p.m. to experience the best salsa and Latin dance Austin has to offer. Students will be able to partake in fun competitions while listening to a variety music from bachata to merengue and much more. The event is free and located in the Texas Union ballroom.

Fest Africa

Come join the African Students Association as they celebrate the diversity and accomplishments of the African continent and its people. There will be music, food, and plenty of fun as you dance the night away. The event is free and will take place at the Main Mall from 7 – 10:30 p.m.

Brazil’s Grupo Corpo performs

Texas Performing Arts presents the twoevening return of Brazil’s world-renowned dance company, Grupo Corpo. The show will be held at the Performing Arts Center (PAC) at the Bass Concert Hall from 8-10 p.m, with tickets ranging from $10-$42.

Today in history In 1960

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested along with 50 student protesters for conducting a sitin demonstration at a whites-only restaurant located in Rich’s department store in Atlanta, Georgia. With help from presidential hopeful John F. Kennedy, King’s original four month prison sentence was dropped just one week after the incident.

Austin

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff Mustang Quarterback Garrett Gilbert threw for 265 yards and a career-high four touchdowns Thursday night. After a rocky start at Texas, the transfer to SMU has proven to be a refreshing start for the Lake Travis High School graduate.

A SECOND CHANCE Former Longhorn QB Garrett Gilbert trying to salvage career at SMU

By Christian Corona

T

he last time Garrett Gilbert had this good of a game, he was in high school. The former Longhorns quarterback looked like the prolific passer he was at Lake Travis High School, throwing for 265 yards and a career-high four touchdowns in SMU’s 72-42 win over Houston Thursday night in what was, by far, his best performance since

he decided to transfer from Texas last September. “The sky’s the limit for us,” Gilbert said. “I still think offensively with us and the playmakers we have and the running back we have in Zach [Line], and the offensive line continues to gel and get better and better each week. Tonight things just went our way.” He couldn’t remember the last time he threw as many as four touchdowns in a game. It had been a while.

CITY

Council investigated amid alleged violation By Joshua Fetcher Austin City Council members may avoid prosecution for allegedly violating the Texas Open Meetings Act by entering into an agreement with the Travis County Attorney’s Office. Mayor Lee Leffingwell and a lawyer representing Council Member Mike Martinez entered into an agreement requiring council members to follow open meetings laws and take online classes educating them about the law, according to The Austin AmericanStatesman. In the article, attorney Joe Turner, who represents Martinez, said members who sign the agreement will not face charges or fines. Under Section 551 of the

Texas Government Code, failing to follow the Texas Open Meetings Act is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $500 and up to six months in jail. In 2011 Travis County Attorney David Escamilla began an investigation after local activist Brian Rodgers issued a complaint to Escamilla’s office accusing council members of violating the Open Meetings Act by sharing information with one another about items the council would discuss in future meetings. Under the act, governing bodies must notify the public of the time, location and content of meetings. The act requires a quorum, or majority of members, be present to conduct business

ACT continues on page 2

He last accomplished the feat when he was a 17-year-old leading Lake Travis to a 48-23 victory over Longview in the 2008 4A state title game, his 30th straight win as the Cavaliers’ starting quarterback. The game took place in Waco, halfway between where he began his college career and where he’s trying to salvage it. A two-time state champion at Lake Travis, where he went 39-4 as a starter, Gilbert attracted the attention of many top-notch college football programs. He had his heart set on Texas, where he went 5-7 in his first full season as a starter in

2010. After making two starts in 2011, Gilbert underwent shoulder surgery and transferred to SMU. “Texas is the biggest and the best,” Gilbert said. “SMU is a program that obviously, in the past, has had some success but has had a little bit of a period of — I don’t know what the word for it is — but a lot of losing. You don’t see 100,000 people in the stands because we only have a 32,000-seat stadium.” Earlier this year, Gilbert revisited his alma mater at Lake Travis, where he enjoyed the

GILBERT continues on page 7

STATE OF EMERGENCY

Four UT students took a trip across the border last weekend to see the impoverished lifestyle of factory workers and the struggles they face just four hours to the south as they push for better working conditions. Philosophy senior Sophia Poitier, Plan II senior Sabina Hinz-Foley, Plan II sophomore Bianca HinzFoley and former UT student Yajaira Fraga traveled Friday to the border city of Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila, Mexico. There, they met with representatives from an automobile manufacturing plant owned by PKC Group that employs close to 8,000 people. Employees of the factory have received international media attention during the last few months as they have attempted to form a union and gain better working conditions and increased pay. The four students are members of the UT chapter of United Students Against Sweatshops, an international organization that advocates for workers’ rights. Poitier said some of the factory workers invited the students to their homes, where they saw the dirty, cramped government or make-shift structures many

MEXICO continues on page 2 A bomb threat was made Thursday morning via email targeting Texas State University’s admissions building. The building remained closed for the rest of the day.

David Maly Daily Texan Staff

TX State acts quickly in bomb scare By David Maly

SAN MARCOS — Members of the Texas State University community breathed a deep sigh of relief Thursday afternoon after campus police issued an all-clear alert following a bomb threat against its admissions building that morning. In contrast to the response taken by authorities at UT when a bomb threat was made against their campus Sept. 14, authori-

ties at Texas State University alerted their campus community more quickly and evacuated the area targeted by the threat more effectively. Texas State University spokesperson Jayme Blaschke said a bomb threat was made against Texas State University Thursday morning through an email to a Houston-based admissions officer’s university email account. The email showed up in her email account at 7:21 a.m., but

she did not notice it until later. After she saw it, she immediately contacted her supervisors, who contacted Texas State University police at 8:48 a.m. Texas State University police then evaluated the threat’s validity and alerted the campus community at 9:40 a.m. via email, text, the university’s website, message boards around the campus and computer alerts. Texas State Police

THREAT continues on page 2


News

2

Friday, October 19, 2012

C

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo

The Daily Texan Volume 113, Issue 48

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

K t

Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com

E

Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low

High

86

69 T-Swizzle wuz here.

Zachary Strain | Daily Texan Staff Texas Ballroom member Sherry Zeng and Samuel Ekis, social officer in the club, dance in Anna Hiss Gym Thursday. The club meets on weekdays and offers instruction in various types of dancing.

during public meetings. The governing body may convene a closed session to discuss property transactions, contract negotiations, the deployment or implementation of security measures, gifts and donations, personnel matters and litigation. Governmental bodies may only take final action on a matter discussed in a closed session during an open meeting. Before Thursday’s city council meeting, Leffingwell said he would not offer further comment on the case and beyond his statement in the Austin American-Statesman. “I’m happy that this process has finally concluded and determined that there were no violations,” Leffingwell told the Statesman Wednesday. “As always, we will continue to uphold the highest standards of transparency at City Hall.” Former Council Member Randi Shade, who This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Kayla Oliver, Pete Stroud Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Boze, Samantha Katsounas, Allie Koletcha, Jody Serrano Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bobby Blanchard, Joshua Fechter, Lazaro Hernandez, David Maly, Alexa Ura Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristine Reyna Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Amyna Dosani, Sherry Hu, Luis San Miguel Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Andrew Torrey Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nathan Goldsmith, Pu Ying Huang, Zachary Strain, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fanny Trang, Marisa Vasquez Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Macias Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oluwademilade Adejuyigbe, Thomas Allison, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Hannah Smothers, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ricky Stein, Alex Williams, Laura Wright Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer, Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Wes Maulsby Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ghayde Ghraowi Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Omar Longoria Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Cheng Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Tiffany Hinman Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tayla Bavvon Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garrett Callahan, Christopher Caraveo, Peter Sblendorio, Evan Berko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah White, Samantha Jackson, Nitya Duran, Jacob Martella Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexa Hart, Bobby Blanchard, Faith Ann Ruszkowski Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Nill Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jori Epstein, Sarah Smith, Amy Yu, Rachel Kaser Comic Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lakeem Wilson, Christina Paige Sze, Desiree Avila, Mark Moralez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Davila, Anik Bhattacharaya, Cody Bubenik, David Hook Illustrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anne-Katrine Harris Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vince Gutierrez, Angela Bunstead

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Chang, Zach Congdon, Draike Delagarza, Jake Dworkis, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ivan Meza, Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

Texan Ad Deadlines

10/19/12

MEXICO continues from page 1

ACT continues from page 1

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

held office at the time of the accusations, said in a statement Wednesday that she accepted the deal over the summer. “I never knowingly conspired to circumvent the Texas Open Meetings Act, and over this past summer I entered into an agreement for deferred prosecution in an effort to put the investigation behind me,” Shade said. Shade lost re-election to current Council Member Kathie Tovo in 2011. In the statement, Shade said council members met with one another outside public meetings long before her term began in 2008. The Daily Texan reported in 2011 that Rodgers accused Leffingwell of meeting with two council members at a time in his office for an hour before each city council meeting. Meeting with only two members would prevent the presence of a quorum

THREAT continues from page 1

took 52 minutes to alert campus after receiving the threat. UTPD took 75 minutes to alert the campus Sept. 14. Blaschke said the threat targeted the university’s admissions building, so Texas State University police evacuated that building and the 800-foot perimeter around it under the direction of the Austin Police Department bomb squad. That meant the evacuation of two residence halls, Towers Hall and San Jacinto Hall, which house 900 people total. On Sept. 14 at UT, members of the UT community were alerted that the University had received a bomb threat 75 minutes after police found out about it and were told to “get as far away from the buildings as possible,” resulting in people lingering near campus buildings the bomb threat had targeted, violating the University’s 300-foot minimum distance guidelines used during building evacuations, according to

and a violation of the act. Wanda Cash, associate director of the School of Journalism, said she found it interesting that the agreement includes online courses on the act. Officials who are members of a governmental body subject to the act are required to complete Open Meetings Act training 90 days after assuming the responsibilities of their office, according to Section 551 of the Texas Government Code. “Apparently they weren’t paying attention the first time,” Cash said. City spokesperson Roxanne Evans said the city has spent $343,602.73 hiring law firms to advise city officials on the investigation and on open meeting topics since the investigation began. Escamilla declined comment Thursday, because the investigation is still ongoing. UT’s Building Management & Restricted Access Plan. In an interview with The Daily Texan Tuesday, Bob Harkins, associate vice president for campus safety and security at UT, said UT has looked into its failure to evacuate the UT community an appropriate distance from the targeted area Sept. 14. He said the University will try not to make the same mistake in the future. Blaschke said no arrest has been made in relation to Thursday’s threat, and he could not release many details on the specifics of the investigation, as it is still ongoing. “They have an origin email, and whether the email originated from that web account is questionable,” Blaschke said. The Austin Police Department bomb squad, San Marcos police, Hays County police, state of Texas police and the FBI assisted Texas State University police with the investigation. No arrest has been made at this time in response to the Sept. 14 bomb threat at UT. FBI Special Agent Erik Vasys said the investigation into the Sept. 14 bomb threat at UT is still ongoing.

