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THE DAILY TEXAN 1

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Monday, July 09, 2012

Learning to think:

Why Texas Republicans fear students who think for themselves. OPINION p.4

SUMMER OUR GUIDE TO BEATING THE RECORD-BREAKING HEAT.

LIFE&ARTS | PAGE 16


INSIDE 2

THE DAILY TEXAN

CONTENTS

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

VOLUME 113 | ISSUE 6

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Hadjigeorge Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jody Serrano Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Hannah Jane DeCiutiis Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Klarissa Fitzpatrick Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amyna Dosani, Kristine Reyna, Luis San Miguel Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Benavides Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Sarah “Ksenia” Foster, Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Andrew Torrey, Marisa Vasquez Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah-Grace Sweeny Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nick Cremona Senior Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tony Snyder Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ghayde Ghraowi Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria, Paxton Thomes Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Emily Salada Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Harry Jung IV, Antonio Morales, Trey Scott Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Josephine Pham, Aron Fernandez, John Massingil, Xinzhu Shao, Holly Hansel Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Cooper Life&Arts Writer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nicole Raney Photographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zachary Strain

Advertising

(512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman, Adrian Lloyd, Morgan Haenchen, Ted Moreland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paola Reyes, Fredis Benitez, Tyrell Elegonye, Zach Congdon Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Student Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Allison McMordie Student Buys of Texas Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Buys of Texas Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Suzi Zhaw, Esteban Rivera Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron Rodriguez Special Editions Adviser & Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Imperatore

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published twice weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks and most Federal Holidays. and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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Texan Ad Deadlines

7/9/12

Date of Publication

Space Deadline

Monday

Tuesday

Camera-ready Art Due 11 a.m.

Friday

3

13 SPORTS

OPINION

Critical Thinking

The Texas Republicans 2012 educational philosophy.

6

NEWS

THE ELECTION WILL BE TWEETED Politicians, social media and partisan messages.

10 MULTIMEDIA In the ring

Smythe Looks Ahead

Class of 2013 tight end Durham Smythe anxious to reunite with David Ash.

16 LIFE&ARTS brutes and ‘savages’

Oliver Stone’s latest, starring Taylor Kitsch and Blake Lively, reviewed.

20 COMICS

Photos from Austin’s Lord’s Gym. Cover Photo by Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan Staff Constantine Caramanis lounges on the side of Big Stacy Pool as he talks to Wade Miller and Andrea Schutz. Public pools and swimming holes offer a break from the summer heat in Austin.

A Student’s Right To Privacy The information below is considered directory information. Under federal law, directory information can be made available to the public. You may restrict access to this information by visiting http://registrar.utexas.edu/restrictmyinfo. Please be aware that if you would like to restrict information from appearing in the printed directory, you must make your changes at this web page by the twelfth class day of the fall semester. If you request that ALL your directory information be restricted NO information about you will be given to anyone, including your family members, except as required by law. Any restriction you make will remain in effect until you revoke it. ������� ���������������������� addresses ��������������� ����������������� ���public user name (UT EID) ����������������� ���������������������� ��������������������

����������������� �������������������������� ������������������������������

��� �������������������������������� an athletic team �� ����������������������� information ������������������������������ �� ������������������������ received (including selection educational institution attended criteria) �� �����������������������employ�� ���������������������������� ment when employed by the recognized activities and University in a position that sports requires student status

DIRECTORY INFORMATION SHOULD BE KEPT CURRENT. Official correspondence is sent to the postal or e-mail address last given to the registrar; if the student has failed to correct this address, he or she will not be relieved of responsibility on the grounds that the correspondence was not delivered. For details about educational records and official communications with the University see General Information, 2011–2012.


NEWS 3

College report card praises, criticizes Texas’ performance By Bobby Blanchard Texas received an average score in student performance and a failing grade in its openness to accept higher education providers in a recent report by the Institute for a Competitive Workforce, a nonprofit affiliate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Called Leaders & Laggards, the June study presents a state-by-state report card that assigns letter grades in six categories to all 50 states based on their four-year and twoyear higher education institutions. The report gave Texas A’s in two categories: one for

efficiency and cost effectiveness and another for transparency and accountability at four-year institutions. It also analyzed student access and success, ability to meet labor market demand, policy environment and innovation, where the state scored grades ranging from F to A. The organization did not assign any states an overall grade. Jaimie Matthews, programs and research manager at the institute, said she hoped the study would draw states’ attention to areas in which they could improve. “I think it’s really important for people to understand why we didn’t assign one

grade,” Matthews said. “It’s because a lot of states have things they can certainly improve upon. We didn’t want that to be masked by good performance in other areas.” Texas received one failing grade in the category of openness to providers, which is a state’s willingness to allow new organizations to move in and open new higher education institutions. Matthews said when handing out grades in this category, Leaders & Laggards looked at what regulations were in place, financial burden and the burden of the approval process on organizations who were attempting to become educational provid-

Six-Year Graduation Rates Cost per completion University of Texas

$65,390

National

$68,140

State

$48,849

Thousands Graduated Illustration by Betsy Cooper

ers in the state. “The interesting thing with new providers is we understand how new regulations exist, but some of them are prohibitory in the sense that they don’t allow for these services to come in and educate good people,” Matthews said. “So those states might want to assess what types of barriers they have in place.” In the efficiency and cost-

effectiveness at four-year institutions category, the study reported Texas had a $48,849 cost completion while the national average was $68,140. UT-Austin’s average cost per degree in 2008-2009 is listed at $65,390. Texas received an ‘A’ in its transparency and accountability. In this category, Matthews said the study focused on if and how states

publish information about higher education, which includes things like cost and graduation rates. “For the public accountability report, some states put out 500-page documents where it is almost impossible to find what you’re looking for,” Matthews said. “So we were really interested to see

REPORT continues on PagE 7

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4 OPINION

@DTeditorial

OPINION

facebook.com/dailytexan

4

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

512-471-5084

editor@dailytexanonline.com

Re-thinking the GOP platform “We oppose the teaching of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (values clarification), critical thinking skills and similar programs that are simply a relabeling of Outcome-Based Education (OBE) (mastery learning) which focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority.” — 2012 Texas Republican Party platform If only they knew. At the University of Texas at Austin, the average student faces so many events beyond HOTS and OBE that challenge his or her “fixed beliefs” and undermine “parental authority.” A partial list of such moments: seeing toenail clippings and leftover macaroni in the shower drain in a Jester bathroom; being assigned a nudist roommate; discovering that ultimately everything (rice, eggs, wet socks) is microwavable; failing to eat or sleep for 48 hours, then sleeping for 72 hours and waking only to eat; witnessing a water pitcher fly from a West Campus balcony and trigger no reaction from passersby; experiencing the depth of deprivation necessary to pass an organic chemistry test; realizing that the Perry-Castañeda Library building’s floor plan mimics the shape of the state of Texas; and drinking nine beers. It’s tough to take seriously the state Republicans’ educational philosophy, which was published along with their other positions in the 2012 platform, and voted on during the recent party convention in

