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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

Check out today’s reason to party. COMICS PAGE 10

SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE

FROM GRAFFITI TO GENIE Local artist puts unique spin on vintage inspirations

Tight end makes big comeback after long recovery period LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

>> Breaking news, blogs and more: www.dailytexanonline.com

TODAY

@thedailytexan

By Megan Strickland Daily Texan Staff

Keystone Pipeline

The State Department is holding a hearing on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, which would bring tar sand oil from Alberta, Canada, to the Texas Gulf Coast. 3:30-8 p.m. in the LBJ Library, Lady Bird Johnson Auditorium

Students will compete with professors to answer questions about science, pop culture and everything in between. 5-6:30 p.m. in SZB 330

Flu Shots

facebook.com/dailytexan

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Fraternity sued by national chapter for assets

Calendar

Natural Sciences Week Quiz Bowl

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

The former UT chapter of the Kappa Alpha fraternity is being sued by the national Kappa Alpha organization.

The national Kappa Alpha fraternity organization filed a lawsuit against its former UT chapter, claiming the group owes the national organization hundreds of thousands of dollars in assets. The lawsuit alleges the UT group hired exotic dancers that performed live sexual acts for recruitment purposes and hazed pledge members. When the national organization suspended the UT chapter for the incident in June, the UT chapter disassociated and formed Texas Omicron, according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit demands the return of

delinquent dues, real estate at 2515 Leon St., kitchen appliances, artwork and other property the national chapter alleges belongs to the Kappa Alpha organization. Attorney Robert Alden is an alumnus and board member of UT Texas Omicron. He said he believes the lawsuit is just a way for Kappa Alpha to embarrass Texas Omicron because it is the only chapter to ever leave the national organization. “The lawsuit is full of inflammatory language intended to generate bad publicity for the chapter,” Alden said. “They are completely irrelevant for the merits of the legal claims they’ve made and are inappropriate to even be in a pleading.” But Kappa Alpha said in a Tues-

Students, faculty recall memories of shooting on one-year anniversary By Allie Kolechta Daily Texan Staff

Association of Latinos in Communications

we can work on ways to improve that communication system.” An operating error with the siren system was one of the problems that occurred on the day of the shooting, according to a UTPD report of the event. The siren system is activated by a case-sensitive activation code,

One year ago today, mathematics sophomore Colton Tooley arrived on campus with an AK-47. After firing multiple shots, he died by a self-inflicted gunshot on the sixth floor of the Perry-Castañeda Library. Associate English professor Phillip Barrish had just dropped some books into the return slot in front of the PCL that morning when he heard gunfire. After seeing people running as fast as they could down 21st Street and ducking into the McCombs School of Business across the street, he decided to move, he said. “What was going on hadn’t yet clicked for me, but I decided to step back into the lobby just in case,” he said. “Ironically, this proved not to have been the wisest decision I could have made.” A man in a black ski mask holding a gun, later identified as Tooley, entered the library about three seconds after Barrish stepped into the entryway, he said. Tooley then moved past Barrish torward the elevators, the professor said. “As he passed by, I looked at the front of his mask, still trying to figure out exactly what was going on, and he turned briefly to look at me,” Barrish said. “Even then, it took me a second to grasp that what I was seeing — a man with an automatic

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The Association of Latinos in Communication announces its first general meeting. Meet the new officers, learn more about ALIC and discuss plans for the semester. 7-8 p.m. in SSB 4.212

Poetry on the Plaza

Poetry on the Plaza features Shakespearean actor Dale Rapley in a staged reading with commentary from W.H. Auden’s “The Sea and the Mirror.” Noon1 p.m. in the Harry Ransom Center.

Today in history Erika Rich | Daily Texan file photo

The Boston Red Sox’s Ted William becomes last player to hit .400.

Campus watch Graffiti

DOTIE FINE ARTS, 2301 Trinity Ave A UT staff member discovered the unpublished work of an aspiring Picasso inside a 2nd floor men’s restroom stall. The staff member discovered the image of a partially drawn leg and foot. The medium of choice was black permanent marker. Estimated repair: $50.00. Discovered on: 9-26-11, at 2:29 P.M.

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Quote to note I looked around for the other places I could live in, but I’ve only liked other places because they reminded me of Austin.” — Ian Shults Local Artists LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

LAWSUIT continues on PAGE 2

University remembers day of fear

University Health Services will offer flu shots from noon to 4 p.m. in SSB G1.310. For a full list of flu shot dates, visit healthyhorns.utexas.edu.

In 1941

day press release that its former Texas chapter violated the fraternity’s law when it decided to form a “rogue, independent chapter” while holding $200,000 of possessions the national organization says belong to it. “Kappa Alpha law expressly forbids this action,” the organization’s press release said. “Regrettably, the national organization will have little choice but to seek the expulsion of each individual, undergraduate or alumnus involved in this effort.” Alden said the national Kappa Alpha organization filed the suit after the alumni board and active UT chapter decided to leave the Kappa Alpha organization when the na-

Police officers walk past the east side of the Perry-Castañeda Library while responding to the campus shooting on Sept. 28, 2010. In response to the incident, UT officials have implemented changes regarding police response to emergencies on campus.

UTPD works to improve emergency response, increase campus security By Megan Strickland Daily Texan Staff

The impact of Colton Tooley firing shots on 21st Street and his suicide in the Perry Casteñeda Library on Sept. 28, 2010, lasted longer than the days following the incident. A year later, the UT community continues to perfect its emer-

gency response measures, while also grappling with rifts in the student body over gun control issues and creating a network of support for emotionally distressed students and. Gerald Robert Harkins, associate vice president for Campus Safety and Security, said that since the shooting, the UT Police Department has worked

within its own department and with other local law enforcement agencies to smooth over some minor security obstacles that popped up during the response to the shooting. “We had put together a system of communication that had not been tested under stress,” Harkins s aid. “Now t hat we have seen that system in action,

Student wins scholarship with support from faculty

Forum on graduation rate encourages student input By Andrew Messamore Daily Texan Staff

By Lydia Herrera Daily Texan Staff

The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation awarded a $10,000 scholarship to computer science and mathematics major Ben Braun Monday, said computer science professor Calvin Lin, who helped nominate Braun. Every year, 26 scholarships worth $10,000 each are awarded to students at the educational institutions that are partnered with ASF, said Beth Higdon, a spokeswoman for ASF. She said that the foundation, originally known as the Mercury Seven Foundation, is a way to help keep America at the forefront of science and technology.

Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff

Computer science and mathematics senior Ben Braun was awarded a $10,000 scholarship from the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation.

Higdon said that the scholarship, awarded to juniors and seniors, is given to only one student from each institution. She said university faculty nominate two students from the natural science and engineering fields for the award and the ASF scholarship committee chooses one recipient. “To be considered for the award,

the student must be performing at the top of their class, be a well-rounded student and be actively involved in lab and research work in their field,” Higdon said. Braun began researching ways to build Nano scale machines with

SCIENCE continues on PAGE 2

In order to obtain student input for the task force working to increase the four-year graduation rate, the Liberal Arts Council and Senate of College Councils hosted an open forum at the University Teaching Center on Tuesday evening. Using discussions and various polls of those who attended, the videotaped forum invited students to offer their opinions on what should be done to raise the four-year graduation rate, currently at 52 percent, to associate dean Marc Musick and dean Randy Diehl, the task force chair. “Student support is imperative for increasing four-year gradua-

tion rates,” Diehl said. “Any successful initiative begins with listening, and that’s what this forum is about. I hope students will share their ideas about what motivates them to achieve a fouryear degree and the barriers that may be standing in their way.” Several topics were discussed at the event, particularly how to balance the ‘cultivation of the mind’ desired by President William Powers Jr. in reaching the four-year goal. Some were surprised, then, when many of the activities often associated with more time spent in college correlated with earlier graduation, such as the fact that students who studied abroad were statistically

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NEWS

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 112, Number 47

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Viviana Aldous (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Lena Price (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com

Randi Diehl, M dean of the Jacks College of Bristre C Liberal Arts, of Las speaks at the stands o forum for cou Liberal Arts ing th Studies. Diehl of C discussed difMurray, M ferent ways Jac to increase docto percentage of has students that charge graduate in the involu recommended manslau four-year time in th frame. icon’s dea Tu

News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Photo Office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com

Kiersten Holmes Daily Texan Staff

Comics Office: (512) 232-4386

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Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2011 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

about was about being innovative, and I’m really interested in getting a follow up of Musick’s research,� said international relations sophomore Kolby Lee. “What stood out seven times more likely to gradu- to me was the correlation between study abroad and less time spent ate in four years, Diehl said. “A lot of what they were talking in college.�

The task force, which has been meeting twice a week since the summer, is composed of 10 faculty members from various colleges and five student representatives. Up until this point, the task force has been meeting with expert witnesses and student leaders to ob-