of the workers pay a significant portion of their pay to live in. “I actually got to see what these people’s lives are like and that makes it much more real and much more urgent,” Poitier said. “It made me realize how important solidarity is for these workers, because not only are they working 10 hours a day, holding second jobs and taking care of children, but they are also organizing in their spare time.” Poitier said, people in the UT community and the rest of the country are generally not aware enough of the living conditions that exist in Mexico. Fraga agreed, saying most of the media attention on Mexico in the U.S. tends to focus on issues associated with the border. “Obviously you hear and read things about Mexico, and they are never pretty,” Fraga said. “But you never get to read about the struggles

THEFT

continues from page 1 bigger city or think West Campus is safe since it is close to UT. “They think it is part of UT, and it’s all wholesome and good, and nobody is supposed to mess with their stuff because they go to UT,” Griffin said. “But it doesn’t happen that way.” According to APD statistics, the 78705 zip code, which encompasses the areas west, northwest and north of campus, has a similar rate of property crime when compared to other parts of the city and Austin overall. In 2011, 78705 had four incidents of property crime for every 100 people, and the city of Austin had five incidents for every 100 people. Jones said he has seen a carefree attitude in regard to keeping apartment codes secure. “The problem is apartment codes are handed out a little too much,” Jones

R E C Y C L E check out The Daily Texan

AFTER READING YOUR COPY

ONLINE

that people go through day in and day out.” Bianca Hinz-Foley said another goal of the trip was to encourage the workers and lend additional support to their struggle. “One of our objectives as USAS students is to stand in solidarity with worker rights organizations that struggle to combat illegal and inhumane working conditions in their factories and workplaces in Austin and abroad,” Biana HinzFoley said in an email. Poitier said the UT chapter of USAS will be focusing most of its efforts in the near future on an effort to get the University Co-op to purchase roughly $250,000 worth of apparel from a factory in Central America that has come to serve as an example of fair working conditions in an impoverished area. “We want the Co-op to show that they care about the rights of factory workers,” Poitier said.

said. “You need to be wary about who you’re handing out apartment codes to.” Accounting junior Rebecca Harrison said her home and car were broken into last fall when she left the door to her home unlocked because she was expecting one of her roommates to come home later. While she was asleep, she said someone broke into the house and stole her roommate’s laptop, camera and iPod. The burglar then used Harrison’s car keys to steal her GPS and iPod from her car. “It was mostly our fault because we left our door unlocked,” Harrison said. “Now we always lock our door, no matter who is home or who is not. We have a sign on our door to remind us.” When people forget to lock their doors, Jones and Griffin said thefts similar to Harrison’s are common. “In general, people forget things like this can happen,” Jones said. “What people fail to realize is there are some

stories videos photo galleries dailytexanonline.com


W&N 3

Friday, October 19, 2012

World & Nation 3

Amyna Dosani, Wire Editor

NEWS BRIEFLY Syrian airstrikes kill at least 43 in north side

BEIRUT — Syrian warplanes hammered a strategic city captured by rebels, leaving behind scenes of carnage captured Thursday on amateur videos that showed a man holding up two childsized legs not connected to a body and another carrying a dismembered arm. Activists said airstrikes over the past two days on opposition targets across Syria’s north have killed at least 43 people. The scenes from the city of Maaret al-Numan provide a window into the carnage being wrought by the Syrian military’s increasing reliance on airstrikes to fight rebels waging a civil war to topple Assad. Rights groups say the airstrikes often hit civilian areas. And this week, U.S.based Human Rights Watch accused Syria of using cluster bombs, which pose grave dangers to civilians. The regime contends that it is fighting terrorists backed by foreign powers who seek to destroy Syria and denies using cluster bombs. Activists say more than 33,000 people have been killed since the anti-Assad uprising started in March 2011.

US Navy to sanitize moldy Gitmo offices GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba — Legal offices that are so contaminated with mold and rat droppings that lawyers in the Sept. 11 terrorism trial have been getting sick will get a full clean-up and be evaluated by safety experts, a military official said Thursday. A “comprehensive” cleaning of the offices, which are primarily used by defense teams in the Guantanamo Bay tribunals, will begin by the end of the month and be finished in time for a hearing scheduled in December, said Army Capt. Michael Lebowitz, one of the prosecutors in the case of five prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attacks. “It’s almost like a fresh start,” Lebowitz told the case judge, who has been fielding complaints about the offices this week while presiding over a pretrial hearing at the U.S. base in Cuba. The issue of the contaminated offices has repeatedly interrupted progress on more than two dozen pretrial motions this week. Defense lawyers had sought to postpone the hearing outright, which would have further delayed a case that has been plagued by delays.

DC Comics wins case over Superman rights LOS ANGELES — DC Comics will retain its rights to Superman after a judge ruled Wednesday that the heirs of one of the superhero’s co-creators signed away their ability to reclaim copyrights to the Man of Steel roughly 20 years ago. The ruling means that DC Comics and its owner Warner Bros. will retain all rights to continue using the character in books, films, television and other mediums, including a the film reboot planned for next year. DC Comics sued the heirs of artist Joe Shuster in 2010, seeking a ruling that they lost their ability to try to reclaim the superhero’s copyrights in 1992. U.S. District Court Judge Otis Wright II agreed, stating that Shuster’s sister and brother relinquished any chance to reclaim Superman copyrights in exchange for annual pension payments from DC Comics. In April, the $412 check that DC Comics wrote to acquire Superman and other creative works by Shuster and writer Jerry Siegel sold for $160,000 in an online auction. —Compiled from Associated Press Reports

Peter Morrison | Associated Press A protester opposed to abortion demonstrates outside the Marie Stopes clinic in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Thursday. The first abortion clinic on the island of Ireland opened in Belfast, sparking protests by Christian conservatives from both the Catholic and Protestant sides of Northern Ireland’s divide.

Ireland opens first abortion clinic By Nigel Duara Associated Press

BELFAST, Northern Ireland — The first abortion clinic on the island of Ireland opened Thursday in downtown Belfast, unleashing angry protests on the street and uniting Catholic and Protestant politicians in calls to

investigate the new facility. The clinic, run by the British family planning charity Marie Stopes, will be permitted to provide abortions only in exceptional circumstances to women less than nine weeks pregnant. But the opening caught Northern Ireland’s socially conservative politicians off guard, and they vowed to

launch an investigation into how the clinic operates. About 400 protesters who lined the sidewalk outside the facility all day said they were certain that public pressure would force authorities to shut it. “I expect the heads of government to run Marie Stopes out of Northern Ireland,” the protest leader, Bernadette Smyth of the pressure group

Precious Life, told supporters through a bullhorn. “Those who have come ... storm heaven with your prayers!” Abortion is one of few issues that unites Northern Ireland, a predominantly Protestant corner of the United Kingdom, and the mostly Catholic Republic of Ireland. Both jurisdictions keep abortion outlawed ex-

cept in cases where doctors deem the woman’s life at risk from continued pregnancy. Inside the clinic on Thursday, doctors and counselors dealt with several women in crisis pregnancies. Clinic directors say the only form of abortion they will provide are pills that induce miscarriages in women up to nine weeks pregnant.

Alamo repairs need $1 million funding By Paul J. Weber Associated Press

Jamie Francis, The Oregonian | Associated Press file photo In this April 13, 2010, Kerry Lewis, left, leans into his lawyer, Paul Mones, in a Portland, Ore., courtroom after a jury found the Boy Scouts of America negligent for repeated sexual abuse by an assistant Scoutmaster in the 1980s.

Scouts neglected victims By Nigel Duara Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — An array of local authorities — police chiefs, prosecutors, pastors and town Boy Scout leaders among them — quietly shielded scoutmasters and others who allegedly molested children, according to a newly opened trove of confidential files compiled from 1959 to 1985. At the time, those authorities

justified their actions as necessary to protect the good name and good works of Scouting. But as detailed in 14,500 pages of secret “perversion files” released Thursday by order of the Oregon Supreme Court, their maneuvers protected suspected sexual predators while victims suffered in silence. The files document sex abuse allegations across the country, from a small town in the Adirondacks to downtown Los Angeles.

At a news conference Thursday, Portland attorney Kelly Clark blasted the Boy Scouts for their continuing legal battles to try to keep the full trove of files secret. “You do not keep secrets hidden about dangers to children,” said Clark, who in 2010 won a landmark lawsuit against the Boy Scouts on behalf of a plaintiff who was molested by an assistant scoutmaster in the 1980s.

