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Orakpo selected 13th in first round of NFL Draft

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Seniors debut collections at fashion finale

TOMORROW’S WeaTHeR

Waldo drops by Eeyore’s birthday bash, leads crazy chase

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The Daily Texan Monday, April 27, 2009

Complaints spur UTPD crackdown of cyclists

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Statue immortalizes Barbara Jordan

By Avi Selk Daily Texan Staff “I was just trying to get to the library so I could study for my test,” said Rocco Bernardoni, sweating through his T-shirt as he dismounted his bicycle in front of the police officer who had chased him a block down Speedway. “You ran a stop sign. Are you familiar with the state bike laws?” asked UT Police Officer Joseph Silas, still wearing his helmet as he inspected the advertising junior’s ID card. Bernardoni placed his hands on his thighs, leaned forward and breathed in heavily. “It’s just really hard for me to keep my composure,” he told the officer. After Silas issued him a $50 ticket and rode away, Bernardoni’s composure relented. “I shouldn’t have stopped pedaling,” he said, tears streaming down behind his sunglasses. “This is outrageous, that they have to interrupt our education just to give us a hard time.”

For some, an unwelcome surprise “They don’t like it,” said Silas, perched next to his police-specialized Trek bicycle outside the Perry Castañeda Library, as a throng of students passed him on their way to Thursday classes. Silas spent most of the day losing his voice, and his breath, as he shouted down, lectured and chased dozens of cyclists for traffic violations. Most of the day’s offenders got off with a verbal warning, but during a similar operation a few weeks earlier, Silas and another officer ticketed 35 cyclists in fewer than two hours — a total of $1,750 in fines, all payable to UT Parking and Transportation. The crackdowns — now weekly operations —

BIKE continues on page 5A UT Police Officer Joe Silas gives computer sciences senior Ryan Howard a verbal warning for bicycling through a stop sign on 21st Street and Speedway.

Lauren Gerson Daily Texan Staff

UT on lookout after swine flu detected in US By Avi Selk Daily Texan Staff University officials say they are closely monitoring the campus for any sign of a mutant swine flu that has alarmed public health officials as it spreads from Mexico into Texas and across the United States. Theresa Spalding, medical director for University Health Services, said two students were treated for influenza last week. She said they most likely had a common strain, not the swine virus, but that any cases of the flu were unusual this time of year. The samples were sent to a state laboratory for further testing, she said. The new flu — a mysterious hybrid of avian, swine and human viruses that has killed dozens and sickened hundreds in Mexico — has been discovered in San Antonio, California, New York, Kansas and Ohio. Suspected cases have also been reported in Europe, Asia and New Zealand. Swine-based viruses commonly mutate and infect humans, but the new strain is alarming some health authorities because it tends to infect young, healthy

FLU continues on page 2A

Karina Jacques | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Barbara Jordan Elementary School students were among the first to see the Barbara Jordan statue up close on Friday. Right, A family observes the unveiling of the 10-foot-tall statue, which was built to honor the former U.S. congresswoman and UT law professor.

In honor of trailblazing politician, UT unveils its first sculpture of a woman By Lena Price Daily Texan Staff As Barbara Jordan’s commencement address to UT’s 1986 graduating class blared across Whitis Avenue on Friday for all to hear, sign language interpreter Lucy Brotherton stood in front of the crowd translating the speech for those who couldn’t.

More than 1,000 people blocked traffic on Whitis Avenue and 24th Street to celebrate Jordan’s words and life achievements. The ceremony featured remarks from state legislators and people who knew Jordan personally, as well as music from the Long-

STATUE continues on page 2A

Bill pushing for university research advancement clears House By Erin Mulvaney Daily Texan Staff Seven state universities may have the opportunity to join UT as tierone academic research institutions. A bill passed unanimously through the Texas House on Friday would create three initiatives

and establish funding methods to help emerging universities in the state achieve prominence as research institutions. The Texas Higher Education Coordination Board would administer the programs, and the measure requires an additional $500 million

in funding in the state’s 2010-2011 budget. Earlier in the session, opponents of the bill said that due to the state’s tight budget, Texas should focus more of its limited resources on the institutions that are closer to gaining tier-one status.

Texas currently has three universities considered tier-one research institutions: UT, Texas A&M University and Rice University. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching describes

RESEARCH continues on page 2A


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News

Monday, April 27, 2009

The Daily Texan

research: Universities seek prominence,

Tight squeeze

Volume 109, Number 134 25 cents

funds in sprint to be next tier-one school From page 1A a tier-one research institution as having membership in the American Association of Universities and at least $100 million in federal research grants per year. The sizes of endowments, the quality of the faculty and the number of doctorates awarded are also factors. The author, state Rep. Dan Branch, R-Dallas, said students are going to other states because of the lack of major research universities in Texas. He compared Texas universities to California’s higher education system, which has nine tier-one research institutions. “Lack of major research and development infrastructure is costing our state billions of dollars each year in missed opportunities to attract research funding,” Branch said. “California’s nine tier-one universities helped that state earn 1.3 percent of federal dollars.” Branch has said that eco-

nomic progress and cultural advancement are linked to research and education. “We’re running some of the best and brightest out of the state,” Branch said. “This is our chance to seize the moment.” The seven emerging research universities in Texas compete for funding to gain prominence for their universities. Schools currently have the ability to seek funding on an individual basis, but the bill would create three funds: the Research University Development Fund, the Texas Research Incentive Program and the National Research University Benchmark Fund. These funds would provide competitive grants and match dollars with the schools. The universities would be awarded incentives for making efforts to improve their research programs by increasing research, raising private money and working to earn an international distinction of excellence, ac-

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591

emerging research universities

Editor: Leah Finnegan (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com

• Texas Tech University • University of Texas at Arlington • University of Texas at Dallas • University of Texas at El Paso • University of Texas at San Antonio • University of Houston • University of North Texas

Managing Editor: Vikram Swaruup (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com

cording to analysis of the bill. Raymund Paredes, commissioner of the coordinating board, said the universities are likely to need heavy funding — as high as $100 million per year — before they will reach tierone level. “We’re going to have to increase funding and sustain it for a good long time before we can get these schools where they need to be,” Paredes said.

Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff

Artists stack themselves in a tree at Colorado and Seventh streets on Sunday. The performance, “Bodies in Urban Spaces,” is directed by Willi Dorner and involves climbing on objects found in a city.

ON THE WEB: See gallery of featured photos @ dailytexanonline.com

ODDLY ENOUGH Swiss state to German hikers: Put some clothes on, please APPENZELL, Switzerland — Voters in the heart of the Swiss Alps on Sunday passed legislation banning naked hiking after dozens of mostly German nudists started rambling through their picturesque region. By a show of hands, citizens of the small state of Appenzell Inner Rhodes voted overwhelm-

ingly at their traditional openair annual assembly to impose a $176 fine on violators. Only a scattering of people on Sunday opposed the ban on the back-to-nature activity that took off last autumn when naked hikers — primarily Germans — started showing up in eastern Switzerland. The cantonal government recommended the ban after citizens objected to encountering walkers wearing nothing but hiking boots and socks. — The Associated Press

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sTaTue: Jordan served as law professor

at UT, congresswoman during Watergate From page 1A horn Singers and the Innervisions Gospel Choir. The 10-foot-tall statue is the first on campus to commemorate a woman. Jordan was the first black woman to serve in the Texas Senate and the first black woman from the South to sit in the U.S. House of Representatives. A small group of deaf students and faculty sat in the front row to watch the unveiling of the statue to honor the former U.S. congresswoman known for her oratory skills. Brotherton, one of two interpreters translating the cere-

TSM EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING Wednesday April 29, 2009 8:30 A.M. University of Texas HSM 3.302 2500 Whitis Ave. Austin, Texas 78712

Visitors Welcome We encourage any community member who has any kind of temporary or permanent disability to contact Texas Student Media beforehand so that appropriate accommodations can be made. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

mony, said Jordan would have been pleased that her message was accessible to the deaf. “Barbara Jordan always championed the cause of diversity,” Brotherton said. “Her words empowered people from all walks of life, and I think she would think it’s terrific that more people get to hear them.” State Rep. Dawnna Dukes, D-Austin, who co-authored legislation in 2003 that pushed for the statue’s creation, said it was fitting that Jordan should receive this honor. “When I was 10 years old, I was sitting in my parents’ bedroom watching this black-

and-white television,” Dukes said. “I saw [Jordan] sitting at a table, and she was speaking with a voice that I thought mimicked the voice of God.” Jordan served as a U.S. representative during the Watergate hearings, and after retiring from politics, taught law at UT for 17 years. University President William Powers delivered the dedication remarks before the statue’s unveiling. “She was a courageous leader who struck down barriers of race and gender,” Powers said. “She was a great Texan, a great American and a great human.”

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2009 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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Flu: US officials declare public health emergency From page 1A people and is spreading outside flu season. University officials expressed concern over the virus Friday afternoon as the first news reports of the U.S. cases crossed their desks. Since then, U.S. officials have declared a public health emergency, and the World Health Organization warned that the virus has the potential to become a pandemic. A UT Safety Alert e-mail sent

out Sunday afternoon urged students to wash their hands frequently and cover their sneezes with tissues or their upper sleeves, while cautioning that the virus causes only mild symptoms in most people. UHS asks anyone with flu symptoms, including a sore throat, runny nose, fever, vomiting or diarrhea, to call its 24-hour Nurse Advice Line at (512) 475-6877. Spalding said the University has a plan in case of an epidem-

ic. Mass e-mails and text alerts would be sent out as soon as the virus was discovered on campus. If the virus appeared to be rapidly spreading, campus health workers might start sequestering the infected. “We would kind of quarantine them so they wouldn’t infect the rest of the building, but we’re nowhere near that stage right now,” Spalding said Friday afternoon. UT officials could not be reached for an update by press time.