LAWSUIT continues from PAGE 1

ternity was suspended because of hazing, and new hazing allegations arose in 2011, a statement released Tuesday said. “We take allegations like this extremely seriously and will not tolerate hazing of any sort in our student organizations,� Reagins-Lilly said in a statement issued by her office. “We began investigating immediately. The lawsuit lays out additional allegations that we will also look into.� A l d e n s ai d a lu m n i c on ducted their own investigation into allegations of hazing and sexual misconduct. “The alumni advisers for the chap-

ter investigated these allegations, and we have not found any evidence of hazing,� Alden said. “As for the sex show, there’s a lady with her sidekick who comes around to all the fraternities and offers her services. Omicron wasn’t the only one. She does this nationally.� Alden said the UT chapter enacted its own disciplinary measures that it believed were more appropriate than national Kappa Alpha’s more severe terms. “It’s not acceptable behavior,� Alden said. “We’ve taken corrective action, and that kind of thing will never happen again.�

he didn’t want to hurt anybody except himself.� Faculty and staff on campus keep a stronger eye out now for students who may be going to a dangerous place psychologically, and awareness has increased to a certain extent, Barrish said. He said the members of the campus community that were already opposed to concealed carry on campus have also come to feel more strongly about the issue. “I remember feeling, right after he had walked through the lobby, that we were lucky nobody in the lobby had pulled out a concealed weapon,� he said. “Even at the time, that struck me as the one thing that could have provoked him to start firing.� Doug Barnett, chief of staff of UT libraries, was in his office on the third floor of the PCL when he learned of the shooting. Despite the hectic nature of the situation, the safety procedures went smoothly, he said. “That day reinforced what I think we all took for granted — how every

member of the University community is a part of one big community,� he said. “Part of what we want to make sure we’re all doing is looking out for each other and being watchful.� Journalism sophomore Alyssa Sanchez was in an 8 a.m. journalism lecture in the University Teaching Center when two students ran in to announce that they had heard gunshots outside of the PCL. The building was on lockdown soon after, and students kept up by watching the local news and through utilizing social media and text messaging, she said. “It was really nerve-wracking being so close but not knowing what was going on most of the time,� she said. “I was scared the shooter might come to our building since it was so close by.� A year later, campus feels safe again, Sanchez said. Although there was fear and confusion in the immediate aftermath of the shooting, the University handled the situation in a way that made campus feel safe again, she said. “Even though the first few days after the shooting, I was scared, today I feel safe walking around campus,� she said. “The situation was handled pretty well, and that secured a lot of the fears students felt this past year.�

tional office made allegations of fraternity misconduct in May. The national Kappa Alpha organization punished the chapter by threatening to seize its fraternity house. Dean of Students Soncia ReaginsLilly said the University will conduct its own investigation into the allegations of the lawsuit. The University had already been working with Kappa Alpha national and local representatives since 2004, when the fra-

TOOLEY continues from PAGE 1 weapon in the library — was real.� Although the situation was surreal, there was not a sense of imminent threat for those in the lobby of the PCL, Barrish said. “I wasn’t afraid for myself or for others in the lobby,� he said. “Somehow, even though he had a gun, he hadn’t struck me as aggressive. Part of me was worried, though, that he might be looking for somebody in particular on an upper floor. As it turned out, of course,

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Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Daley, Sussanah Jacob, Shabab Siddiqui Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lena Price Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Stottlemyre Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Pagan, Colton Pence, Huma Munir Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jillian Bliss, Liz Farmer, Allie Kolechta Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Myers Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera, Ashley Morgan, Klarissa Fitzpatrick Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexa Hart Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Nuncio, Chris Benavides, Bobby Blanchard Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Edwards, Shannon Kinter Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Allison, Mary Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrence Peart, Fanny Trang, Danielle Villasana Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Stroh Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ali Breland, Benjamin Smith, Julie Rene Tran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron West, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Laymance Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nick Cremona, Christian Corona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Elliot Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gerald Rich Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren Multimedia Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer A. Rubin

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Megan Strickland, Jody Serano Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tamir Kalifa, Jono Foley, Kiersten Holms Columnist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Samian Quazi Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Cooper, Sarah Foster Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brionne Griffin, Andie Shyong Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Henry Butash, David Casteneda Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claudine Lucena, Betsy Cooper, Tyler Suder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rory Harman, Katie Carrell, John Massingill Web Staffers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Savannah Williams, Hayley Fick

Advertising

Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Senior Local Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Casey Lee, Adrian Lloyd, Morgan Haenchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paola Reyes, Fredis Benitez, Hwanjong Cho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zach Congdon, Cameron McClure, Edward Moreland Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Student Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jason Tennenbaum Student Buys of Texas Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Casey Rogers, Bianca Krause, Aaron Rodriquez Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Schraeder

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published twice weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks and most Federal Holidays. and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

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9/28/11

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tain a better understanding of the problem of graduation, Diehl said. Ultimately, the task force hopes to develop a plan that will work for Powers’ goal to have an 80 percent four-year graduation rate in five years, Diehl said. The deadline for their proposal is currently set

for December. “The conclusions are that students that are integrated in their university socially and academically will do better,� Musick said. “What we want to do is change people’s minds about how they view the campus.�

SAFETY continues from PAGE 1 which was unknown to staff and caused a delay. Staff has since been trained to operate the case-sensitive system, according to Hawkins. UTPD has also been training with the Austin Police Department to raise coordination of the two forces should another active shooter situation arise. Harkins said overall, UT did a great job of responding to Tooley’s actions, but the University will continue to look for ways to train for active shooter situations as well as to prevent them. “C olton To ole y came to campus with 30 rounds of ammunition,� Harkins said. “Had he decided to kill people, we could have had 30 people dead on the ground before UTPD got there. In my opinion, the chances of stopping a shooting like that are pretty slim. We can only look to ways to optimize our response system and work w it h U T C ou ns e l i ng an d Me nt a l He a lt h C e nt e r t o raise awareness.� In the past year, the UT C ounseling and Mental Health Center has increased its efforts to educate faculty, staff and students about resources available for individuals experiencing stressed, depressed, anxious, homicidal, suicidal or mentally troubling thoughts. “We have trained hundreds more in the UT community with Be That One suicide workshops,� said associate director for CMHC Jane Bost.

SCIENCE continues from PAGE 1 DNA during the spring semester of his freshman year at the University. The research tries to provide a computer-assisted design tool for Nano scale devices made from polymer DNA, he said. “As a building material, [DNA] is cheap. It’s robust and reliable,� Braun said. “We’ve discovered we can do quite interesting things with DNA.� Braun said he harbors a deep passion for science and learning new things. He said his love for science was instilled in him as a child by his parents, both of whom are actively involved with research at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. “My father played puzzle games with me since I was young. We played chess a lot and other games that required quite of bit of thinking,� Braun said. “Solving problems always seemed fun to me and science seems like a profession that always lets you solve problems and [gives you] fun puzzles to solve every day and you’re

“We are out there on campus doing a lot of training, raising a lot of awareness.� Tooley’s actions became part of a heated debate in the 2011 Texas Legislative session when a bill to allow concealed carry of hand guns on Texas college campuses was introduced by three state senators. The concealed carry measure did not pass this session. S o ci a l work s ophomore Kelley Mathis said she has faith in the University’s capability to respond in a future incident. “I t h i n k U T re s p on d e d well,� Mathis said. “The only thing I feel UT could have done better was getting us the news. The only source to me was TV news, and it was incredibly inaccurate. Rumors of a second shooter and multiple dead bodies created an environment of fear that was unnecessary.�

Scan for a look back at all The Daily Texan’s coverage of the shooting. bit.ly/DTlookback never bored.� Braun said he knew right away he wanted to be involved with research when he got to the University. He began by working with natural sciences professor Andrew Ellington doing hands-on things but soon switched to computational work, where he contributed much more, Ellington said. Robert Crippen, former astronaut, UT alumnus and ASF board member presented Braun with the $10,000 scholarship, Lin said. “[Braun] has had a pretty spectacular academic record in terms of his grades and he’s in the Turing Scholars Program and Dean’s Scholars,� Lin said. “But what really stood out is the impact he’s already had in such a short time.� Crippen stressed the fact that the award exists to encourage more involvement in research in the sciences, specifically to increase the number of engineers and scientists that this country produces, Braun said. “I think that such an award, being really large, shows that there’s a strong support for undergraduate research in the United States and in the community,� Braun said.

Jason Re Daily Tex Associat


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WORLD&NATION

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Ashley Morgan, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

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Mexican foundation offers blind photography course By Olga Rodriguez The Associated Press

Michael Jackson fan Bristre Clayton of Las Vegas stands outside court during the trial of Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson’s doctor who has been charged with involuntary manslaughter in the pop icon’s death, on Tuesday.

Jason Redmond Daily Texan Staff Associated Press

Doctor goes to trial in Michael Jackson case By Anthony McCartney & Linda Deutsch The Associated Press

First, prosecutors showed a photo of Michael Jackson’s pale and lifeless body lying on a gurney. Then, they played a recording of his voice, just weeks before his death. Slow and slurred, his words echoed Tuesday through a Los Angeles courtroom at the start of the trial of the doctor accused of killing him. As a worldwide audience watched on TV and Jackson’s family looked on from inside the courtroom, a drugged Jackson said: “We have to be phenomenal. When people leave this show, when people leave my show, I want them

to say, ‘I’ve never seen nothing like this in my life. Go. Go. I’ve never seen nothing like this. Go. It’s amazing. He’s the greatest entertainer in the world.’” Prosecutors played the audio for the first time during opening statements as they portrayed Dr. Conrad Murray, 58, as an incompetent physician who used a dangerous anesthetic without adequate safeguards and whose neglect left the superstar abandoned as he lay dying. The theme was Jackson’s quest for sleep and propofol, the potion he called his “milk.” Jurors were told that it was a powerful anesthetic, not a sleep aid, and Murray misused it.