The agency now overseeing the Alamo said Thursday that the historic site needs $1 million for an “extensive list” of repairs that grew under its longtime caretakers, while a decision on the heated issue of whether to display the famous “Victory or Death” letter from the 1836 battle is set for next week. Fearing one of the most sacred texts in Texas might be damaged if removed from “dark storage” for a 177th anniversary celebration in February, members of the state’s historical commission are wary of the request from the state’s General Land Office. The commission is expected to rule Wednesday. The letter was penned by Col. William Barret Travis, the commander of the Alamo garrison, as Mexican forces encroached in considerable numbers. Seldom has the letter been displayed in public and never on the original grounds in San Antonio. “The concerns the agency have are the mitigation of risk,” said Peggy Rudd, director of the Texas State Library

and Archives Commission. “This is a document that is almost 200 years old. It has not always been cared for in the most appropriate ways.” The General Land Office took ownership of the Alamo last year at the behest of the Legislature, which had grown concerned about the care of the iconic Texas landmark. Worries arose following accusations of mismanagement and financial incompetence levied at the nonprofit Daughters of the Republic of Texas, the century-old caretakers of the shrine. The Daughters remain the Alamo’s primary caretaker but now answer to stricter state oversight. Larry Laine, the office’s deputy commissioner, told members of the Texas House’s Committee on Culture, Recreation and Tourism that his agency will ask for a one-time $1 million appropriation when the Legislature reconvenes in January. Even if lawmakers approved the funding next year, it wouldn’t come close to the amount of preservation work consultants have said the Alamo needs. Some estimates exceed $5 million.

Colombia, FARC hold peace talks By Vivian Sequera Associated Press

HURDAL, Norway — Colombia’s first peace talks in a decade were inaugurated Thursday a half world away with a demonstration of just how widely the two sides differ on how to end a vexing, nearly five-decade-old conflict. The Oslo talks were brief, symbolic and largely perfunctory. Held at a secret venue, they lasted seven hours. The

government’s lead negotiator, Humberto de la Calle, sought to set a businesslike, cordial tone in brief remarks, saying the government seeks “mutual dignified treatment” in the talks and doesn’t expect the sides to see eye-to-eye ideologically. Ivan Marquez, of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, said it had come to Oslo “with an olive branch.” Then he began railing against Colombia’s “corrupt oligarchy,” its alleged masters in Washington, “state-

sponsored violence,” the government’s “deceptive and backward” land policies, and the “vampires” of transnational oil and mining that FARC says are ravaging the nation. Members of the government team, separated from the FARC negotiators at a long table by Norwegian and Cuban diplomats who have acted as facilitators, looked bored and slightly annoyed, some crossing their arms, others propping up chins with hands.

Fernando Martinez | Associated Press Amalia de Marquez holds a portrait of her son, Enrique Marquez, who she says was kidnapped by rebels from Colombia’s Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC), and a banner that reads “Freedom” in Spanish during a protest in Bogota, Colombia, Thursday.


Opinion 4

Friday, October 19, 2012

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

We asked: Do debates affect your vote? The Nov. 6 presidential election is 18 days away. We asked students lying on the South Mall enjoying the fall breeze if they watched the last two debates or read the coverage, and if so, whether or not President Barack Obama and former Gov. Mitt Romney’s debate performances will influence their vote. “I don’t watch the debates, but I read coverage of them online in different national newspapers like The Washington Post and The New York Times, so they will affect the way I vote. I feel like how people handle themselves in the debate situation, not necessarily the actual ideas that they express, is a really good indicator of their leadership qualities. And their ability to communicate is really important to me, and something I look for [when I read about the debates]. At this point I haven’t come to a decision yet, but what I’ve seen has really influenced my opinion.” —Jeannie Binder, Plan II, music and French fifth-year from Corpus Christi

“I don’t watch the debates, I don’t follow the coverage, and I’m not voting. Honestly, I forgot to register.” — Amanda Andrade, biology freshman from Richmond

It’s more of a pointing and yelling match than a real issues conversation, so no, I don’t think it will affect how I vote.” — Anna Pope, Latin American studies senior from Wimberley

“I don’t watch the debates, I don’t follow the coverage. I mean, I know what goes on, but that doesn’t interest me. I think both candidates are childish.” — Ryan Arnett, architecture freshman from Richmond

“I watch the debates. I read the coverage occasionally. The debates will influence the way I vote. The first one didn’t, but the second one did. I’ve been undecided for a long time, but during the second debate, I thought the candidates’ opinions were clearer, and I could identify with one of them more than the other.” — Regan Hann, studio art junior from McKinney

“I watched the first debate. I don’t think it’s going to influence the way I vote at all because they just talk about bullshit anyway.

GALLERY

SG’s tuition survey: All talk, no action By Ryan Nill Daily Texan Columnist

Radioactive waste

Don’t let TCEQ make Texas toxic By Laura Wright Daily Texan Columnist

Every day, labs in the University of Texas System produce low-level radioactive waste in the course of medical procedures and scientific research. Despite what the comic books would have you believe, this radioactive waste isn’t fluorescent green glowing sludge. Most of the waste the UT System produces consists of objects like gloves, protective clothing and laboratory glassware that have been exposed to radiation during routine research or medical protocols. Roughly 90 percent of this low-level radioactive waste can be safely contained on-site at the UT System labs that produce them. But what happens to the other 10 percent of toxic trash raises concerns. In 1980, the federal Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) Policy Act made each state responsible for disposing of all the LLRW produced within its borders. Only four LLRW disposal facilities, which dispose of waste by burying it in controlled shallow land, exist in the U.S. All 50 states depend on these four facilities to dispose of their radioactive waste, and until 2008, Texas disposed of its LLRW in South Carolina. But when that facility closed its doors, Texas was forced to look into other options. Enter Waste Control Specialists LLC, the private vendors who recently built a new disposal facility in Andrews County in West Texas. Li-

censed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and established as part of a “compact” with the state of Vermont, the facility accepts waste from Texas, Vermont and the federal government. It accepted its first shipments of radioactive waste last April. According to Chuck McDonald, a spokesperson for Waste Control Specialists, both the UT and A&M Systems have requested direct contracts with WCS. In a Sept. 26 meeting of the Texas House Committee on Environmental Regulation, he testified that these contracts were about to be finalized. (Full disclosure: I serve as an unpaid intern in State Senator Wendy Davis’s office, but these opinions are my own and not hers or her staff ’s.) Disposing of LLRW is expensive, but luckily the UT System produces very little of it — only 10 to 20 drums per year. Under contracts that fix the prices charged by WCS, the approximate cost to dispose of one 55-gallon drum of waste material is $2,000, meaning that the UT System will spend no more than $40,000 dollars on LLRW disposal each year. The problem with WCS isn’t financial — it’s environmental. WCS is run by Dallas businessman Harold Simmons, who persuaded the Commission to allow him to put up stock of Titanium Metals Corporation, a company he owns, as security on the facility. So if anything monumental goes wrong with the Andrews facility, stock in WCS’s sister company will be given to the state for damages. As the Texas Observer

reported, radioactive waste disposal facilities are typically secured with a bond, a letter of credit or insurance. Securing one with stocks, let alone stocks so strongly tied to the operator of the facility, is near unheard of. It’s as if Simmons convinced a bank to give him a line of credit by using another line of credit as collateral. It just doesn’t make sense. In the same Sept. 26 committee meeting, State Representative Lon Burnam interrogated McDonald about whether or not the disposal routes used by WCS to transport the waste met federal and state safety standards. McDonalds responded that he could not speak to that specifically because he was not aware of the routes. McDonald also said that WCS ensures the financial stability of WCS by moving around the stocks in the security every single day. Maybe that’s worked so far to keep the company financially secure, but that’s not the point. The point is that the state agency that’s supposed to be regulating WCS is allowing it to secure the high-risk venture with stock in a sister company. That hardly seems like regulation at all. And if the Commission can’t stand up to Simmons on something as blatantly fishy as securing his company with stock in his other company, then how will they stand up to him on the more serious issues that have been raised about the facility’s environmental impact — issues like ground water contamination and safe transportation of LLRW? It’s not hard to imagine that they won’t. Wright is Plan II and biology junior from San Antonio.

On Jan. 30, 2011, Occupy UT, an organization known for eschewing traditional politics, staged an act of political theater by moving their weekly occupation from the steps of the Main Building to the Student Government Assembly to support a vote on a tuition referendum resolution. The idea was to use a referendum vote to get an official student opinion on soaring tuition costs and budget cuts from the state government that Student Government could use at the legislature. The referendum was not well received by many Student Government Representatives, who were concerned about its non-binding nature; there was no way SG could enforce a tuition raise or increase, regardless of how the surveyed students voted. Although the resolution required a referendum vote during the next round of campuswide elections, it didn’t require SG to do anything with the results. To make it more useful, Student Government added a comprehensive survey in addition to the referendum. Although the survey was added in order to provide a more accurate picture of students’ opinions regarding tuition, its implementation has been flawed from the start, and it seems unlikely that it will ever be the useful tool it was intended to be. The survey, which was first distributed last spring, was written by SG and the Senate of College Councils with help from Dr. Gale Stuart, director of the Rapid Analysis Team and former director of assessment for the Division of Student Affairs. Stuart, who acted as a survey research consultant, said that there were “serious hurdles” in the design and administration of the survey. First, the survey was administered between spring break and finals — one of the hardest periods of the year during which to engage students. Secondly, instead of acquiring a random sample of students, Student Government used a list of 9,183 unique, but not random, email addresses of potential surveytakers. “I’m neither confident nor un-confident in these results,” Stuart said. Preliminary results were completed April 23, but by that time student officials were in transition and no one further

LEGALESE

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE

EDITORIAL TWITTER

RECYCLE

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.