Ft. Worth, Texas June 7-9. But, Republicans hold the majority in the Texas Legislature and occupy most of the elected offices in Texas. A majority of Texans support their views; hence, they affect us all. The drafters of the Republicans’ platform devoted twoand-a-half pages to positions under the heading “Educating Our Children.” In addition to the proposed banning of HOTS and OBE, the platform calls for ditching multicultural education that “emphasized differences”; teaching and giving “equal treatment to all sides of scientific theories ... including intelligent design”; repealing the ‘Top 10% Rule’ so Texans rather than out-ofstate or foreign students get first dibs (still on a merit basis) on all slots at state universities; abstinence-based education; and putting all public school expenditures online. Political bloggers had a field day attacking the platform, focusing negatively on its opposition to “critical thinking.” In response, a Republican Party spokesman said the inclusion of “critical thinking” was an error and oversight. But the term “Higher Order Thinking Skills” describes a set of learning objectives meant to promote “critical thinking,” as first articulated by educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom’s 1956 book “Taxonomy of Educational Objectives.” The correction therefore leaves Republican leaders’ intent intact: they don’t want students to go to schools where they might develop the skills they need to question the ideas their parents put into their heads.

But the party goes astray by making the insulting and incorrect assumption that Texas students are unable to think for themselves. By advocating for a public education system that prohibits your exposure to ideas different than the ones you heard at your family’s dinner table, the Republican Party is suggesting that students would most certainly adopt and adhere to any idea taught in class. Besides being insulting, the Party’s proposal to bar the teaching of critical thinking, HOTS — or whatever you want to call listening and reading, debating, and then agreeing or refuting ideas — presents long-term dangers. Places and times change rapidly. Texas Gov. Rick Perry was once a Democrat. So were most Texans. The Texas Capitol used to have a gate on its northernmost end to keep the cattle out. The roads around UT’s Tower were once dirt. UT and schools in Texas strive to educate the future leaders of the state. The present worries and concerns of our state policymakers will serve as fodder for a seventhgrade Texas history class in less than a decade. The notion that students should be protected from views different from those of their parents is like putting an entire generation of third graders on a school bus and making sure not a single one ever learns to drive. Thirty years pass, the drivers die and you have a state filled with adults unable to move the bus forward and lead us through the challenges of that future day.

Does freedom ring? By Emily Mathis

Daily Texan Columnist “Memories of a Promise: Short Stories by Middle Eastern Women” intended to explore Middle Eastern women’s lives. The book was going to be dedicated to the late Dr. Elizabeth “BJ” Warnock Fernea, who was a professor of literature and Middle Eastern studies at UT. It promised to dispel abounding stereotypes by examining women’s experiences in the region. Two Israeli writers were to be featured in the book, along with twenty-nine Arab writers. Acting in accordance with the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel, which is a cultural and academic boycott in favor of a free Palestine, thirteen of the twenty-nine

writers withdrew their submissions after learning two Israeli writers’ work would be included in the book. The Center for Middle Eastern Studies consequently cancelled the publication of the book rather than publishing an incomplete volume. There are no plans to resurrect the project or honor Dr. Fernea. When the conflict of interest first became known there were initial propositions for compromise. Many in favor of the Israeli writers’ inclusion suggested replacing the withdrawn submissions with new submissions from other writers. The Center chose instead to cancel the publication of the book. By refusing to compromise with either the protesters or the Israeli writers, the University was clear in its

position as a partisan-free institution intent on preserving academic integrity and free speech. Academic boycotts have a controversial history. In 1980, the United Nations passed a resolution urging cultural and academic centers to break ties with South Africa in protest of apartheid. Opposition to that UN boycott was fierce, and many noted that a boycott against the academic institutions of South Africa was counterproductive because South African universities were the origin of much anti-apartheid dialogue. For the most part, universities have historically stood as havens for uncensored political dialogue. Fast forward to the present day. The Center for Mid-

continues on PAGE 5


OPINION 5

OPINION 5

Defense against the ‘Dark Arts’

BOOK continues from PAGE 4 dle Eastern Studies refused to condone the academic boycott against “Memory of a Promise.” By doing so, the university would have compromised its role as a citadel of free speech. “Academic boycotts are not acceptable,” says Dr. Kamran Aghaie, director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. “When we start playing these political games, we give up academic integrity … We get this [protest] all the time, angry, irate voices, and we just say ‘no.’ These are the academic standards.” By refusing to remove the Israeli writers from the book or attempting to compromise with the Arab writers, the Center effectively allowed the book to fold. In doing so, the Center for Middle Eastern studies sent a message to the students at UT that our university remains a place for uncensored speech and, according to the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, does not participate in partisan politics. It is clear to me that the

university strives to maintain this standard through discussion-oriented classes, an active student government and student publications. We are free in these and other mediums to express ourselves and our opinions. Students have a responsibility to embrace this message from the University and to exercise our right to free speech concerning the Palestinian struggle and other world affairs while we remain students here. The issue at hand is not Palestinian freedom but the necessity for uncensored dialogue at our university. Whether you believe in a free Palestine or not, uncensored dialogue in the university setting is essential for successful international relations. The ideas that we form in our university years will stay with us for life, and we are the ones who will be working to solve and understand turmoil in the Middle East in the coming years. If “what starts here changes the world,” then let’s start by

engaging in free dialogue. The failure of the book raises the question: Where is the debate on Middle Eastern affairs that should be taking place here at UT? The Middle East is a region where much of the world’s conflict takes place. Why wouldn’t we seek to understand these conflicts? Dr. Aghaie is pessimistic that the failure to publish “Memory of a Promise” will enhance student debate activity. “Groups need to find creative ways for dialogue … We want to be talking to each other,” he said. We forget that it is a right rather than a privilege to express our opinion in this country. But even in this country, our careers can determine the freedom with which we will express our opinion. For now, we are members of an institution that has embraced its role as a place of free dialogue. This is the time to express yourself. Now is when your voices will be heard. Mathis is an English and musicology major from Denton.