Defense attorneys countered that Jackson caused his own death by taking a drug dose, including propofol, after Murray left the room. Nothing the cardiologist could have done would have saved the King of Pop, defense attorney Ed Chernoff told jurors, because Jackson was desperate to regain his fame and needed rest to prepare for a series of crucial comeback concerts. A number of Jackson’s family members were in the courthouse, including his father Joseph, mother Katherine, sisters LaToya and Janet, and brothers Jermaine, Randy and Tito. The family’s most emotion-

al moment came when the prosecutor played a video excerpt from Jackson’s “This Is It” rehearsal in which he sang “Earth Song,” a plea for better treatment of the environment. As Jackson sang the words, “I used to dream. I used to glance beyond the stars,” his mother, Katherine, dabbed at her eyes with a tissue. Prosecutor David Walgren noted it was Jackson’s last performance. Murray, who arrived at court holding hands with his mother, has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter. If convicted, he could face up to four years in prison and the loss of his medical license.

Rodrigo Telon Yucute focuses on the sound of the voices, raises a camera and snaps off a shot, capturing an image of a couple laughing as they sit on a yellow park bench. He shows it to the subjects but cannot see it himself. The photographer-in-training has been blind for nearly 30 years. “When I was young, I met a lot of people, and it always caught my attention how they would take photographs to keep as mementos,” Telon said. “I like to take photographs to capture a moment that I can later share with my family and friends so they can see what my life is like.” Telon was a 22-year-old guerrilla fighter in his home country of Guatemala when a land mine exploded, ripping apart his left forearm and destroying his eyesight. After years of rehabilitation, he learned Braille and how to use a cane to get around. Now 51, Telon is fulfilling his longtime wish of taking photographs. He is one of 30 visually impaired or blind people learning photography with the help of the Mexico City foundation Ojos Que Sienten, or Eyes That Feel. Founded five years ago by professional Mexican photographer Gina Badenoch, the foundation teaches the blind to express in photographs how they perceive the world. Her students use hearing, touch, smell and taste to choose their subjects and create their images. “It helps them feel part of society again. It helps them be seen and be heard again,” she said. For many of the new photographers, the most rewarding part is having their sighted friends describe the images. “Being able to share something I

made and hear people who are seeing your photograph describe what you created in your mind is something I enjoy tremendously,” said Jose Manuel Pacheco Crispin, a 33-year-old university student who began losing his sight at 16 because of a retinal degenerative disease. “It has helped me to break barriers and to keep having crazy ideas,” said Pacheco, who recently climbed to the top of Iztaccihuatl, a 17,159foot volcano near Mexico City. Photography doesn’t come easy. Beginners often leave out the heads or legs of their subject, but they learn to improve their images. The sun’s warmth helps them know where to place themselves to photograph their subject. They may touch a flower to sense its shape or listen for the wind blowing through leaves to locate a tree. “My hearing, my smell, all my senses are alert when I’m taking a photograph,” said Jose Antonio Dominguez. Dominguez, 49, first lost sight in his right eye when he was a teenager because of glaucoma. Each blind photographer has a project to work on for two months. Dominguez wants to photograph people who help him as he navigates the chaotic streets of Mexico City. Telon, who lost his parents and two brothers during the civil war in Guatemala, will focus part of his project on an 8-year-old girl who lost her arm and who refuses to wear her artificial limb. “I want to tell her my story and how I got accustomed to using my artificial arm,” Telon said. He may also tell her about a daughter he last saw 29 years ago, when she was 6 weeks old. “When I left to join the guerrilla, she was starting to smile,” Telon said. “That’s a photograph I keep in my mind.”


OPINION

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Wednesday, September 28, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Viviana Aldous, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

New ID law safeguards voting By Samian Quazi Daily Texan Columnist

VIEWPOINT

the profit and America gets the pollution. How is that in our national interest? This project would put our already limited freshwater resources at risk to contamination and further degrade the air quality of Texas port cities. It would feed our costly addiction to oil, and it would wed our future to the destructive production of tar sands crude. And most eerily, investing in this project alone will undo any progress that’s been made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the past and will render all future progress doubtful. The decision on whether to build this pipeline rests almost entirely with President Barack Obama. Public determination meetings are being held across the country on this matter, and the U.S. State Department is coming to UT’s campus today to ask people what they think about the pipeline. The Sierra Student Coalition will meet at 6 p.m. in front of Littlefield Fountain for its March for Clean Energy before attending the hearing, which will be held from 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Lady Bird Johnson Auditorium of the LBJ Library. The only way that we can stop this horrible mistake in the making is to attend and let Obama know that this is not the change we had hoped for.

The U.S. Department of Justice asked Texas on Friday to provide more information on the state’s new voter ID law. The law, which passed in the Legislature this year and goes into effect Jan. 1, requires prospective Texas voters to bring valid photo ID to receive a ballot. Though flawed, this law codifies legitimate safeguards against voting fraud and the Justice Department should approve it quickly. Under the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Texas is required to receive clearance from the Justice Department before the state can implement any election-related changes. This provision, which applies to a handful of mostly southern states with a history of voting discrimination, came into effect when the voter ID law passed. The department is now examining whether the ID law would negatively affect voter participation among minority groups. Specifically, the Justice Department asked Texas to provide more information about the 605,576 registered voters who do not currently have a valid ID. Some Democrats and civil rights organizations charged that the new law unfairly targets Hispanic voters lacking such identification. The department wants to know how many of these registered voters have Spanish surnames and which counties they live in as part of its assessment. But Hispanic voters themselves benefit from the voter ID law. Currently, anyone who can provide a copy of even a current utility bill or a bank statement with their name and a Texas address on it can vote. The new law’s list of valid photo ID would all require legal U.S. residency to be granted. And since the U.S. government routinely deports immigrants who show up to vote in a national or statewide election, the new law will hopefully serve as a deterrent against non-citizens voting. A Hispanic immigrant may be misled into voting while not yet a citizen, only to painfully blow their shot at the American dream later on as they thought they were fulfilling a civic duty. Naturalized and U.S.-born Hispanics should have no problems in voting. The former can still present their citizenship certificate as valid ID, whereas the latter presumably should have no more difficulty acquiring a state ID on their 18th birthday than a non-Hispanic Texan. UT students eligible to vote in Texas elections should also have no problem complying with the law’s new rules. A Texas resident of any age can go to a DPS office and purchase a personal ID card for $16. UT students originally from out of state can also easily acquire a Texas drivers’ license or state ID if they bring a copy to DPS of the same ID from their former state of residence. And students will now be able to get a free election identification certificate if they prefer. Detractors of the new law insist the new law strikes a blow at student voters by not accepting student IDs as valid identification. Congressman John Lewis of Georgia wrote in an Aug. 26 New York Times op-ed: “Texas also rejects student IDs but allows voting by those who have a license to carry a concealed handgun. These schemes are clearly crafted to affect not just how we vote, but who votes.” Moses may have wandered the desert, but I spent my first semester this May trudging throughout an unfamiliar campus to get a UT student ID card. No UT student can reasonably expect to have fun waiting at a DPS office to get a state ID, but it beats finding the FAC building in 100-degree weather. And when I had to shell out $10 for my UT card, nobody complained I was paying a ‘poll tax’ for a card that should somehow ensure my state voting rights. By not accepting student IDs, Texas has eliminated a major potential avenue for voting fraud. The theory that this new law will malign Texas seniors is as specious as the argument it could harm minorities and college students. True, the elderly are less likely to have unexpired drivers’ licenses than other voting-age groups. Yet, impaired mobility has never stopped this demographic’s status as America’s most reliable voting bloc. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a whopping 74.5 percent of Texans aged 65 to 74 who were registered voters for the November 2008 elections actually voted in that election. Less than half that percentage, or 36.6 percent, of 18- to 24-year-old registered Texan voters did the same. Seniors, with already formidable political clout, are loath to be disenfranchised so easily. I anticipate many of them will organize transportation services to pick up ID cards from DPS offices before the March primaries. At any rate, the new law essentially waives such requirements for those 70 and older by issuing such Texans an election identification certificate that does not expire. Democratic and civil rights organizations’ fears over this new law are overblown. And when polling organizations such as Rasmussen Reports find that around 75 percent of Americans support photo ID laws, liberals would be wise to support the new Texas law.

Morgan is president of UT’s Sierra Student Coalition.

Quazi is a nursing graduate student.

