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Monday, July 23, 2012

WANDERLUST We took the Megabus from Austin to New Orleans — for $50.

MULTIMEDIA | PAGE 8

Omid Kokabee A UT student sits in prison in Iran and UT remains silent. OPINION p.4


NEWS 2

THE DAILY TEXAN

CONTENTS

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Hadjigeorge Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jody Serrano Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Hannah Jane DeCiutiis Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Klarissa Fitzpatrick Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amyna Dosani, Kristine Reyna, Luis San Miguel Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Cooper Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Sarah “Ksenia” Foster, Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Andrew Torrey, Marisa Vasquez Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah-Grace Sweeny Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nick Cremona Senior Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tony Snyder Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ghayde Ghraowi Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria, Paxton Thomes Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Advertising

(512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman, Adrian Lloyd, Morgan Haenchen, Ted Moreland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paola Reyes, Fredis Benitez, Tyrell Elegonye, Zach Congdon Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Student Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Allison McMordie Student Buys of Texas Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Buys of Texas Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Suzi Zhaw, Esteban Rivera Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron Rodriguez Special Editions Adviser & Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Imperatore

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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7/22/12

Date of Publication

Space Deadline

Monday

Tuesday

4

Camera-ready Art Due 11 a.m.

Friday

Opinion

6

NEWS

A veteran’s voice

Ex marks the spot

How mandatory service could cure our towering deficit.

Meeting John Beckworth, the Texas Exes’ new president.

13

Issue Staff

General Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Maly Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Riley Brands, Sherry Hu, Emily Salada, Jordan Smith Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nitya Duran Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsey Cooper, Holly Hansel, John Massingil, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Josephine Pham, Xiuzhu Shao Illustrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsey Cooper, Holly Hansel Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emily Mathis Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nathan Goldsmith

Texan Ad Deadlines

VOLUME 113 | ISSUE 4

SPORTS

13

l&A

MEDIA DAZE

fast and furious

The Longhorns and the rest of the new-look Big 12 head to Dallas for the 2012 Big 12 Media Days.

On the scene at Little Woodrow’s turtle races. Slow and steady? Not at Woodrow’s.

13

Comics

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE

E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

RECYCLE

Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. Cover photo by Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan Staff

Revelers dance in Fat Catz club on Bourbon Street in New Orleans, Louisiana.


NEWS 3

John Beckworth is the newly elected board president of UT’s alumni association, Texas Exes. One of Beckworth’s goals is to expand the Forty Acres Scholars Program.

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME

a real world job to jump-start a real world career

Marisa Vasquez Daily Texan Staff

Texas Exes president to grow Forty Acres Scholars Program By David Maly UT alumnus John Beckworth has walked down the burnt orange road for most of his life. He received two degrees at the University and even married a fellow UT graduate. This month, Beckworth continues his burnt orange streak, becoming the 87th board president of UT’s alumni association, Texas Exes. Beckworth, a lifetime member of Texas Exes and partner at Houston law firm WattBeckworth, took over as Texas Exes president July 1. He replaced former president Machree Garrett Gibson, the first black female president of the organization. He had previously served one year as president-elect. Beckworth will serve a one-year term and said he hopes to grow and strengthen the organization in several ways to better support the central goal of Texas Exes — to support the University, its students and alumni. “Our goal is to enhance the University’s mission of being a university of the first

class, both for its immediate constituency, students, as well as for the state of Texas and the exes,” he said. Specifically, Beckworth said he plans to increase the openness of communication between Texas Exes and its constituencies, increase the focus of the organization’s volunteer efforts and expand the Forty Acres Scholars Program, a scholarship program run by Texas Exes that works to attract the most talented students to UT and support them. “The Forty Acres Scholars Program has potential,” he said. “Indeed, it is undertaking a really transformational effort on our school to provide a comprehensive scholarship experience to very gifted students and to create such a textured experience that they will positively affect their fellow students and the community beyond them.” Beckworth said UT has greatly affected both his and his family’s life. He attended the UT School of Law with his wife, Laura, and has two sons who are UT alumni. He also has another son who will be starting graduate school at UT.

“Burnt orange is in their blood,” Texas Exes spokesman Tim Taliaferro said. Taliaferro said by becoming president, Beckworth is taking on a very important responsibility, since the president serves as leader of a very large and historic organization of about 99,000 members. He said the board president is “sort of the honorary leader of the organization. He or she sets general priorities and oversees the staff operations.” Armiya Humphrey, business honors junior and Forty Acres Scholar, said she thinks the program is very successful in attracting the most gifted students to UT and would strongly advocate its expansion. “When I was looking at colleges, my top school was Harvard,” she said. “I got in, and that was where I was planning on going before I went down to finals weekend of the scholars program and saw all the resources that UT has, how much they were going to put into this program and, basically, what it could help me do.”

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1 FEBRUARY 23, 2011

an advertising special edition

(You must be a UT Student) Email your resume to: advjobs@texasstudentmedia.com and call 512.471.1865 for more information

of The Daily Texan

INSIDE

> SAVE SPACE and DECORATE using these tips pg. 3-4 > SPICE UP your new pantry with four simple ingredients pg. 9 > YOUR GO-TO GUIDE for today’s Housing Fair pg. 10-11