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By Kayla Oliver

Daily Texan Columnist In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Dolores Umbridge, the meddling powermonger turned High Inquisitor, ousts beloved Headmaster Albus Dumbledore on dubious grounds in order to advance her own agenda. A similar episode took place at Michigan’s Hillsdale College in 1999, when vice president Ronald Trowbridge led the effort to fire the university’s president. According to a 1999 National Review article, Trowbridge, similar to the likenamed Umbridge, had only circumstantial evidence, but, he said: “Circumstantial evidence is the most damaging evidence there is, because it’s the most difficult to arrange.” Before he retired from fulltime work, Ronald Trowbridge worked as chief of staff to U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren Burger, a university professor, a vice president of Hillsdale College, and a director for both the Fulbright Program and the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. He is now a senior fellow at the Texas Public Policy Foundation, an Austin think tank with a mission statement emphasizing “personal responsibility,” “free enterprise” and “limited government.” Trowbridge leads the growing ranks of conservatives focused on the inefficiencies of public universities. In numerous reports and editorials, he advocates for the privatization of university services, more comprehensive proof of professors’ productivity, reductions in research funding and heavier teaching loads for tenured professors. In his article, “Victory by Compromise,” posted last September on the Texas Public Policy Foundation’s website, Trow-

bridge applauds UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa’s “Framework for Advancing Excellence” action plan. Passed by the UT System Board of Regents in August 2011, Cigarroa’s plan includes an extensive online database of professors’ teaching loads, research grants, student evaluations and more. Trowbridge’s measurements of professors’ success not only emphasize accountability but also prioritize efficiency and financial gain over the academic value of their research.

Circumstantial evidence is the most damaging evidence there is, because it’s the most difficult to arrange. — Ronald Trowbridge

Trowbridge’s arguments showcase conservative policymakers’ underlying mistrust of any work that doesn’t generate a profit. “A professor is always going to say, ‘My research is important,’ but that may or may not be true,” he said in a recent interview. “You need to ask if you do your research, does it have any influence on the outside world, does anybody care, does anybody read it?” To illustrate his point, Trowbridge brings in the Bard. “In the last 20 years, there have been 29,000 articles on Shakespeare in the world,” he says. “The question is: Do you really need another one? The scholar is going to say ‘absolutely yes,’ but I really wonder about that.” English professor and Liberal Arts Honors Program director Larry Carver qualifies as an

“absolutely yes” scholar. “Every generation has to discover its own Shakespeare,” he says. “The reason we reread it is not so much about generating anything particularly new, but learning about ourselves.” Gordon Appleman, UT alumnus and member of the Texas Coalition for Excellence in Higher Education’s executive committee said, “The argument that some academic research is not worthy of financial support is symptomatic of the short-sighted philosophy held by some socalled higher education ‘reformers’ that a measurable return on investment must be immediately evident to be valuable.” Trowbridge’s solution to the problem: “If you privatize you entirely avoid anybody politicizing the school … the university is able to select its own Regents, and the school can do anything it wants to do,” he says. This approach also opens the door for politicization by private funders, including corporations and the predatory banks. Trowbridge deflects accusations of hypocrisy. His dissertation on influences of Victorian writer Thomas Carlyle inspired a book, but then he concluded, “If I published the book, almost no one would care and almost no one would buy it. In the end, Trowbridge represents only a small part of a larger trend toward molding the university experience into a more cost-effective, four-year dash. His attempts to streamline higher education is reminiscent of one of Dolores Umbridge’s more troubling proclamations during her tenure as Defense Against the Dark Arts professor: “It is the view of the Ministry that a theoretical knowledge will be sufficient to get you through your examinations, which after all, is what school is all about.” Oliver is an English and sociology major from New Braunfels


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News Editor Nick Hadjigeorge

Politicians turn to social media to broadcast beliefs, appearances By Bobby Blanchard New research finds that elected officials are using social media to announce political stances rather than promoting their campaign, contradicting previous research.

Seventeen UT students and Sherri Greenberg, director at the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs, spent more than a year researching how members of Congress use the social media platforms Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. To conduct their research, they watched official congressional social media accounts over a 59-day period, categorizing 47,000 different Twitter and Facebook posts. Greenberg said the highest category was position-taking posts, a surprise considering research that suggested the opposite.

Greenberg said the study shows elected officials have experienced an evolution in their usage of social media. “They have matured in how they are using it,” Greenberg said. “They are more comfortable, I think, now in not just saying ‘Oh, I’m on the news tonight’ but actually taking positions and talking about issues.” “I knew that usage had increased exponentially, but I was not aware of the change in how they were using the technology,” Greenberg said. “Earlier research on Twitter has

shown that they were using it mainly to let people know about media appearances.” For example, an elected official might tweet that they would be appearing on CNN or a local news station later that evening. Greenberg’s study showed a shift in usage from tweets about media appearances to tweets and posts about political positions. Greenberg said the politicians have turned to social media to promote their stances because it is cheaper than buying airtime on television. “If you don’t have money for TV, then you can use YouTube,” Greenberg said. “Or you can tweet at someone.” The research also showed politicians are growing more comfortable with social media. Public affairs graduate student Matthew Cornelius worked with Greenberg on the study and said that three years ago, less than half of Congressional members were using social media. Now, 98 percent of Congress is using at least one social media platform and 72 percent are using Twitter,

YouTube and Facebook. “What they are using it for is really a mirror of what is happening in the country at large,” Cornelius said. “People are using these tools to state their claim and be on one side of the issue.” In their study, Greenberg said they also found that members of Congress were using Twitter almost twice as much as Facebook. “They’re using Twitter more because it is so easy,” Greenberg said. “With only 140 characters, you don’t have to watch your grammar quite as much.” Greenberg also said she thinks Facebook is less effective. “People tend to say Facebook is ‘my personal feed,’” Greenberg said. “They don’t want to be bothered by ads or campaigns.” Public affairs graduate student Racheal Kane, who also worked on the study, said she is unsure the change will make for a better political atmosphere. However, she said increased transparency will hold politicians

more accountable. “One thing we saw was members of Congress actually tweeting and posting on how they were voting on individual bills,” Kane said. “In the past, you really had to go digging to find that. My concern, though, is not all people are using social media and are tuning in to what is going on.” Student Government President Thor Lund said the results of the study did not surprise him. He said social media provides an outlet for elected officials to voice opinions that might not be heard otherwise. As elected officials, Lund said he and SG Vice President Wills Brown use their social media accounts to let students know what they do on a day-to-day basis. During their campaign, Lund and Brown said they would deliver monthly YouTube addresses starting in August. “We also use it to show that we are out across campus advocating for the issues that directly affect students,” Lund said.