The Daily Texan

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan press crew members, who will be laid off in May.

Permanent Staff

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AN C I X ME RTINI MA

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leah Finnegan Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vikram Swaruup Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephen Keller, Gabrielle Muñoz Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audrey Campbell, Josh Haney, Abhinav Kumar, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jillian Sheridan, Abby Terrell, Mary Tuma News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Beherec, Katie Flores, Lee Ann Holman Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous, Pierre Bertrand, Amy Bingham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mohini Madgavkar, Erin Mulvaney, Avi Selk Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Muto Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Green, Austin Litzler, Vikkey Packard Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janie Shaw Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marissa Edwards, Shatha Hussein, Lindsey Morgan, Emily Watkins Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Peter Franklin Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kim Espinosa, May-Ying Lam Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paul Chouy, Bryant Haertlein, Emily Kinsolving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Rogers, Jordan Smothermon Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ana McKenzie Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy O'Connor, Leigh Patterson, Raquel Villarreal Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . Roxanna Asgarian, Mary Lingwall, Rachel Meador, Robert Rich, JJ Velasquez Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .David R. Henry Associate Sports Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anup Shah, Colby White Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Anderson, Blake Hurtik, Laken Litman, Austin Talbert Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolynn Calabrese Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Erik Reyna Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Priscilla Villarreal Associate Multimedia Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jenny Baxter, Juan Elizondo Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard A. Finnell

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Martinez, Lena Price, Laura Ceglio, Hudson Lockett Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Jacques, Peyton McGee, Melissa Dominguez, Rachel Colson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Young Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Knopp, Jordan Godwin, Dan Hurwitz Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amber Genuske, Laura Clark, Priscilla Totiyapungprasert Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Friedenthal Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Linda Gonzalez, Jordan Humphreys Sports/Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bethan Johnsen Wire Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Sofhauser Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Molly Wahlberg, Alexis Mouledoux, Susannah Duerr Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pavel Nitchovski Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Scott Miles, Josh Flanagan, Edgar Vega, Nam Nguyen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryohei Yatsu, Katie Smith, Ryan Hailey, Jeremy Johnson Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachael Schroeder, Stephen Gamache

Advertising

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591) or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2009 Texas Student Media.

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Texan Ad Deadlines

04/27/09

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 10 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)


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5A UNIV

Students play market with $30,000 By Hudson Lockett Daily Texan Staff In the midst of an economic crisis, the Asian Business Association Investment Team is managing a $30,000 portfolio without any faculty supervision. The team, formed to give students experience investing real money, tracks its progress against the S&P 500, a group of companies chosen to reflect the economic status of the biggest players in the financial market. Wendy Lin, a business and Chinese junior, said alumni Eric Yu Chang and James Peng

founded the group in fall 2007 using money they made off their own investments. Members said the group was up about 3.5 percent relative to the market in 2009, though the members don’t get anything but experience from their investments. “Granted, it’s nice to have good returns,” Lin said. The group keeps a percentage of the portfolio in cash so it can start over should it lose its invested money. Finance senior Vishal Kumar said the group aims to give members an edge in classes, intern-

ships and job interviews by giving them experience and knowledge only available through investing money in the market. “It’s just really interesting to see kids who are sophomores learning things, doing things that you don’t even see people when they graduate being able to do,” Kumar said. The 13 members follow the group’s stocks in turns and send updates out via e-mail at the end of each hour-long shift. “One person on the team is always watching the market,” said finance senior Jeffrey Pao. Pao said that between week-

ly meetings to pitch potential investments, individual research and four smaller group meetings headed by the chairs of individual stocks, members spend about 15 hours a week together. “We’re a really tight-knit group,” he said. Along with the responsibility inherent to investing thousands of dollars in a stock, Kumar said he thinks the economic crisis is a better environment for learning to scrutinize companies. “It makes you really do your research when you’re looking into any sort of investment” he said.

Emily Kinsolving | Daily Texan Staff

As part of a national lobbying effort, students walk from the UT Tower to the Capitol to raise awareness for Invisible Children on Saturday afternoon. Protesters then camped out on the Capitol grounds, hoping to be “rescued” by celebrities.

In name of Uganda, group waits for ‘rescue’ By Laura Ceglio Daily Texan Staff Sleeping bags, pillows and backpacks littered the Capitol lawn Sunday as more than 800 people from all over Texas waited to be “rescued” by media and celebrity moguls. “The Rescue” occurred in hundreds of cities all over the world in an effort by the nonprofit group Invisible Children to raise money and spread knowledge about child kidnappings in Uganda. To successfully rescue the participants, the media and a government official or powerful celebrity must make an appearance at the rally. Participants gathered at the UT Tower and then marched in groups to the Capitol while grasping a rope, a symbolic event known as “the abduction.”

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“Every day, children are taken from their homes and forced to be soldiers in the civil war that has taken place in Uganda for 21 years,” said Victorio Marasigan, a computer design junior at Texas State University. Once at the Capitol, volunteers each wrote two letters to their U.S. senators to bolster support from the Legislature. “We found out that writing letters is the most effective way to gain attention, because senators are required by law to read all of their letters,” said Brynne Henn, one of the organizers for the Austin rally. “In June, a group of us will travel to Washington, D.C., and hand-deliver the written letters to the senators.” The organization also sold merchandise to raise money, including a variety of DVDs, each

of which tells a story about a different child in Uganda affected by the kidnappings. Allen Weier, a University of Mary Hardin-Baylor student, said he decided to volunteer after he saw a screening of one of the videos. “I only found out about this on Wednesday, but when I heard the stories about these children, I knew I had to do something,” Weier said. Participants initially expected to be rescued on Saturday by Maya Angelou, who was in town speaking. Upon learning that she couldn’t make it, the number of protesters thinned to fewer than 100, Henn said. “Right now we are trying to mobilize as many people as possible to come out,” Henn said. “We’re expecting to get rescued tomorrow by some of the senators when Congress will be back in session.”

“We are trying to get [Gov.] Rick Perry to come out by making YouTube videos asking for his help.” — Brynne Henn, rally organizer As of Sunday afternoon, 17 cities still had not been rescued, but those participants of rescued cities will begin to travel to the places still in need, Henn said. “We are trying to get [Gov.] Rick Perry to come out by making YouTube videos asking for his help,” Henn said. “These events bring out a lot of emotion, so it’s hard to ignore.”

POLICE: Cyclists bemoan

sudden law enforcement From page 1A started a few weeks ago, after the department received a rash of student and staff complaints about reckless cyclists, said UTPD Chief Robert Dahlstrom. “Bicycles can literally kill people,” he said, referencing regular accidents, including a cyclist he said hit a pedestrian on West Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard earlier this year, fracturing the man’s skull. Dahlstrom said UT’s estimated 8,000 cyclists are welcomed, even encouraged, to ride on campus — but that too many of them treat traffic laws as suggestions. Not all cyclists see that as a problem. “Everybody that comes up, all day long, they slow down and they just go through the stop sign. That’s just how it goes,” computer sciences senior Ryan Howard told Silas as he dismounted, gesturing to the mess of bicycles, pedestrians and vehicles in the intersection behind him. “I need the definition of ‘stop,’” Howard said. Silas, with practiced patience and a hoarse voice, began to define it but soon had to interrupt himself as another cyclist zoomed past the same stop sign. “Sir! Sir!” he said. “See?” said Howard triumphantly. “I was slower than that guy.” Like many people that day, Howard said he was annoyed that police were suddenly enforcing traffic rules that cyclists routinely ignore without consequences, instead of going after reckless riders and drivers. “I mean, this is just kind of like an open parking lot, isn’t it?” he said. While some cyclists disdain the rules, other violators are simply unaware of them. “Laws?” laughed Joseph ElAzzi, a geology graduate student from Lebanon who was surprised to get a ticket while riding through campus during Texas Relays weekend. “There are no bike laws in my country.

There are no car laws, either.” Ignorance, however, is not an acceptable excuse for some offenders, such as Parking and Transportation employee James Schneider and an engineering professor who declined to give his name. Both men meekly received verbal warnings Thursday for ignoring stop signs. “They seem to give the cars a break when they roll through,” Schneider said after Silas was out of earshot.

Not an annoyance to all While generally unpopular with bicyclists, Silas got some love from the four-wheeled — and even the three-wheeled — crowds. Two bus drivers beamed their approval as they rolled past the sidewalk lineup of detained cyclists. And the crackdown took a slightly surreal twist when Silas noticed second-string Longhorn quarterback Sherrod Harris zipping down Speedway in a burnt-orange mobility scooter. “Sherrod! You gotta ride that thing on the right side of the road,” Silas yelled as Harris, his leg in bandages after recent surgery, grinned and scooted onto the sidewalk to chat with the officer. Watching Silas work as he stood across the street with a Daily Texan reporter and photographer, Officer Zachary Miller said the crackdowns would continue at least until the end of the semester — possibly longer, if cyclists don’t get the message. Not many have, Silas said. Ticketing another stop-signrunner he’d chased two blocks — this one late for a human sexuality test — the officer tried his best to be conciliatory. “Are you familiar with the bike laws in the state of Texas, by any chance?” he asked the woman, a rower who alternately sobbed and took sips from a plastic water bottle. “It doesn’t really matter at this point, does it?” she said.