The survey was intelligently conceived but unsuccessfully conducted.

analyzed the data. But there may still be hope for this survey. Next semester, the state Legislature goes back into session, and having an official student opinion on tuition would be a helpful tool. Michael Morton, the current President of the Senate of College Councils and co-chair of Invest in Texas, a statewide student lobbying group, said that this survey will be helpful in the lobbying effort. Even though tuition has been frozen for two years, there is still the opportunity to petition the Legislature for more funding for universities and financial aid. Morton managed to receive the survey in the transition period between administrations and independently examined the results. Student Government Officials were unable to initially comment on the tuition survey. When presented with the preliminary results, SG Vice President Wills Brown said that he and the rest of the executive board still need to sit down with Stuart to determine what needs to be done to complete the survey. There have been questions in the past about the effectiveness of student participation in discussions about tuition and funding. This survey was the first attempt to get the student body’s perspective on a topic so essential to the student experience. As much as I would like to see this survey successfully and confidently completed, a look at the demographics of the survey are not promising. With nearly 20 percent more female respondents than male, almost as many business students as natural sciences students, and the lack of “Hispanic/Latino” as an option under the race category, this survey does not seem representative enough to use. The survey was unsuccessfully conducted but not un-intelligently conceived. It poses an important question. SG leaders should competently complete the survey, or start over and finish the job.

Nill is an ecology, evolution and behavior senior from San Antonio.

E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it.


News

Friday, October 19, 2012

5 POLITICS

CAMPUS

Panel talks youth, polarizing politics

By Christine Ayala

Zachary Strain | Daily Texan Staff Kye Allums, a transgender man, speaks about his transition from a woman to a man and experience as a former NCAA athlete during the Gender & Sexuality Center Speaker Series Thursday in Gregory Gym.

Ex-athlete tackles gender issues By Tiffany Hinman

Former NCAA athlete Kye Allums may have received support from his coaches and teammates when he came out as a transgender man, but his journey in finding himself did not always athtract positive attention. Allums presented “The Transition Tour” through the d Gender & Sexuality Center s Speaker Series Thursday in s Gregory Gym in an effort to fight ignorance and discrimisnation associated with transdgenders by discussing the rdifferences between gender texpression, gender identity land sexual orientation. Alglums discussed his transition sfrom a woman to a man. n “Sex is what you have, gender -is how you feel,” Allums said. “No one else should tell you Thow to express your gender. It is

not a choice. It is a feeling.” Allums attended Centennial High School in Circle Pines, Minn. At this time he was known by his original name, Kay-Kay. His mother raised him as a Jehovah’s witness. When he told her he was gay, Allums said she quoted Bible scriptures at him. “The next day I woke up, and she took me to the hospital to get a drug test,” Allums said. “She then took me to a church and made me sign a contract afterward promising to pray more. Our relationship was never the same.” Allums attended George Washington University after graduation to play women’s basketball. Allums received support from his coaches and teammates after coming out as a transgender man. He said just a few months later the NCAA approved transgender policies for athletes. According to NCAA policy,

a student athlete may participate in sex-separated sports if they do not use hormone therapy. After a year of treatment, a female-to-male athlete receiving testosterone will not be eligible to compete on a women’s team and a maleto-female athlete receiving testosterone suppression will not be eligible to compete on a men’s team. Allums chose not to receive testosterone or undergo surgeries while playing for George Washington University. “I wanted to continue to play with my team,” Allums said. “I wanted to finish playing when my teammates finished playing. I did not want to undergo hormones and be forced to play for a different team. If you cannot beat me, then it’s because you suck, not because of any hormones.” Electrical engineering sophomore Joshua Bryant attended

e s UNIVERSITY y y l l o r n

— Regina Lawrence

Annette Strauss Institute Director

partisanship in politics, lobbying and undisclosed donations inhibit legislative action. “There is an enormous amount of outside money coming into the system,” McKinnon said. “It’s amplifying the voices of minority interests. If you are outside of Washington and you look at what’s happening in Washington, you hear these voices that you think reflect the view of the country, and they don’t.” Panelist Trey Grayson, director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University and former Secretary of State of Kentucky, helped produce Harvard’s 2012 survey, “Young Americans’ Attitudes Toward Politics and Public Service,” in which only 48 percent of 18 to 29-year-olds surveyed nationwide said they will definitely be voting. Grayson said a polarized political system has contributed to the lack of participation. “The concern is that, for many of you, this is your introduction to politics, to voting,” Grayson said. “We want you all to believe in the system and believe that your voices matter and that your votes matter — that you can make a difference.” The institute will host a postelection debriefing conference Nov. 9 in the Belo Center for New Media.

Court requires suspect to shave By Angela K. Brown Associated Press

Taylor Barron | Daily Texan Staff Senate of College Councils President Michael Morton, Academic Integrity Committee co-chairs Peter Paul Wong and Shahana Momin, Policy Director Josh Fjelstul and Vice President Andrew Clark present legislation piece S.R. 1203 in support of a new honor code for The University of Texas at Austin.

UT Senate files new honor code The Senate of College Councils adopted a proposal for a new University honor code Wednesday, a move that organization president Michael Morton believes will increase academic integrity at the University. The new honor code will read: “As a student of the University of Texas at Austin, I shall abide by the core values of the University and uphold academic integrity.” “This is something that students are going to be held to, and it’s going to be something that they as students in the University of Texas at Austin will live by,” Morton said. “This is forming how the culture will be in the University in terms of academic integrity.” UT President William Powers Jr. first introduced the idea to implement a new honor code last spring semester when he established an Honor Code Task Force to investigate the effectiveness of the current honor code in the University,

I don’t know if [young people] know this, but politics hasn’t always been like this — been so divided.

NATIONAL

o t -

By Lazaro Hernandez

the lecture. He said being a student is stressful enough without fear of discrimination. “We need to make every student feel safer in the learning environment,” Bryant said. “There does not need to be any added pressure.” Ixchel Rosal, director of the Division of Diversity & Community Engagement, said UT has made great strides to help with the overall comfort of transgender students. “Gender identity and gender expression have been included in the anti-discrimination policy, which is huge,” Rosal said. “There has also been an effort to create more gender-neutral restrooms on campus as well as the preferred name policy, which allows students to establish a preferred name in the classroom.” Students can access more information about transgenderism at the Gender and Sexuality Center.

With Election Day less than a month away, ballots are filled with candidates from the far left and far right, leaving some voters stuck in the middle. Members of a political panel called “Political Polarization: A Conversation Across the Divide” said the wide ideological divide between left and right is alienating young voters. The panel, sponsored by the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life within the College of Communications, was held Thursday. The institute aims to create understanding to overcome political problems and encourage civic engagement. Regina Lawrence, the institute’s director, said the topic is important to students who have only witnessed partisanship in government. “I don’t know if [young people] know this, but politics hasn’t always been like this, been so divided,” Lawrence said. “A lot of people are feeling the same frustration about politics and bad blood between parties. Right now it might be fun if you are super-partisan, but it is not very helpful for the rest of us.” Panelist Linda Moore Forbes, former staff of the Democratic Leadership Council and special assistant to the President during the Clinton administration, said constant political reporting and partisan media coverage have contributed to the political divide. “Now we have a situation where people focus on the short-term battle every single day in the media,” Forbes said. “The tipping point of when it changed was the rise of the internet, the rise of the blogosphere.” Panelist Mark McKinnon, former media adviser to George W. Bush, said along with the

Morton said. Powers said in June that he wanted greater student involvement in the creation and implementation of the new honor code. “One thing needed was more student involvement in the implementation, or what you might call enforcement, of the honor code,” Powers said. “I think a lot of universities have student panels and groups that help complement the honor code, and it seems like a fruitful idea.” Senate reached the final wording of the new honor code Oct. 11 at a president’s committee meeting, taking student input into consideration, Morton said. “Students were divided in terms of those who wanted the code to be very actionable and those who wanted a more positive tone for it,” Morton said. “So that is where we came up with the compromise for this honor code, which is both actionable and accomplishes what we wanted but also has a more positive tone for students.” The current honor code was

adopted in 2004 by former UT President Larry Faulkner. The honor code reads: “The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness and respect toward peers and community.” Peter Paul Wong, co-chair of the Senate’s Academic Integrity Committee, helped write the new honor code proposal with other members of the committee. He said replacing the current honor code is necessary because it is difficult to implement. “It is very hard to say when someone is violating the current honor code, because it is not really a statement that is strong or has a particular action to it,” Wong said. “It is very vague and very narrow, and it is not as specific as the one we proposed.” Senate will submit the new honor code to Powers for final approval.

FORT WORTH — An Army appeals court ruled Thursday that the Fort Hood shooting suspect can have his beard forcibly shaved off before his murder trial. The U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals upheld the military trial judge’s decision to order Maj. Nidal Hasan to appear in court clean shaven or be forcibly shaved, according to a release from Fort Hood. The opinion came on the heels of last week’s hearing at Fort Belvoir in Virginia, in which the court heard arguments from both sides. Hasan, who did not attend the hearing, has said he grew a beard because his Muslim faith requires it, despite the

Army’s ban on beards. A few exceptions have been made for religious reasons. The appeals court also ruled that Col. Gregory Gross, the trial judge, properly found that the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act does not give Hasan the right to have a beard while in uniform during his trial. The court specifically upheld Gross’ previous ruling that Hasan did not prove that his beard was an expression of a sincerely held religious belief. The appeals court said that even if Hasan did grow a beard for a sincere religious reason, compelling government interests justified Gross’ order requiring Hasan to comply with Army grooming standards. The appeals court also upheld six contempt of court findings against Hasan.

Gross fined him $1,000 for each instance. Hasan’s attorneys have said they will appeal the ruling to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, which means Hasan’s court-martial remains on hold. Hasan, 42, faces the death penalty if convicted in the 2009 attack that killed 13 and wounded more than two dozen others on the Texas Army post, about 125 miles southwest of Fort Worth. The Army has specific guidelines on forced shaving. Five military police officers restrains the inmate “with the reasonable force necessary,” and a medical professional is on hand. The shaving must be done with electric clippers and must be videotaped, according to Army rules.

Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has an opening for 1 student board position. *College of Communications, Place 2 (unexpired term: 06/12-05/14) This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States.

Your job as a board member?

• Adopt annual budget • Review monthly income and expenses • Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Texas Travesty and Cactus yearbook editors, The Daily Texan managing editor • Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for The Daily Texan editor • Review major purchase requests • Time commitment? About five hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work).

Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/board/

Deadline is noon on Friday, October 19, 2012

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME


Sports

Friday, Octo

WEEK

6

Friday, October 19, 2012

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

men’s Swi

MEN’S GOLF

Vegas seeks second title By Peter Sblendorio Julio Vegas has experienced just about everything during his career with Texas. Currently in his fifth season, Vegas has competed in his fair share of golf tournaments, and has been with Texas long enough to witness the Longhorns jump from an average team to champions. He is the lone senior on this year’s roster, and his experience, dependable play and remarkable work ethic have allowed him to emerge as a leader. “One of the main things about this team is that everybody is able to play,” Vegas said. “I just focus on myself and show my teammates how to work hard and how to behave on and off the field. I try to lead by example.” Vegas grew up in Venezuela and joined the Longhorns in 2008, following his brother, Jhonattan, who played at Texas from 2004 through 2007. Vegas made his debut with the Longhorns as a sophomore in 2010 at the PING Preview, becoming a regular contributor. Vegas enjoyed a breakout year as a junior, competing in nearly every event and becoming a consistent and productive player. He recorded an average score of 72.07 per round in 13 tournaments, good for third on the team, and logged his first career victory at the Morris Williams Intercollegiate. Overall Vegas registered six top 10 finishes last season and was named to the All-Big

Derek Stout | Daily Texan file photo Julio Vegas followed his brother to Texas and is now the only senior on this year’s squad and one of five returning from last year’s championship team. Vegas helped lead Texas to a national title this past summer and is looking for another one.

12 and Golfweek All-American Second teams. While Vegas’ strides on the golf course were a significant contribution to the Longhorns’ title run last season, the Texas coaching staff believes his devotion to working hard and his hunger for success are what separate the senior from other players. “Julio is a very special guy as far as players go,” head coach John Fields said. “His work ethic is outstanding, and his

confidence is remarkable. He just has such a large desire to be successful, and he is extremely directed toward that in whatever he is doing. A lot of people talk about giving their absolute best, but they’re really only giving 30 or 40 percent. Julio gives the absolute.” The Texas golfers agree with this and believe that Vegas’ drive makes him a good role model and a strong teammate. “It’s his last year. We know he wants to make it special, and

we want to make it special for him,” junior Toni Hakula said. “You can see it in his demeanor. He is a really hard worker, and he definitely brings something special to the team.” Vegas credits much of his success in golf to his brother, who is currently competing in the PGA Tour. He believes that Jhonattan Vegas set a strong example in preparing for tournaments through hard work and devotion, and his brother’s glowing reports about Texas

were a large part of Vegas’ decision to play here. “Every time he came back to Venezuela, he told me about Austin and the awesome people and coaches, and that’s a big reason why I came,” Vegas said. “I don’t regret it. It’s been a great experience, and hopefully there will be more great experiences this year.” At the conclusion of this season, Vegas hopes to

VEGAS continues on page 7

WEEKEND PREVIEWs men’s tennis | nitya duran

Junior Corey Knebel played on the mound as closer last season for the Longhorns. Texas heads to the ballpark this weekend for its first fall game, hoping to erase last year’s disappointment. Rebecca Howeth Daily Texan file photo

baseball | Garrett Callahan Five months ago, Augie Garrido and his Longhorns sat through Selection Sunday for the NCAA tournament with great disappointment. After not making the tournament for the first time since 1998, the team is back and once again ready to get on the field. Sunday marks the first fall game for Texas as it takes on Sam Houston State right here in Austin. While fall practice started last month, this is the first chance the team has to prove it has changed from last year. For the team, this

wasn’t a rebuilding year but just another year to get back on track. This is also the first fall game for Sam Houston State as it gets ready for the season this spring. Last year the Bearkats went 40-22, 26-10 in conference play and didn’t make it through the NCAA Regional tournament. As they come to Austin with a plan to further their post-season play, the BearKats come with a mindset to upset the Longhorns. As the Longhorns set their goals for the season,

TEXAS

SAM HOUSTON STATE VS.

Date: Sunday Time: 1 p.m. Location: Disch-Falk Field

the team that went 3022 last season wants to use this game to work on those goals. They hope to come out of the weekend with their first win of the year and high hopes of good things to come as the Longhorns continue to turn their play around from last year’s disappointing results.

The Longhorns are looking to bounce back from their outing at the ITA AllAmerican Championships in Tulsa a few weeks ago. Several Longhorns dropped early in the first few rounds, and the outcome looked dim. But after a slow start, momentum picked up and the Longhorns had an impressive showing in the rest of the AllAmerican Championships. The qualifying singles rounds of the All-American Championships were not kind to Texas: No Longhorn got out of the qualifying rounds. The qualifying doubles round was another story. The Texas duo of senior Daniel Whitehead and replacement partner junior Sudanwa Sitaram achieved four straight wins to advance to the main draw before being defeated. Doubles tandem senior Chris Camillone and junior David Holiner were defeated in the second round of the main draw. Sophomore stand-out Soren Hess-Olesen played impressive tennis en route to the third round of the

Baylor team that leads the conference in goals, averaging 2.4 a game. The Bears also lead the conference in shutouts, with 10 going into the contest Friday. Baylor is tied with Texas Tech for third in the conference at nine points each. But while the Red Raiders have three wins, the Bears have three draws and have not been able to get goals in those close games. They have a pair of 1-1 draws and, most recently, a 0-0 draw against Oklahoma State. But all of Baylor’s ties have come on the road. It

TEXAS

This w Longhorns 2012-2013 ing a rout ultimate de NCAA Cha The ann Collegiate YANKEES open the reg Texas, whic 12 Champio runner-up i TIGERS The twofeature co events betw as A&M, SM nate Word letterwinner GIANTS season’s na petitive team the Longhor Of tho CARDINALS members, niors who individual for UT. Dax 200 freestyl championsh TOP TWEET Austin Sur the 200 indi Jackson Jeffcoat for Texas a @Yung_Jack33 Michael M “Thank youthe all for 1,650 junior after the well wishes! UT from I’ll be back!to#PTL “[McBroo #hookem” credibly har sistant coac

MLB

women’s t SPORTS After a we BRIEFLY competition horns head

Tigers to move on, R ITA Texas Cardinals up 3-1 Th pionships.

to erase th The Detroit Tigers an unaccep took game four against LosYankees Angele the New York performanc 8-1, ending the series Ae and propelling Senior the Tito action aft gers to the World Series. losses in With the win the TigersC seeksAmerito imp also claimed the 2-4 startThis to t can League Penant. regional will be their first tripmee to 13-2 and wo the World Series since gional single 2006, when they lost to the St. Louis Cardinals 4-1. Detroit will face the winner of the National League Championship UN Series. The Cardinals AD IRNE F ONL the are currently leading NLCS, 3-1, against rdthe ad s wo San Francisco Giants.

FRE

— Sara Beth Purdy

HOUSING

Basketball legend 370 Unf. Apts. Slater Martin dies D GREAT Daniel Whitehead Senior USTA/ITA Texas Regional Championships

Date: Saturday Time: All day Location: Fort Worth

singles main draw before being knocked out of the competition. Whitehead was defeated in the first round of the singles main draw but made it to the third round of the consolation singles. This weekend the Texas tennis team will be traveling to Fort Worth to compete in the USTA/ITA Texas Regional Championships hosted by TCU. The tournament will take place Oct. 20-23.

women’s soccer | wes maulsby After being picked to finish No. 6 in the Big 12 before the season started, Texas has had a surprising start to its conference slate. The Longhorns knocked off defending Big 12 champions Oklahoma on the way to a 4-1 start in conference play. But with just three games left until the Big 12 tournament, Texas has to play two of the top three teams in the conference this season and the only two ranked teams in the Big 12 at this point. First Texas will take a trip to Waco to play a

SIDELINE

1-1 $7 Former Hyde TexasParkguard Slater Martin died ThursWest Campus 2day at the age of 86 in Houston. Martin led the2 North Campus Longhorns through their best seasonApartment in school Finde history. In 1947, Martin and the rest of512-322-9556 the “Mighty AusApt.com Mice” finished third in ANNOUNC the NCAA tournament. During his 530 three seasons Travel-Transpo at Texas, Martin helped post a 63-14 record. In 2009, MartinCOLLEGE had hisSKI No.& 15 jersey retiredBreckenridge by Texas,• Beaver Creek • an honor only given to a total of three Longhorns. In 1962, Martin was inbreckenridge ducted into the Longhorn Hall of Honor and in 1982 20 Mountains. 5 R was the first Longhorn inducted into the Basketball M O R F Hall of Fame. ONLY While at Texas, Martin set the record for points in a single game at 49 against TCU in 1949 and set the career-scoring record with 984 points. After college Martin WW played for 11 years in600 the We NBA, with 1-800-SKI-WILD the Minne-• apolis Lakers for seven seasons and560with St. Publicthe Notice Louis Hawks for four. As a pro, he racked up eight trips to the NCAA finals, bringing home five (but only as we’v world championships.

IT’S

BAYLOR VS.