UT launches inquiry of sociology study By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis A public allegation of scientific misconduct has prompted UT officials to make an inquiry into a recent sociology study authored by a UT professor which claims children raised by homosexual couples are worse off than those raised by heterosexual parents. Sociology associate professor Mark Regnerus came into the limelight in June for publishing The New Family Structure Study, in which he attempted to discern whether there was a difference between children raised by gay parents as opposed to those raised in traditional family structures. Scott Rose, a New York Citybased investigative journalist and blogger for the pro-gay rights website The New Civil Rights Movement, prompted a UT inquiry in an open letter to the University published online June 24. In his letter, Rose said Regnerus’ study violates UT’s academic dishonesty policy, because he accepted money from politically active groups and purposefully used flawed data collection methods in his study. Rose also stated Regnerus acted “in bad faith” as a member of the scientific community and questioned whether or not Regnerus engaged in “improper relationships” with the groups funding the study. David Ochsner, director of public affairs in the College of Liberal Arts, said the study is still in the inquiry phase and a

Mark Regnerus Sociology associate professor

formal investigation will not begin unless compelling evidence of scientific misconduct is discovered. “Anytime somebody makes an allegation like that, it automatically triggers what we call an inquiry, which is just a preliminary fact-finding exercise,” Ochsner said. Regnerus’ study appeared in the online journal Social Science Research and received funding from the Witherspoon Institute and The Bradley Foundation, two organizations known to support conservative beliefs. In a July 1 blog post for The New Civil Rights Movement, Rose said a main reason Regnerus’ study is flawed is because Knowledge Networks, the survey company Regnerus used to collect data, uses a method of data collection that combines both address-based sampling and random-digitdialing, the latter of which is only applicable to households with landlines. According to the Center for Disease Control and

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Paperwork discourages doctors from taking patients By Chris Tomlinson Associated Press

The number of Texas doctors willing to accept government-funded health insurance plans for the poor and the elderly is dropping dramatically amid complaints about low pay and red tape, showed a survey by the Texas Medical Association provided to The Associated Press Sunday before its Monday release. Only 31 percent of Texas doctors said they were accepting new patients who rely on Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor and disabled. In 2010, the last time the survey was

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continues from page 6 Prevention, as of 2010, a significant percentage of people within the age range Regnerus sampled live in households that do not have landlines, excluding them from being surveyed via randomdigit-dialing. Knowledge Networks does provide more inclusive methods that would only use address-based sampling, according to the New Fam-

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how states display the data they collect. That’s something that Texas should be proud of, the fact that they collect it and they 7put it out in an easy-to-

taken, 42 percent of doctors accepted new Medicaid patients. The doctors’ reluctance to take on new Medicaid patients comes at a bad time, since the new federal health care law proposes adding 6 million additional people to the Texas Medicaid rolls with the intent of ensuring every U.S. citizen has access to health insurance. The state ranks last in the nation in terms of percentage of people insured, with 27 percent of Texans without any kind of insurance, according to a March Gallup poll. Doctors complain that the Texas Medicaid program pays only half of the actual cost of most services, leaving

them to absorb the losses. The Republican-controlled Legislature cut Medicaid reimbursements to doctors by a total of 2 percent in 2010 and 2011 and dramatically reduced payments for patients who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare, the health care program for senior citizens. “Every business has a breaking point, and physicians’ practices are no different,” said Dr. Michael Speer, president of the Texas Medical Association. While the federally managed Medicare program pays better than state-controlled Medicaid, doctors found caring for those patients to be onerous because of the

paperwork required. “All the bureaucratic red tape and administrative burdens only serve to increase the cost of running a practice

while diverting a physician’s attention away from patient care,” Speer said. “What’s lost in the health care debate is the simple fact that patients

need a doctor when they get sick. And physicians want to take care of patients and not push endless reams of paper around our desk.”

ily Structures Study website, but survey collection using only address-based sampling costs more and takes more time. Rose said if Regnerus had spent more money to use only address-based sampling or had instead compared stable heterosexual couples to equally stable same-sex couples using a method of “snowball” sampling, which includes a smaller sample of surveys chosen directly by the researcher, a more valid analysis would’ve been reached. “Regnerus is saying that his sampling method is su-

perior,” Rose said. “What he doesn’t tell you is that although a ‘snowball’ sampling has limits, the analysis of it can have benefits. But if the analysis is not valid sociology, it doesn’t matter that you use that superior sampling.” Regnerus, lead author of the study, said beyond his disappointment in the allegation, he had no further comments about the inquiry process. “It happened, and I’m going along with it and what is required of me,” Regnerus said. “I’m sad that it has occurred, I think. But, I probably shouldn’t

say much about it.” Despite Regnerus’ statement that he does not have any ties to the ideals of the conservative funders, Rose said Regnerus should have been conscious of the way the study would be used by antigay advocates. “Regnerus had to have known the kind of thing they were going to do with this study,” Rose said. “When he says he can’t control what they do, it’s not about him controlling them. It’s about his conscience in knowing what they were going to do.”

Rose said he believes the UT inquiry will not be sufficient in rectifying any damage done to the gay or scientific communities by the study. He said he intends to take further action against the University and will attempt to get the study noticed in mainstream media and television. “Frankly, what I see happening is that I’m going to involve the Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus and find people who are responsible for funding grants to the University, and I’m going to get those people to

act,” Rose said. Ochsner said it will be some time before the inquiry phase is complete and a decision is made about the possibility of a formal investigation. “It will be sometime next month in August before there will be any determination of whether or not to take the next step,” Ochsner said. “The thing that we need to get people to understand is that although this doesn’t happen every day, there are definitely times where an allegation like this is made, and we do look into it.”

use format.” The University of Texas System, for example, has a UT System Productivity Dashboard with information regarding enrollment, graduation, cost and other indicators. Texas received a ‘C’ in the area of student access and success, partly because of

its below-average student graduation rate over six years. Texas had a completion rate of 47.9 percent, while the national average was 54.5 percent. According to the UT System Productivity Dashboard, the six-year graduation rate in 2004 for the UT System was 82.9 percent.

Overall, Matthews said Leaders & Laggards hopes states will focus more on output over input. “We really need to move to a thinking on what is this education doing not only for the taxpayers and for future employers but for the students, as well,” Matthews said.

In this June 1 file photo, dentist Dr. Francis Tham and dental assistant Latasha Johnson attend to Medicaid patient Pamela Scott at the Chicago Family Health Center in Chicago.

Spencer Green Associated Press

Texas received a ‘C’ in the area of student access and success, partly because of its belowaverage student graduation rate over six years.


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Steven Senne | Associated Press

A sign at the entrance of a polling station in East Greenwich, R.I., advising voters that identification is required.

Federal courts set to decide on voter ID law By Chris Tomlinson Mel Evans | Associated Press

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addresses a crowd at a town hall meeting in Manchester, N.J on March 29. Christie branded a lawmaker “one arrogant S.O.B.”