Opinion 4

@DTeditorial

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

Board of Regents, Supreme Leaders Earlier this month, the UT Board of Regents denied President Bill Powers Jr.’s request to make an official statement about Iran’s imprisonment of Omid Kokabee, a UT physics graduate student. The Regents cited a rule in the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents that prohibits university personnel from making official statements on behalf of the university that relate to political or controversial issues. A bright, promising physics student — who was recognized as such by both Iranian and U.S. scientists — Kokabee was arrested and detained in his native Iran in February 2011. After a brief trial, during which the prosecution presented few facts, an Iranian court sentenced Kokabee to 10 years imprisonment for “communicating with a hostile government” and “illegal earnings.” Kokabee, who completed his undergraduate education in Iran, came to UT in the fall of 2010 to earn a doctoral degree in quantum optics. During

his first winter break, Kokabee went to Tehran to visit his family. Iranian authorities arrested him at the airport before he boarded his return flight to America. Kokabee was taken to Evin Prison, in northwestern Iran, where he was put in solitary confinement. During his May 2012 trial, Iranian statecontrolled television broadcast eerie footage of Kokabee’s fellow prisoners thanking the Iranian government for arresting them and begging for clemency. Kokabee denied all charges against him. Worldwide, members of the science community have denounced Kokabee’s arrest and the punishment levied against him. After Kokabee’s trial, the Rector of the University of Oslo, Ole Petter Otterson, sent an open letter to the Iranian leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, asking that Kokabee receive a fair trial But at UT, the only official response to Kokabee’s unjust circumstances has been silence. In late June, President Pow-

ers attempted to change that. Powers wrote to the Board of Regents, seeking a waiver to the rule that prevents him from speaking out about political or controversial issues in his capacity as university president. In response, Chancellor of the Board Francisco Cigarroa denied Powers’ request, writing that only the board president or UT system chancellor may comment upon “matters of a political or obviously controversial nature, which represent an official position of the UT system or any institution or department thereof.” The underlying logic of the rule: If other university personnel — Powers — take formal, public positions of a political nature, their view may be confused as being the official position of the public institution, according to Anthony de Bruyn, a UT System spokesman. Cigarroa encouraged Powers to reach out to human rights groups on his own. The rule cited by Cigarroa would allow Powers to do this so long as he did not claim to

do so in his capacity as president of UT. With the trial and imprisonment of Omid Kokabee, a physicist’s career and a fellow student’s life has been arbitrarily torn asunder. What makes sense about an official at a university in Oslo being more liberated to speak up against the injustice of Kokabee’s circumstances than the president of Kokabee’s own university? Is the Board of Regents’ rule-following really a nose-thumbing gesture directed at President Powers, who has sparred with the board about separate issues in recent months? If yes, the Board of Regents has played a card that reflects poorly on it and UT. By effectively silencing UT’s institutional voice about Kokabee, the Board of Regents allows the school to join the side of Kokabee’s captors, courtroom judge and those dominant in the Iranian government who favor silencing political discourse and individual rights. Historically, university presi-

dents exercising their First Amendment rights have injected more intelligence into all sorts of debates and by doing so, raised the profile of their schools. Nicholas Butler, who served as president of Columbia University in New York from 1902 to 1945, advised American presidents, campaigned for Prohibition, played a significant role in Republican politics and won a Nobel Peace Prize for his campaign against war as an appropriate, diplomatic action. Before he became U.S. President, Woodrow Wilson, as president of Princeton University between 1902 and 1910, fought what he thought was a culture of elitism and smallness at the school, and sought to enlarge students’ worldview at the same time as he enlarged the university. Closer to home, UT had its own champion of the bully pulpit: former university president Homer Price Rainey, who raised his voice for academic freedom. But the conclusion of Rainey’s tenure left our school

with a problematic legacy. In 1944, Rainey defended an English professor’s right to teach John Dos Passos’ novel “USA.” The Board of Regents responded to his outspokenness by firing Rainey. Subsequently, Rainey received national credit for his courage and, according to the UT Faculty Council’s website, became “a symbol for academic freedom on the campus in the decades that followed.” The episode marked UT as a school governed by an intolerant board. In 2012, times have changed. Nationwide, few university presidents, in between their fundraising obligations, enter political debates with gusto. But nonetheless the Board of Regents should take lessons from its own history and remember that freedom of former university professors to add their voice to the national and international dialogue speaks to everything worth defending in this country and absent in Iran.

A veteran’s voice: skin in the game By Paul Theobald Guest Columnist

There is constant, contentious debate in politics, especially these days. But even our politicians agree that our national debt is a problem that needs fixing. Today, it is somewhere around $15.8 trillion and climbing, according to usdebtclock.org. There are many contributing factors to the debt, but the U.S. military’s endeavors in the past

decade have contributed a significant amount. War is neither free nor inexpensive, and reimbursement is not guaranteed to nations who wage it. Over the past 11 years, the U.S. military has incurred costs from war that this country has yet to pay. Instead of raising taxes or cutting spending to pay for military action, we cut taxes and borrowed more money. These fiscally unsound practices are reflected in our multi-trillion dollar debt.

Yet somehow our military involvements have not been expensive enough. As a nation, we do not have enough skin in the game to understand the true costs we pay in blood and treasure. As a people, we do not fully understand our military endeavors’ cost to our society. Military action has not cost most of us as individuals enough to make us care, and the burden of that action rests on a minority. In our daily lives,

we are sheltered from war and its deadly events. Less than 1 percent of Americans commit themselves to mortal danger abroad in defense of our democratic ideals and national security. Our leaders, most of whom were chosen in elections with low voter turnout, do not appear to recognize or to address the causal relationship be tween defense spending and

SERVICE continues on page 5

Carlo Nasisse | Daily Texan Staff Paul Theobald served in the Navy as an electronics technician from 2004 to 2009.