EnD o WoR

Date: Friday Time: 7 p.m. Location: Waco

it)! After cor — Sara Beththe Purdy

has outscored its last four home opponents, 13-2. On Sunday Texas catches a break with a road trip against TCU. The Horned Frogs are winless in conference play and have the worst record in the Big 12. After playing what should be a competitive game against Baylor, the match against TCU should be

Zachary Strain | Daily Texan file photo Freshman goalkeeper Abby Smith. After a rocky non-conference season, the Longhorns are 4-1 against Big 12 teams.

a nice cooldown before the Longhorns finish the season against leagueleading West Virginia

next Friday. Texas and Baylor kick off at 7 p.m. Friday and will face TCU at 1 p.m. Oct. 26.

nomic systems unfathomably prophesied by A religions will s one. He will NO as a religious fi NOT want to be is inspiring peo & realize that h huge (dysfuncti desperate need o ing, Love, & Pe that the people h sibilty & power t ful new world. www.theemerge

ON THE WEB WEEKEND PREVIEWS

Check out previews of women’s rowing and women’s golf online. dailytexanonline.com


SPTS/CLASS 7

sports

ober 19, 2012

7

VEGAS

KEND PREVIEWs

imming & diving | sarah white

weekend the launch their season, chartte toward the estination of an ampionship. nual Southwest Plunge will gular season for ch was the Big on and NCAA in 2011-12. -day meet will ontests in 17 ween Texas, TexMU and Incard. Twenty-nine rs from last ationally comm will represent rns at the event. ose returning three are sehave earned NCAA titles x Hill took the le at the NCAA hip last season; rhoff claimed ividual medley as a freshman; McBroom won freestyle as a r he transferred m Minnesota. om] is an inrd worker,” asch Kris Kubik

Austin Surhoff Senior back stroke and IM SOUTHWEST COLLEGIATE PLUNGE

Date: Friday and Saturday Time: All day Location: Mansfield, TX

said. “It’s easy to say that about a lot of people, but for Michael if we have to do anything [in practice], we have to slow him down.” Fans can also look for a strong showing during relay events, as Texas fielded competitive relay teams at last year’s NCAA Championship. In 2012 Surhoff and Hill teamed with returning sophomore Clay Youngquist and former Longhorn Jimmy Feigen to take first in the 400 freestyle relay.

continues from page 6

women’s swimming & diving | Evan Berko The Longhorns will head up to SMU’s Perkins Natatorium for its first official meet this weekend. The tournament will last two days starting at 6:30 p.m. both Friday and Saturday. Unlike traditional dual meets, the No. 9 Longhorns can only bring eight swimmers and one diver. They will go against USC, Florida, SMU, North Carolina and Louisville. All six teams, including Texas, are nationally ranked. “I have never been to this sort of meet before,” first-year head coach Carol Capitani said. “We are going to see how one-third of our team is performing right now and how fit they are.” Texas won the meet last year, but for the swimmers who have been training intensely, it’s more about the experience than the results. “Our times are less of a concern,” senior swimmer Laura Sogar said. “It’s important getting out there, racing and practicing

GILBERT Laura Sogar Senior breast stroke and IM SMU CLASSIC

Teams: SMU, Florida, North Carolina, USC, Louisville and Texas Date: Friday and Saturday Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Dallas

mental toughness.” Capitani, who is excited for her first meet as head coach, is more focused on her swimmers than the beginning of her coaching career. “I just want them to race tough and maybe surprise some people,” Capitani said.

tennis | christopher Caraveo

eekend off from n, the Longto Waco for the Regional ChamThe team looks he memories of ptable outing in es with a better ce this weekend. eriel Ellis returns fter suffering two California. Ellis mprove upon her the season at the et, where she was on the Texas Rees championship

ITA Texas Regional Championships

Date: Friday - Tuesday Time: All day Location: Waco

Every Division I school in Texas will be competing. The champions will move on to New York City for the ITA National Intercollegiate Indoor Championships in November. Championship play at the

Aeriel Ellis Senior

Baylor Tennis Center begins Friday, with the finals taking place Tuesday, Oct. 23.

continues from page 1

sustained success he hasn’t had in college. Gilbert couldn’t walk through the gates before shaking the hands of dozens of red-and-black-clad Lake Travis faithfuls, smiling the whole time. He seemed comfortable, at home and at ease there at Cavalier Stadium. They love him there. “It’s a cool place to be, man,” Gilbert said. “We used to not be able to make it past the first round of the playoffs. Now you go into the season, it’s 160, state championship or bust. There’s a lot of high expectations, but that’s what happens with the success.” If anyone’s familiar with high expectations, it’s Gilbert. He claimed they weren’t too high while he was at Texas, refusing to make excuses for his tumultuous Longhorns career. But after taking 27 hours of classes this spring so he could be immediately eligible at SMU, he brought that career to an end. “It was tough. I think my grades suffered a little bit,” Gilbert said. “I didn’t do anything. I went to school, I went home and I lifted weights. That’s it. If I would have been doing football stuff and that type of thing, it would have been a little more difficult.” It wasn’t until 10 months after his surgery to repair a torn labrum in his right shoulder that Gilbert felt fully comfortable throwing a football. But once he was, he didn’t want to stop. “No one’s really excited about two-a-days, but I was excited to put the shoulder

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

NS R FO

EE!

s on

as a freshman back in 2009. Junior Elizabeth Begley will have the chance to build on her 7-4 record. The Longhorns’ most consistent player this season has benefited from advancing deep into her draws, including an appearance in the singles final at the Longhorn Invitational. Sophomores Noel Scott and Lina Padegimaite enter the championships with a 3-2 record in doubles play, seeking to make up for an early exit in Los Angeles.

follow his brother’s lead once again and play golf professionally. For now, though, the senior is narrowing his focus to this season, seeking to win another title with the Longhorns. “Our goal is to win an-

ly

other championship,” Vegas said. “After school I’ll try to play pro golf. I’m not sure when it will happen, but I’m putting all of my focus on this year because I’m not sure of what’s in the future.” The future seems bright for Vegas no matter where he ends up, and this season he could very well end up being the key to another Longhorns title run. pads on again,” Gilbert said. “I hadn’t played in so long. I was really happy to just be able to go out and compete again.” Gilbert threw for 286 yards and two touchdowns in his SMU debut but was also picked off twice in a 59-24 loss to Baylor. He took the field with his younger brother, Griffin, for the first time on separate sidelines when TCU beat SMU, 24-16, a few weeks later. The Mustangs have won two of their three games since, improving to 3-4 on the year. “I’ve been a little conservative with him, trying to guide him along. I just said it’s time to throw it,” SMU head coach June Jones said after the Mustangs’ win over Houston. “I tried to be a little more aggressive for him and let him throw it down the field. I’m glad he saw some of the things he saw and executed the throws.” Gilbert stays in touch with his former Texas teammates and even reaches out to his former high school coach, Chad Morris, from time to time. Morris now serves as Clemson University’s offensive coordinator and is the nation’s highest-paid assistant coach. “He’s the best coach I’ve ever been around,” Gilbert said. “Coach Morris deserves everything he’s gotten. You don’t see meteroic rises like that from a state high school coach to the highest-paid offensive coordinator in the nation. It’s unbelievable.” The meteroic rise that many have waited for Gilbert to have has not happened yet. It may never come. Recapturing the magic he created in high school is much easier said than done. But, for a brief moment Thursday, that magic returned.

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

Self-serve, 24/7 on the Web at www.DailyTexanOnline.com

G RENTAL

SERVICES

620 Legal Services

DEALS!

750

-1 $849

2-1 $900

PRofESSIonAL, AffoRDAbLE certified notary public through the State of Texas. Call or email. (832) 538-5058 morganhaenchen@me.com

EMPLOYMENT

766 Recruitment

ers

InTERnET mARkETInG

CEMENTS

ortation

& BOARD WEEK

Vail • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin

Perfect for college students with computer skills. Claim your future now. Contact www.lanksimmons.com

$5,500-$10,000 PAID EGG DonoRS SAT>1100, ACT>24, GPA> 3.0 N/ Smokers, Ages 18-27. Reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com DonATE youR EGGS Become an Egg Donor

Resorts. 1 Price.

Give a miracle with egg donation. See how to qualify for compensation. www.txeggdonor. com or call 888-my-donor.

790 Part Time plus t/s

WW.UBSKI.COM

est 28 St, Suite #102 th

• 1-800-754-9453

ThE

of ThE RLD

ve come to know rrupt world ecos collapse, one wise person ALL major world speak to everyOT come across figure. He does worshipped. He ople to wake up humanity is one ional) family in of Justice, Sharace; and to see have the responto build a beauti-

ence.org

800 General Help Wanted

STuDEnTPAyouTS.com Paid Survey Takers Needed In Austin. 100% FREE To Join! Click On Surveys.

WInERy EquIPmEnT SuPPLy Shipping Department Manager Fulltime: starting at $14 / hr M-F 9-5 in North Austin. Motivated with good organizational skills. Email resume to: stpats@stpats. com

WoRk foR LGbT RIGhTS

The Human Rights Campaign needs passionate individuals to end workplace discrimination against the LGBT community. Earn $8-13/hr. Call 512-469-0495

bARTEnDInG! $300/DAY POTENTIAL

830 Administrative-Mgmt

No experience necessary. Training available. Age 18+. 800-9656520 ext. 113

DIGITAL mAnAGInG EDIToR nEEDED in San Angelo. Description and qualifications available, please email sanangelo@townsquaremedia.co

GEnERAL offIcE cLERk Parttime office clerk needed for downtown lawfirm. 1:00 to 6:00p.m. M-F Send resume and salary requirements to jellison@w-g.com. fRonT DESk monIToR for Downtown Highrise Weekend Shifts Background Check Required Apply at wg1122@yahoo. com

840 Sales mAkE $50-$200* PER WEEk with virtually no effort. tinyurl. com/bo2r2ns

DailyTexanClassifieds.com

EGG DONORS NEEDED Receive $100 upon completion of application!

We are seeking women of all ethnicities to help real people build their family. Must be between the ages of 21-29 and live a healthy lifestyle. Please contact us at: 1-800-264-8828 or info@aperfectmatch.com

$10,000 compensation plus all expenses paid

790 Part Time

870 Medical

WoRk fRom homE

The Medical Service Bureau provides call center services to the medical community. We are seeking customer service agents to join our elite team who process inbound calls. Ideal candidates will be professional, positive, & detail-oriented. Work from home after completion of training. Start at $11.50/hour. Apply at www. JobsAtMSB. com.

