Issuu on Google+

P1

THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

DORM DELIGHTS Without the assistance of toasters, we can still iron food to perfection

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10 >> Breaking news, blogs and more: dailytexanonline.com

SAND TRAPPING

MY DEAR WATSON

Longhorns make themselves at home in the Morris Williams tourney

J.J. Pickle Research Campus dedicates fast supercomputer

NEWS PAGE 5

@thedailytexan

SPORTS PAGE 6

facebook.com/dailytexan

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

82ND LEGISLATURE

Amendment could require ‘family values’ centers at UT

TODAY Calendar Teacher Career Fair

Unfunded mandate would challenge sexuality institutes with costs covered by Texas

The College of Education is sponsoring a Teacher Career Fair in the Frank Erwin Center from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

By Melissa Ayala Daily Texan Staff

‘Dengue Drug Discovery’

called Growing Places, was enlisted to assist the classes and attends every class. ON THE WEB: “We tried to design For more photos of this class Team Bravo visit for kids who @dailytexan online.com w o u l d n’ t normally have this experience,” Laudenheimer said. “This is their chance to hang on a bar or roll down

State university campuses with gender and sexuality centers could have to add a “traditional family values center” that receives equal state funding if an amendment to the House Budget Bill from Rep. Wayne Christian, R-Center, succeeds. The House passed a version of the budget that included this amendment Sunday. While presenting the amendment, Christian said universities such as UT and A&M would be affected because they have gender and sexuality centers that offer and encourage education about “alternative sexual practices.” “This is not restricting [alternative sexual practice education],” Christian said. “If they’re going to [offer such education], they have to match the center, the dollars, the mortar and the cost of taxpayer dollars for traditional values. You would be able to go to The University of Texas and A&M and attend their heterosexual gender and sexuality centers.” Gender and Sexuality Center director Ana Ixchel Rosal said according to her interpretation of the amendment, it will not af-

ACTIVE continues on PAGE 8

VALUES continues on PAGE 2

Dr. Stan Watowich will discuss his recent work on improving conventional computational and biochemical approaches to discover dengue antiviral compounds. The talk will be in the AT&T Conference Center Amphitheater, Room 204 at 5:45 p.m. Allen Otto | Daily Texan Staff

Hungry for Health!

The nutrition student organizations are presenting a Hungry for Health! Fair to food made by Austin’s culinary professionals. The fair will be held in the Student Activity Center Ballroom at 6 p.m.

‘Citizen Havel is Rolling Barrels’

Arnošt Šerkézy’s film will be shown in the GRG Building 102 at 7 p.m.

Global Economic Crisis of Media The award-winning journalist P. Sainath will speak about mass media in the FAC 21 at 7 p.m.

Today in history In 1951 Ethel and Julius Rosenberg are sentenced to death for spying for the Soviet Union.

‘‘

Quote to note “This game is definitely a revenge game. Last time against [Texas A&M Corpus Christi] we came out flat; we underestimated them.”

— Jacob Felts Longhorn catcher SPORTS PAGE 7

Emma Hurley, 8, hugs her friend Dean Osterweil, 8, near the end of Team Bravo’s class Wednesday evening. Team Bravo is a class for children with disabilities that focuses on using gymnastics as a form of fun physical therapy.

Stretching beyond their limitations By Lindsey Cherner Daily Texan Staff

For their Wednesday evening gymnastics class, the children made their way to the rubber circles and took a seat, most with the assistance of a UT student volunteer or parent. They began shouting cooking instructions as they warmed up — like as “spread on the peanut butter!” — as they stretched toward their toes. While the children spread the imaginary peanut butter, they hard-

ly realized they were stretching the same muscles they used in physical therapy most days of the week. Instead of their normal programs, today the kids are working with Bravo Team, a class where children with disabilities learn gymnastics skills for an hour every Wednesday. “If you make every moment fun and imaginative, they’ll want to participate,” said Kim Laudenheimer, owner and director of Champions Academy, a recreational sports center. “The food is a distraction, but the funny thing is, if we forget one,

they know.” Laudenheimer directs Bravo Team and said the kids’ physical and mental conditions range from cerebral palsy to autism, yet they all have the same desire to be active. For the last three years, Laudenheimer has rented space from the Jewish Community Center off of Hart Lane for Bravo Team. The class is funded completely by the Jewish Community Center, giving parents a financial break. Additionally, Doug Levine, a physical therapist from a clinic