OPINION 5

Plastic bags vs. women’s lives

By Emily Mathis

Daily Texan Columnist

On any given night in Austin about 4,000 people will be in need of emergency overnight shelter, according to House the Homeless, an Austinbased nonprofit. Only 700 beds will be available at local shelters, such as the Salvation Army and Front Steps. Much of the city’s homeless population will end up on the streets waiting for a bed, often for several weeks. Cities nationwide are unable to accommodate the growing national homeless population. But in Austin, the recent murder of Valerie Godoy, a homeless woman, has many concerned because women turned away from shelters are not safe on the streets. Because of ongoing investigation, the Austin Police Department’s Homicide Unit declined to comment about the circumstances of Godoy’s death. According to APD, Godoy was homeless at the time of her death and killed by “blunt force trauma.” Her death has sparked outspoken concern for the population of single, homeless women in Austin who account for an estimated 7 to 20 percent of the total Austin homeless population, according to Richard Troxell, president of House the Homeless. The National Institute of Justice, a federal agency, reports that homeless

women are two to four times more at-risk of becoming a victim of a violent crime, such as physical or sexual assault. “The city of Austin currently has seven overnight shelters … some of which are shelters for domestic violence or cater to a certain demographic. These shelters are funded by federal, city and state governments,” says Jessie Aric, program manager for the Ending Community Homelessness Coalition, a nonprofit in Austin. Around 10 local churches convert their facilities to overnight shelters when the weather gets rough. Yet Troxell says, “More and more people are being turned away from overnight shelters due to the rising homeless population. There simply aren’t enough beds to handle the growing need. There is an urgent need to protect these women.” House the Homeless has organized a petition for a women’s homeless shelter in Austin. There are currently over 2,800 signatures on this petition. The organization plans to take the petition to the Austin City Council when the number of signatures “[have] reached a tipping point,” according to Troxell, who cannot determine when or what number that will be. “When the City Council sees that there is a legitimate concern, they can respond to the need.” The City Council would then form a task force and begin to determine where

money for the shelter will come from, Troxell said. Immediately after Godoy’s death, House the Homeless went to the City Council to request that a women’s homeless shelter be built. The nonprofit’s representatives have been informed by city council members that there is not enough money in the city budget to fund a women’s shelter. There are other options to finance a shelter that a task force could determine, such as a federal loan or private donations. In the meantime, local homeless advocacy groups have begun to organize to provide short-term, immediate emergency shelter for single, homeless women. In 2012, the Austin City Council confidently voted to spend $2 million to educate the public about the new citywide plastic and paper bag ban. I hope I’m not alone in feeling frustrated by the City Council’s response that “there isn’t enough money” to create a women’s shelter. Our city council members would do well to observe the roughly 3,300 people sleeping on the streets of Austin on any given night the next time they favor spending money on a plastic bag ban over human life and dignity. Students can rally to help Austin’s most vulnerable. Convince the Austin City Council that we value the protection of our homeless population. Visit housethehomeless.org and please, sign the petition. Mathis is an English and musicology major from Denton.

SERVICE continues from page 4

the national debt. Estimates produced by a study at Brown University looked at the postSept. 11 conflicts and placed the cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan close to $4 trillion dollars, nearly a quarter of the national debt. To address these issues, I support the reinstitution of the draft. When the draft is reinstated, we will see a substantial rise in voter turnout at the very next election, scrutiny of defense spending and accountability in government. These changes will occur as a result of the redistribution of military recruitment demographics. Presently, a majority of military members originate from backgrounds with little opportunity or choices. I joined the Navy, serving in the engine room of a nuclear submarine, to earn educa-

tional benefits so that I could afford a higher education. The draft would introduce a new awareness of the impact of our military endeavors into more segments of our society. A draft would bring all aspects of war, including fiscal aspects, into our political discussions. I am optimistic enough that reinstituting the draft will be the beginning of a solution to our military-fiscal problem and will suggest an additional option for alleviating a greater problem of a lack of democratic participation. I’m talking about mandatory public service. If we begin mandating that all young adults, after completion of high school, participate in a period of two years of civil service, we will greater engage citizens who, by virtue of their age, are newly endowed with the responsibility to vote. Positions in entry-level and lowskilled areas of certain governmental and non-governmental service and bureaucratic orga-

nizations could be provided at low wages to aspiring students. After participating in such a mandatory service program, the young adults would in turn receive substantial financial assistance modeled after the incredibly successful GI Bill towards a college degree, technical, vocational or certificate training. It all boils down to this: The more engaged in the democratic process and informed about our government and its policies, the more active we are in voting. It is by voting that the individual is able to decide which leaders are accountable, what policies are sound and what leaders and policies deserve to be thrown out. An active and informed citizenry makes democratically elected leaders either perform efficiently or lose their jobs. Theobald is a government and philosophy major from Austin.


NEWS 6

@thedailytexan

News Editor Nick Hadjigeorge

Texas reacts to tragic theater shooting

Former UTSA student victim in Aurora shooting tragedy By David Maly

By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis

Barry Gutierrez | Associated Press Judy Goos, center left, hugs her daughter's friend, Isaiah Bow, 20, while eyewitnesses Emma Goos, 19, left, and Terrell Wallin, 20, right, gather outside Gateway High School where witnesses were brought for questioning Friday, July 20, in Aurora, Colo.

he admires the efforts by Ghawi’s family to share her memory with the world. “She was one of the people that was always outgoing, the more the merrier,” he said. “She wasn’t ever afraid to stick her hand out and say, ‘Hi, I’m Jessica.’ She loved everybody, and everyone got a fair shake with her, no matter what.” Lavender said Ghawi had moved to the Denver, Colo. area from San Antonio, Texas last July to pursue her passion to become a sportscaster. She transferred from UT-San Antonio to Metropolitian