Vulgar politicians show shift in norms By Jennifer Peltz Associated Press

What the $?&! is going on with our politicians? The mayors of New York and Philadelphia and the governor of New Jersey let loose with a few choice vulgarities over the past two weeks in otherwise G-rated public settings, including a town-hall meeting and a City Hall event. While foul language has been uttered in politics before, the blue streak is making some wonder whether it reflects the coarsening effects of pop culture in this realityTV era of “Jersey Shore” and “The Real Housewives,” a decline in public discourse, a desire by politicians to come

across as average Joes, or just a really hot summer. First there was famously blunt New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie branding a lawmaker “one arrogant S.O.B.” at a town hall last month. Then New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, apparently having trouble stomaching a slew of puns in his prepared remarks for Tuesday’s contestant weigh-in at City Hall before the Fourth of July hot dog-eating contest, chuckled, “Who wrote this s---?” to guffaws from the crowd. Then it was Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter’s turn Thursday at a news conference at which he discussed a shooting a few blocks from the center of the city’s July Fourth celebration. He said

he wasn’t going to let the city’s image be harmed by “some little ass---- 16-yearold.” “My sense is: Because they want to appear to be in tune with popular culture, politicians feel free to express themselves in profane ways,” said Rutgers University political scientist Ross K. Baker. And he finds that troubling: “I honestly do believe that, in aping the coarseness of popular culture, people in public life are really dragging us into a discourse of fang and claw,” Baker said. The seeming proliferation of political swearing reflects changes in both social norms and the media landscape, said Robert Thompson, director of the Bleier Center for Television and Popular

Culture at Syracuse University. Offhand remarks that might once not have been reported now get captured on video and posted online. “Politics has been nasty” for years, Thompson said. “The difference is we now have media that show this stuff.” Nutter, who has used vulgarities before in response to street violence, has described his language as an “honest, clear, direct response.” The biggest problem with political figures using bad language is that it crowds out whatever they were actually trying to say, said etiquette expert Lizzie Post of the Emily Post Institute. “The words we’re focusing on are probably not the ones they want us to,” she said.

Associated Press

The fate of Texas’ controversial new voter ID law, which requires voters to show photo identification at the polls, is set to be decided this week in a federal court in Washington. The state, which claims the law will prevent voter fraud, is seeking to persuade a threejudge panel to uphold the statute. The Justice Department and a slew of intervening groups say the law disproportionately affects minority voters, violating the federal Voting Rights Act. They want it thrown out. The case will be a test of the Voting Rights Act, passed in 1965, which was designed to protect minorities’ rights to vote. The Justice Department set up this week’s court fight when it blocked implementation of the law in March. Texas quickly filed a lawsuit in federal court, bringing the two sides back to Washington for the second time in months. One of the judges in this week’s trial, Rosemary Collyer, appointed in 2002 by President

George W. Bush, is involved in both cases. The other judges hearing the voter ID case are David Tatel, appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1994, and Robert Wilkins, appointed in 2010 by President Barack Obama. Texas plans to argue its law is a simple safeguard on voter fraud. The state already requires voters to show a voter identification card or other acceptable form of ID, but it has no photo requirement. In an interview with The Associated Press, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott said the new law is similar to those in Georgia and Indiana that have withstood legal scrutiny. He said he believed Texas’ law was in line with Supreme Court precedent. “What the Supreme Court has made clear is that to get documentation and have a photograph taken ... is simply not an infringement of the right to vote,” Abbott said. The Justice Department and intervening groups claim the law addresses a problem that doesn’t really exist. The five-day trial will begin Monday.


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RIGHT: David Dominguez helps his son warm up before a bout. DJ’s parents take turns driving him to Lord’s Gym for training.

BOTTOM: DJ reacts to the decision that fell in his opponent’s favor.

“I looked at his face and I thought, ‘There’s no way.’ I feel like I won that fight.”

KNOCKOUT!

Zachary Strain When DJ Dominguez was two years old, he was almost kidnapped in a grocery store, prompting his mother, Donnas Dominguez, to enroll him in martial arts. “I wanted him to be able to protect himself, and it ends up, he protects me now,” Donnas Dominguez said. DJ, now a part-time student at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, continued practicing a variety of martial arts through high school and began training as a boxer at Lord’s Gym in Austin in 2010. Despite losing his last match, he plans to turn professional in a year.


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“There’s a want to [boxing] ... It’s so much deeper than [winning].”

“I’m going to keep doing this until I die or I get the win I’m looking for.” TOP LEFT: DJ and his mother, Donnas Dominguez, pray together before his bout.

TOP RIGHT:

Despite a ruptured heart valve after overexertion in 2008, DJ has competed in 11 amateur bouts.

LEFT:

DJ makes contact with an opponent during a sparring session at Lord’s Gym.

“Boxing certainly is something you can empty everything into.”


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Chimpanzees MUSIC TO YOUR EARS attack, student left in coma Two adult chimpanzees that viciously attacked a U.S. student at a primate sanctuary in South Africa were defending their territory and will be allowed to live, the lead government investigator said Tuesday. Conservationist Dries Pienaar blamed human error for Thursday’s attack. But one of the sanctuary managers, Eugene Cussons, said he did not blame Andrew F. Oberle for crossing between two safety fences to retrieve a rock that the chimps were in the habit of throwing at tourists. Oberle was in critical condition and in a medically induced coma in the hospital by Monday night. On Tuesday, doctors refused to describe his condition saying the family, which has arrived from the United States, is traumatized and asking for privacy. Pienaar told The Associated Press that the chimps tore off one of Oberle’s testicles and some fingers from one hand as well as mauling his head. This was “to my astonishment, I couldn’t believe it because I know those chimps personally,” he said. He said he found no negligence on the part of the Jane Goodall Institute’s Chimpanzee Eden SA in eastern South Africa. “The only thing that happened is Andrew

stepped over the small barrier fence and went right up to the electric fence,” he said. “We all know that they are tame chimps, but he shouldn’t have done that. He’s a researcher. He’s supposed to read their body language.” Oberle was leading a group of tourists at the time. The visitors were 10 meters from the second fence, as required by safety rules. After Oberle stepped over the first fence, the chimps dragged him under the electric fence, then out into a public area where they continued to attack him, Cussons said. Cussons said he was happy that Pienaar found the chimps were involved in territorial defense and would therefore not be killed or punished. He said he was forced to shoot one of the chimps, but not mortally, after he and a ranger failed to scare the animals into releasing Oberle. When they drove a car at them, chimp Nikki jumped onto the front and smashed the windshield, causing Cussons to fire. Nikki, aged about 16, was wounded in the abdomen and is being treated at the Johannesburg Zoo. The other attacker, Amadeus, in its 20s, is on lockdown with its family at the sanctuary. Pienaar, who has worked as a conservationist for 33

Marisa Vasquez | Daily Texan Staff Sam Dublin plays the theremin, a sound component in the art exhibit “Event Horizon,” at the Women and Their Work gallery Saturday afternoon. Artist Letecia Bajuyo created the piece with donated CDs and DVDs.

years, said he condoned the shooting, a last option under protocols that recommend first shock treatment or pepper sprays. “Other than that, I’m happy with things,” Pienaar said. “I’m not having the chimps put down. I don’t think there’s reason for that.” Oberle is a post-graduate student of anthropology and primate behavior at the University of Texas at San Antonio. It was his second trip to study at the South African institute, which takes in orphaned and abused chimpanzees — The Associated Press

The Facebook group Help Andrew Oberle shows graduate student Andrew Oberle sitting with a chimp. Doctors are reporting improvement in the condition of Oberle, who was attacked by chimps he was studying in South Africa.