Texas officials top list of highest-paid US university executives By Mathew Stottlemyre Daily Texan Staff

UT’s president and the UT System chancellor are the secondand third-highest paid public university executives in the country, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education. In total take-home pay for fiscal year 2009-10, System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa earned $750,000 and President William Powers Jr. earned $746,738. According to the survey of 185 officials nation-wide, the median take-home pay was $375,442. Ohio State University president E. Gordon Gee topped the list and was the only official to earn more than $1 million, with earnings of $1,323,911 in 2009-10. These figures include base salary, bonuses and deferred compensation payments in which the University withholds and invests a portion of the total pay and returns the money and any earnings at a predetermined time. Both Powers and Cigarroa declined to comment on their own salaries. Ben Bond, chair of Staff Council and a training specialist in the Red McCombs School of Business, said

to attract effective leaders the UT System has to provide adequate compensation, but many staff see the high executive salaries as incompatible with other efforts to trim the budget. “It is diff ic u lt for University employees to face ongoing lay- William Powers Jr. offs while UT Austin President not seeing temporary salar y reduction by those who can most afford it,” Bond said. The UT System Board of Francisco Cigarroa Regents, w h o s e UT System Chancellor members are appointed by the governor, sets the pay for both officials. The board’s chairman said in a statement that, because of the

TODAY’S TIP: Turn Lunch Leftovers into UT Compost

PAY continues on PAGE 2

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff

Bicyclists merge into approaching traffic as they reach the end of the bike lane at the intersection of 24th and Guadalupe streets.

Forum calls for more bike-friendly city By Amy Thornton Daily Texan Staff

Despite Austin’s reputation as a top bicycling destination, the city should improve its bicycling infrastructure, said representatives from bike organizations at a forum for Austin City Council candidates Monday. The forum was a citywide collaboration of bicycling organizations including the League of Bicycling Voters and UT’s Orange Bike Project, and was de-

signed to bring concerns of Austin cyclists to candidates running for Austin City Council. The league’s website claims this year’s forum will be a strong factor in determining the outcome of City Council elections in May. “Our common goal is to get people on bikes and a number of barriers keep the people who want to ride from doing that,” said Tom Wald, executive director of the league. “Often times, implementing bicycling and pe-

destrian infrastructure comes down to making sure the common good is served, possibly at the expense of a couple people’s individual interests.” About 75 people attended the forum, and the council attendees included incumbents Laura Morrison, Chris Riley and Randi Shade, as well as new candidates Kathie Tovo, Michael “Max” Nofziger and Kris Bailey. “This is about health, as well as

BIKE continues on PAGE 2


P2

2 NEWS

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

fect UT since the center’s current $180,000 annual budget is not funded by state dollars. “We get funding from students services fees and individual donations,” Rosal said. “So technically the University has not appropriated any state funds to support the [Gender and Sexuality] center. So a traditional family value center would get no [state] money because the state doesn’t fund us.” Christian’s chief of staff Jon McClellan said the amendment was intended to affect UT and other universities, and they will look into Rosal’s interpretation of the amendment. “That is news to us. I have a feeling our group has a different idea of what constitutes as receiving state funding than the Gender and Sexuality Center does,” McClellan said. McClellan said as far as he knows UT would still be affected by the amendment. “Obviously if the Gender and Sexuality Center is not funded by taxpayer and state dollars, [the

center] would not be affected by it,” he said. “It’s going to be up to the implementation of the lawyers from the state and UT and all that.” The amendment text defines alternative sexual practices as “gay, lesbian, homosexual, bisexual, pansexual, transsexual, transgender, gender questioning or gender identity issues.” Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, asked Christian to define “pansexual,” which caused laughter throughout the chamber. The amendment must still be approved in a joint committee, where the budget bill will head next. “While it is humorous to you, it is humorous to me what we are allowing [gender and sexuality centers] to do with our tax dollars,” Christian said during the debate. Rosal said the amendment did not surprise her but wonders how the bill will define traditional family values. “We see all types of families and all those have traditions that go all the way back,” Rosal said. “I’m