State University of Denver for its broadcast journalism program and began to pursue professional opportunities in the Denver, Colo. area. She worked as an intern in the sports department of Fox31 Denver and as a National Hockey League blogger for the sports website Busted Coverage. Lavender said Ghawi had an astounding interest in sports. “She just had this passion for it,” he said. “She truly loved sports, and that’s what she wanted to do her whole life, just to be involved in sports in some way — hopefully as a

Jessica Ghawi sportscaster as she had already started doing — but she was exploring every aspect of it. She wanted to

GHAWI continues on page 10

In the wake of the shooting at Friday’s midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colo., the Austin Police Department said it does not plan to tighten security in movie theaters around the area. APD spokesman Chad Martinka said APD does not plan to station additional officers at Austin movie theaters at this time, and that it is ultimately the individual theaters’ decision to increase safety precautions. The shooting resulted in 12 deaths and 59 wounded at the hands of 24-year-old shooter James Holmes. “The majority of the movie theaters around town have private contracts with officers,” Martinka said. “If they’re adding extra people, it’s through their private off-duty contract.” Local Alamo Drafthouse Cinema locations declined to comment on whether the Aurora shooting will lead to increased security on their premises.

R E C YC L E

A former UT-San Antonio student was among the 12 people killed in the Aurora, Colo. shooting Friday. Since her death, Jessica Ghawi’s friends and family have taken to the airwaves to tell the world who she was and to urge the public to shift attention from the killer to the victims of the incident. Ghawi, 24, was one of many attending the midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises” when lone gunman James Holmes entered the packed movie theater and proceeded to indiscriminately shoot theater patrons. Holmes, dressed in riot apparel similar to the villain’s apparel in the movie, killed 12 people and injured 59 as of Sunday. Shortly after her death, Jordan Ghawi, Jessica’s brother, participated in interviews with CNN’s Anderson Cooper, FOX’s Greta Van Susteren and other news outlets to spread the word about victims like Ghawi. Jordan Ghawi also launched an Internet campaign via Twitter, Facebook and various personal blogs to encourage people to stop paying attention to Holmes. “Let us remember the names of the victims and not the name of the coward who committed this act,” Jordan Ghawi tweeted on the day of Ghawi’s death. By Saturday, Ghawi’s death had garnered so much media attention that her family began to direct media campaign efforts onto the other 11 victims killed to ensure that their stories were told as well. Mike Lavender, a friend of both Ghawi and her family, said

No additional security planned for local theaters

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Date: To: From: Subject:

July 23, 2012 All Students at The University of Texas at Austin Dr. Soncia Reagins-Lilly, Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Texas Hazing Statute Summary and The University of Texas at Austin’s Hazing Regulations

The 70th Texas Legislature enacted a law concerning hazing. Under the law, individuals or organizations engaging in hazing could be subject to fines and charged with a criminal offense. According to the law, a person can commit a hazing offense not only by engaging in a hazing activity, but also by soliciting, directing, encouraging, aiding or attempting to aid another in hazing; by intentionally, knowingly or recklessly allowing hazing to occur; or by failing to report, in writing to the Dean of Students or another appropriate official of the institution, first-hand knowledge that a hazing incident is planned or has occurred. The fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity is not a defense to prosecution for hazing under this law. In an effort to encourage reporting of hazing incidents, the law grants immunity from civil or criminal liability to any person who reports a specific hazing event in good faith and without malice to the Dean of Students or other appropriate official of the institution and immunizes that person for participation in any judicial proceeding resulting from liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed as a result of the report. Additionally, a doctor or other medical practitioner who treats a student who may have been subjected to hazing may make a good faith report of the suspected hazing activities to police or other law enforcement officials and is immune from civil or other liability that might otherwise be imposed or incurred as a result of the report. The penalty for failure to report is a fine of up to $1,000, up to 180 days in jail, or both. Penalties for other hazing offenses vary according to the severity of the injury which results and include fines from $500 to $10,000 and/or confinement for up to two years.

HAzing DefineD The law defines hazing as any intentional, knowing or reckless act, occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at an educational institution. Hazing includes but is not limited to: A. any type of physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, striking, branding, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body or similar activity; B. any type of physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, calisthenics, or other activity that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student; C. any activity involving consumption of food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug or other substance which subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or which adversely affects the mental or physical health of the student; D. any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism, that subjects the student to extreme mental stress, shame or humiliation, that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourages the student from entering or remaining registered in an educational institution, or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subsection; E. any activity that induces, causes or requires the student to perform a duty or task which involves a violation of the Penal Code.

UniveRSiTy DiSciplinARy RUleS This law does not affect or in any way limit the right of the university to enforce its own rules against hazing under Chapter 16 of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities. In addition, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System, Series 50101, Number 2, Section 2.8, provide that: A. Hazing with or without the consent of a student is prohibited by the System, and a violation of that prohibition renders both the person inflicting the hazing and the person submitting to the hazing subject to discipline. B. Initiations or activities by organizations may include no feature that is dangerous, harmful or degrading to the student. A violation of this prohibition renders both the organization and participating individuals subject to discipline.