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OpiniOn

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Editor in Chief: Leah Finnegan Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Audrey Campbell Josh Haney Jillian Sheridan Abby Terrell Mary Tuma

T he Daily Texan

GALLERY

VIEWPOINT

Compensate the wrongly convicted A bill that seeks to award more compensation to people who have been wrongly imprisoned passed through the Texas House on Friday with an overwhelmingly favorable vote. House Bill 1736, authored by Rep. Rafael Anchia, D-Dallas, proposes an increase in the lump-sum payment given to citizens who have been wrongly convicted of crimes. Passage of the bill would mean that those exonerated from their criminal sentences would receive $80,000 for each year they had been incarcerated. Anchia told the Austin American-Statesman that the bill’s goal is “about trying to achieve some semblance of justice” for those who have been wrongfully convicted and spent their life behind bars undeservingly. The bill, named the Tim Cole Act, works to help people who have been released from prison and are trying to get their lives back in order. Timothy Cole died in prison before his name and reputation could be cleared in conjunction with the 1985 rape case involving another student at Texas Tech University. In hopes of facilitating a smooth transition from jail back into society, the proposal would also provide monthly annuity payments over the course of the individuals’ life, based on the amount of time they had to serve. It would also make recipients eligible for health insurance. Best of all, the bill awards recipients 120 hours of tuition funds for courses at a community college or state university, allowing them the chance to work toward a degree and a career. The added stipulations of the bill ensure that the wrongfully accused is provided every opportunity to set their life back on track. The Innocence Project, an activist group supporting the bill, states that the largest contributing factor of wrongful criminal convictions throughout the U.S. is eyewitness misidentification — a mistaken testimony on the part of witnesses’ claims. The mistaken testimony of eyewitnesses accounts for more than 75 percent of convictions that are later overturned using DNA testing and proof of innocence, according to the project. The Innocence Project also argues that DNA testing is not an option in 9095 percent of criminal cases, and therefore, the court system relies on other kinds of subjective evidence that cannot be scientifically proven or conducted, such as eyewitness testimony. With the support of DNA testing, 38 people, the most nationwide, have been exonerated in Texas. The state has paid roughly $9 million to 46 people who proved to have been wrongfully convicted and imprisoned. This money could be better spent elsewhere had our court systems not been so quick to sentence without proper evidence. DNA testing is worth the time and expense to prevent the wrongful incarceration of innocent men and women and the damage to their reputations, their families and their lives. The Texas court system has become too reliant on faulty evidence. The state must improve its legal system, so as to put an end to the shameful and unacceptable practice of mistakenly convicting Texas residents. — Audrey Campbell for the editorial board

GALLERY

THE FIRING LINE Philo-philanthropic I When I first heard about McCombs’ Student Philanthropy Month, my reaction was similar to the sentiments expressed in the April 23 opinion piece “An open anonymous letter.” On the surface, it seemed like a “nonsensical fundraising campaign,” and I refused to donate accordingly. If McCombs needs more money to fund its operations, the school should raise prices like a normal business would. The situation looks ironic at first glance, doesn’t it? A business school not following normal business practices seems hypocritical and deserving of criticism. But there is neither irony nor hypocrisy in this situation.The campaign is cleverly crafted to attract students who want a better degree and professional programs and students, like me, who are more interested in a great bang for our buck. Last week, I donated $5 to the campaign, and I received the following: a “Students Hooked on Texas” T-shirt, a Chipotle burrito, a guaranteed Kerbey Lane lunch and a chance to get one of more than $300 worth of gifts donated specifically to the campaign. The students running the campaign apparently worked hard to attract cheap students like me. So to those students who want to make their dollars go farther, you’ll be getting great value from your donation. And to those students who donate to improve McCombs, you’ll be getting great value from your degree. The best part is that anyone who opts in to this win-win scheme can do so voluntarily. Grant Rauscher Finance, business honors and government junior

Philo-philanthropic II I can personally speak on behalf of BBA Lega-

A modest defense of shallowness By Andrew Friedenthal Daily Texan Columnist In the past few weeks, frumpy Scotswoman Susan Boyle has rocketed to fame due to her popular rendition of the song “I Dreamed A Dream,” from the musical “Les Misérables,” on the U.K. TV show “Britain’s Got Talent.” I’ve watched the YouTube video of her performance easily a dozen times by now, and each time I’m struck more and more with the same sentiment: Why, exactly, does this woman — according to Facebook — have more fans than God? Though her voice and performance are certainly strong, Boyle is only about as good as any performer on a national tour of a hit musical. What’s much more striking about her, and what’s being carefully winked at without being stated in most of the commentary about her, is that she’s ugly. Her voice is superb, yes, but her looks are more akin to your friend’s aging mother (and not the neighborhood MILF, either) and certainly are not up to the exacting standards that we rightfully set for our celebrities. Her popularity has arisen not due to her vocal talent in and of itself but rather from the inconsistency of her harmonious voice and her plain face and body. Were Susan Boyle a man, the standards we would hold him or her to would not be nearly as extreme, and a homely appearance would be much more acceptable to us. However, for a woman with a beautiful voice to not have an equally beautiful body seems to be a malicious quirk of fate, a bit of cognitive dissonance that we, the American public, more so than the British public, cannot seem to get around. Perhaps that is because, here in America, we are a bit more demanding of our pop idols and celebrities. Our heroes, after all, are actors, models, sports stars and reality show contestants. We deserve beauty on the outside to match beauty on the inside (which is only secondary, anyway). Indeed, one can see the danger here almost immediately. It is

cy, a campaign encouraging students to give back to the McCombs Business School in ways that their tuition does not. Sadly, the economic climate we are currently facing is terrible. Believe me, my family and I have been hurt and affected by this economic downturn, as I’m sure many others within the McCombs community have been. McCombs is facing challenges as well. For example, each year, the University Co-op donates $50,000 to McCombs to be used for the funding of programs, events and organizations aimed at developing students professionally in ways that our classes do not. However, the Co-op recently announced that it will be unable to make this donation for the coming school year. This campaign should compensate some of this loss. I want to emphasize that in no way do we intend to insinuate that those students who do not contribute are lesser members of the McCombs community. Many students have reasons to not get involved with BBA Legacy. We do not want any students from McCombs to feel pressured or alienated as a result of the campaign. I want everyone to feel that the resources they choose to part with are benefiting causes of their choice. I would personally like to thank all who have contributed the more than $4,000 raised so far by BBA Legacy. Additionally, thanks to MBA Legacy and Make-A-Mark Campaigns. Together, our student giving programs will help to build a brighter future. Kelly Pallini Marketing junior 2009 BBA Legacy Chair

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline. com. Letters must be fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity and liability. We regret that we cannot publish all letters.

beyond contention that in today’s world the beautiful and glamorous are best suited for thriving and, indeed, even for survival. They receive perks and privileges from the rest of us that allow them to succeed in all their endeavors, whether it be cutting into a long line or putting out a vanity CD, which gives them an leg up in terms of economic, emotional and physical advancement. Fortunately, popular culture, at least in this country (once again, I remind you of the creeping danger Susan Boyle represents), has kept pace with this biological, genetic need. We have learned, first and foremost, to judge a book by its cover. Think of how the two most successful of the seven “American Idol” winners — Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood — are the most “traditionally” attractive of the bunch (meaning, of course, thin, young, white), while the overweight Ruben Studdard has barely been heard from since. Britain may have talent, but America has standards of attractiveness. The prevalence of makeover shows over the past few years is further testament to the continuing American Dream of beauty at all costs. Indeed, this ethos can be found in some of our greatest films dating back for decades. In “Casablanca,” for example, Ingrid Bergman makes the understandable and righteous choice of the traditionally handsome Paul Henreid over the more stone-faced, if mildly charismatic, Humphrey Bogart. Even more tellingly, in “Annie Hall,” the famously unattractive Woody Allen confronts an attractive couple on the street, asking them how they account for their happiness, to which they reply that they are “very shallow and empty and have no ideas and nothing interesting to say.” When Allen responds, “So you’ve managed to work out something?” we learn that Allen’s rich inner life, cultivated at the expense of his own outer appearance, leads him to an existence of neurotic misery that the beautiful couple, the ultimate heroes of the movie, know nothing of in their blissful state of love and pleasure. Our art, then, agrees with our tabloids, informing us that external beauty is the end goal of what we should seek in American life. Ultimately, it’s not what you’re like, how you feel or even what you do that matters — it’s what you look like. Friedenthal is an American studies graduate student.

SEX ED WITH GULI FAGER Dear Guli, I’ve been seeing this guy recently, and we just started having sex about a week ago. We’ve been using condoms every time, but a few days ago, after we were done having sex, I saw the condom on the sheets and realized that it had come off at some point. My boyfriend is really concerned that I might be pregnant, and I’m not sure what to do. A pregnancy test won’t show if I’m pregnant for at least a week, right? Tracy

Dear Tracy, If fewer than five days have passed since this “condom mishap,” I recommend you take Plan B as soon as you can. When taken up to 120 hours or five days after unprotected sex, Plan B reduces the risk of pregnancy by about 85 percent. Plan B is a high dose of levongestrel, a hormone that is found in most regular combination birth control pills. When taken in high doses, it prevents pregnancy by thickening cervical mucus (so the sperm can’t get into the fallopian

tubes where the egg hangs out after ovulation)— inhibiting ovulation (so there is no egg to fertilize) and changing the environment of the fallopian tubes from a slick, waterslide-like surface to a Jell-O-like material that sperm can’t swim through to get to an egg. Getting a pregnancy test is a good idea, but you’re right that you may need to wait a few days. Pregnancy tests look for human chorionic gonadotropin, or HCG. HCG is produced when the fertilized egg has implanted in the uterus, and since it can take several days after fertilization for implantation to occur, a pregnancy test taken very soon after unprotected sex may not show a positive result. At University Health Services, we perform a urine test that can detect a pregnancy about 10 days after sex. Plan B is available over the counter at the UHS Pharmacy, and you can make an appointment for a pregnancy test by calling (512) 475-4955. Got a burning question (or a burning sensation)? E-mail Guli Fager, healthy sexuality education coordinator at UHS, at g.fager@uhs.utexas.edu.