The Daily Texan

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lena Price Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Alsdorf, Aziza Musa, Audrey White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melissa Ayala, Allie Kolechta, Marty McAndrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Ahsika Sanders Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Morgan, Austin Myers, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jake Rector, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Daniel Nuncio, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Heimsath Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Gerson, Danielle Villasana Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Gerald Rich Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Anne Stroh, Francisco Marin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allistair Pinsof, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Anderson Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer, Trey Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolynn Calabrese Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joshua Barajas Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Zimmerman Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janese Quitugua Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yvonne Marquez, Huma Munir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joe Layton, Amy Thornton Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brenna Cleeland, Thu Pham, Charlotte Halloran-Couch Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Hye Jin Kang, Kristin Holcomb Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Derek Stout, Jono Foley Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy, Alex Endress, Nick Cremona Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan, Lindsey Cherner Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betsy Cooper, Gillian Rhodes, Tyler Suder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Carrell, Andrew Craft, Brianne Klitgaard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill, Emery Ferguson Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emily Grubert Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amanda Sardos

BIKE continues from PAGE 1 not exactly sure what is meant by that.” One student said the proposal is only fair to support the diverse needs of the campus. “For those people who do agree with LGBTQ, there are plenty of people who don’t [agree],” said Republicans on Campus President Justin May. “I think it’s important that as a University, there’s a free exchange of ideas and education. It’s appropriate that institutions provide information representing all viewpoints.” Ben Kruger-Robbins, co-director of UT GLBT advocacy group StandOut, said the amendment will inhibit the possible growth of the Gender and Sexuality Center. “These are really crucial resources for both providing a sense of community to LGBTQ and allied students and also promoting education to LGBTQ causes,” Kruger-Robbins said. Kruger-Robbins said the item will only put more weight on an already-strained University budget. “In a legislative session that’s supposedly focusing on budget cuts, funding family value centers is actually detrimental to the causes the Legislature purports to be working towards,” he said.

the character of the city that we into downtown, since they can’t want to be,” said Riley, who is expand downtown streets.” an avid biker. “We could conA subcommittee of the UT tinue sprawling out, or we could Campus Environmental Cenhave places that are more walk- ter, the Orange Bike Project able and bikable and reflect the promotes bicycling on campus city’s perthrough sonality.” checkCycling ing out or related lending bito t ranscycles for portation the semeschoices ter, allowi n u r b an ing stugrowth, the dents to city’s stramake bicytegic mocling their bility plan, primary electric bimode of cycles, retransporspecting tation. bic yclists “A u s — Chris Riley, Council member tin is preton the street and ty bikeaddressing f r i e n d l y, the limited but there resource of are a lot street space of drivalso drew conversation. ers and nonbikers who don’t “We want to improve trans- give the right of way,” said cyportation for Austin,” said De- clist and chemical engineersiree French, co-chairwoman of ing senior Lauren Bissey. “They UT’s Orange Bike Project. “We’re could improve the enforcement looking at how bikes can limit of the existing bike laws and rethe number of cars that are go- percussions for those who vioing to continue to travel and go late them.”

We could continue sprawling out, or we could have places that are more walkable and bikable and reflect the city’s personality.

PAY continues from PAGE 1 complexity, multi-billion dollar budgets and high-profile nature of UT Austin and the UT System, the Board is satisfied that the current salaries are appropriate. “Each position requires an individual of extraordinary talent and the market for such talent is very competitive,” said chairman Gene Powell. “In addition, the board feels very fortunate that the overwhelming portion of these two compensation packages is supported by endowment and gift funds and thus do not come from general revenue funds.” Regents do not receive salaries

NEWS BRIEFLY

for their service on the board. Matt Flores, UT System assistant director of public affairs, said endowments dedicated to the purpose and returns on investments from other donations fund the president’s and chancellor’s salaries because state law limits the amount of appropriated state funds a public university can pay officials to close to $70,000. Flores said Cigarroa has received no pay increases in his two years at the System. In his first year, Cigarroa implemented a pay freeze for top executives, including himself and all the presidents

VALUES continues from PAGE 1

within the System, and though he was eligible for an increase in his second year, he made it clear to the board he would not accept one, Flores said. William Lasher, professor emeritus of educational administration, said without outside funds, it is almost impossible for university governing boards to hire a quality CEO. “These jobs are 24-hour, seven-day-a-week jobs with almost overwhelming CEO responsibilities,” Lasher said.

your copy of The

Advertising

Volume 111, Number 177

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Claire Cardona (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

4/5/11

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com

APPLICATIONS

Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

are being accepted for the following student positions with Texas Student Media

Summer 2011

Daily Texan Managing Editor, Fall 2011

2012 Cactus Yearbook Editor Application forms and a list of qualifications are available in the Office of the Director, William Randolph Hearst Building (HSM), 2500 Whitis Ave., Room 3.304. The TSM Board of Operating Trustees will interview applicants and make the appointment at 1:00 p.m. on April 15, 2011 in the College of Communication (CMA), LBJ Room #5.160, 2600 Whitis Avenue. DEADLINE: Noon, Tuesday, April 5, 2011 Please return completed applications, transcripts and all supporting materials to the Director’s Office. Interested applicants are invited to stop by and visit with the Director to discuss student positions.