DAngeRoUS oR DegRADing AcTiviTieS Activities which under certain conditions constitute acts which are dangerous, harmful or degrading, in violation of Chapter 16 and subsections 6-303(b)(3) and 11-404(a)(8) of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities include but are not limited to:

c Calisthenics, such as sit-ups, push-ups or any other form of physical exercise; c Total or partial nudity at any time; c The eating or ingestion of any unwanted substance; c The wearing or carrying of any embarrassing, degrading or physically burdensome article; c Paddle swats, including the trading of swats;

c Pushing, shoving, tackling or any other physical contact; c Throwing any substance on a person; c Consumption of alcoholic beverages accompanied by either threats or peer pressure; c Lineups for the purpose of interrogating, demeaning or intimidating; c Transportation and abandonment (road trips, kidnaps, walks, rides, drops); c Confining individuals in an area that is uncomfortable or dangerous (hot box effect, high temperature, too small); c Any form of individual interrogation; c Any type of servitude that is of personal benefit to the individual members; c Wearing of embarrassing or uncomfortable clothing; c Assigning pranks such as stealing, painting objects, harassing other organizations; c Intentionally messing up the house or a room for clean up; c Demeaning names; c Yelling or screaming; and c Requiring boxing matches or fights for entertainment.

DiSciplineD oRgAnizATionS, inclUDing THoSe ReSolveD viA MUTUAl AgReeMenTS In accordance with requirements of the Texas Education Code Section 51.936(c), the following organizations have been disciplined for hazing and/or convicted for hazing, on or off campus, during the preceding three years:

c Absolute Texxas* Conditional registration is one and a half (1.5) years (Completed November 19, 2009). c Alpha epsilon pi Penalty issued August 17, 2011 (Probation through August 17, 2013). c alpha Kappa Delta phi* Conditional registration is three (3) years (June 10, 2013). c Alpha Rho chi-Architecture* Conditional registration is three (3) years (May 29, 2015). c Alpha Tau omega* Found to be in violation; Penalty pending. c Beta chi Theta* Conditional registration is one (1) year (Completed August 24, 2010). c Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, inc. Penalty issued November 10, 2009 (Suspended through December 31, 2009; Probation through October 30, 2012). c Delta Tau Delta* Conditional registration is two (2) years (September 9, 2012). c Kappa phi gamma Sorority, inc.* Conditional registration is two (2) years (April 30, 2014). c lambda phi epsilon Penalty issued December 20, 2005 (Cancelled through December 19, 2011; Suspended through December 19, 2012; Probation through December 19, 2013). c omega phi gamma* Conditional registration is three (3) years (July 13, 2014). c phi chi Theta-Business* Conditional registration is two (2) years (July 7, 2014). c phi Delta chi-pharmacy* Conditional registration is one (1) year (Completed March 5, 2010). c phi Delta Theta* Found to be in violation; Penalty pending. c phi gamma Delta* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed July 15, 2010). c phi Kappa psi Penalty issued February 7, 2006 (Cancelled through February 6, 2007; Suspended through March 27, 2008; Probation through March 24, 2010). c pi Kappa phi* Conditional registration is two (2) years (February 27, 2014). c Sigma Alpha epsilon* Conditional registration is five (5) years (April 7, 2013). c Sigma Alpha Mu* Conditional registration is two (2) years (April 20, 2014). c Sigma chi* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed May 16, 2010). c Sigma gamma Rho Sorority, inc.* Conditional registration is one (1) year (Completed August 16, 2010). c Sigma phi epsilon* Conditional registration is two (2) years (September 1, 2012). c Silver Spurs* Conditional registration is two (2) years (July 13, 2013). c Texas cheer and pom* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed July 23, 2011). c Texas iron Spikes* Conditional registration is three (3) years (March 7, 2014). c Texas omicron (formerly known as Kappa Alpha)* Conditional registration is three (3) years (April 11, 2015). c Texas Wranglers* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed October 6, 2010). c zeta Beta Tau* Conditional registration is two (2) years (August 19, 2012). *Resolved via Mutual Agreement To report an act of hazing to the Office of the Dean of Students, visit deanofstudents.utexas.edu/complaint. php. For further information or clarification of probationary member activities, please contact Student Activities in the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Services Building (SSB) 4.400, 512-471-3065.


MULTIMEDIA 8

THE PLACES YOU’LL GO By Andrew Torrey

I

ABOVE: Mooah Desalleia plays his washboard on Bourbon Street in New Orleans.

saw my first Megabus at the intersection of Dean Keeton Street and Guadalupe Street and the sight of it made me forget where I was. Its design bears the look of a double-decker, life-size clown balloon sculpture forged from steel. Not a sharp line on the damn thing. It’s all curves and bubbles stuck together in an effort to appear modern but falling short into something comical. In appearance, an average bus is to Megabus as sneakers are to clown shoes. I was awestruck by the sight

of this blue and yellow, childish monstrosity muscling its way through an intersection meant for sensibly-sized vehicles. Megabus is a conglomerate of coach systems whose American routes are all owned by Coach USA. It came to America in 2006 after having marked success in the U.K., where it had been running since 2003. Megabus has transformed from a hub-andspoke transportation system based around Northeastern cities to a full network throughout the Southeast

and parts of the Midwest, and it seems poised to spread farther. The system is known for its cheap ticket prices: It works on a system that promotes planning trips far in advance, with tickets getting more expensive as the travel dates get closer. I purchased my tickets a week and a half in advance and still only had to pay about $50 for a round trip, much cheaper than a standard fare of $118 for one-way travel on a Greyhound bus. Post-war prosperity, coupled with the building of the Dwight

D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, gave rise to the use of personallyowned automobiles as a primary mode of transportation throughout the U.S. New individualism in interstate travel birthed the Kerouac-ian ethos of the “Great American Roadtrip,” and as a consequence, bus travel decreased and forced Greyhound to start investing in other businesses to stay afloat. The main users of bus systems in the post-war period were largely low-income minorities and


LEFT: People wait to board the Megabus in Houston. BOTTOM: Tiwana Mathew and Legacy Casmire,3, were taking a Coach USA bus to visit Casmire’s father in Beaumont, Texas.