LEGALESE

SUBMIT A COLUMN

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the editorial board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

The Daily Texan welcomes submissions for guest columns. Columns must be between 500 and 700 words. Send columns to editor@dailytexanonline.com. The Texan reserves the right to edit all columns for clarity and liability if chosen for publication.


5A UNIV

Students play market with $30,000 By Hudson Lockett Daily Texan Staff In the midst of an economic crisis, the Asian Business Association Investment Team is managing a $30,000 portfolio without any faculty supervision. The team, formed to give students experience investing real money, tracks its progress against the S&P 500, a group of companies chosen to reflect the economic status of the biggest players in the financial market. Wendy Lin, a business and Chinese junior, said alumni Eric Yu Chang and James Peng

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founded the group in fall 2007 using money they made off their own investments. Members said the group was up about 3.5 percent relative to the market in 2009, though the members don’t get anything but experience from their investments. “Granted, it’s nice to have good returns,” Lin said. The group keeps a percentage of the portfolio in cash so it can start over should it lose its invested money. Finance senior Vishal Kumar said the group aims to give members an edge in classes, intern-

ships and job interviews by giving them experience and knowledge only available through investing money in the market. “It’s just really interesting to see kids who are sophomores learning things, doing things that you don’t even see people when they graduate being able to do,” Kumar said. The 13 members follow the group’s stocks in turns and send updates out via e-mail at the end of each hour-long shift. “One person on the team is always watching the market,” said finance senior Jeffrey Pao. Pao said that between week-

ly meetings to pitch potential investments, individual research and four smaller group meetings headed by the chairs of individual stocks, members spend about 15 hours a week together. “We’re a really tight-knit group,” he said. Along with the responsibility inherent to investing thousands of dollars in a stock, Kumar said he thinks the economic crisis is a better environment for learning to scrutinize companies. “It makes you really do your research when you’re looking into any sort of investment” he said.

POLICE: Cyclists bemoan

sudden law enforcement From page 1A By Avi Selk Daily Texan Staff “I was just trying to get to the library so I could study for my test,” said Rocco Bernardoni, sweating through his T-shirt as he dismounted his bicycle in front of the police officer who had chased him a block down Speedway. “You ran a stop sign. Are you familiar with the state bike laws?” asked UT Police Officer Joseph Silas, still wearing his helmet as he inspected the advertising junior’s ID card. Bernardoni placed his hands on his thighs, leaned forward and breathed in heavily. “It’s just really hard for me to keep my composure,” he told the officer. After Silas issued him a $50 ticket and rode away, Bernardoni’s composure relented. “I shouldn’t have stopped pedaling,” he said, tears streaming down behind his sunglasses. “This is outrageous, that they have to interrupt our education just to give us a hard time.”

For some, an unwelcome surprise

Emily Kinsolving | Daily Texan Staff

As part of a national lobbying effort, students walk from the UT Tower to the Capitol to raise awareness for Invisible Children on Saturday afternoon. Protesters then camped out on the Capitol grounds, hoping to be “rescued” by celebrities.

In name of Uganda, group waits for ‘rescue’ By Laura Ceglio Daily Texan Staff Sleeping bags, pillows and backpacks littered the Capitol lawn Sunday as more than 800 people from all over Texas waited to be “rescued” by media and celebrity moguls. “The Rescue” occurred in hundreds of cities all over the world in an effort by the nonprofit group Invisible Children to raise money and spread knowledge about child kidnappings in Uganda. To successfully rescue the participants, the media and a government official or powerful celebrity must make an appearance at the rally. Participants gathered at the UT Tower and then marched in groups to the Capitol while grasping a rope, a symbolic event known as “the abduction.”

“Every day, children are taken from their homes and forced to be soldiers in the civil war that has taken place in Uganda for 21 years,” said Victorio Marasigan, a computer design junior at Texas State University. Once at the Capitol, volunteers each wrote two letters to their U.S. senators to bolster support from the Legislature. “We found out that writing letters is the most effective way to gain attention, because senators are required by law to read all of their letters,” said Brynne Henn, one of the organizers for the Austin rally. “In June, a group of us will travel to Washington, D.C., and hand-deliver the written letters to the senators.” The organization also sold merchandise to raise money, including a variety of DVDs, each

of which tells a story about a different child in Uganda affected by the kidnappings. Allen Weier, a University of Mary Hardin-Baylor student, said he decided to volunteer after he saw a screening of one of the videos. “I only found out about this on Wednesday, but when I heard the stories about these children, I knew I had to do something,” Weier said. Participants initially expected to be rescued on Saturday by Maya Angelou, who was in town speaking. Upon learning that she couldn’t make it, the number of protesters thinned to fewer than 100, Henn said. “Right now we are trying to mobilize as many people as possible to come out,” Henn said. “We’re expecting to get rescued tomorrow by some of the senators when Congress will be back in session.”

“We are trying to get [Gov.] Rick Perry to come out by making YouTube videos asking for his help.” — Brynne Henn, rally organizer As of Sunday afternoon, 17 cities still had not been rescued, but those participants of rescued cities will begin to travel to the places still in need, Henn said. “We are trying to get [Gov.] Rick Perry to come out by making YouTube videos asking for his help,” Henn said. “These events bring out a lot of emotion, so it’s hard to ignore.”

“They don’t like it,” said Silas, perched next to his policespecialized Trek bicycle outside the Perry Castañeda Library, as a throng of students passed him on their way to Thursday classes. Silas spent most of the day losing his voice, and his breath, as he shouted down, lectured and chased dozens of cyclists for traffic violations. Most of the day’s offenders got off with a verbal warning, but during a similar operation a few weeks earlier, Silas and another officer ticketed 35 cyclists in fewer than two hours — a total of $1,750 in fines, all payable to UT Parking and Transportation. The crackdowns — now weekly operations — started a few weeks ago, after the department received a rash of student and staff complaints about reckless

cyclists, said UTPD Chief Robert Dahlstrom. “Bicycles can literally kill people,” he said, referencing regular accidents, including a cyclist he said hit a pedestrian on West Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard earlier this year, fracturing the man’s skull. Dahlstrom said UT’s estimated 8,000 cyclists are welcomed, even encouraged, to ride on campus — but that too many of them treat traffic laws as suggestions. Not all cyclists see that as a problem. “Everybody that comes up, all day long, they slow down and they just go through the stop sign. That’s just how it goes,” computer sciences senior Ryan Howard told Silas as he dismounted, gesturing to the mess of bicycles, pedestrians and vehicles in the intersection behind him. “I need the definition of ‘stop,’” Howard said. Silas, with practiced patience and a hoarse voice, began to define it but soon had to interrupt himself as another cyclist zoomed past the same stop sign. “Sir! Sir!” he said. “See?” said Howard triumphantly. “I was slower than that guy.” Like many people that day, Howard said he was annoyed that police were suddenly enforcing traffic rules that cyclists routinely ignore without consequences, instead of going after reckless riders and drivers. “I mean, this is just kind of like an open parking lot, isn’t it?” he said. While some cyclists disdain the rules, other violators are simply unaware of them. “Laws?” laughed Joseph ElAzzi, a geology graduate student from Lebanon who was surprised to get a ticket while riding through campus during Texas Relays weekend. “There are no bike laws in my country. There are no car laws, either.” Ignorance, however, is not an acceptable excuse for some offenders, such as Parking and Transportation employee James Schneider and an en-


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NEWS BRIEFLY Education graduate program No. 3 among public colleges UT’s College of Education ranked third among education graduate programs at public colleges and seventh overall in U.S. News & World Report’s 2009 list of the best education programs in America. The ranking makes the college the highest-rated school at UT and places it among the nation’s elite education programs at Harvard, Stanford, Columbia, Vanderbilt and the University of California, Los Angeles. “This past year has been a very productive one for faculty and students in the College of Education,” said Manuel Justiz, dean of the College of Education. “I am extremely proud of what we have accomplished in the way of research and scholarship, and I certainly am gratified to have our faculty and students recognized at a national level.” Last year, the college’s graduate program ranked fifth among public colleges and 10th overall. The report uses information gathered from 278 graduate programs from across the country offering doctoral degrees in education to calculate its rankings based on criteria such as mean Graduate Record Examination scores, student-faculty ratio, percent of faculty with awards and research activity. — Andrew Martinez

Committee to hear testimony on Keller impeachment case The Texas House Committee on Judiciary and Civil Jurisprudence will hear public testimony today regarding the impeachment of Chief Justice Sharon Keller for her alleged “neglect of duty and willing disregard for human life” in the 2007 execution of Michael Wayne Richard. On Aug. 18, 1986, Richard, on parole for burglary, sexually assaulted and murdered Marguerite Dixon after stealing her two television sets. He was sentenced to death in 1995. The day of Richard’s execution, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to consider a similar case that challenged the constitutionality of lethal injection, on the basis that it is a form of cruel and unusual punishment. Upon the Supreme Court’s decision, Richard’s lawyers called the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals to see whether Keller would be available to hear an appeal. Keller said her court would be open no later than 5 p.m. When Richard’s lawyers arrived shortly after 5 p.m., they were told they could not file an appeal. Richard was executed by lethal injection later that night. Daniel Williams, an aide to state Rep. Lon Burnam, D-Fort Worth, the congressman who filed the resolution for Keller’s impeachment, said Keller contradicted prior court practices of staying open after hours to hear appeals. If Burnam’s resolution passes, the House will select a committee to investigate Keller’s actions. Should the committee find grounds for impeachment, a trial will be held in the state Senate to determine Keller’s fate. — AM