The Associated Press


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Sports Editor Nick Cremona

FOOTBALL

ROUND ROCK EXPRESS

Express reeling, look to end skid following break

Durham Smythe, a former teammate of current Texas quarterback David Ash at Belton High School, will join the Longhorns in 2013. The high school junior hopes to eventually join the ranks of former Texas tight ends to make it to the NFL.

By Antonio Morales

Andrew Torrey Daily Texan Staff

Smythe will fill void left by Finley By Harry Jung IV

Bo Scaife, David Thomas and Jermichael Finley are all names that come to mind when one thinks of the great tight ends to have come from the University of Texas. Now, after a four-year absence of an offensive threat at the tight end position, the Longhorns are making it an emphasis in their recruiting strategy. Texas has two tight ends com-

mitted in its 2013 recruiting class, one of whom is 6-foot-6, 230 pound Durham Smythe from Belton. Smythe is currently ranked as a top 50 recruit in the state of Texas, and is the No. 13 ranked tight end in the nation according to Rivals.com. During his junior year of high school, he snagged 22 catches for 341 yards and three touchdowns. Most notably though, Smythe is coming from the same school as current Tex-

as quarterback David Ash. “It’s pretty cool to refuel and be back at school with him again, he’s a great leader,” said Smythe. “I only got to compete with him my sophomore year, so I didn’t play with him much, but I look forward to being under his lead and learning from him as a Longhorn.” Smythe represented the US in the IFAF Under-19 World Championship this past weekend and was able to spend time on the Forty Acres in his off time.

“It’s a pretty rare, but cool opportunity to play for your country, and I’m enjoying meeting some of the players my age that will head off to college soon as well,” said Smythe. Despite losing to Canada by a score of 23-17 in the gold medal game, Smythe hauled in four catches for 33 yards, and was named to the All-Tournament Team after producing seven receptions for 55

SMYTHE continues on PAGE 14

Dealing with major shakeups to its starting rotation, the Round Rock Express (3951) lost its last three consecutive series. Round Rock will have to wait until after the All-Star break to pursue its first series win of the month. Even though the team didn’t win the series, pitcher Ben Snyder’s five shutout innings in his second spot start of the season helped end Round Rock’s fivegame losing skid. Snyder earned his second win of the season, allowing four

hits while walking two batters in Round Rock’s victory over Albuquerque. As defending American South division champions, the Express has had to adjust to the Texas Rangers’ sudden need for minor league pitchers. After going the first month of the season without making a move, the Rangers have needed to make numerous call-ups due to injuries. Nearly half of the Express pitching rotation from the start of the season has been called up to the major

EXPRESS continues on PAGE 14

Pu Ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff An Express player sneaks a peek at the opposing pitcher as he throws a pitch towards home plate.


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leagues. Round Rock’s top two starting pitchers are no

longer with the club — Neil Ramirez was sent down in

the farm system and Martin Perez is currently in the Rangers rotation. Michael Kirkman, Tanner Scheppers and Yoshinori Tateyama are also currently on the Rangers’ active roster. The Dell Diamond has also served as a warm-up stage for a couple of major league regulars over the past month. Roy Oswalt, the newest Ranger, and

SMYTHE continues from page 13

yards throughout the week. Although Smythe has one more year of high school ball to play, he still expressed excitement about being a future Longhorn, despite growing up on the opposing side of Texas his whole life. “It’s a pretty crazy story that I actually ended up

fan favorite Derek Holland made a few starts for the Express on their way back to the big leagues. Left-hander Chad Bell has been the beneficiary of one of Round Rock’s rotation spots left open by all of the injuries and call-ups. Starting the year in single-A, Bell was eager to join the Express and grateful to be one step closer to the major leagues.

“It’s been a crazy year so far. I’ve been throwing really well and working hard. It goes to show you never know when you’ll get your opportunity,” Bell said. So far, Bell has made the most of his opportunity by winning two of his first three triple-A starts. He has only allowed five earned runs in 17 innings pitched and has 12 strikeouts.

As the Rangers’ major league roster gets healthy again, the Express will have the opportunity to stabilize its roster coming out of the All-Star break. Currently in last place of the American South division and 12 games behind the leader, the Express will need a strong second half push in order to defend its division championship.

here,” said Smythe, referring to his decision to come play football at Texas. “I had a dad that played at Baylor, a sister that attended Tech, and many of my friends are going to Texas A&M. So it’s weird that I actually ended up in Austin, but I’m happy to be here and play on one of the top programs in the country.” Seeing the success that Smythe has had on the field, one question still re-

mains: can he be the next wunderkind that the Longhorns are looking for at the tight end position? While Vince Young and Colt McCoy had some great targets at the end position to throw to, the exit of Finley left a hole in the Texas depth chart for several years. During the last few seasons, Blaine Irby was plagued by a horrible knee injury that cost him most of his collegiate eligibil-

ity, while Greg Smith and Dan Buckner never quite blossomed into the players they were projected to be. Smythe hopes he can help the Longhorns return to top form and end the search for the next great UT tight end, but with players like M.J. McFarland in front of him on the depth chart, he will have to prove his worth once he’s puts on the burnt orange.

SOCCER

Parker cleared to play for France in London PARIS— Spurs guard Tony Parker can play for European runner-up France in the Olympic Games after San Antonio’s doctors agreed he has recovered from an eye injur y. Parker scratched his left cornea during a nightclub melee in New York last month. “ The two ophthalmologists (from the Spurs) confirmed the opinion of the French doctor

who operated on Tony Parker and the two Swiss specialists who also examined the player last Thursday and indicated that he can resume playing,” the French Basketball Federation said on Friday, adding that Spurs coach Gregg Popovich also gave his blessing. France’s first game at the Olympics is against the United States on July 29. “It is great news and

a relief for the whole France team,” coach Vincent Collet said. “I spoke with Tony on the phone, and he sounded ver y happy — and also relieved — about this development. It was a difficult and alarming situation for ever yone.” Parker was included on the team’s 12-man Olympic roster as he waited to see whether his injur y would heal in time. He was hurt by shards

of flying glass in a nightclub fight involving singer Chris Brown and members of hip-hop star Drake’s entourage. Parker scored 26 points for France when it lost last year’s European final 98-85 to Spain. France will be missing Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah, who is still recovering from a left ankle injur y from the NBA playoffs. — The Associated Press