European immigrants, stigmatizing the use of buses as something for the poor and foreigners. Bus travel just didn’t fit into the myth of road trips in America, something used out of necessity rather than adventure. My first bus from Austin to Houston was a standard Coach USA bus, as the company uses its ownership of various coach systems to connect the Megabus network. My second Megabus was from Houston to New

Orleans, and the ride was a departure from previous bus trips I had taken. Megabus touts free Wi-Fi on their buses, but my experience was the connection was painfully slow and would cut out with such frequency that it really wasn’t worth using. They do have electrical outlets for every seat, a feature that makes traveling with electronic devices a lot less stressful by removing the future worry of finding a

place to charge them. The Megabus uses open parking lots instead of formal bus stations, so the locations are generally more convenient. The bus in Houston dropped me directly downtown, and the bus to New Orleans dropped me less than a mile from the French Quarter. I spent eight hours shooting Bourbon Street in New Orleans, a whirlwind of drunken revelry at a different caliber than most other

cities — these people made average Sixth Streeters look like blue-haired old ladies. Overall, Megabus is a cheap way to move around the eastern and central states. With recent economic downturn and the mainstreaming of more ecologically-friendly modes of transportation through the green movement, Megabus is poised to end the lingering stereotype of the ‘Great American Roadtrip.’

LEFT: Women dance on stage in Fat Catz club on Bourbon Street in New Orleans. RIGHT: Johnathan Boatright skates as a young man bikes by in downtown Houston.


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UT buildings fight against termites’ tenacity By Bobby Blanchard UT assistant landscaping manager Janet McCreless said she learned there are two types of buildings in Texas: those with termites and those that will get termites. The University of Texas is a sprawling campus, set in the middle of Texas with more than 150 buildings and structures. Mike Matthews, spokesperson for Austin pest control company Bug Master, said termites thrive in Texas’ wet and warm environment, which typically translates to temperatures in the 70s. Termites infect buildings by coming up through the soil, where they feed upon dead plant material like wood or paper. McCreless said multiple departments on campus deal with termites, so the cost to treat and fix damages varies greatly and is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Because of that, McCreless said it would be difficult to determine just how much termite infestations cost UT annually in terms of treatment and repairs. Treatment and repairs are handled separately and by different companies. She said whatever the number is, it would be large. Bug Master inspects the

Tower’s bait stations, which are sites used to attract and detect termites. Bug Master also provides treatment options, should the company find termites, and UT pays $2,400 a year for Bug Master’s services. While termites can affect buildings year-round if the weather is right, McCreless said the University is usually swarmed in the spring. She said UT normally has two to three swarms a year. “If you have an infestation, and I’m talking as a homeowner, then that is probably one of the most expensive and worst issues you can deal with,” McCreless said. “It’s far worse than almost any other pest control problem.” Kiersten Legge, UT pest control technician, said facilities have to inspect buildings regularly to check for termites. “A lot of time when they swarm you just know where they’re at,” Legge said. “You can see them. They look like a flying ant.” McCreless said pest control methods have changed in recent years, and treatment previously meant spraying chemicals that would kill everything. Environmental concerns have stopped use of these types of chemicals, and policies now require much tamer substances.

“We have to learn more and more about their biology, where back in the old days we used broad spectrum chemicals that killed everything and kept them away for a longer period,” McCreless said. “We can’t use those chemicals anymore, so you really have to be a scientist to know how to treat, how to detect and how to stop them.” McCreless said the University normally only deals with subterranean termites, which live in soil and create mud tubes to climb to the surface. There have been reports of a new species of termite appearing in Austin called the Formosan termite, which normally makes its habitat further south in areas like Houston. “They can take down entire trees in very short periods, while our standard subterranean termites take a much longer time to decay,” McCreless said. In addition, Formosan termites can move both through the air and through the soil, making them more troublesome since they can reach buildings easier. Legge said there have not been any signs of the Formosan termites appearing on campus. But termites do not always threaten the buildings

It’s far worse than almost any other pest control problem.

— Janet McCreless UT assistant landscaping manager

themselves. Legge said there was an instance recently when they found termites eating away at paper documents. Sometimes termites go after trees, but McCreless said facilities do not always treat those cases. “It really just depends. There are trees in different stages of life. If it is a majestic, beautiful tree, we would probably treat,” McCreless said. “If it’s an old, decrepit tree, we probably wouldn’t.” After all, McCreless said, termites are a natural part of the environment and are sometimes a beneficial pest. “They are beneficial in the natural ecology because they decay, they aid in the decomposition of fallen trees,” McCreless said. “But in the urban environment, they are not so good because they eat the structures that we build to live in.”

GHAWI

continues from page 6

be an announcer at a game, she wanted to be a broadcaster, she wanted to play.” Ghawi narrowly escaped another shooting last month in Toronto. Lavender said the incident seriously affected her and caused her to live every day to its fullest, one of the many lessons he hopes people will take from the memories of Ghawi’s life.