Monday, April 27, 2009

Finding Waldo at Eeyore’s birthday party Flash mob, drum circles fill Austin’s Pease Park at eclectic annual festival By Pierre Bertrand Daily Texan Staff A group of identically dressed people gathered along the south side of Pease Park on Saturday to celebrate Eeyore’s 46th birthday. Their mission: Pull off the world’s largest live “Where’s Waldo?” search. Imagine Woodstock meets Winnie the Pooh meets Austin City Limits, and you have Eeyore’s annual birthday festival. At the heart of the festival, a huge drum circle continuously pounded, and a small crowd of 50 people danced next to a statue representing Winnie the Pooh’s depressive donkey. People — some using pieces of wood as drumsticks — drummed on frying pans, buckets and containers of water, while others played flutes and didgeridoos. After a brief meeting and photo shoot, more than 20 Waldos — all wearing red and white striped shirts — infiltrated the crowd in the park. As participants in Flash Mob Austin’s latest stunt, they wandered aimlessly in a sea of thousands of eclectically costumed patrons amid a cacophony of drum circles and makeshift musicians. On the outskirts of the crowd, one could see little groups of Waldo look-alikes whose job was to act as decoys while festivalgoers tried to find the authentic Waldo for small prizes, which included stickers and tickets to an improv performance. The grand prize was a pack of Sweet Leaf Tea. The festival, which started in the 1960s as a distraction from political events such as the Vietnam War, continues to draw large crowds. “I always thought the festival was going to be stupid, but it’s awesome,” said Terry, a Waldo look-alike. “I always thought

Kim Espinosa | Daily Texan Staff

Scott and Melanie McClure dance at Eeyore’s birthday party in Pease Park on Saturday afternoon. Attendants could choose from activities such as drum circles, maypole dancing, hula-hooping and body painting, as well as participate in a giant “Where’s Waldo?” search coordinated by Austin Flash Mob. it was a bunch of people getting together smoking in the woods naked.” He wasn’t far off. Terry, along with two other flash mob agents, spent the greater part of two hours wandering the park. They passed bare-chested women with painted-on bathing suits, a man wearing only a thong and pregnant women with painted, swollen bellies. As part of the stunt, Terry would tell anyone who came up to him to let Waldo know that Martin, Waldo’s friend, was looking for him. When the real Waldo was found, prizes were handed out.

For some patrons, the search for Waldo was an obsession. “I swear to God I just saw the real Waldo just a minute a ago,” said Malachi Muncy, a freelance reporter. “I lost my [daughter]. I lost my wife. I’m just looking for Waldo.” Muncy said he just wanted to find Waldo and post a photo of him on his blog. “Last year I just came to get stoned,” Muncy said. “The festival seems more normal than usual, but it’s still Austin.” Eventually, after a two-hour search, about 10 people found the real Waldo, who was wearing his traditional hat and cane in 86-de-

“I lost my [daughter]. I lost my wife. I’m just looking for Waldo.” — Malachi Muncy, freelance reporter

gree weather. Jinx Colgate and her friend Megan Fine, both 17, won the grand prize for finding Waldo next to a costume competition and food vendors. “We were just standing there

and we saw Waldo,” Colgate said. “And we just freaked out.” As the flash mob dispersed, Colgate made her way to the costume competition, letting her pet ferret drink from an open bottle of tea.

ON THE WEB: Watch video from Eeyore’s birthday party @ dailytexanonline.com

‘Vagina Monologues’ debut sign language performance

Peyton McGee | Daily Texan Staff

Christine “Star” Carr performs “Reclaiming Cunt” in a sign-language performance of “The Vagina Monologues” on Saturday night. The play included eight performers and an interpreter for the signing-impaired.

By Hudson Lockett Daily Texan Staff “Some of you might be wondering what the sign is for vagina monologues,” signed Lauren Kinast to audience members in Jester Auditorium on Saturday night. The Gender and Sexuality Center has put on performances with interpreters present in years past, but Friday and Saturday marked the first time “The Vagina Monologues” was performed solely in American Sign Language.

Interpreters narrated the performance for the signingimpaired. Laughter rippled through the auditorium as Kinast, the assistant director of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services, explained that the name of the monologues would vary between actresses. ASL gave no official pronunciation for the series of personal vignettes on female sexuality, she said. Director Don Miller said through an interpreter that he was approached a month ago

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by Kinast to do an ASL performance of the monologues. “She said that we needed people from the community, so of course I volunteered,” Miller said. Auditions ended two weeks before opening night, he said. The cast did a full run-through of the show the night before. Franky Ramont, a senior lecturer Department of Linguistics and one of the seven women performing, said through an interpreter that she had done some acting a few years ago and enjoyed it. “When I was offered the chance to do this again, I couldn’t say no,” she said. The performances, sponsored by Services for Students with Disabilities and UT for Rural Enhancement Through Education & Design, was part of V-Day, a movement to combat violence against women and girls worldwide. Proceeds from the performances benefited the movement, SafePlace-Deaf Services and the rural enhancement group’s Mali Signs Project, a program that provides health care information to the deaf and hard of hearing in that country. “I had never seen [the play] in American Sign Language before, so it was really cool,” said Lynn Hou, a linguistics graduate student, through an interpreter. Hou said she had seen other performances with an interpreter present, but nothing like this. “I thought the show was very inspirational, and it was very educational as well,” Hou said. Mindi Gould, a sign language interpreter, said the m o n o l o g u e s w e re m o re graphic in ASL. “I think it was more moving, almost, because it’s visual,” Gould said.


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Sports Editor: David R. Henry E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T he Daily Texan

texas catcher Preston Clark sprints down first baseline to try to beat out a grounder. Clark was 0-for-5 in texas’ 6-6 tie with Kansas State on Sunday.

Maxx Scholten Daily Texan Staff

MEN’S tENNiS

Baylor outlasts Texas in finals, captures Big 12 by Evan Knopp Daily Texan Staff The story remains the same for Texas in the Big 12 championships as it did in the regular season, as the team lost an emotional match to Baylor 4-3 in Norman, Okla., on Sunday. The Horns drew a matchup against Oklahoma in the first round of the tournament and defeated the sooners with ease, 4-0. After Olivier Sajous and Miguel Reyes-Varela dismantled OU’s George Chanturia and Blake Boswell, the No. 2 doubles team consisting of Dimitar Kutrovsky and Josh Zavala locked up the doubles point with an 8-3 victory. Jonah Kane-West continued the dominance, winning his singles match 6-3, 6-1. Kellen Damico followed with his stellar play by losing only three games in two sets, setting up Zavala to close out the Sooners. After a tough first set that Zavala eventually won in a tiebreaker, he closed out Chanturia and the Sooners by winning the second set 6-3. Next up for the Horns was Texas A&M and a chance at revenge for the loss they suffered to the Aggies on April 16 in College Station. Doubles play mirrored that of the previous encounter, as the No. 2 and 3 teams put away the Aggies with 8-6 victories. Ed Corrie and Damico had their No. 1 doubles match suspended as Texas had already locked up the doubles point. Corrie, who has hit a bit of a rough spot as of late, couldn’t get it going against Austin Krajicek and lost 6-3, 6-3 to put A&M in a 1-1 tie with the Horns. The next match to come off the court was Damico’s, as he beat Will Spencer in straight sets. Damico started off the season slowly, falling from the No. 2 singles spot to the No. 5 at one point. He’s been been on a tear since a trip to Oklahoma in late March, winning his last nine singles matches. Kutrovsky then put Texas up 3-1 by taking down Connor Pollock 6-4, 7-6 (3). After a loss at No. 4 singles, the Horns ended the threat when Kane-West won a second-set tiebreaker over Colin Hoover. This clinched a spot in the championship match for the fourth consecutive year. No. 7 Baylor had no trouble making the finals, easily taking down Oklahoma State 4-1 in the semi-finals. Baylor soundly defeated the Horns 6-1 in Austin only three weeks ago. Kutrovsky and Zavala dropped their opening match against Denes Lukacs and Maros Horny 8-3 to give Baylor the early lead. While Reyes-Varela and Sajous tied it up, Corrie and Damico couldn’t hold off the Bears in the deciding match — Baylor came out with a 1-0 lead. Damico continued his success at the No 3 singles spot by making quick work of Dominik Mueller 6-2, 6-1. However, the Bears came roaring back with back-to-back victories to take the lead 3-1. Dimitar Kutrovsky avenged his previous straightset loss to Denes Lukacs by winning his No. 1 singles match 6-4, 7-6 (1). Texas then tied it up 3-3 when Jonah Kane-West won a closely contested match against Horny 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. The lineup switch has worked well for head coach Michael Center, as Kane-West had played extremely well since being inserted into the No. 6 spot. “He gave a real spark to our team, not only by winning his matches, but his competitiveness and attitude were outstanding,” Center said. The Big 12 championship then came down to a third set played by Corrie. Baylor’s Jordan Rux had beaten Corrie on April 2, but Corrie took the first set 7-5 by winning five games in a row. Corrie then held a 4-2 lead on serve in the third set but couldn’t hold on as Rux broke serve and then finished out the match by winning the last four games. It’s a disappointing end to the Big 12 season, to be sure, but Center isn’t letting the team members hang their heads. “I was really proud of the way the guys fought back and put ourselves in a position to win,” Center said. “We just came up a little short.”