Daily Texan

The Daily Texan

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

Daily Texan Managing Editor,

UTPD received reports of an Asian male armed with two tan rifles outside of the Recreational Sports building at 6 p.m. Monday night, but it turned out to be an ROTC student transporting his replica rifles, said UT spokesman Don Hale. “This was an ROTC student transferring replica weapons from one trunk to another,” Hale said. “This woman saw him do that and called the police.” UT emergency text alerts notified subscribers of the possible gunman at 6:25 p.m. and issued the all-clear announcement within 30 minutes. University operations director Rhonda Weldon said UTPD would not release the name of the student. ROTC had a rehearsal for a ceremony at Clark Field today and received clearance from the Dean of Students office before using their facsimile weapons on campus, Weldon said. Texas A&M experienced a similar situation last October when an ROTC member was carrying his replica rifle on campus, leading to a brief campus-wide lockdown. Weldon said the Campus Safety and Security Committee may consider creating a system that would alert the campus when ROTC members or other groups have authorization to bear replica weapons on campus. In this case, Weldon said the UT text alert and emergency email system worked well, especially because the incident was after normal business hours. “It was a really good test of the system in an after-hours setting,” Weldon said. “The text alert works extremely well. We were able to get the emergency webpage up, and we got the emails out. We would have liked that to happen a little sooner, but for after hours I think we did very well.” — Audrey White

R E C YC L E

Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryanne Lee Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Samantha Chavez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selen Flores, Patti Zhang, Sarah Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato, Ryan Ford, Ashley Janik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susie Reinecke, Rachel Huey Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

Texan Ad Deadlines

Student mistaken to be armed, UT sends campus-wide warning

Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

most e h t e . r. Mak e e fun v m a m h u u this s ile yo e e h t w s a s t i cours d ow r e t r e o c m g e m ew ut a f ad su ur tim o o o r y k b now! c t d o t e l n c n t a ’ A k . n s d e m Do an of tim rogra reak d p b a r r e u u h o a of yo ny of spot a r u m o o y e s fr . eser v Choo r d more n t a u e l o u d to fin sched U D E . UTB Visit Open/General Registration for May: April 30 to May 22 Open/General Registration for Summer I: April 30 to June 5 Open/General Registration for Summer II: April 30 to July 12 Open/General Registration for Fall 2010: April 30 to August 7 KNOWLEDGE KNOWS NO BOUNDARIES.

The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College Visit utb.edu or call (956) UTB-4YOU for more information. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn.

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2011 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

CORRECTION Because of an editing error, Monday’s Page 1 news story about an alleged assault during round up should have said UT community members formed a coalition to prevent racial discrimination. Because of an error, Monday’s Page 1 news story about the House Budget should have said the bill passed largely along party lines.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

85

Low

65

my water bottle of wine


W/N P3

World&NatioN

3

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Austin Myers, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

British records reveal nation’s weapon sales to Middle East, Libya By David Stringer The Associated Press

LONDON — Britain approved the export of shotguns and tear gas to Libya, machine guns and sniper rifles to Bahrain, and miltary technology to Yemen over the last three years, lawmakers disclosed Tuesday in a report criticizing the governments involved. Legislators accused successive British governments of putting efforts to boost arms sales ahead of concerns over the risk that authoritarian regimes could use U.K.-supplied weapons against their critics. In a joint report, Parliament’s foreign affairs, defense, international development and business committees said that ministers had failed to properly consider the implications of weapons sales to the Middle East and elsewhere. “Both the present government and its predecessor misjudged the risk that arms approved for export to certain authoritarian countries in North Africa and the Middle East might be used for internal repression,� the report said. Following protests that have swept the Middle East, and the violent suppression of demonstrations in some countries, Britain has revoked dozens of licenses approving weapons sales to Libya, Bahrain, Tunisia and Egypt. Ministers also have ordered a review of all arms exports to Bahrain and Yemen, and the U.K. has supported a U.N. arms embargo on Libya. Britain has been “vigorously backpedalling on arms exports that had previously been approved,� said