ONLINE Daily updates from the Olympic Games. @Texansports

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Sports 11

Sports Editor Nick Cremona

Big 12 Media Days gives teams chance

PRESS

to discuss upcoming football season

Rising juniors to represent Longhorns in Dallas Okafor, Vaccaro miss event due to arrests By Nick Cremona

In the Big 12 Conference there’s a fine line between controversy and a calculated chess move when it comes to selecting players to represent one’s school in front of the media. Bringing a quarterback may seem like a no-brainer for some schools, but for others it’s a tactical decision based more on preserving confidence in certain players while still withholding certain aspects of the offseason from the media. In the case of Big 12 Media Days, only three teams (Texas, Oklahoma State and Iowa State) have decided against bringing a quarterback to field questions and mingle among the hordes of media affiliates before the fall season starts. Oklahoma State head coach Mike Gundy has a policy against bringing first-year players to events such as the Media Days, which explains why newly-appointed freshman quarterback Wes Lunt will have to watch this year’s festivities from home. Paul Rhoads, head coach at Iowa State, still isn’t certain if former junior college transfer Steele Jantz will be his starting quarterback come fall, so he chose instead to bring two linebackers (Jake Knott and

A.J. Klein) and a running back (James White). What may seem an easy way out of questions pertaining to who will run a given team’s offense can also be viewed as a smart move to shift the focus away from a particular player and instead have the team become the main focal point. Sure, questions will be asked about the quarterbacks not in attendance, but just like politicians on the campaign trail, coaches will defer and work around any uncomfortable or potentially sticky scenarios. The Longhorns, or Mack Brown if you’re into details, decided to leave last year’s starting quarterback David Ash for a second straight year but will bring a solid group of Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff File Photo

players to Dallas. Rising juniors Carrington Byndom and Jordan Hicks, along with redshirt junior Mason Walters, will instead accompany Brown. A safe group of guys, yes, but that’s something we’ve come to expect from Brown at this stage in his coaching

Jordan Hicks, Linebacker

career. No one in this group is going to speak offthe-cuff, and that’s exactly what Brown wants. Keep it simple, stupid. At the same time, these three Longhorns will do well to preserve the face of the Texas football program. Walters is coming off of a strong sophomore season in which he

DEFENSE

continues on page 12

By Sarah Beth Purdy The only question surrounding the Texas defense this summer is just how good they can be as an overall unit. A lot of that expectation comes from a star-studded returning cast that includes seniors safety Kenny Vaccaro and defensive end Alex Okafor. Okafor and Vaccaro are expected to lead a high-powered defense this season. In 2011, Texas finished 11th in total defense and is expected to finish higher this year. The public will get to hear exactly what to expect out of this year’s defense from head coach Mack Brown and defensive coordinator Manny Diaz at the Big 12 Media Days this week in Dallas. However, the public will not get to hear from defensive leaders Okafor and Vaccaro. Due to an off-season incident, the seniors are banned from addressing the media until September and will not make it to Dallas this week. In May, Okafor and Vaccaro, along with senior tight end Barrett Matthews and former Longhorn Eryon Barnett, were arrested in downtown Austin for failing to obey a

lawful order. The four athletes refused to leave a downtown pizza establishment after being asked by several individuals, including police. The incident led to their arrest and charges of class C misdemeanors. “They are paying hard for really being disrespectful to authority figures,” Brown said. “It’s our job to make sure that we all keep the respect of the authority figures that we have. Our police department has a very, very difficult job. If they ask you to leave, you should leave, and you should leave quickly.” All charges in the case against the players were dismissed, and the Longhorns will not face any serious legal ramifications because of the incident, but other penalties were handed down by the Texas coaching staff. Although they will not miss much, if any, game time when the season starts, the three players will not represent the team in public until school starts for the 2012 season. “These guys will be able to address it when we start back in the fall but not until

ARRESTS continues on page 12


SPORTS 12

TCU, WVU add depth to Big 12 By Nitya Duran The Big 12 announced the addition of Texas Christian and West Virginia to the conference on July 1. Two spots became available after the departure of Missouri and Texas A&M from the conference last year and were filled after much speculation. The addition of these schools strengthens the overall depth of the conference and is a good indication of what to expect from the Big 12 this year and in years to come. The TCU Horned Frogs are a force to be reckoned with, posting an impressive 11-2 record last year (7-0 in conference) as part of the Mountain West Conference. They have been the reigning champions of the Mountain West in the

DEFENSE

anchored an offensive line that opened some massive holes for Malcolm Brown and Joe Bergeron, and he will look to do more of the same this season. Walters will be able to provide insight on the state of the offensive line and, of course, the man he’s in charge of protecting — sophomore quarterback Ash. Byndom and Hicks essentially are serving as replacements to the dynamic duo of Kenny Vaccaro and Big 12 pre-season Defensive Player of the Year Alex Okafor, both of whom had a run-in with police earlier this summer and will not be representing Texas at any media functions this off-season. It’s no big deal for Byndom and Hicks, who have already

team’s last three seasons and finished in the Top 25 in both Associated Press and USA Today polls. This shows they are consistently fierce competitors in both the regular season and the offseason. The Horned Frogs’ success can be credited, at least in part, to head coach of 11 seasons Gary Patterson. Under his leadership, TCU has won at least 10 games per season for eight seasons, only failing to miss a bowl game once in 2004. In the East Coast, the Big 12 welcomes the West Virginia Mountaineers, who also have an esteemed football program. Last year, as members of the Big East, 23rdranked WVU posted a 10-3 record (5-2 in conference) under head coach Dana Holgorsen en route to winning

continues from page 11 matured within the Longhorns’ defense. Consider this another step in their athletic careers that they should handle with ease. There is already a considerable amount of buzz surrounding the Longhorn defense as the start of the season nears. Defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat, along with Okafor and Vaccaro, were named to the preseason All-Big 12 Team recently, and Texas was picked to finish in the top five in the Big 12 by the media. While Texas may not have a quarterback on hand, there will be plenty of other topics of conversation to fill time at the Media Days. Expect the defense of the Longhorns to get a lot of attention, and for good reason.