ON THE WEB: Read coverage of women’s golf @ dailytexanonline.com

baSEball

Texas 6, Kansas State 6

Kansas State holds Texas winless Horns fall from atop Big 12; KSU’s ‘brilliant’ play too much for Texas by laken litman Daily Texan Staff The Longhorns can only hope that the sun will come out tomorrow. It was a gloomy weekend for Texas, and not only because of the overcast weather. Apparently, the immediate effect of losing to Rice is to lose the next series against a team from the state of Kansas. In March, Texas (29-11-1, 12-8-1 Big 12) went to Houston to play Rice in a mid-week game and was hand-

ed its third loss of the season. That weekend, the Horns traveled to Lawrence, Kan., to face KU and lost all three games by only one run. This weekend Texas lost a Big 12 series against a different Kansas team — Kansas State (31-11-1, 10-7-1 Big 12). The Longhorns lost the first two games and tied the final game on Sunday. “The three Kansas games and the three Kansas State games are almost carbon copies of each other,” said head coach Augie Garrido. “Whatever could go wrong did go wrong. I mean [Kansas

TOUGH continues on page 2B

Failed rally highlights weekend-long futility for struggling Longhorns by austin talbert Daily Texan Staff Down one run in the eighth, Texas was ready to rally. Two on, no out — the table was set. And the Longhorns desperately needed a rally. After dropping the two straight one-run games to start its weekend set with Kansas State, Texas needed a late-inning comeback to steal a win Sunday to regain some momentum and remain atop the Big 12.

But what Texas needed all weekend failed to come through. And after sweeping Oklahoma to take control of the Big 12 last weekend, the Longhorns failed to take a single game from Kansas State, turning the top of the Big 12 into mass chaos. Preston Clark attempted to bunt both runners over, but instead he fouled off two attempts and proceeded to strike out. Kyle Lusson met the same fortune, striking out on three straight pitches. Michael Torres, the hottest-hitting Longhorn of late, moved to the top of the or-

BASEBALL continues on page 2B

Redskins make Orakpo lucky No. 13

Jason DeCrow | Associated Press

former longhorn brian orakpo holds up his new jersey Saturday in New York. the Washington Redskins made orakpo the 13th pick in this year’s Nfl Draft. orakpo became the 14th texas player picked in the first round since texas coach Mack brown arrived in 1998.

Former standout highlights draft for Texas; three more Horns picked Sunday by David R. Henry Daily Texan Staff At Radio City Music Hall in New York City, surrounded by friends and family, Texas defensive end Brian Orakpo was all smiles when the Washington Redskins selected him with the 13th pick in the first round of Saturday’s NFL Draft. “Being a first-round draft pick is a dream come true,” Orakpo said. “It really shows how hard work pays off and is a tribute to my family, coaches, teammates — everyone that helped me get here.” Going 13th was a little bit later than most expected Orakpo to be drafted, but he’s not complaining. “It was tough to wait a little

longer than I expected, but when it came down to the Washington Redskins, I was really excited,” Orakpo said. “It just felt like the perfect fit. It’s a lot like Texas, a great organization with a proud history, a winning tradition, great fans.” In 2008, Orakpo, the Horns’ defensive captain, won the Nagurski Trophy (nation’s top defensive player), Lombardi Award (nation’s top lineman) and Hendricks Award (nation’s top defensive end) and was named the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year. It’s a bittersweet moment for Longhorn fans who are also fans of the Dallas Cowboys, since the Redskins and the Cowboys are long-standing rivals.

Orakpo is the 14th Longhorn drafted in the first round in the Mack Brown era. Orakpo was the only Longhorn drafted on the first day of the NFL draft, but a few of his teammates heard their names called on Day Two. Defensive Tackle Roy Miller went much higher than expected in the third round to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers with the 81st pick. The 6-foot-1, 310-pound Miller is in the same mold as former Longhorn Casey Hampton, a probowler and Super Bowl-winning defensive tackle with the Pittsburgh Steelers. “It’s something that you dream of,” Miller said. “There aren’t too

many people that get picked in the NFL Draft. I’m definitely honored to be picked by the Bucs. I’m so excited because they’ve had a lot of great players on defense there, so going to a place that’s known for defense is going to be a lot of fun.” Another surprise was defensive end Henry Melton going in the fourth round. The Chicago Bears took Melton with the 105th pick. Melton started his career as a running back at Texas, but then moved to defensive end his junior year following the advice of his uncle, former Denver Bronco player Ray Crockett.

DRAFT continues on page 3B

Softball

Texas 12, Oklahoma State 2

Texas splits series with Oklahoma State

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

texas’ Desiree Williams rounds third base. Williams hit two home runs in texas’ win Saturday.

by Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff The bats were hot and cold for Texas on Saturday in Stillwater, Okla., as the Longhorns split a doubleheader against the Cowboys to finish up their final road trip of the regular season. After managing only three hits in a 4-1 loss in the series opener, the Longhorn offense tore up Oklahoma State’s pitching, forcing the game to end after five innings due to a run rule. Game one opened with the Oklahoma State scoring three unearned runs after an error by Nadia Taylor. The Longhorn seventh-inning rally fell short as they left the bases loaded after Desiree Williams and Courtney Craig struck out consecutively to end the game. In the circle, Brittany Barnhill pitched a complete game

The Longhorn offense tore up Oklahoma State’s pitching, forcing the game to end after five innings due to a run rule. but did not get the run support to earn what could have been her 23rd win. The series finale began with a bang as Williams led off the game with a solo home run and later hit another long ball in her next at bat. Williams set another school record, earning her 62nd career stolen base in game one. Second baseman Loryn Johnson followed the homer two batters later with one of her own. Barnhill led off a four-run inning with a solo shot to left center to give the Longhorns another run. Erin Tresselt gave Barnhill

a break as she took over in the pitcher’s spot for Texas in game two. Tresselt made quick work of Oklahoma State, only needing 51 pitches to get the win. Taking over what could be considered a closer role, Tresselt made a rare start and even got to take some swings at the plate as she saw her first three-plate appearances for the season, scoring one of the runs in the 12-2 blowout. The Longhorns conclude their season with a doubleheader against UTSA on Thursday and their Big 12 season finale against Texas A&M.


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BASEBAll: Longhorns rally late, fail

Women’s Tennis

Baylor too much for Texas, again Horns cruise to finals, but Bears keep team from capturing 8th Big 12 title By Rishi Daulat Daily Texan Staff If Baylor wasn’t in the Big 12, Texas would have about 20 conference championship titles in women’s tennis. But once again, the Big 12 championships were a microcosm of the conference regular season for the Horns. No. 32 Texas destroyed every team except Baylor, yet once it reached the finals, Texas was helpless against the Bears. After receiving a first-round bye, Texas faced off against Texas Tech in the second round, dominating the Red Raiders 4-0. The Horns captured the doubles point by winning two of the three matches and then picking up the required three singles victories. The sole sore spot of the day came at first doubles, when Texas’ ITA No. 39 tandem of Vanja Corovic and Marija Milic continued their sudden decline with an 8-4 loss to Samantha van der Drift and Kelsy Garland. Krista Damico, Amanda Craddock

to capture win over Kansas State From page 1B

and Caroline Larsson all picked up singles and doubles wins for Texas. In their semifinal match against Texas A&M, the Horns withstood a furious Aggie rally in the singles session, winning 4-2. The Aggies defeated Oklahoma State 4-1 in the second round yet came out flat in the doubles session with Texas, easing through the first and second spot matches. The singles session was a battle, with Larsson and Sarah Lancaster both earning tough three-set wins. Maggie Mello was the other singles victor for the Horns, winning 6-2, 6-4. In the finals facing ITA No. 5 Baylor, Texas was once again thoroughly out-matched, losing 4-1. The doubles session was a no-contest as the Bears picked up comfortable wins at the second and third slots. ITA No. 116 Corovic was the only Longhorn to grab a win — a substantial victory — as she defeated No. 39 Taylor Ormond. The Horns were hoping to capture their eighth Big 12 title, but Paul Chouy | Daily Texan Staff the team now looks forward to the NCAA tournament, which starts Texas freshman Krista Damico lines up a shot. Baylor’s Lenka Broosova on May 8. defeated Damico 6-0, 6-1 in the Big 12 championships.

der on Sunday — he drove a hard-hit ball into center field. The laser headed straight to Kansas State center fielder Dane Yelovich, who was in the right position to take away Texas hits throughout the weekend. The rally was over. “We had 10 balls we hit right on the nose that were outs today,” said Texas coach Augie Garrido. “Six of those in a row. The baseball gods are being pretty rough.” Texas scored a run in the bottom of the ninth to tie the game, but the Wildcats — as they did all weekend — would have the final say on the outcome. Jordan Etier, who was pinch running for Cameron Rupp, would have been the winning run, but instead he was gunned down at home. Texas would have to settle for a tie. The laser-beam throw from Yelovich kept the Longhorns from taking a single game from the Wildcats. “It wouldn’t have been as close if I would have been running,” said Rupp, who doubled in the tying run in the ninth. “My slow self would

have been out by a long way. It took a perfect throw. It didn’t go our way this weekend. It didn’t go our way today.” Because of Big 12 travel rules, the game officially became a tie after the scoreless 10th inning. The rules, agreed upon by the coaches before the game, stated that no inning could begin after 4:45 p.m. “I hate to see the last one slip away,” said Kansas State coach Brad Hill. “We played good baseball all the way through.” Texas, on the other hand, avoided another loss and its second Big 12 series sweep of the season — the first coming on the road at the hands of Kansas’s other school. “A tie is better than losing,” Garrido said. “A win would have been a nice surprise.” After winning 10 straight games, Texas has failed to secure a win in its last four. “No one can play better baseball than Kansas State has played this weekend,” Garrido said. “And whatever could go wrong for us went wrong. We are here to dominate. We are expected to dominate. This is about as rough as it gets.”