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AZTEX SOCCER

Aztex assault led by young strikers By Nick Cremona

Although the 2012 season is the Austin Aztex’s first campaign in the USL Premier Development League, the team has quickly become one of the league’s best. With just two games remaining in the regular season, the Aztex (8-4-2) are as hot as any of the 73 teams in the Premier Development League and could clinch a playoff berth with a win in their final two games. Composed of mostly college athletes who are on summer break, the Aztex are currently in second place in the Mid South Division of the league’s Southern Conference with 26 points. In their season finale at House Park this past weekend, the Aztex treated the crowd of nearly 2,000 to a 7-0 drub-

bing of the lowly West Texas Sockers (2-6-6). The win was the fifth time the Aztex have scored more than three goals in a game this season, all of which have resulted in wins. In the past two games alone, the Aztex have scored a total of 13 goals, while only allowing one. A big part of this late season surge can be accredited to the play of two young forwards, Kris Tyrpak and Kekuta Manneh. Tyrpak currently attends Houston Baptist University on a soccer scholarship and said he is glad to have the opportunity to showcase his talent during the summer months. “All the top players from Division I, II and III colleges come to the PDL, and the teams are loaded with talent,” said Tyrpak. The 20-year-old Dripping Springs High School graduate

is a rising amateur star within the league and currently sits in third place for overall points scored this season with 23. In the 7-0 win to close out the regular season home schedule, he scored early and often, resulting in his second hat trick of the year. His first came in the home opener against the El Paso Patriots in May. “It feels good to end the season at home with a hat trick like that,” Tyrpak said. Even with a 4-0 halftime lead over the Sockers, Tyrpak said head coach Paul Dalglish told the team to “keep it classy, don’t do anything stupid and try to get a couple more goals for the fans.” Tyrpak’s partner in crime at forward, 17-year-old Kekuta Manneh, has already caught the eye of the Los Angeles Galaxy of the MLS, who invited the

Lake Travis High junior out to L.A. for a week of practice at the beginning of the summer. “They just wanted me to practice with the team and see how I fit in,” Manneh said. “I would love to play soccer for a living, but for now, my focus is on school.” In just 11 games this year, Manneh has scored ten goals and notched nine assists. “It’s a good experience playing with Kekuta, because I know he’s going to go on to do bigger and better things at the highest level of soccer,” Tyrpak said. “It’s an honor to play alongside him.” The duo of Tyrpak and Manneh has asserted itself as two of the most productive players in the Premier Development League. If they decide to continue to play with the Aztex in coming years, they

Pu Ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff The Austin Aztex lead all USL PDL teams in goals scored with 39 goals in 14 games played.

could help the club establish a national presence and foster future player development. As of now, the Aztex have their sights set on the playoffs, which will pit them against a Southeast Division opponent. The top two teams from each of the nine divisions of the league will advance to the playoffs in which the higher-seeded team gets home field advantage.

The Aztex are also the league leaders in goals scored at home with 25, so they would relish the opportunity of a home playoff game. “We are looking forward to the playoffs, but we still have some work to do to be in the best position,” Manneh said. “Hopefully we can come back to play some games at home — the crowd really gets behind us.”

FOOTBALL COLUMN

Ash doesn’t need to be a hero for Texas By Trey Scott With a defense that will be among the best of any not in the Southeastern Conference and the triumvirate of talented running backs Malcolm Brown, Joe Bergeron and Johnathan Gray, the Longhorns have enough pieces to contend for a Big 12 ChampionshipcomeNovember. They won’t mean anything, though, if David Ash doesn’t take the next step as quarterback. With voluntary workouts underway, the heat is on Ash, who was 3-3 last season as a starter. To be fair, he was thrust into the role without much warning;. This time a year ago, with Gar-

rett Gilbert in the lead at quarterback and Case McCoy and Connor Wood behind him, Ash was preparing to redshirt. You know what followed. Ash looked much more comfortable in the spring, though, completing five of six passes for 83 yards in the Orange-White scrimmage. “I thought I played better football this spring than I did last season,” Ash said afterward. You’d hope so, considering he completed just 57 percent of his passes and threw eight interceptions to four touchdowns. Co-offensive coordinator Byran Harsin spoke of Ash’s development in the spring. “The anxiety of not knowing where to go in practice, what the

drills are or where we go is gone,” Harsin said. “The anxiety of not knowing what the formation is or not knowing how to call the play in the huddle is gone.” Ash was wide-eyed as a freshman, at times unwilling or unable to take complete control of the offense or the huddle. The fact that he’s feeling more comfortable and not looking over his shoulder means that he’s probably ready to be just the guy the Longhorns need: a game manager. I wouldn’t put much stock in a quarterback controversy this fall. The days of throwing the ball 58 times a game (Colt McCoy vs. Ohio State, 2009) or asking a quarterback to amass 336 yards

of offense (Vince Young vs. Colorado, 2005) are long gone. If Texas has that kind of special quarterback, then great. If it doesn’t — and most teams do not — then Texas will just need one who will protect the football. Take Alabama’s AJ McCarron: not considered a once-ina-lifetime quarterback by any means, he guided Alabama to the BCS Championship. McCarron wasn’t asked to win games — just not to lose them. In 328 attempts, McCarron only threw five interceptions. Had Ash attempted that many passes, the numbers project he would have thrown 15 picks. Yes, to a fan base spoiled from years of watching Young and

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan file photo With a strong supporting cast in 2012, the Longhorns’ sophomore signal caller David Ash (14) just needs to manage games for UT.

McCoy, it sounds a little boring, especially in the age of the quarterback, where exceptional names — Griffin III, Luck and Newton, most recently — bubble up every year. David Ash

doesn’t need to be nearly as good as any of those guys, not with the other parts Texas has in place. He just needs to be a lot better and smarter with the football than he was as a freshman.


16 L&A

Life&ARTS @thedailytexan

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Life&Arts Editor Aleksander Chan

SUMMER FUN

The Sound of Music, Zilker Summer Musical

July 6 – Aug. 11, Thursdays - Sundays 8:30 p.m. Sheffield Hillside Theatre The hills of Central Texas are alive with the sound of music. This beloved musical is finally available for free and plays every weekend until Aug. 11.

By Nicole Raney

It’s more than 100 degrees. Again. You’re bored. Again. Maybe you’re a little short on cash because all of your money is going toward paying for the air conditioning. You’ve either spent all day working or all day on your couch. Either way, you desperately need something to do. Summer is almost over, but it doesn’t have to end yet. Here are a few events (most of them free) that will make the rest of your summer in Austin a lot cooler. Eastside Movies in the Park

7:30 p.m., movie starts at 8:30 p.m. Fiesta Gardens Free Sat. July 14: “Muppet Treasure Island” Sat. Aug. 11: The Goonies It’s hard to beat watching a free movie ... unless it’s outside on a big screen! These are kid-friendly events — so be prepared for lots of families but these movies are some classics that anyone can get into. There will be vendors with food and beverages, but you’re allowed to bring water. Dogs, however, are not allowed — leave your pooch at home.