ARRESTS

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff Senior safety Kenny Vaccaro’s name has found its way on numerous awards watch lists, including the Thorpe awards.

the Orange Bowl against No. 14 Clemson, a game where WVU set the record for most points scored in a bowl game. They have had four consecutive nine-win seasons and have been the Big East cochampions for the past two years. The Mountaineers have not been in many bowl games in recent years, but they have still posted solid records every year and continue to be a team to look out for. It may only be Holgorsen’s second season with WVU and his

first head coach position, but he has been coaching football since the mid-1990s and has made a name for himself as an offensive strategist. He improved the offenses of Texas Tech, Houston and Oklahoma State before landing at WVU and could lead the Mountaineers to another successful season. With an early dark horse Heisman Trophy candidate in senior quarterback Geno Smith, the Mountaineers have their eyes on another conference title as well.

that point,” Brown said. “We want them to earn that right from their teammates to represent our team publicly.” Vaccaro, four-year defensive back, was chosen to the All-Big 12 first team in 2011 and was honorable mention for Defensive Player of the Year. In 2011, Vaccaro started at safety in 13 games and posted two sacks along with two interceptions. For the 2012 season, Vaccaro has been named to the Thorpe watch list for the nation’s best defensive back, the Bednarik watch list for the defensive player of the year and the Nagurski watch list for most outstanding defensive player. Vaccaro was also named to the preseason All-Big 12 team for 2012. In 2012, Okafor started in all 13 games, finishing with seven sacks and one fumble recovery. He was also named to the 2011 All-Big 12 first team and was a 2011 AFCA FBS Coaches’ All-American.

continues from page 11

In addition to also being named to the Bednarik and Nagurski watch lists, Okafor was named to the 2012 Lombardi Award watch list for the lineman or linebacker of the year and the Walter Camp Player of the Year watch list. Okafor is a pre-season AllBig 12 team member and preseason Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year. “These are three leaders on our football team,” Brown said of the trio and their roles on the field. Okafor and Vaccaro may not be on hand in Dallas, but the success of the Longhorns’ defense this season is strongly tied to their ability to disrupt opponents’ offensive game plans and lead the Texas defense. The hope is that barring the pair, along with Matthews, from speaking with the media until the fall will allow them to focus on off-season preparation and be fully focused once the season begins.


@DTlifeandarts

By Laura Wright When I asked longtime bar manager Jonathan Richards, the mastermind behind the turtle races at Little Woodrow’s bar who has organized “everything from banana pudding wrestling to mechanical bull riding,” where turtle racing ranks on his list of booze-fueled spectator sports, he nodded enthusiastically and said it’s got to be in his top three. Sure, he admitted, it’s not number one — there was, after all, that wet T-shirt mechanical bull contest he used to organize at a Beaumont honkytonk. But honky-tonks aside, the spectators at Little Woodrow’s love the reptilian races. Rhinestone Sally, an “80-yearsyoung” fan, has been coming regularly since the races started three weeks ago and drives 35 miles each Friday to attend the event. “It’s just so unique,” she said cheerfully, her bedazzled cowboy hat glittering beneath the bar’s lights. Last week, as a token of appreciation, she even gave the team at Woodrow’s an enameled turtle figurine on a bed of fake grass. Little Woodrow’s on Sixth Street holds turtle races every Friday night at dusk (they attempt to respect turtles’ nocturnal preferences and only race them when the sun sets). If you are so inclined, you can bring your own turtle and enter it free of charge, but know that smaller, red turtles are preferred to 40-pound snapping ones. So how, you ask, might turtle racing work? Each Friday night, the Little Woodrow’s team assembles a miniature ring in the

LIFE&ARTS 13

L&A Editor Aleksander Chan

OFF TO THE RACES

Turtle handler Otis Welch (foreground) presents a turtle to the crowd Friday night at Little Woodrow’s on Sixth street. When they are not racing, the turtles live in an aquarium at the Little Woodrow’s offices.

Nate Goldsmith Daily Texan Staff

center of the bar. Inside of this ring lies an AstroTurf mat painted with a white circle. The six noble red turtles that compete in the games must cross this white ring twice to win eternal glory. At no additional cost, onlookers can place “bets” on the turtle they deem destined for greatness. These bets are dropped in buckets that bear the turtle’s number. If your turtle claws its way over the shells of its competitors, a ticket will be drawn from the bucket, automatically entering you in a raffle for a nifty

turtle-racing T-shirt. But before the turtles are released from their holding bucket, they are presented to the crowd by their handlers, allowing the bar’s enthusiastic patrons to cheer or jeer. The handlers, who will have taken a 30-minute class on turtle care, delicately take the turtles from their tanks and hold them out proudly to the audience, the way one holds a panini and aggressively insists their friend take a bite of. The turtles respond to this attention in one of three ways: squirming

energetically, hiding inside their shells or peeing on themselves and their handler. The turtles, now energized by the support of their fans or the hatred of their detractors, are placed in a bottomless plastic bucket. A female volunteer is selected from the crowd to seductively lift the modified trash can and let loose the turtle fury. And ... they’re off, scrambling across the AstroTurf as if to disprove every ill-informed iteration of the “turtles are slow” stereotype they’ve had to put up

with in their tiny turtle lives. When I attended, every turtle ran but No. 4, whose immobile stance in the center of the ring suggested that he was either very ill or, more likely (Little Woodrow’s pampers its turtles and makes sure they get regular veterinary attention) disheartened by the cruel comments of that drunk guy who totally bet on No. 3 instead. In 15 minutes, the race was over after three rounds. The winner that night? I don’t remember, but it was a turtle.

Want to see how fast a turtle can run?

bit.ly/NqNcz0


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SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


07-23-12