Clean up the catalog

At last weekend’s Texas Tribune Festival, UT President William Powers Jr. faced a series of questions about the current debate surrounding the efficiency of the University. The problem, as Powers sees it, is “a federalism one — who decides what and at what level.” In short, the University should not be micromanaged. The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board recently suggested that it would cut any degree program at public colleges and universities that fails to graduate at least 25 students over five years. At UT, the Greek and Latin majors have been given as examples of at-risk, low-producing programs. On its face, the board’s rule seems to fit the type of micromanagement that Powers derided. And it hardly needs saying that the value of a major cannot be accurately measured by the number of students who graduate with it. Powers said cutting the Greek program would seriously injure students studying other topics. Students majoring in religious studies, classics and ancient history routinely take Greek language courses. Their ability to study the ancient world would be severely limited were UT to lack the expert Greek language faculty it has now. The increased sorting of students into smaller and smaller bins creates this apparent inefficiency despite the problem being only one of perception. It is not hard to see how this process results in low enrollment for given majors. If programs are defined narrowly, of course only a small number of students will fit into them. The University’s enrollment numbers for the classics department

in fall 2010 illustrate the point. Instead of 94 students studying the classics, broadly defined, we have 26 students studying ancient history and civilization, 31 studying classical architecture, 27 studying classics and 10 studying Latin. Zero students were majoring in Greek during this semester and the fall semester preceding it. But all of these programs require students to take at least some Greek or Latin. Outside observers are not likely to delve into the course catalog to determine the true extent to which a Greek major differs from a classics major — very little — and instead cry waste. Whether or not such waste is real rather than superficial is no doubt highly situational. But small departments are proliferating at an alarming rate. Even many of the so-called interdisciplinary programs are themselves tiny silos by another name. And we do not need any more silos; we need more warehouses. In the case of the Greek major, the problem is illusory. Enough students take the classes to make teaching them worthwhile. But that can be hard to convey to outside observers. The problem is that the University’s organizational structure allows and, in some cases, seems to encourage these situations to develop. UT can avoid harmful micromanagement by, as Powers recently put it, “cleaning up the catalog” and correcting incorrect perceptions of this type that can make great headlines but are not actual problems. — Matt Daley for the editorial board.

Voice opposition to the Keystone pipeline By Brittany Morgan Daily Texan Guest Columnist

Large numbers of protesters were recently arrested in Washington, D.C., in opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline, earning them the record for the largest act of non-violent civil disobedience since the Vietnam War. The more than 1,700-mile pipeline would cut through the Ogallala aquifer, the nation’s largest, and through Texas’ Corrizo-Willcox aquifer among other waterways between Canada and the Texas Gulf Coast. As any engineer could tell you, no pipe is 100-percent leak-proof. The existing pipeline has had 13 leaks since June 2010, and the “extralarge” pipeline extension poses extreme risks to our freshwater resources and croplands. Additionally, tar sands — the crude product being transported — involves tearing down many acres of pristine forestland so it can be tediously strip-mined, leaving a wrecked ecosystem and vast amounts of toxic waste that goes into tailings lakes that can be seen from space. The tar sands refinery has also been shown to add three to four times as many greenhouse gas pollutants to the atmosphere than the conventional oil refinery — a major worry for climatologists concerned about

the ongoing climate crises that we face. James Hansen, a long-time leading climate scientist and the current director of NASA’s Goddard Institute, has said the building of this pipeline would make catastrophic climate change inevitable. The American Petroleum Institute has called the pipeline the “biggest shovel-ready project” in the country, and Exxon has spent millions telling the American people that Canadian tar sands translates to energy security. While job creation sounds good, the institute’s argument has been seriously overblown. The pipeline is a $7 billion project — big, but hardly the biggest. It will generate 5,000 to 8,000 jobs in an economy that needs 400,000 jobs every month to reduce unemployment. Although TransCanada claims the oil is for American consumers and that it will decrease our reliance on oil from the Middle East, there is good reason to believe that the pipeline is instead meant to get Canadian tar sands oil to China and other rapidly growing countries. For example, Chinese companies have invested $15 billion into Canadian tar sands reserves in the last 18 months, and the energy minister of Alberta has even admitted that getting the tar sands flowing to China is a top priority. China gets the oil, Canada gets

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NEWS

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Professionals divided on inflammatory speech issues By Sarah White Daily Texan Staff

If we can’t speak what we think, there is no way to affect change and we effectively shut d own the avenue for progress, said Tara Smith, BB&T Corp. chair holder. On Tuesday, the BB&T chair for the Study of Objectivism hosted a dialogue on the topic of inflammatory speech in the Graduate School of Business Building. At the event, they discussed diverse issues relating to the topic of free speech, including blasphemous, offensive and hateful speech. Smith met with Nadine Strossen, former president of the American Civil Liberties Union, Alexander Tsesis, law professor at Loyola University and John Burnett, correspondent for National Public Radio. Tsesis led the discussion by mentioning court cases that support the idea that hate speech is not protected by the constitution and that regulation is a viable option. “Copyright violations, distributions of child pornography, obscenity and threats against the president are all content-based limitations on speech that are already in place,� Tsesis said. He said instances of harmful hate speech have assisted to prolong and intensify racism in the American South and abroad in places such as Nazi Germany. “The truth does not always win out in the market place of ideas and hate speech can be very powerful,� Tsesis said. Strossen said that she held an opposite position on the topic of inflammatory speech. “[In allowing censorship,] we give government officials unfettered pow-

Tamir Kalifa| Daily Texan Staff

Alexander Tsesis, a law professor at Loyola University, talks Tuesday at “Free Speech Dialogues,� a panel about inflammatory speech.

ers. Every idea can be seen as an incitement, and the decisions [of government officials] will be arbitrary at best and discriminatory at worst,� she said. Strossen said that she recognizes the claim that hate speech can be damaging, but she does not believe censorship is the answer. “The government must remain neutral to the viewpoint of the speech,� Strossen said. “The solution

is not to eliminate this speech but to answer it.� Burnett spoke about his experiences with inflammatory speech and the Ku Klux Klan as a reporter. “I have deep misgivings about being the medium through which these Ku Klux Klan protests were given attention,� Burnett said. However, he said that in the end, he respects their right to free speech.

“We are all grown-ups, and we have the ability to handle these kinds of issues,� Burnett said. Smith said she tried to involve speakers from numerous different viewpoints in order to make the event a dialogue rather than a debate. “The term ‘debate’ seems to imply that there are only two positions and that there can be a winner or a loser,� Smith said. “In fact,

Kiersten Holms Daily Texan Staff

the United States, beginning with Reconstruction after the Civil War and American involvement in the Philippines, Germany, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq. “[The book] is structured based on specific historical cases, and it follows a chronological organization. One of the points I make is that each experience builds on the last,� Suri said. Suri said that a great amount of research was involved in the development of “Liberty’s

Surest Guardian.� “The research involved a lot of reading about different conflicts and experiences and then doing a lot of archival work,� Suri said. Suri also spoke about the impact he hopes the book will have. “I really want young people to take seriously the fact that they can change the world and that they need to change the world,� he said. He mentioned that his work as a professor was influential to his research and writing and that the

book was greatly impacted by his experiences with students. “Part of my book is about how Americans have changed the world — not always for the better,� Suri said. “Especially now, young people need to continue doing that.� William Inboden, assistant professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs, said that he believes Suri’s book will be instrumental in filling a gap in public policy. “[In public policy issues,] policymakers’ first question is often ‘what

SG concerned with oil pipeline project impact representatives on the committee did not feel comfortable voting in opposition to the pipeline,� Desai said. The Legislative Affairs Committee killed Townsend’s original bill in session and drafted a new bill calling for student involvement on the issue and for the State Department to provide a new environmental impact statement that would provide more information on risks of the Keystone project on Texas lands and communities during drought conditions. The bill passed with an amendment that would only ask the State Department to analyze the environmental impacts instead of issuing a new resolution. School of Law representative Austin Carlson said the original resolution was in the greater political arena instead of the SG arena. “I am all for having student involvement, but you walk a very fine line when you touch an underlying political issue,� Carlson said.

ys

can history tell us about this subject?’ All too often, there are not enough resources.� Inboden said. Frank Gavin, associate professor in the Department of History and the LBJ School of Public Affairs, said that Suri’s presence at UT will help to focus on valuable issues at the University. “Suri’s work will be influential in the way that it concentrates on what has worked in the past in order to connect history to contemporary policy issues,� Gavin said.

President William Powers Jr., director of admissions Kedra Ishop and other members of the Office of Admissions will be traveling to El Paso today to celebrate the grand opening of the El Paso Admissions Center. Like other UT admissions offices across the state, the El Paso office will serve as a place for students to learn about the University of Texas application process, including housing and scholarship opportunities. The office will work to expedite the process of finding prospective students interested in attending UT, said Augustine Garza, deputy director of the Office of Admissions. “Our goal is to inform students about UT and encourage them to consider the University. We want to get the message out,� said Garza. “When we are talking to audiences, we have kids who have never heard of our system, and all of a sudden, they get interested and they become prospects.� Beginning with the Houston branch that opened in 1995, these admissions offices have been built with the intention of representing all areas of Texas. An admissions office in Laredo is currently being planned, although it is expected to be the last one built, said Garza. The El Paso center, which has now been open for three weeks, has a three-member full-time staff that lives and works in El Paso, said Michael Talamantes, director of the El Paso Admissions Center. “The El Paso Admissions Center is a physical testament to the University of Texas at Austin’s commitment to provide outreach to all prospective students across Texas,� said Talamantes. “We will visit the greater El Paso area high schools and participate in college fairs and other school [and] community events to inform students about opportunities available at the University.� The opening of an admissions office in El Paso was “very exciting,� said theatre and dance sophomore Cynthia Jimenez, a native of El Paso. “I think it’s very awesome because a lot of people don’t realize how easy it is to apply to get into UT because people in El Paso don’t know what resources are out there for them. Hopefully, it’ll bring more people out from El Paso, especially in the Hispanic community.� The center will not, however, be a workshop where students will learn testing strategy or how to get in to UT. The center would still prove very useful for information, said computer sciences senior Stephen Moore. “I applied online, and that was it,� said Moore. “The center could be extremely useful to find out what you needed to know — for a single person. When I applied, I knew almost nothing about UT.�



of T as ex

degradation of air quality and the effect on natural aquifers, which could, in turn, affect the families and homes of UT students. “We hope that this legislation, if passed by SG, will serve to illustrate the level of concern present in the student body about this issue,� Townsend said. Townsend said his committee wrote the legislation in preparation for the State Department public hearing about the pipeline to be held Wednesday. Questions arose last week about whether the issue of the Keystone pipeline could be considered student life or whether it was solely a political issue. Yaman Desai, chair of the Legislative Affairs Committee, said representatives mainly had concern with the proposed legislation because they felt not enough was known about the pipeline and about the environmental and economical issues it would cause. “[Because] we found such contradictory and inconclusive research on the pipeline, many

u eB Th

Student Government passed a resolution supporting student involvement in the proposed Keystone Oil Pipeline Project on Tuesday night. The resolution did not state SG’s opposition to the pipeline but rather called for more environmental and ecological information from the State Department. Andrew Townsend, assistant director for the Campus Environmental Center, presented legislation opposing the oil pipeline to SG last week. The Keystone Oil Pipeline, a project by energy company TransCanada, would run more than 1,600 miles from Alberta, Canada, and would end in the Nederland and Port Arthur area. Townsend said he and many members of the CEC were concerned with the environmental impact the pipeline would have on the state of Texas, especially the

these are very multifaceted and complex issues.� Smith and the three panel members spoke about specific cases of free speech questions including Klan protests, flag burnings and recent anti-gay protests at military funerals. “It is in the particulars that these issues get interesting,� Smith said. “The stakes are real around the world and in the neighborhood.�

Jeremi Suri, author of “Liberty’s Surest Guardian� and distinguished professor in global leadership, history, and public policy, looks to America’s history and various conflicts as a mechanism of nation building.

By Sarah Lawson Daily Texan Staff

By Jody Serrano Daily Texan Staff

Center opens in El Paso to encourage admissions By Andrew Messamore Daily Texan Staff

Book tells of U.S. success, world impact Renowned UT professor Jeremi Suri released a book Tuesday focusing on the principles of successful nation-building based on research that delves into U.S. history. Suri joined the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and the Department of History as a professor this fall. His book was titled “Liberty’s Surest Guardian: American Nation-Building from the Founders to Obama.� “The book is an effort to understand how Americans have sought to change the world, and one of my points is that we have sought to change the world by changing ourselves,� Suri said. He said that his book includes an analysis of several factors that are involved in successful nation-building: partners, process, problemsolving, purpose and people. “After examining history, [I found that] these are the five elements that contribute to more success rather than more failure, though they do not guarantee [success],� Suri said. Suri said his analysis involved a consideration of crucial historical examples of nation-building by

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SPORTS

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ADVENTURE STARTS HERE www.utrecsports.org

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Trey Scott, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

Tight ends make mark on offense

SIDELINE MLB RAYS

By Austin Laymance Daily Texan Staff

The tight ends finally had something positive to celebrate. As soon as D.J. Grant crossed the goal line for a 45-yard touchdown reception on Texas’ sixth play of the game against UCLA, all six Longhorn tight ends rushed onto the Rose Bowl field, cheering in unison. They had plenty of cause for such a dramatic reaction. For starters, it was the first touchdown by a Texas tight end in five games and only the third catch from the position on the season. But that play had an even deeper meaning. It marked Grant’s arrival after three long seasons of watching and waiting on the sidelines and two years of multiple surgeries and grueling rehab for the man who tore his right ACL, PCL and hamstring before he ever suited up on game day. T h e l o u d e s t c h e e r l e a d e r, though, was senior tight end Blaine Irby. And for good reason. Irby calls Grant a close friend, but their friendship wasn’t born

TIGHT ENDS continues on PAGE 8

YANKESS

RED SOX

ORIOLES

ASTROS

CARDINALS Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan File Photo

Tight ends D.J. Grant, left, and Blaine Irby, right, celebrate after a Grant touchdown catch during a 49-20 win against UCLA on Sept. 17. Irby and Grant are both coming off of terrible injuries last season, and are having a huge impact on the Texas offense this season.

BY THE NUMBERS

FOOTBALL

Six random Big 12 football thoughts to consider

Lawrence Peart Daily File Photo

THOUGHTS continues on PAGE 8

Buffalo Bills quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick has been on fire this year, while leading his team to a 3-0 record.

By Chris Hummer Daily Texan Staff

It was another turbulent week in the world of fantasy football, with a number of key injuries and numerous breakout performances that just make you ask, “He did what?� So, let’s explore how last week’s games affect your lineup: who is truly hot and who is not.

HOT Any Buffalo Bills offensive player

1. If you haven’t been watching football this season and you took a look at this story, you’d probably think I was crazy, and to be honest, it feels a little bit weird seeing the Bills in this spot. But they are on fire. Buffalo is averaging 37.66 points a game, and everyone is getting touches. Harvard graduate Ryan Fitzpatrick is scorching with at least 18 points in his first three games, making him a viable starting quarterback in any league. Running back Fred Jackson is quickly establishing himself as a top10 back with at least 11 points in every game — he has also broken the 20-point mark in the last two. Plus, wide receiver Steve Johnson and tight end Scott Chandler have both firmly announced their fantasy prowess as strong starting options. It’s not too late to get on the Bills’ bandwagon: Chandler is still available in 51 percent of ESPN fantasy leagues.

Gary Wiepert Associated Press

217 receiving yards and two touch- for owners who picked Vick in the downs last Sunday and is a must-play top-10 of the draft. If you did, it’s week to week. probably time to pick up Fitzpatrick or Eagles’ backup Mike KafTorrey Smith, Baltimore ka because Vick’s injury pattern is a troubling one. 3. Who? That’s what many will say when they look at the Week 3 scoring leaders and see this rookie at Kenny Britt, Tennessee the top of the list. Smith, a second- 2. The wide receiver has been a round pick from Maryland, went fantasy beast this year, but on Sunoff for 152 yards receiving and three day, he tore ligaments in his knee touchdowns against the St. Louis and will miss significant time. For Rams. He is still available in 99 per- those desperately scrambling afcent of ESPN leagues, and while he ter his loss, think about pickwon’t consistently post such ridicu- ing up his teammate Nate Washlous numbers, he should still see quite ington, who is available in 90 pera few balls from Joe Flacco the rest of cent of leagues, or Oakland’s Denarius Moore, available in 60 percent the season. of leagues.

NOT

Michael Vick, Philadelphia

1.

This guy cannot seem to stay healthy. A week after suffering a conWes Welker, New cussion against the Falcons, Vick England Patriots reportedly broke his non-throw2. Not much to say here. When ing hand Sunday against the Gipaired with Tom Brady, this guy is a ants. It’s uncertain if he’ll be good to monster. The former Red Raider had go in Week 4, disappointing news

Frank Gore, San Francisco

3.

Gore continued his slow start to the season Sunday with only 42 yards on 17 carries. The running back is fighting nagging injuries and is starting to show signs of aging. Astute owners might look to pick up his backup, Kendall Hunter.

Pair of Texas liberos hail all the way from Hawaii By Chris Hummer Daily Texan Staff

Hawaii is know for its sandy beaches, great weather and relaxing environment, but around Austin, the Aloha state is know for producing the excellent defensive volleyball players Sydney Yogi and Sarah Palmer. Last year, Texas starting libero Yogi went down with an injury late in the season. It was Palmer, her backup, who filled in nicely for her. A freshman, Palmer received instrumental advice and support from Yogi during that period, who coached her through the finer points of playing libero. The advice was helpful because Palmer played an attacking position in high school, outside hitter, and was still working to adjust to play-

VS. Date: Tonight Time: 7 p.m. Place: Norman, Okla.

The number of field goals Dallas Cowboys rookie kicker Dan Bailey made on Monday in the 1816 win against the Washington Redskins, accounting for all 18 of Dallas’ points.

181 The number of games played in baseball so far this season, and after all of that the Boston Red Sox and the Tampa Bay Rays are still tied for the wildcard lead. The Red Sox have already lost 18 times in September allowing the the Rays to get back in the race.

11.4

ing the defensive libero slot. “She was always there to cheer me on and support me if I had any questions, and was always there on the bench for me,� Palmer said. “During the final four, she actually wrote me a couple of notes telling me what I should be doing, and staying in that libero mentality, which really helped. I really appreciate all of her support she gave me last season.� The pair’s journey to Austin started with Yogi, when she committed to Texas over four years ago. While the 40 Ac r e s is a significant distance away from her home in the pacific, when she visited campus, she knew it was the right environment for her. “I don’t think you can deny the kind of pride that you see when you come and visit the campus,� Yogi said. “It’s like nowhere else you can imagine, burnt orange everywhere is kind of hard to miss. Yog i

Who’s hot, who’s not in fantasy football

VOLLEYBALL N0. 8 TEXAS AT OKLAHOMA

er

FANTASY FOOTBALL

Pal m

1. In case you’re not keeping up, Texas commit Johnathan Gray, who already owns the state record for career rushing touchdowns, has now rushed 79 times for 1,079 rushing yards and 17 touchdowns through four games this season for Aledo High School. That’s like a video game ... ... Actually, it’s a lot better than

Syd ney

A six pack of thoughts that thankfully have nothing to do with conference realignment:

Senior running back Fozzy Whittaker has taken his role in stride as he and freshman back Malcolm Brown have been splitting time in the back field this season.