Seeks College-Educated Men 18–39 to Participate in a Six-Month Donor Program

Donors average $150 per specimen. Apply on-line

www.123Donate.com

FOR SALE

Sell Electronics

SToP GETTInG RobbED for wireless service! Get unlimited voice, text and data for $59.99 monthly. No contracts. No credit check. No deposit. Earn FREE service by referring others. WirelessDealOfTheYear. com

HOUSING DIRECTORY

963 Walk to Campus Room foR REnT Spacious, fully furnished 2/1 1470 sq ft duplex five blocks north of campus near speedway and west 32nd. All bills paid plus w/d, wireless. 1 bedroom for male only, no pets $920 512-5857093 512-585-7093

SEE WHAT OUR

ONLINE SYSTEM has to offer, and place YOUR AD NOW! dailytexanclassifieds.com

790 Part Time

REMEMbER! you saw it in the Texan


8 COMICS

Comics

8

Friday, October 19, 2012

Anik Bhattacharya

COdy Bubenik

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Friday, October 19, 2012

Edited by Will Shortz 1 11 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 25 28 29 30

Across Colorado state song composer Minor but necessary part The main characters are usually introduced in it 100% Head off? “Let ___ already!” It might be disappearing What-___ Liberty League school Head-turning cry Coke user’s activity Relatively ready Christ the Redeemer overlooks it Pierre’s world Having complicity with

31 Its discovery may result in a recount 33 Some Windows systems 34 Players who made a historic touchdown in 1964 35 Dionysus’ aunt 36 Hitch up? 38 It hits the ground silently 39 Alternative name for abalone 40 At-cost connection 41 Bow’s counterpart 42 It’s the same for all customers 44 Come together 45 Uses a 46-Across 46 One holding the line 47 Overseas relig. title 50 Hooked on, say 51 Natural hair conditioner

A R O U S E S

P E N N A M E

E A S T M A N

A R M O I R E

T R A I N E E

W H Y A R E A R E S T K S B O C Y O U Z O O U N T M T S E C E O M E L E T A G I O A I G N C L L E R O L I D O L O R S O O T H A F R S O N S

A D L I B L I E G E F R E N C A R I A S A T U A L T E S C E R E T E S S P A S M A S H C O S I O N O B O T Z E P A A U E G P F D E

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE P A Y D I R T

55 Stick by the water? 56 Delicious leftovers 57 Trip up 58 Figure on a $5,000 EE savings bond

S S H A P E D

12

S W E E T O N

22 23

13 15 21

24 25

Down Sci-fi knight With 7-Down, easy things to score goals on Hayshaker Grp. concerned with hacking Not so smart Improve morally See 2-Down Big multilanguage broadcaster, briefly Penlight-wielding doc Seymour’s “Somewhere in Time” co-star Acts rudely at a supermarket, say Notice on a driver’s license Guyanese capital Packed piece Father-and-son prophets in the Book of Mormon Chick magnet? Raphael’s “___ Madonna” Disparate What “burns, burns, burns” in a hit country song

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

No. 0914 10

11

14 16 19

20

22 26

23

27

48

49

29

31

33

21

24

28

30

36

13

17

18

25

12

15

32

34

35

37

38

39

40

42

41

43

44

45

46

50

51

55

56

57

58

52

53

47 54

Puzzle by Peter A. Collins

26 One making a coat warmer, say 27 28 31 32

34 Support for a dancer 37 Process Official in charge 38 Busch Stadium of sorts? scoreboard abbr. Criticize loudly 41 Beguile 43 Licensing fee The Once-___ collector, briefly (Seuss character) 44 Doomed soul It’s often made 46 Order to make a scene? before breakfast

47 Upset 48 Seating specification 49 “What ___?”

SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU 52 ___-Locka, Fla.

53 Intel product, for short 54 Hebrew for “good”

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

t

5 1

4

3

9 7 2 6 3 5 7 1 6 1 3 4 8 4 5 2 3 1 5 7 8 7 9 3 5 2

Today’s solution will appear here tomorrow

9 8 6 1 3 7 4 2 5

3 4 1 5 2 6 7 8 9

5 2 7 4 9 8 1 6 3

4 9 2 7 8 3 5 1 6

6 5 3 2 1 4 8 9 7

7 1 8 9 6 5 3 4 2

8 7 9 3 4 2 6 5 1

1 6 5 8 7 9 2 3 4

2 3 4 9 5 1 9 7 8


Life & Arts

Friday, October 19, 2012

FEST continues from page 10

THEATER

Lawrence Peart | Courtesy of Texas Performing Arts Abe Koogler (left) plays Cyrus and Jesse Bertron (right) plays Dan in “The Cataract.”

Conflict, emotional expression floods new play ‘The Cataract’ Nineteenth-century play uses surrealism, clarifies individual human perspective By Faith Ann Ruszkowski standards, whereas Cyrus The word “cataract” has a double meaning. The first, more common meaning refers to a degenerative eye disease that causes clouding of the eye. The second, lesser known definition of “cataract” refers to a waterfall. These two definitions have nothing in common. Absolutely nothing. However, the play “The Cataract,” written by alumna Lisa D’Amour and directed by fine arts grad student Will Davis manages to unite the two incongruous definitions in such a way that they seem worthy of sharing the same word. The performance is about two men at the end of the 19th century, Cyrus and Dan, who are working on damming a section of the Mississippi River that flows from a waterfall. Dan has traveled with his significant other, Dinah, from the South to stay in Minnesota with Cyrus and his wife, Lottie, to work on the river dam. Dan and Dinah are lax and easygoing with questionable moral

and Lottie are uptight, seemingly straight-laced and proper. But as the story and characters unravel, the audience sees that each character has been viewing the world through metaphorical cataracts. The characters have deliberately imposed cloudy lenses over how they view themselves and their surroundings. “This is a play about a journey towards your true nature. It is about crashing into people who are not like you and what you learn from them,” Davis said. The characters certainly do crash into each other as their cataracts clear in almost every way possible. There are clashes in personality, in lifestyle choices and in culture. All the tension between the characters lends itself to some very comedic and physical portrayals of the characters’ emotions. “I love that the physical language, the gestures, of the play hold the same weight as the dialogue. I love that we see two opposing worlds spliced open and thrown together,”

Katie Bender, the fine arts grad student who portrays Dinah, said. The emotional narrative of this play is told through physical expression. The dialogue, to a certain extent, just describes what is going on. Since the set of the play and the props on stage rarely change, much of the dialogue is used to point out that this is a house, that this is a river, that this is Minnesota or that this is a bed. The script is delivered in a Seuss-like style through short, declarative sentences. However, these assertive statements do convey that the characters, Cyrus and Lottie in particular, are unwilling to vocalize their true feelings, and the audience is left to interpret the characters’ true thoughts through their physical expressions. “Cyrus is a deeply repressed man,” said graduate student Abe Koogler, who plays Cyrus. Cyrus’ repression leads to some of the more peculiar, surreal elements of “The Cataract.” Magic and surrealism factor prominently into the symbolism of the production. Cyrus carves magic walnuts that glow when opened, and at one point a flower is

“The Cataract” Director: Will Davis Location: B. Iden Payne Theatre Date: Friday, Oct. 19 through Sunday, Oct. 28 Price: $15-$25 Website: texasperformingarts.org yanked from Dinah’s eye. The Minnesota where the play takes place straddles the line between the conscious and the subconscious, the real and the imaginary, and the audience is never quite sure which is which. In all the play is, as Davis puts it, “gloriously strange and hilarious.” While not for the prude or unprogressive theatergoer, “The Cataract” explores, with great emotion, how humans discover who they are. “It’s about understanding who you are and either falling in love with it or being repulsed by yourself,” Davis said.

screening at the Paramount, so make sure to get there early. The idea of Bill Murray playing Franklin D. Roosevelt is too good to pass up, and lackluster early reviews won’t dissuade me from checking out “Hyde Park on Hudson” Saturday afternoon. Later that evening, the audience will be treated to David O. Russell’s “Silver Linings Playbook,” an exploration of mental illness starring Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence. Both have received huge accolades for their performances, and Russell has made a habit of churning out entertaining crowd-pleasers with real substance to them. Another major player at the festival is Denzel Washington’s latest Oscar hopeful, Robert Zemeckis’ “Flight.” A reportedly complex portrayal of addiction, “Flight” received rave reviews from the New York Film Festival. Anyone with an aversion to intense plane crash scenes should probably stay far away. Austin Film Festival offers more than just screenings. It also offers numerous panels delving into all aspects of the business as well as Q-and-A sessions with the festival’s major award recipients. Yesterday early-bird attendees were lucky enough to sit in on a conversation with David Chase. Upcoming events include chats with James Franco, “The X-Files” creator Chris Carter, “Prometheus” screenwriter Damon Lindelof and “Freaks and Geeks” creator Paul Feig. Oh, and just a little someone named Frank Darabont (“The Shawshank Redemption” and “The Walking Dead”). Screenwriters will find endless panels awaiting them, from “Layered Storytelling” to “Writing for Video Games” to topics as specific as “The First Ten Pages.” There are also case studies of individual films, such as Max Landis’ presentation of his original screenplay for this year’s “Chronicle,” and a discussion of what had to be changed or beefed up before the film hit the big screen.

Austin Fil

Date: Thurs through Thur

Website: austinfilmfe

Fans of horse-racing “Luck” will to like in th tival, includ reading of duced first e drama’s can season. Scre Roth will be will host s panels thro festival. Dus won’t be pr festival, but rial debut, “ screen Tues The film foc tirement ho singers and that follow lover-turned rives on the biggest conc An event tin Film Fest be comple some Texa dent cinem like “The stars Abbie woman forc illegal immi the border, p uniquely Tex compelling. Todd Berge panel show film, “It’s made it to th A comedy a of the world ter” locks fo a house as th rages outsi ably, some sues arise. F gratulations, of a man wh proposal wa upon arrivin gagement pa creative con of room for This year’s Festival boas of big films excited for, that promise time invested panels that c huge differe ative output film fan shou to attend fo ence equall ing, illumina plain Texan.