Tough: Wildcats capture weekend series by overpowering Texas From page 1B State] was brilliant. Everything worked for them.” Almost every time a Longhorn hit, the ball became a magnet to a Wildcat’s glove. “The reality of it all is that we went out and played quality baseball, and they beat us,” Garrido said. “Some of it was

that the balls were hit hard and went to people at the wrong time. It wasn’t because we didn’t execute. We executed well. I was disappointed [in the losses], but I’m not disappointed in our performance.” In game one of the weekend series, the Longhorns took an early two-run lead. They increased the lead with another run in the bot-

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tom of the fourth. But the Wildcats fought back and crafted their first lead of the game in the top of the eighth when third baseman Jason King singled to right field, stole second and scored on a single by shortstop Drew Biery for the 3-2 advantage. Kansas State then tacked on an insurance run to make the final score 4-2 in the ninth. Game two was tit for tat. The Horns came out ready to rock’n’roll by taking a first-inning lead with a pair of runs. Leadoff hitter Travis Tucker laced a single up the middle, moved to second on a sacrifice bunt by third baseman Michael Torres and scored on a single to left field by Keyes, who scored on an error. But the Wildcats came back in the top of the second and knotted the score 2-2. Zeroes littered the scoreboard up until the extra 11th inning, when the Wildcats scored two runs. First baseman Brandon Belt hit a lead-off home run to the scoreboard in left center to cut one run from the lead. The rally continued when shortstop Brandon Loy doubled to left field, and Torres tied the score 4-4 with a single that skimmed over the top of the outreached glove of Kansas State’s shortstop. “Both teams are fighting, scratching, clawing,” said Kansas State head coach Brad Hill. “I mean, we get a two-run homer, and lo and behold, here they come. It was a great battle, and both teams showed a lot of heart.” The Wildcats stitched the game-winning rally in the top of the 12th, when Martini drove

in the game-winning run with a single down right field ending the scoring, 5-4. In game three, the Longhorns avoided the sweep with a 6-6 tie. “A tie is better than losing because [rankings] are about winning percentage and the tie keeps you with a better winning percentage than a loss,” Garrido said. “Certainly winning would have been a nice surprise, but be that is it may, no one can play baseball any better than Kansas State played this weekend. It was remarkable.” Kansas State scored first this time in the top of the second with a home run off of Texas pitcher Brandon Workman. Texas immediately responded with a run, but the Wildcats reclaimed the lead in the third and added more runs in the fourth and sixth innings and led Texas 4-1 at one point. Texas took its only lead of the game with a four-run sixth inning. Belt started the rally with a double to left center field. He then moved to third on a wild pitch and scored on a single by Keyes. With one out, Lusson drew a walk, and Loy reached on bunt single to load the bases. Lusson and Keyes scored to tie the game after a hit by Clark. Texas took the 5-4 lead when Torres hit a sacrifice fly to plate Loy. Kansas State regained its lead with a single to right field with loaded bases, plating two runners. Leading the way 6-5 in the ninth, Belt doubled to center field, moved to third on a ground out by Keyes and scored the gametying run when Rupp doubled to the gap in left center field. The game ended in the 10th inning as a tie due to time restrictions.

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3B CLASS

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Monday, April 27, 2009

Draft: NFL

Men’s TraCk and Field

Horns break school record at Penn Relays

teams pick 4 former Horns From page 1B “Watching my uncle play, I always wanted to follow in his footsteps,” Melton said. “When [the Bears] called and said they were going to make me the pick, I kind of lost my mind. I’m still calming down a bit. I had heard I could go anywhere from late third round to never, so it is just a relief.” Melton had four sacks and 10 tackles for a loss in 2008.

“Being a first-round draft pick is a dream come true.” — Brian Orakpo, defensive end “Melton displays excellent lower-body strength that gives him the ability to stack and shed when holding the edge against the run,” said ESPN. com’s Scouts Inc. “He also flashes the quickness and natural ability to bend that could allow him to develop.” Running back Chris Ogbonnaya, a prototypical thirddown back in the NFL due to his pass catching and blocking ability, went in the seventh round to the St. Louis Rams with the 211th pick. Ogbonnaya ran for just 378 yards in 2008 but had more than 100 yards in the Oklahoma game. “I’m really happy about being drafted,” Ogbonnaya said. “I’m looking forward to helping the Rams and contributing. It’s definitely an honor, and I’m excited about the next chapter. I’ve just started to calm down. About 20 minutes ago, it was a circus here.” Senior receiver Quan Cosby, who went to Englewood, N.J., to watch the NFL draft with comedian Bill Cosby (no relation), did not get drafted. Teams were concerned about his age (26) and height (5-feet-9-inches).

Paul Chouy | Daily Texan Staff

Texas senior Tevas everett, front, takes the baton from fellow senior Mike Carmody in the 4x800-meter at the Texas relays earlier this month. everett and his brother Tevan, along with Jacob Hernandez and kyle Miller, broke a 28-year-old school record in the event by running a 7:16.33 at the Penn relays.

WoMen’s TraCk and Field

Longhorns capture relays at cold, wet meet in Iowa Texas cruises to relay wins, captures gold in both 4x100, 4x400 By Chris Tavarez Daily Texan Staff There’s only one way to describe the conditions in Des Moines, Iowa, on Saturday. “Cold and wet,” said head coach Beverly Kearney. To be a bit more specific, the temperatures were in the upper 40s and came with a nice helping of wind and rain. The adverse conditions may have hurt some

The two relays’ ability to perform at an elite level despite the conditions showed Kearney how far the team has come. “We are really starting to gel going into the conference and regional and national championships, and that’s what you want to do,” Kearney said. “I think that it says a lot for us being as young as we are and being able to handle those adverse conditions.” Even with a gold in the 4x400, Malone wasn’t done. She also won her first gold in the long jump this season with a mark of 20 1/2, which she achieved on her first jump of the day.

Classifieds

Perhaps the biggest news coming out of the meet was that threetime NCAA high jump champion Destinee Hooker didn’t clear the opening height. Hooker was competing in the invitational section alongside five Olympians from the 2008 Beijing Olympics and hadn’t lost a meet all season, but her marks had been going down since the end of the indoor season. “Getting started that early in the morning, at an international level — your first in a real international level-type competition — and in those adverse circumstances really played a part in [her per-

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performances, but certainly not those of Texas’ 4x100-meter- and 4x400-meter-relay teams. The 4x100 team of freshmen Stacey-Ann Smith, LaKiedra Stewart and Angele Cooper and senior Alex Anderson took the gold with a regional qualifying time of 44 minutes, 33 seconds, their second-fastest time of the season. Joining Smith and Anderson for the 4x400 was freshman Judy Nwosu and sophomore Chantel Malone. The relay posted a re1 gional qualifying time of 3:35.08, nearly a full second faster than second place.

CLASSIFIEDS

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pace,” Miller said. “About 150 meters to go, I moved up so we would be in an even position at the handoff.” Miller took the baton from one brother to the other, handing off to Tevan Everett, with Texas in a close race with Arkansas and Penn State. At the final handoff, Penn State had a slight lead over Texas. “Jacob and I talked about before the race, that if I couldn’t get us into first, he just wanted to get the baton with us about five to 10 meters behind,” Everett said. Enter Jacob Hernandez. The two-time national champion in the 800 meters only needed one lap to regain the lead and one lap to widen it. “As we came around the last 200, I could hear the other pack coming, and I just pushed,” Hernandez said. “I took a peek at the JumboTron, but just a peek — people tell you that you lose time by looking up there, so I just kept it up to stay ahead.” With a stellar 1:46.21 split by Hernandez, Texas clocked in at 7:16.33 to win the race and break the 28-year-old school record.

By Jordan Godwin Daily Texan Staff On Saturday, head coach Bubba Thornton put together what was possibly the best 4x800-meter relay lineup in the history of Texas track. With two national champions in Tevan Everett and Jacob Hernandez and a strong supporting cast of Tevas Everett and Kyle Miller, the Longhorns were poised for a new school record. “Our 4x800-meter relay team is going to have a shot this weekend,” Thornton said before the Penn Relays. “They want the school record.” Running the first leg, Tevas Everett gave Texas an early lead. “I’ve been running first leg all season, so I was prepared,” Everett said. “There was a lot of banging going on at the start — I know I got pushed, but I just stayed up toward the front pack until I kicked.” After a 1-minute, 50.59-second effort, Everett handed off to Kyle Miller, who won the 1,500-meter run at the Texas Twilight Invitational last weekend. “I just sat in second and waited there, setting a comfortable

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formance],” Kearney said. On Saturday, the Black Coaches and Administrators named Kearney the Female Coach of the Year. “Beverly’s record of achievement sets the standard in women’s track and field,” said Texas Women’s Athletic Director Chris Plonsky. “She has a long legacy of building championship teams as well as helping young women learn about facing challenges in life away from the competition arena with a positive, inspirational and achievement-oriented mindset. She is a treasure for the University of Texas.”