Sar ah

By Trey Scott Daily Texan Columnist

a video game. Tuesday night, I created a 99-overall running back on NCAA 12 and then played four games with him, giving him three 20-carry games and one 19-carry game. Here’s what cyber-back finished with: 79 carries, 948 yards, 10 touchdowns. Gray’s the real deal, PS3 don’t lie. 2. None of the polls agree with me, but I’m not so sure Oklahoma State isn’t the best team in the conference. A big, come-frombehind win on the road against Texas A&M (2-1) looked more impressive than Oklahoma’s win two Saturdays ago on the road against Florida State (2-2). If the

6

HAWAII continues on PAGE 7

As in the $11.4 million that were on the line when Bill Haas and Hunter Mahan squared off in a playoff for the PGA Tour Championship and the Fed Cup on Sunday. Haas won on hole three of the playoff with a par.

Join us today at 5 p.m. for a live chat previewing Saturday’s game against Iowa State


8 SPTS

8

SPORTS

THOUGHTS continues from PAGE 7 Cowboys and Sooners faced off right now on at a neutral site, I’d take the ’Pokes by a touchdown. They’ll have a good chance to prove they’re the best in the conference: this year, Bedlam’s at their home teepee. 3. I’m no stat guy (we have one of those), but I think the Longhorns’ biggest numerical accomplishment thus far is finding a way to get 12 different guys the ball via the passing game. Variety is good; running backs, fullbacks, h-backs, tight ends, receivers and even quarterbacks have all caught passes so far this year. Since I’m expecting DeSean Hales, Miles Onyegbule, Blaine Irby, Darius Terrell and Barrett Matthews to all snag a pass this year, the number of players with catches could rise to 17. Last year’s figure? 13. 4. Texas head coach Mack Brown says that Demarco Cobbs (forearm) and Chet Moss (back) are being evaluated and just might be

HAWAII

continues from PAGE 7 I think you feel a real sense of community here — it’s a just a real special place to be.� When it came time for Palmer to make a commitment to a school, she looked to Yogi, whose parents are family friends, for advice about the Texas program. Which is when Yogi posed the question, “What better place in the U.S. is there?� Palmer agreed and decided to come to the Lone Star state. Yogi doesn’t feel that she had a large influence on Palmer’s decision, though, but she does feel that she made the right choice. “I didn’t try to convince her to come her or anything, but I answered he questions honestly, and in the end, I think she made a really smart decision,� Yogi said with a wry smile. Both players have adjusted well to Austin, an immensely different environment in comparison to Hawaii,

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 able to go this week. The return of Cobbs, a svelte outside linebacker who has the quicks to get after the quarterback and cover a slot receiver, would be huge for the Longhorns defense. 5. Hard not to love Fozzy Whittaker. The senior running back has spent all season answering more questions about true freshman Malcolm Brown than himself, but he’s handled it all with grace. Fozzy might not be the main horse in the Longhorns’ backfield anymore, but he’s an important and versatile one. 6. Along the same token, can’t we all just agree that Brown deserves to be more than the “costarter� at running back? After three games, he leads the Longhorns in rushing yards and yardsper-attempt. Brown’s clearly the missing piece in the ground game Texas has been missing since Jamaal Charles left after the 2007 season. I’m all for playing Whittaker in the “Wild� packages and on third downs, but give Brown the title of first-string running back — he more than deserves it.

and love certain aspects of the capital city. “Austin is so lively,� Palmer said. “There’s always something going on. On any given night, I can look up and see what’s going on and I can find something that would interest me. As opposed to Hawaii where I would just sit around and watch TV or chill with my friends.� There are certain aspects of Hawaii that are hard to replace though, like the beach. But both players mentioned one thing specifically that is hard to go without. “The food is definitely the thing I miss the most, my family does kind of a good job sending stuff over, but there are just some things you can’t ship,� Yogi said. While the food might not compare to their usual Hawaiian diet, they both have found a home in Austin and are a huge part of the No. 8 ranked Longhorns, success. Yogi, Palmer and the rest of the team will be back in action tonight against rival Oklahoma who they went 2-0 against last year.

SEC: no plans for 14th university By John Zenor The Associated Press

Commissioner Mike Slive tried to temporarily quell the “enormous speculation� about whether — or more likely when — the Southeastern Conference will add a 14th member to join Texas A&M. Slive said Tuesday, a day after festivities welcoming member No. 13, that the SEC presidents and chancellors are not currently considering any other schools for admission and that Texas A&M was the only one to submit an application. He reiterated that he anticipates having just 13 members in 2012-13. “I really can’t emphasize this enough. This has all been about Texas A&M,� Slive said in a conference call with Texas A&M President R. Loftin Bowen. “We have not initiated any conversations with any in-

stitution. This was about Texas A&M understanding that some of the complexities that 13 teams brings, and that’s really it.� Slive said the SEC will begin negotiations this fall with ESPN and CBS to upgrade the current 15-year contracts with both networks. Dave Einsel | Associated Press He has appointed a point perTexas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin, left, exchanges helmets with son and three senior administrators — who he declined to iden- Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive, right, on Monday. tify — to work with Texas A&M’s ber appealing, saying “we’ll just see “I know there will be enormous transition team that Loftin said speculation,� Slive said. “There will includes “well over a dozen people.� how the future plays out.� He said he didn’t know if there be speculation about how we’re goSlive said league athletic directors would meet in the next few weeks was a specific deadline when the ing to schedule. There’ll be speculato begin considering options such as SEC would need to add a 14th mem- tion about whether we’re going to go to 14 and if we go to 14, who’s that scheduling. He said he wasn’t sure if ber for next season. Adding a 13th team was just an- going to be, how’s that going to hapTexas A&M would land in the SEC West but “obviously it makes sense to other step in the conference expan- pen, when’s that going to happen. “They’re all appropriate questions. me that Texas A&M be in the West.� sions that began last year with ColSlive declined to discuss what orado (Pac-12) and Nebraska (Big We will deal with those on a timetable that works for us.� would make a potential 14th mem- Ten) leaving the Big 12.

TIGHT ENDS continues from PAGE 7 on the field. It was forged on the training table and in the weight room. If anyone understands what it took for Grant to return to action, it’s Irby. He was with him every step of the way. Irby rehabbed alongside Grant for two years after suffering a similar injury during his sophomore year in 2008, when he tore his ACL, LCL and meniscus — not to mention the severe nerve damage that left him with a 5 percent chance of walking normally again. “Before both of us hurt our knees, D.J. and I probably weren’t even that close,� Irby said. “But I think we’re the closest in the tight end room just because we’ve gone through that experience together, gone through such a hardship together, it really brings us closer.�

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While both players have returned this season from their knee injuries, they each realize they wouldn’t be where they’re at without the other. “Blaine gave me all the confidence I need with him coming back the way he did,� Grant said. Throughout the rehab process, they ran sprints together, competed for the fastest time in the 40-yard dash, lifted weights and received treatment, day after day, side by side. “Every day we were working, competing, pushing each other, and I think I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for D.J.,� Irby said. But Grant needed more than just someone to push him physically. After all, the rehab process is equally taxing mentally. “When I first got hurt, I was a little down,� Grant said. “Blaine

came to talk to me and said, ‘You know it’s never over. You still have two years when you come back. You can get it together.’ Having somebody support you like that really brings your hopes back up, and it got my confidence back and helped me get back to where I’m at today.� There were plenty of opportunities for Grant and Irby to abandon their rehab. Two years, of course, is quite a long time. And rehab is never easy. Yet they persevered through it all, with the Texas training staff constantly prodding them to get better. “It was very frustrating, but I knew it would have a greater meaning to me after I was done,� Grant said. “And now I look back at it, I’m glad for all the pushing they did to me. All the hard work they gave me to do. Look at me

now. It’s working out for me.� Instead of giving up, Grant and Irby took advantage of their extra time in the weight room. Although they couldn’t be on the field running routes and catching passes with the rest of the tight ends, they were busy bulking up to improve their blocking. “ D u r i n g h i s t i m e a w a y, [Grant] got stronger just like Blaine did,� said tight ends coach Bruce Chambers. “When you get stronger, that brings confidence. You’re very confident in blocking. When a guy gets that confidence and knows he’s strong, he can go in there and make those blocks.� Yes, they found the silver lining. And things might just finally be going their way. For now, it looks like the tight ends will have plenty to cheer about.

Tex


9 CLASS/SPT/ENT

SPORTS

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

9

Rebeca Rodriguez | Daily Texan Staff

Texas’ third baseman Nadia Taylor awaits the pitch during Texas’ fall opener against Temple College in which they won 20-0. Taylor and the Longhorns are looking to bounce back from a tough first-round loss in last year’s regional round of the NCAA tournament, and are using the fall season as a tune up for the real games in the spring.

Texas impresses in fall season opener with dominating win By Sara Beth Purdy Daily Texan Staff

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But it was the Texas offense that stole the spotlight, as the team registered an astounding 25 hits. Senior third baseman Nadia Taylor headlined the hitting frenzy with a three-run homer in the first inning.