DUO continues from page 10 BOOKS continues from page 10 being abused, beaten and often raped, but eventually she overcomes her pain and struggles. Celie has an on-and-off relationship with a woman named Shug, who also serves as Celie’s main mentor as she develops.

queen who frequented gay bars and clubs and was seeing a crack-addicted male escort. KlimerPurcell manages to tell the often tragic story of his time in the ‘90s with a humorous tone and lighthearted voice.

“Boy Meets Boy” by David Levithan (2003) Young Adult Levithan’s story is set in a town where homophobia does not exist. “Boy Meets Boy” is a gay love story where being gay is not the central theme to the plot, which differs from most LGBTQ novels that deal almost entirely with themes of acceptance. Instead, Levithan crafts a charming love story with beautiful prose. Simple, straightforward and easy to read.

“Giovanni’s Room” by James Baldwin (1956) Literature Set in Paris, Baldwin’s novel is about the love affair between his protagonist, David, and a bartender named Giovanni. “Giovanni’s Room” deals with acceptance and denial, as the character David tries to convince himself to be straight by forcing himself to have sex with women. Realistic for its time and setting, this novel does not have a happy ending, but it is a mustread and recommended by today’s top LGBTQ authors, like John Waters.

“I Am Not Myself These Days” by Josh KilmerPurcell (2006) Memoir Part tragedy and part comedy, Kilmer-Purcell’s memoir weaves the story of his earlier days and nights in New York, where he lived a double life. By day he was an advertising art director, and by night he was “Aqua,” a drag

“Stone Butch Blues” by Leslie Feinberg (1993) Literature “Stone Butch Blues” chronicles Jess Goldberg’s life as she struggles with both her sexuality, gender identity and gender role during the late ‘60s and

early ‘70s. The book tells the transgender experience, and Feinberg does a masterful job presenting the complicated historical time revolving around the Stonewall riot by telling it through human eyes. Regarded as a groundbreaking story of fiction for gender identity and transgenderism, Feinberg’s story started as a hit in the underground community before making it big in mainstream literature. “Annie on My Mind” by Nancy Garden (1982) Young Adult Garden’s novel tells the teenage love story between Annie Kenyon and Liza Winthrop. The two start out as friends, but their relationship quickly grows until they have their first kiss. It is not until this point that Liza starts thinking about her sexuality, and from this point on Liza struggles to accept her own sexuality. Narrated by the confused, conflicted and often lost Liza, the book is a consolation to anyone going through something similar. While this is almost a cliche plot by today’s standards, it was revolutionary to young

adult fiction at the time. The book was banned by multiple schools and even burned. “Me Talk Pretty One Day” by David Sedaris (2000) Memoir In his fourth collection of essays and thoughts, Sedaris divides his book into two parts. Part one deals with his upbringing and time in New York, and part two addresses his time spent with his partner in Paris. Sedaris did not speak French when he first moved to Paris, so most of his experiences have a whimsical humor to them. “Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes” by Lisa Moore (2011) Nonfiction Moore, a UT professor in the College of Liberal Arts, traces the history of lesbian art in visual arts, poetry and gardening. The book focuses on four 18thcentury women: Mary Delany, Anna Seward, Honora Sneyd and Sarah Pierce. Through lush narratives, Moore uncovers how all of them used their art forms to express love for other women.

deadline we had set for ourselves to find a place, so it worked out. They completely trusted us to not ruin their cafeteria.” The two vastly different films shared most of the same crew and were made within weeks of each other. Georghiades said the tight schedule would not have been possible without the versatility of the crew. “We literally finished the food fight, rested for about a week and got right back up and started working on ‘Teleported Man,’” Pineda said. “We were all over the place. I think we had about six different locations. When you’re working 12-hour days and carrying around equipment, everyone’s tired, but everyone kept such a great attitude.” With an almost endless list of duties, including casting, budgeting and securing locations, Pineda said one of her most important roles as a producer — and something she takes the most pride in — is keeping morale high to ensure the success of the films. “It’s so important that everyone feels they are appreciated, because even with the smallest task, without the help of the crew I’d be totally

screwed,” P “But everyo pumped. I th tivity leaked on the crew, a people were to be there in mashed broccoli and

“The Telep

Director: Z

Runtime: 1

Date: Friday 9:30 p.m.

Location: T Theatre

“Incident a School 173

Director: A

Runtime: 1

Date: Sund 7:15 p.m.

Location: T Theatre

Website: hideoutthea


Life & Arts 10

Friday, October 19, 2012

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

BOOKS | LGBTQ

Varied LGBTQ lit makes for gripping reads Books dig deep into LGBTQ experiences, expose personal struggles and triumphs By Bobby Blanchard Allies and members of the LGBTQ community will don purple Friday as part of a movement against bullying of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation organization, or GLAAD, declared Oct. 19 “Spirit Day” several years ago. On Spirit Day, allies and LGBTQ people alike are encouraged to wear an article of purple clothing. But for the bookworms who want to do more than wear purple, The Daily Texan has compiled a short list of books with LGBTQ themes you should be reading. Note that this list does not aim to list “the best” but instead offers a sample of the literature.

edited several times after, Forster’s book was published posthumously. The novel was ahead of its time, both when it was written and when it was published, and deals with the now standard theme of selfacceptance of one’s sexuality. Forster called his main character, Maurice Hall, a snob, who Forster says is saved by his homosexuality. Considering the novel’s Victorian-age setting, it is both odd and heartwarming to see a happy ending.

“The Color Purple” by Alice Walker (1982) Literature Told through a series of letters, “The Color Purple” tells the story of a black woman in the South during the late 1930s. Celie, the book’s main character, starts at the bottom of the social ladder, and the book primarily deals with “Maurice” by E.M. Forster class fixtures as she climbs up. Celie goes through life (1971) Literature Although it was written in 1913 and revisited and BOOKS continues on page 9

Illustration by Anne-Katrine Harris | Daily Texan Staff

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL

Film festival screens latest works features interviews with creators By Alex Williams

Photo courtesy of Focus Features Bill Murray acts in a scene from “Hyde Park on Hudson.” The film will be shown with others at the 19th annual Austin Film Festival & Conference this weekend.

POP INDEX

Of all the major film festivals that occur in Austin every year, the 19th Austin Film Festival & Conference is the most distinctly Texan. From its sponsors (including the delectable Salt Lick BBQ) to its films (several from UT alumnus are playing this year), Austin Film Festival is all about Texan pride and showcasing some of the Oscar season’s biggest films. The festival kicked off last night with “Not Fade Away,” David Chase’s first

production since “The Sopranos” ended five years ago. Drawn from Chase’s youth, the film chronicles a Jersey youth (John Magero) growing up in the ‘60s and trying to make it in the music business. The film shows that Chase hasn’t lost the ability to craft strong characters and that he’s even become more stylistically bold, something that avid “Sopranos” watchers might think impossible. James Gandolfini, playing Magero’s father, gives a tender, wistful

performance, and he may be the best thing about “Not Fade Away.” Other hot tickets at this year’s festival include “Francophrenia,” the next step in James Franco’s subtle, extended satire on the nature of celebrity. A documentary filmed during Franco’s time with “General Hospital,” the film promises to be a bizarre look at the dynamics of a soap opera set. Franco will be in attendance for Friday’s

FEST continues on page 9

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL

BY ALEKSANDER CHAN

HORNS UP

There are 20 new chapters of“Trapped in the Closet.” The R. Kelly masterpiece lives!

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

Beyoncé is performing at the Superbowl. We are not ready for this jelly.

Artist John Sokol’s word portraits. Making men truly of their words.

Candy Crowley, moderator.

Tom Cruise in the “Jack Reacher” trailer. We want to like it? Ask us again later.

Thinking season two of “American Horror Story” was something we could ignore. Uma Thurman’s baby name. Say Rosalind Arusha Arkadina Altalune Florence Thurman-Busson three times fast.

Tyler Perry, action hero. Never thought we’d say this, but stick to playing Madea, dude.

We’re still reeling from the OU game. It hurts.

HORNS DOWN

Courtesy of Zach Endres Radio-telivision-film seniors Mystie Pineda and Irene Georghiades co-produced “The Teleported Man,” shown above, and “Incident at Public School 173.”

Students score two spots in film festival By Alexa Hart Perhaps cleaning mustard and mashed potatoes off of the walls of a school cafeteria is a less-thanglamorous spring break ideal, but for radio-television-film seniors Mystie Pineda and Irene Georghiades, the dirty work has paid off in a big way. The duo co-produced “Incident at Public School 173,” a tale of love and war in the form of a school food fight. The film has earned a coveted spot in the 19th Austin Film Festival & Conference under the Narrative Shorts category. But if one entry wasn’t enough, the team also worked together on another short film, “The Teleported Man,” a sci-fi thriller that also snagged a spot at the festival. No small feat for two students who also have jobs, internships

and classes to handle. “Both of these are our first films that we’ve made into festivals, so it’s a pretty big deal for us,” Pineda said. “We were just so thrilled to find out we made it with both films.” The films were shot almost back-to-back last March, with very little time for rest in between. Georghiades said the teamwork between she and Pineda was crucial to the success of their work. “We had worked together before but never in leadership roles,” Georghiades said. “And from the very first meeting, we both worked really well together. I don’t think I’ve ever worked in a team with someone where it just clicked that quickly.” Pineda also stressed the importance of finding a team that works well together, not only

to keep things running smoothly but to keep attitudes positive during the strenuous process. “There are a lot of groups that just love to work on projects together, because they know how to communicate together,” Pineda said. “That communication is so important when you’re all giving your time and creative input, because people could get really hurt.” One of the biggest hurdles during production of the films was securing locations. For “Incident,” Pineda said finding a school willing to host a food fight was a challenge. “We had to really search for a place that was going to let us throw food and put 50 elementary schoolaged kids in their school,” Pineda said. “We secured the spot the day of the

DUO continues on page 9

The Daily Texan 2012-10-19  

The Oct. 19, 2012 edition of The DailyTexan.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you