John Stanley, a governing Conservative Party lawmaker. “The committees welcome these revocations of arms export licenses ... but their number, 156 by the time the committees concluded their report, reflects the degree of policy misjudgment that has occurred,� Stanley said. He said the report had published for the first time a country-by-country breakdown of the type of weapons approved for export from Britain in 2009 and 2010. In 2009, licenses were approved to sell combat shotguns, military cargo vehicles and communications equipment to Libya. A year later, ministers sanctioned the sale of infrared and thermal imaging cameras, tear gas and crowd control ammunition. Licenses to sell assault rifles and aircraft cannons to Bahrain were approved in 2009, and clearance for the sale of smoke grenades, submachine guns and sniper rifles granted the following year. Defense firms also were given the go-ahead to sell electronic warfare equipment and machine guns to Egypt, ammunition to Tunisia and body armor, night-vision goggles and military camera components to Yemen. Kaye Stearman, of the lobby group Campaign Against Arms Trade, said the uprisings in the Middle East had acted as a wake-up call to Britain over its arms sales. She said ministers must decide whether exporting weapons or promoting human rights was its priority. “We have long argued that they can’t be reconciled,� Stearman said.

Evan Vucci | Associated Press

President Barack Obama smiles during an event to promote clean energy vehicles on Friday, at a UPS facility in Landover, Md.

Obama launches reelection campaign By Ben Feller The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — No longer the fresh voice of change, President Barack Obama embarked on a bid for re-election Monday by asking a divided, anxious electorate to let him finish the job he won in 2008. He’s getting an early start against a Republican field that’s still undefined, but he’s saddled with an ailing economy that still isn’t working for millions of voters. Obama began with an effort to re-

NEWS BRIEFLY Colorado in state of disaster over wildfire, governor says

Muhammed Muheisen | Associated Press

An anti-government protester displays an egg that reads in Arabic, “Leave Ali�, during a demonstration demanding the resignation of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, on Wednesday.

FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Colorado’s governor has issued a disaster declaration authorizing $1.7 million to help cover the costs of battling a wildfire that has destroyed about 15 homes. Helicopters are dropping water on the blaze about 15 miles west of Fort Collins. Planes also are being used to identify hot spots. Snow and cold weather Sunday helped calm the 7-square-mile fire in a rugged, hilly area. But fire managers say there are still hot spots that winds could spread, and the forecast is for warmer, windier weather. Crews have built containment

capture his outsider’s touch of 2008, bypassing a public statement from the White House in favor of an email sent to millions of supporters. He offered a kickoff video in which official Washington is ignored and even Obama himself only makes a fleeting appearance. What the campaign wanted voters to see instead were people like them speaking of real-life concerns and their faith in Obama, against wholesome backdrops in every clip: a church, a farm, a family in a kitchen, an American flag.

Yet this time around, Obama carries both the benefits and baggage of being the establishment candidate. The president now owns an economy that is adding jobs but still leaving millions of people without help or work. As the incumbent, he can blow into town on Air Force One, draw unparalleled free media coverage and command all the other perks of the presidency. But he must also remobilize his coalition and reenergize it, too, including getting back the indepen-

dent voters who swung Republican in last year’s midterm elections. Obama ran once on hope. This time he will run on his record as well. That means voters will evaluate him on what he has gotten done, including laws to reshape health insurance and Wall Street behavior, and the promises he has not delivered upon, including immigration reform and closing the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. What comes next is a loud, undefined, unpredictable White House contest.

lines around 5 percent of the fire. Residents of more than 300 homes were evacuated but were allowed back. Gov. John Hickenlooper issued the declaration Monday.

tors say Taylor Bean and the bank used their cooked books to try to obtain $570 million in federal Troubled Asset Relief Program funding in late 2008. A federal jury in Alexandria, Va., heard opening statements Monday in the trial of Lee Bentley Farkas. Roughly 2,000 Taylor Bean employees lost their jobs when the company collapsed in 2009. The collapse also helped take down Alabama-based Colonial Bank — the sixth-largest bank failure in U.S. history.