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lined the hitting frenzy with a three- ed another homer to start off the they set a single-game record for run homer in the first inning. Soph- second inning. most home runs at seven against omore Mandy Ogle, the expected Last season, the Longhorns saw Texas Tech where they won 15-2. starter behind the plate, also record- great success at the plate. In April, Other notable performances on offense include juniors Taylor Hoagland and Torie Schmidt, along with sophomore Taylor Thom. Thom had a double in her three hit performance while Schmidt connected for three singles. Hoagland went 3-for-4 last Friday with one triple. Hoagland is coming off a busy summer with the United States Women’s National Softball 1 Team where she helped bring home the gold in the 2011 World Cup of Softball with a 6-4 win over Japan.

  

  

   

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They didn’t let the summer break slow them down. Despite the intense heat, Texas impressed in all aspects of the game, rolling past Temple College 20-0 in its fall season opener last Friday. All four Texas hurlers saw action against the Leopards and combined for a seven-inning no-hitter. Junior Kim Bruins, who started off the game in the circle for Texas, retired all three batters in the first while earning one strikeout. The veteran pitching staff welcomed

freshman Gabby Smith into the circle this weekend. Smith, a right hander from Houston, pitched two complete innings. Sophomore Rachel Fox and junior Blaire Luna, who handled most of the pitching duties last season, each pitched two innings against Temple. Fox had three strikeouts in two innings while Luna, the AllAmerican from Austin, faced the minimum in her two innings with five strikeouts. But it was the Texas offense that stole the spotlight, as the team registered an astounding 25 hits. Senior third baseman Nadia Taylor head-

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10 COMICS

10 COMICS

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THE

  

 


11 ENT

LIFE&ARTS 11

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Recipe delves into mystery of $16 muffin controversy By J.M. Hirsch The Associated Press

So political kerfuffle aside, you have to wonder exactly what a $16 muffin would taste like. Last week’s news that the U.S. government paid $16 apiece for breakfast muffins at a Justice Department conference set off critics of government spending. Hilton Worldwide, the hotel company that hosted the 2009 confab in Washington, disputes the accuracy of the claim, which appeared in a report by Cynthia A. Schnedar, the Justice Department’s inspector general. The hotel called it an accounting thing, explaining that the price included various drinks and gratuity charges, in addition to the muffins. Schnedar stands by the report. All this fails to take into account the most important issue. If you did spend $16 on a muffin, what would it look like? How would it taste? The typical muffin baked in an institutional setting, such as a hotel, costs about 50 cents or less, not including labor. If you go crazy extravagant and reach for the top-shelf organic flour, maybe some hand-harvested wild blueberries from Maine and fancy sugar, you’re still going to max out around $1 per muffin on raw ingredients. Here in The Associated Press test kitchen, we started searching

Matthew Mead | Associated Press

Before serving these $16 muffins, sprinkle the macadamia nuts around the outer edge, then sprinkle the gold leaf over the center surface. Top each with a chocolate-covered strawberry.

for ways to bump up the price of your basic muffin. The end result was anything but basic. We’re also pretty certain you’ll never see one of these babies served at a government conference.

Getting the price-per-muffin that high was hard. We took the obvious steps first — organic flour, sugar and milk, cultured butter, sea salt and freerange eggs. But we still weren’t

even close. A rare honey imported from Zambia helped, as did a healthy amount of pricey macadamia nuts and some Tahitian vanilla beans. But in the end, the only way to

get to $16 was to reach for some old-fashioned booze and gold. That’s right, we glazed our muffins with a chocolate sauce made from organic dark chocolate cut with reduced Scotch Whisky (the

good stuff!) and edible gold leaf flakes. The result? A rather stunning and intense muffin that would cost a mere $192 per dozen (not counting labor) — or $16 each.

DOMO continues from PAGE 12

and laying waste to them. On his song, “Whole City Behind Us,” he spits, “Live from a city of jealous-ass n**gers and bougieass bitches, where you ain’t getting love unless swimmin’ mad riches.” Under The Influence carries an essence more characteristic of Domo Genesis, whereas his first record, Rolling Papers, carried huge Tyler, The Creator influences, both in terms of flow and instrumentals. Under The Influence doesn’t carry the wispy, warped Neptunes-inspired beats characteristic of Tyler. If anything, the mixtape is more reminiscent of classic rap than anything from Odd Future, outside of Mike G’s “Ali.” According to The Los Angeles Times, he’s a fan of Slick Rick and uses Scar-

face and Mobb Deep beats on Under The Influence. Aside from that, the mixtape is still very Odd Future; occasional verses pop up throughout the record about doing horrible things to women or just people in general. These things are all described in a fair amount of detail, layered on with the finest expletives the west coast’s most prominent rapper can conjure. Despite lacking artist features (Tyler is the only Odd Future member that raps on the record besides Domo) and the overall lack of originality, Under The Influence is a solid piece of work. Domo Genesis has proven his technical ability and hopefully his next work will illustrate the fulfillment of his potential as a visionary.

Under the Influence Domo Genesis

Genre: Hip-Hop Tracks: 15 For those who like: Casey Veggies, Smoke DZA

Grade: B

DALI continues from PAGE 12 the shore of his home in Spain. He immediately went inside, put the octopus in acid and then placed it on a copper plate and drew an etching around the imprint it made. Even to Christine Argillet, someone very close to Dali, the man was perplexing and enigmatic. Often painted by the media to be eccentric and flamboyant, she described

a man who was jolly, kind-hearted and possessed a strong desire to simply please others in the most benevolent manner. In this regard, Argillet is the same as Dali. As she noted that the collection was among the most important and impressive of Dali’s work, she said, “To have art known, you must share it.”

WILCO continues from PAGE 12 acoustic riff. This song shows frontman Jeff Tweedy at his best, and, were it the last song Wilco ever produced, fans could die happy. The album isn’t consistently amazing — songs such as “Rising Red Lung” and “Standing O” don’t dazzle — but it’s good throughout and con-

tains moments of folk, rock and pop brilliance. After their last dud of an album, Wilco has gotten back to doing what has made them one of America’s most interesting rock bands in the last decade. They have released an album full of great rock songs made better by surprising, ingenuitive musicianship.

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Kathleen Malone-Van Dyke | Associated Press

Catherine Devine, 22, reads instant messages on her laptop screen at her home in Kings Park, N.Y., on Monday. Devine had her first brush with an online bully in seventh grade before she’d even ventured onto the Internet.

Internet amplifies effects of bullying at every age By Connie Cass The Associated Press

Catherine Devine had her first brush with an online bully in seventh grade, before she’d even ventured onto the Internet. Someone set up the screen name “devinegirl” and, posing as Catherine, sent her classmates instant messages full of trashy talk and lies. “They were making things up about me, and I was the most innocent 12-year-old ever,” Devine remembers. “I hadn’t even kissed anybody yet.” As she grew up, Devine, now 22, learned to thrive in the electronic village. But like other young people, she occasionally stumbled into one of its dark alleys. A new Associated Press-MTV poll of youth in their teens and early 20s finds that most of them — 56 percent — have been the target of some type of online taunting, harassment or bullying, a slight increase over just two years ago. A third say they’ve been involved in “sexting,” the sharing of naked photos or videos of sexual activity. Among those in a relationship, four out of 10 say their partners have used computers or cellphones to abuse or control them. Three-fourths of the young people said they consider these dark-

er aspects of the online world, sometimes broadly called “digital abuse,” a serious problem. They’re not the only ones. Pre s i d e nt B ar a ck O b am a brought students, parents and experts together at the White House in March to try to confront “cyberbullying.” The Education Department sponsors an annual conference to help schools deal with it. Teen suicides linked to vicious online bullying have caused increasing worry in communities across the country. Conduct that rises to the point of bullying is hard to define, but the AP-MTV poll of youth ages 14 to 24 showed plenty of rotten behavior online and a perception that it’s increasing. The share of young people who frequently see people being mean to each other on social networking sites jumped to 55 percent, from 45 percent in 2009. That may be partly because young people are spending more time than ever communicating electronically: seven in 10 had logged into a social networking site in the previous week, and eight in 10 had texted a friend. Devine, who lives on New York’s Long Island, experienced her share of online drama in high school and college: A friend passed around highly personal en-

tries from Devine’s private electronic journal when she was 15. She left her Facebook account open on a University of Scranton library computer, and a prankster posted that she was pregnant (she wasn’t). Most upsetting, when she was 18, Devine succumbed to a boyfriend’s pressure to send a revealing photo of herself, and when they broke up, he briefly raised the threat of embarrassing her with it. “I didn’t realize the power he could have over me from that,” Devine said. “I thought he’d just see it once and then delete it, like I had deleted it.” The Internet didn’t create the turmoil of the teen years and young adulthood — romantic breakups, bitter fights among best friends, jealous rivalries, teasing and bullying. But it does amplify it. “It’s worse online because everybody sees it,” said Tiffany Lyons, 24, of Layton, Utah. “And once anything gets online you can’t get rid of it.” Plus, 75 percent of youth think people do or say things online that they wouldn’t do or say face to face. The most common complaints were people spreading false rumors on Internet pages or by text message, or being downright mean online; more than onefifth of young people said each

of those things had happened to them. Twenty percent saw someone take their electronic messages and share them without permission, and 16 percent said someone posted embarrassing pictures or video of them without their permission. Some of these are one-time incidents; others cross into repeated harassment or bullying. Sameer Hinduja, a cyberbullying researcher, said numerous recent studies taken together suggest a cyberbullying victimization rate of 20 to 25 percent for middle and high school students. Many of these same victims also suffer from in-person abuse. Likewise, many online aggressors are also real-world bullies. “We are seeing offenders who are just jerks to people online and offline,” said Hinduja, an associate professor of criminal justice at Florida Atlantic University and co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center. And computers and cellphones increase the reach of old-fashioned bullying. “When I was bullied in middle school, I could go home and slam my door and forget about it for a while,” said Hinduja. “These kids can be accessed around the clock through technology. There’s really no escape.”