Blues on the Green

For more ongoing events check out page 17.

Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan Staff

Music Under the Star

7:30 p.m. Zilker Park Free Wed. July 11: BoDeans, Sahara Smith Wed. July 25: Marcia Ball, Nakia Aug. 8: Quiet Company, The Eastern Sea, Wild Child

6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum Free Fri. July 13: Junior Brown, Warren Hood, and the Goods Fri. July 20: Little Joe y La Familia, Conjuntazzo Fri. July 27: The Gourds, The Redd Volkaert Trio

Blues on the Green has been a regular fixture in Austin for years now. If you haven’t already been, you absolutely need to go. And if you’ve been already, then you know how much fun it can be. Thousands of people flock to Zilker Park to enjoy free concerts on a giant stage with the downtown skyline as the backdrop. Bring your picnic blankets, appetites, frisbees, dogs and friends.

Here’s another free music series bringing you the sounds of Texas during the sweet summer nights. The shows are a mixture of blues, country, Tejano, bluegrass and Americana, so if you’re looking for a little “down south” to spice up your July, this is the place to be. The museum is also hosting the Texas Music Roadtrip exhibit that people are invited to go check out in between sets. Bonus? Admission to the exhibit is free during this time.

Bastille Day Festival

Sat. July 14, 7:00 - 11:00 p.m. French Legation Museum $8 online, $10 at door

Independence Day has already passed and you need another excuse to party. How’s your French? The only word you need to know is “oui” because you’ll want to say yes to celebrating Bastille Day. The huge French holiday commemorates the day that Bastille prison was stormed and taken over during the French Revolution. At this festival, you can enjoy all things French, including music, food, wine and more.


L&A 17

L&A 17

Night of the Bat Fest

Hot Sauce Festival

Sun. Aug. 26, 11:00 a.m. Fiesta Gardens Free with three nonperishable food item donations (goes to Capital Area Food Bank) or cash donation.

August is already pretty hot, but let’s turn it up a little. Here you get to taste test all the hot sauces that you (and your taste buds) can handle. The only thing hotter than the temperature outside will be the burning sensation in your mouth. Lots of local wares will be for sale as well as live music to enjoy and other refreshments for those who need a break from the heat.

Austin Ice Cream Festival

Sat. Aug. 4, 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Fiesta Gardens $10 So you’re thinking, “But I don’t want to pay $10.” But what about $10 and free ice cream? Your fee also gets you access to games, contests and other forms of delicious entertainment. Plus, you can feel good about paying the entry fee, because a portion of the proceeds will benefit charities.

Sat. Aug. 25, 5:00 p.m. - midnight Congress Avenue Bridge Free The best time to see the bats under the Congress bridge is during the late summer, which is why every year Austin holds Bat Fest, a collection of music, vendors, crafts and (of course) bats.

Superhero Party (21+) Sat. July 21, 10:30 p.m. The Highball $5 online, $7 at door

Because this is the party that Austin deserves. The Highball is throwing another of their amazing superherothemed parties celebrating the release of “The Dark Knight Rises.” Bust out your costumes, capes and underoos because dressing up is certainly encouraged. We’re going to party like it’s the last night in Gotham.

ONG Weekend Stargazing

Fridays and Saturdays until Aug. 11, around 9:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. T. S. Painter Hall, UT Campus Free If you’re looking for just the right star to make your wish on, you can use the Painter Hall Telescope during UT’s free stargazing event every weekend. The times will vary depending on sunset, so check in on the website.

Pu Ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff

ING EVENTS

Geeks Who Drink

Various pubs, bars and restaurants around town host the “Best Damn Pub Quiz” on different nights throughout the week. It’s 21+ to drink but not to be a geek. These quizzes are open and free for everyone so long as you aren’t rude and at least order something from the venue to eat or drink. Check out their website, geekswhodrink.com, for more information.

Unplugged at the Grove (Above)

Every Thursday until Sept. 20, 8:00 p.m. Shady Grove Free Yet another free summer concert series! Bands range from local favorites to some great out-of-towners. These shows are a little more intimate, so get ready to get cozy with your live music.


L&A 18

MOVIE REVIEW: ‘SAVAGES’ | OLIVER STONE

‘Savages’ deals out Stone-d cold comeback allowed Ben to build his empire while Chon acts mostly as security when things go south. However, in addition to sharing a business, they also share Ophelia, played with lithe confidence by Blake Lively. When the Mexican cartels, led by Elena (Salma Hayek) and her muscle man Lado (Benicio Del Toro), try to get into business with an uninterested Ben and Chon, they kidnap Ophelia in an attempt to sway them. “Savages” is defined by its impressive ensemble, and each cast member gets a chance to impress. Kitsch’s career has been unimpressive thus far, but here he’s full of intensity and

By Alex Williams

Oliver Stone is a prolific director, but our generation hasn’t been privy to his best work. His unique bits of Americana mostly hit theaters in the ‘80s, with the director doing his best work on films like “Born on the Fourth of July” and “Platoon.” Some of his more recent work, namely “Natural Born Killers,” also shines, but Stone has been in an undeniable decline. Thankfully, Taylor Kitsch and Aaron Johnson star as California marijuana growers/sellers Chon and Ben. Chon did tours in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the seeds he brought back

danger. Chon’s friendship with Ben is truly the center of the film, and Kitsch and Johnson turn in a really wonderful duet here, their bond coming from somewhere real and honest. Lively has been something of a divisive performer so far, failing to impress in her big screen roles, but she gives a truly interesting performance here. Stone refuses to let her character be an afterthought, a prize that Ben and Chon are fighting to win back, and Lively brings some true soul to a character that is, by design, fairly empty, letting us root for and even start to like her. However, the old pros in

the picture end up stealing the show. John Travolta, playing a sketchy DEA agent, plays his character as very, very large and expressive, a bold decision that pays off throughout the film. Del Toro is appropriately menacing, his bushy eyebrows and mustache doing wonders for his performance. Hayek’s cartel leader is threatening but also strangely maternal, making her fascinating to watch as she navigates her dueling natures. Unfortunately, “Savages” isn’t especially subtle. Stone wields its themes like a sledgehammer and throws its title around like a beach ball at a Nickelback concert.

Photo courtesy of the Associated Press/Universal Pictures Blake Lively and Benicio Del Toro star in Oliver Stone’s “Savages.”

The film frontloads itself with literary references before devolving into pulpy brutality. Nonetheless, Stone is doing stylish, confident work, always trying something new and appropriate, filling even small moments with

unbearable tension. The film moves with an undeniable sense of momentum and is never anything less than a blast. Stone’s impressive return to form is one of the most distinctive, entertaining films of the summer.

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The Daily Texan 07-09-12