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muscular males ages 18-28 wanted for physique photography. $200. 512-927-2448.

stuDy aBroaD lima, peru 6 hours of Anthropology credit. May 28-June 27, 2009 $2334 includes air, hotel, field trips, tuition. 512-223-7689 512-784-2498 Austin Community College

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EMPLOYMENT

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Gymnastics coach (WestlaKe) Enthusiastic, talented individual to teach gymnastics to a range of ages in a noncompetitive gym 10 min. from campus. www. wearechampions.com 512-426-0997 haWthorn suites hotel: Relief Night Audit and Part Time Front Desk. Apply in person. 512-459-3335

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Monday, April 27, 2009


5B ENT

FASHION: Best

collections get design awards From page 6B her potential. “It is not for her own glorification. It is her expression,” said Don Rude, Tovar’s father. “She has a humility about it and that is a rare balance to have.” The models glided down the runway to the Ting Tings, MIA and Beck, among other strut-worthy mixes. All of the designers pursued their own ideas of what was fashionable, with the exception of the occasional trendy jumpsuit or one-shouldered dress. The designers showed an immaculate attention to detail, as exemplified in Avery Allen’s ’50s-inspired collection. Her garments had touches of pink-and-blue-plaid fabric that extended even to the model’s earrings. After a dramatic dimming of the lights, models in evening dresses made their entrance. They walked down the runway and struck a pose on stage as if they were in a photo shoot. The majority of the evening dresses were elegant, flowing gowns, with the exception of one. As MGMT resonated through the building, a full-skirted tulle dress with a deconstructed fabric overlay by designer Erin Dykam emerged. The distinctive outfit was paired with equally rebellious motorcycle boots. Ruffles and tiers of cream silk and satin rounded out the show with the bridal gowns. A remix of Feist’s “My Moon My Man” played as the designers walked hand-in-hand down the catwalk with the models wearing their gowns for the final run-through. Throughout the semester, a panel of fashion experts judged each garment. At the show, the designers’ months of dedication were finally tallied as awards were presented. The Most Marketable Fashion Collection was awarded to Mallory Garmon, whose black-and-white outfits used classical elements while adding interesting twists like jumpsuits and vests. Katha Busk won Most WellConstructed Fashion Collection; her 19th-century-inspired pieces included a hoop skirt with a modern asymmetrical twist. Most Innovative Collection went to Merketa Pokorney for her tiered tulle mini dresses in gold, green, white and blue with convertible elements, like a zip-off vest that can be interchanged with other pieces. The best evening gown was a tie between Busk’s sheer pastel floor-length gown, topped with a corset, and Caitlyn Hopkin’s billowing black gown with peacock feathers and an uneven hemline. Garmon won Best Bridal with a nautical-inspired, floor-length white gown complemented by an appropriate necktie and sailor cap in place of a veil. Stephanie Wagenman humbly accepted the Best Overall Collection award for her bodyskimming pieces in white, black and fuchsia with green details. Her bridal gown was an understated cream column that a bustle of ivory, ruffled scarves enveloping the neck and cascading down to take center stage. “I was shaking in my bones when they announced it,” Wagenman said. “I honestly wasn’t expecting it, and I think all of my fellow students deserve to win Best Overall.” Luminous as it was, the show was bittersweet for many. Garmon said now that their collections have walked, there are mixed emotions. The design students are pleased with their accomplishments but know that times are changing. Senior lecturer Eve Nicols agreed but added that the students have abundant careers ahead of them. “I just feel like each one of them excelled in their own way,” Nicols said as she dabbed at the tears that spotted her cheeks. “There wasn’t a single one that didn’t do absolutely fabulous and I think they will do a wonderful job.”

5B

Life&Arts

Monday, April 27, 2009

Art City Austin experience pleases all senses By Laura Clark Daily Texan Staff As you strolled around the shores of Lady Bird Lake this weekend at Art City Austin, it was hard not to let your senses become overwhelmed. You couldn’t ignore the slow rumble of reggae-esque live music, the smell of delicious local food and the thousands of colors in the different types of art on display. Artists from around the globe showcased their wares along the streets in the newly hip Second Street District, showing off prints, sculptures, jewelry, original paintings and other pieces. In addition to perusing merchandise, patrons of the yearly festival were treated to both stationary and wandering art installations, like pink [unplugged] on Friday, which allowed them to write someone a love note on a vintage typewriter, have it bottled up and delivered throughout Austin by pink-clad bicycle couriers. If you were walking downtown on Saturday, you might have noticed some random dancing people, as “Bodies in Urban Spaces” featured local dancers getting their groove on in the city. The festival also offered familyfriendly entertainment on a kids’ stage, featuring performances from the Austin School for the Performing and Visual Arts and Art Talk Austin, which included panel discussions about art and its impact on the community. The highlight of the festival occurred Saturday night, when

Rachel Colson | Daily Texan Staff

A boy examines a horse made of steel and copper by Adam Homan at the Art City Austin on Sunday afternoon. it was transformed into an outdoor event similar to a nightclub, dubbed Art After Dark. Guests were given the VIP treatment, starting with the gift of a glass that doubled as a strobe light, illuminating whatever libation they chose to put in it.

The twinkling glasses made the party look like a tasteful, high-class rave. Different booths offered guests small tastes of local Austin food from restaurants like The Salt Lick and The Belmont. Edible highlights included a particularly tasty bite-sized

ceviche taco on a fresh corn tortilla from Tacodeli and a truffled mac and cheese from Word of Mouth catering. Regardless of whether you attended the event for the entire weekend or just stopped by to pick up a print from your fa-

vorite photographer, if you were anywhere near Second and Cesar Chavez streets these past few days, odds are you left the area with a full stomach, ringing ears and visions of colorful paintings in your head. If you didn’t, you sure missed out.

MOVIE REVIEW

Surprise twists make revenge thriller ‘Not Forgotten’ By Priscilla Totiyapungprasert Daily Texan Staff “Not Forgotten” is not a typical crime thriller. Plunging into the mysteries of the occult on the Texas-Mexico border, it pulls the audience into a world of seedy streets, whorehouses and deathworshipping rituals. The story begins with Jack Bishop, a seemingly clean-cut banker (Simon Baker), his 11-year-old daughter Toby (Chloe Moretz) and his pretty wife Amaya (Paz Vega), Toby’s stepmom, who are living a comfortable life in the border town of Del Rio. The rebellious Toby disappears one day at soccer practice, setting off a chain of events that reveals Jack’s dark past as he does whatever it takes to recover his daughter. The film focuses more on Jack’s story than his daughter’s kidnapping. His character seems contradictory — he supposedly does not know Spanish, but then suddenly the film shows him speaking perfect Spanish and recognizing regional dialects. He appears skeptical about Amaya’s use of the occult to locate their daughter, yet he attempts to use pagan revenge spells with relative ease. Though the FBI gets involved in the case, Jack follows his wife’s cousin, a local police sheriff,

across the border to do his own investigating in the Mexican underbelly. While he is there, his past identity resurfaces. Once his lies spill out into the open, his wife revokes her support — for a deeper reason than it would seem at the time. Amaya returns with secrets of her own as well. The mysterious flashbacks add to the surreal and mystical atmosphere of the movie. Though it seems unrealistic at times, not all elements of the film are made up. Santa Muerte is venerated as a saint by many, and a bit of research reveals that people pray to her for the return of kidnapped family members. The middle of the movie seems to run around in circles, leaving you impatient about where it is heading. The story switches back and forth not only from the past to the present, but also between Jack and his daughter, who seems all too calm for a girl kidnapped by a cult. The movie’s twists and turns are enough to keep you engaged but at the same time leave you confused as to what is going on. In some parts, it just feels drawn out, and the techniques are a little repetitive. One of the interesting — not to mention creepy — aspects of the movie is the voice-over narrative of Toby, who you learn has ulterior

Courtesy of Skyline Pictures

Simon Baker and Paz Vega play Jack and Amaya Bishop in “Not Forgotten,” a crime thriller about a couple who must face their dark past to recover their kidnapped daughter. “Not Forgotten” opens Friday. motives of her own. The film also does a nice job playing with setting, using the history and culture of border towns to enhance the plot. The characters aren’t whom they appear to be in the story. After the movie spins in circles with no clear direction for a good portion of the time, it suddenly fires off all

its most unpredictable surprises in rapid succession at the end. Most, though not all, of the unknown cards fall into place. While some plot details remain hazy after all is said and done, the movie is worth watching for the ending and lead-up alone. Vega gives a decent perfor-

mance as Amaya, but Barker carries the film with his portrayal of a man leading a troubled double life. With the kind of story that keeps you constantly guessing, “Not Forgotten” is a truly unconventional revenge tale. “Not Forgotten” opens Friday at the Dobie Theatre.


Monday, April 27, 2009

Life&Arts

www.dailytexanonline.com

Melissa Dominguez | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Photographers and audience members focus on a model displaying the work of textiles and apparel senior Caitlyn Hopkins at the annual UT fashion show in the Erwin Center on Friday night. Left, A model struts down the runway in a dress designed by textiles and apparel senior Karla Bonilla.

a runway to remember

walk

Textiles and apparel seniors display talent, unveil collections in annual fashion show

By Amber Genuske Daily Texan Staff The showroom was bustling with crowds of people dressed fashionably, from the classic all-black ensemble to the current trend of head-to-toe neutrals. All were eagerly awaiting the night’s equivalent of graduation, in which, instead of the students in their cap and gown, models would be displaying their diplomas on a catwalk. The School of Human Ecology’s division of Textiles and Apparel hosted its annual senior fashion show Friday at the Erwin Center. Twenty-three design students showed their three-gar-

Karina Jacques | Daily Texan Staff

ment collections and a bridal or evening gown. The pre-show exhibition was bursting from the seams with students from all levels of the program representing their skills through creative mediums from illustration boards to models wearing the constructed garments. The school’s historical fashion collection was also on display, with garments from household names like Yves Saint Laurent and Givenchy, some pieces dating back to the 1820s. The doors opened and the crowd poured in, filling nearly half of the seats in the giant arena. The overhead lights

dimmed, making the runway shine as the speakers pumped out the Pipettes’ “Your Kisses are Wasted on Me.” The projector displayed a montage of springtime images for the ready-towear collection by Megan Tovar titled “Here Comes the Sun.” The models walked out in the impeccably tailored black-and-white collection of shorts and dresses with splashes of vibrant hues. The models wore wayfarer Ray Ban sunglasses to complement the looks. Tovar’s family attended the event to show support and marvel at

FASHION continues on page 5B

ON THE WEB: Watch video from the fashion show @ dailytexanonline.com

Melissa Dominguez | Daily Texan Staff

Models display outfits by textiles and apparel senior Catherine Justiss. For the seniors, the show was a chance to display collections that they had been working on throughout their college careers.

Sara Young | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Students and faculty prepare backstage for the textiles and apparel fashion show Friday night at the Erwin Center. Right, Brigitte Buckholtz gets her makeup retouched before the show, which was organized to display the work of the textiles and apparel seniors.

Karina Jacques | Daily Texan Staff

04-27-09  

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