12 LIFE

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LIFE&ARTS

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Aleksander Chan, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Domo Genesis changes style, gets away from Odd Future By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Kathleen Shwartz looks at one of many original Salvador Dali works on display at West Sixth Street’s Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery. The gallery is now host to more than 200 of Dali’s sketches, tapestries and other works including copper etchings.

Salvador Dali collection on display in Austin By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff

Austin is home to many artists, including extremely talented ones, so it only makes sense that Austin should house the largest collection of copper etchings created by one of contemporary art’s greatest artists, Salvador Dali. The collection, which is currently being exhibited at West Sixth Street’s Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery, features more than 200 of Dali’s works, including copper etchings. The current works are from the collection of Dali’s former publisher and longtime friend, French-

man Pierre Argillet. The collection is now owned and curated by his daughter Christine Argillet. “This collection is the reflection of their friendship,” Christine Argillet said. The works were commissioned by Pierre Argillet and are representative of many of his tastes and preferences. The medium the art is created on exemplifies that. “My father did not think that the print-based lithographs Dali wanted to do were original,” Christine Argillet said. Dali was initially opposed to etching on copper plates because of the brightness they produce, which he perceived to hurt the eyes.

Wilco’s fresh album integrates elements from diverse genres The Whole Love Wilco

Genre: Alternative Rock Tracks: 12 For those who like: Spoon, Billy Bragg

Grade: ABy Clayton Wickham Daily Texan Staff

From the abrasive experimentalism of “Art of Almost,” to the somber acoustic release of “Sunday Morning,” Wilco’s new album The Whole Love is a statement about what Wilco is and always has been: a band that hates to be defined. Coming from another band, the record might be called unfocused, but for Wilco, a group critics have alternately dubbed country rock, experimental and “dad rock,” it marks a brilliant return to form. After making a name for itself with the innovative, dissonancecloaked indie-pop of “I Am Trying to Break Your Heart” and A Ghost is Born, Wilco perplexed fans and critics with the refreshingly simple Sky Blue Sky and then flat out disappointed them with their most recent self-titled album. The Whole Love isn’t another “I Am Trying to Break Your Heart,” but — unlike in their last two albums — the group’s avant-garde tendencies are subtly present here. Distortion swells and weird riffs add depth to songs that evoke the best of Wilco’s folk days and of their first indie-rock record Summerteeth. Every song, even the first track, “Art of Almost,” which

seems more an experimental statement than a coherent song, has something to like about it. After guitarist Nels Cline gets some high-voltage riffing out of his system, the album finds its groove with the catchy second track, “I Might,” and keeps rolling through “Sunloathe,” which channels some of the spookier moments of Abbey Road and “Dawned on Me,” an upbeat indierock tune that evokes prior hits such as “Heavy Metal Drummer.” After the solemn folk song “Black Moon,” the record reaches a high point at “Born Alone.” With its catchy melody and gibberish lyrics, the song’s chorus is as infectious and meltingly sweet as any of the best indie-pop moments on Summerteeth. At times, the second half of the album sounds like a tribute to Wilco’s folk era, but the band’s intervening years are present even during the straightforward folk rock of “Open Mind” and “Capitol City.” In the musical outro of 12-minute folk opus “Sunday Morning,” a soft, jazzy guitar lick from Cline summons up a swell of muffled distortion, and an insistent, tinkling piano line phases in, driving the song into the bittersweet resolution of its unifying

WILCO continues on PAGE 11

Nonetheless, Dali created scores of copper-plated etchings for Pierre Argillet until their professional relationship ended in 1979, when Dali’s will to create print-based lithographs triumphed over his desire to work with Argillet. The two remained good friends. The collection itself features all sorts of works ranging from simple yet caustic sketch-ups to elaborate etches of chaotic vibrance. The works’ themes run the gamut of possibilities, with Dali taking inspiration from everything from hippies and the middle-aged to Spanish bullfights to Mao Zedong’s poetry. One particular piece from the

Mao series is an etching of Mao WHAT: Salvador Dali exhibit that has his head extending out of the view of picture. Christine Argillet explained Dali’s rationale in the WHERE: Russell Collection 1137 W. Sixth Street creation of the etching. Upon inquiry of the detail, Dali merely replied, “Mao is so big, he doesn’t fit WHEN: Sept. 23 to Oct. 31 on one page.” WEB: russell-collection.com Argillet also noted Dali’s affinity for placing his own head on bulls’ bodies. “[He] hated bullfights,” ArTICKETS: Free gillet said. “He always saw himself as the bull, misunderstood by othThe most interesting story of all ers.” is the explanation behind his piece She also shed light on an etchentitled “Medusa.” According to ing symbolizing peace. The three mountains on copper plating all sit Argillet, Dali found an octopus on next to one another but never touch, just as peace is never achieved. DALI continues on PAGE 11

Of the next generation of heavily associated hip-hop stoner acts, Odd Future’s Domo Genesis definitely sits at the top the field. Domo’s peers in the field, Curren$y and Wiz Khalifa, have either created an awkward sound inaccessible to many hip-hop aficionados, let alone fans, or have sold out on the most disgusting level (e.g., Wiz Khalifa’s Rolling Papers, a disgusting mess of unclever verses with pop hooks placed on top of stale beats, in an obvious attempt to gain radio play). On his new mixtape, Under The Influence, Domo has made a number of stylistic changes that distance his sound from his Odd Future counterparts, but he has made no movement towards compromising his beliefs for the sake of success. This is particularly noteworthy, given that of the entire Odd Future group, Domo Genesis made the most drastic changes in terms of appearance after the collective’s rise to prominence. Generally, when artists make a move toward achieving higher status and become image conscious, their art suffers. Ditching the sleepy stoner look that made him falsely appear to be one of the laziest and least valuable of the bunch, Domo has transitioned into a chic, Kanye West-like character who is more emblematic of Northeast eccentricities than of a stoner skater from Ladera, Calif. Lyrically, he makes this clear, not embracing his elevated status but instead recognizing its inherent faults

DOMO continues on PAGE 11

Local artist showcases mysterious, eerie pieces By Jessica Lee Daily Texan Staff

Ian Shults has always been interested in art. As a child, his mother helped him make his own toys out of clay. As a teenager, he started creating graffiti characters under bridges after he was kicked out of his high school art class. From then on, he started to become aware of art everywhere he went. Then, fate intervened. Stults stumbled upon a group of artists building a giant genie sculpture. He stopped in to see what was going on, showed the men some pictures of his graffiti art and eventually was given a job at Skagen Art, which later became Blue Genie Art Industries, a company known for its giant sculptures and murals found around Austin. After eight years as lead illustrator and head sculptor at Blue Genie, Shults is now creating his own artwork and showing in galleries nationally. The series he is currently working on, “The Social Contract,” is done almost entirely in black and white with angular brush strokes, giving the pieces an eerily mysterious effect. Shults’ creative process starts with the search for new inspiration. “Normally, I spend hours and hours online and in magazines looking through photos basically trying to find stuff that I dig and then repurposing them in Photoshop and drawing things out,” Shults said. The characteristic style of Shults’ work can be attributed to the inspiration he finds from old magazines he purchases on eBay. The figures in his pieces look as if they were taken directly from the pages of an aged issue of Life

Ian Schultz | The Associated Press

A collection of artist Ian Schultz’s paintings can be seen at the Wally Workman Gallery located on West Sixth Street.

magazine but are given the distinct flair that Shults is known for. “There’s definitely a vintage swagger going on there,” Shults said. Fabian Puente, an assistant to Shults who describes his job as making sure Shults does not put his paintbrush down, praises Shults’ artwork. “His artwork, to me, is attractive and exciting,” Puente said. “The images he uses mixed with his unique style not only move you emotionally but also keep you engaged long enough that you create a story of your own for the painting.” An assortment of Shults’ paintings can be found at the Wally Workman Gallery located on

West Sixth Street. Each painting takes anywhere between a day to three weeks for Shults to complete. “Several times, it happens that I spend a week on something and end up painting over it,” Shults said. Shults has been successful as an artist. He has consistently sold his artwork and is getting ready for an upcoming show in San Francisco. But he notes that it is hard for artists to prosper in Austin. Though his ultimate goal is to one day become a full-time artist, Shults has to work a second job bartending at Billy’s on Burnet to get by. “There are a ton of artists in Austin, a ton of great artists,” Shults said. “But this town is one that hasn’t been renowned for

how much people buy.” But Shults is not in a hurry to leave Austin for a more art-centric town anytime soon. He grew up in Austin and has been here his entire life. After touring the country with a band he was once a part of, Shults realized he was not interested in living anywhere else. “I looked around for other places I could live in, but I’ve only liked other places because they reminded me of Austin,” Shults said. It is Shults’ passion about art that shines through as he speaks, and Puente believes passion is the key to success in the world of art. “The way I see it is if you’re passionate about something and you’re persistent, you can achieve just about anything,” Puente said.


The Daily Texan 09-28-11