stabbed his neighbor in a dispute over cats and dogs. The Los Angeles Times reports that the fight broke out late Friday when the 74-year-old man said his kittens were being harassed by his neighbor’s dog. Investigators say the man then hit his 64-year-old neighbor in the face with a broom stick, returned with a knife and stabbed the other man in the stomach. Police say the neighbor suffered a swollen lip and a wound to the stomach, but that the injuries are not considered life-threatening. The 74-year-old man was taken into custody. His name and the identity of his neighbor have not been released. — The Associated Press

Chairman of bailed-out bank accused of defrauding TARP ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The onetime chairman and majority owner of what was once one of the country’s largest privately held mortgage lenders is on trial in a fraud scheme prosecutors say was worth nearly $2 billion. The alleged scheme to sell fictitious mortgages contributed to the collapse of Florida-based Taylor Bean & Whitaker and took down a major regional bank. Prosecu-

Two elderly men suffer injuries after dispute concerning pets SAN DIEGO — Authorities say an elderly San Diego man

Better clinic.

2011

APRIL 15 FRANK ERWIN CENTER 6:30 P.M.

Better medicine. Better world.

11

Everybody counts on having safe, effective medicine for anything from the common cold to heart disease. But making sure medications are safe is a complex and careful process.

APRIL 21

At PPD, we count on healthy volunteers to help evaluate medications being developed – maybe like you. You must meet certain requirements to qualify, including a free medical exam and screening tests. We have research studies available in many different lengths, and you’ll ďŹ nd current studies listed here weekly.

Opening for an At-Large position with the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees The Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has reopened their search for an At-Large Place 6 student board member. This is a 2-year term from June 2011 to May 2013. This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States.

PPD has been conducting research studies in Austin for more than 25 years. Call today to ďŹ nd out more.

Your job as a board member? *Adopt annual budget *Review monthly income and expenses *Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Texas Travesty and Cactus yearbook editors, The Daily Texan managing editor *Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for The Daily Texan editor *Review major purchase requests

Current Research Opportunities

Time commitment? About ďŹ ve hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work). Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/board/ The Board will appoint a student to that position at their next meeting on April 15, 2011.

Deadline is noon on Tuesday, April 5, 2011.

Age

Compensation

Men 18 to 45

Up to $3500

Requirements Healthy BMI between 18 and 32

Timeline Sat. 9 Apr. through Mon. 11 Apr. Fri. 29 Apr. through Sun. 1 May Multiple Outpatient Visits

XXXQQEJDPNtt5FYUi11%wUPUPSFDFJWFTUVEZJOGPSNBUJPO


OpiniOn

4

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Lauren Winchester, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

Viewpoint

gallery

Backhanded budgeting

tHe Firing line Roundup Coalition: A clarification In an attempt to correct the misleading headline in The Daily Texan on Monday, I’d like to clarify Student Government’s relationship with the Roundup Coalition. Student Government was not involved in the formation of the Roundup Coalition and has not been a part of the plans or actions of this group. Though there may be members of SG who are part of the Roundup Coalition, Student Government as an organization is not connected. I support open dialogue and a resolution to this unfortunate conflict, and Student Government is eager to help facilitate positive action moving forward.

— Natalie Butler, incoming Student Government president

legalese Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Disclose hydraulic fracturing fluids By emily grubert Daily Texan Columnist

The Texas House is currently considering a bill to disclose fluids used for natural gas production in hydraulically fractured wells. H.B. 3328, proposed by Rep. Jim Keffer, R-Eastland, would take effect on Sept. 1. Rep. Mark Strama, D-Austin, has joined the bill as a coauthor, along with several other representatives. For those unfamiliar with hydraulic fracturing, some natural gas is hard to unearth because the rock it is in has very little space for the gas (porosity) and very few pathways between spaces that allow the gas to move (permeability). A huge technological advancement occurred when the industry figured out how to create artificial pathways by pumping high pressure water mixed with chemicals into the rock until tiny cracks form, repeating the process along a horizontal pathway in the rock. This practice is called multistage horizontal hydraulic fracturing, and it has dramatically increased the United States’ available natural gas supply. However, fracturing fluid providers have been secretive about which chemicals they mix with water before pumping it underground. It is widely believed that more environmentally friendly chemicals are both available and viable but are not yet in wide use. Hydraulic fracturing fluid disclosure has been a contentious issue in the U.S., largely because of the potential risk that these fluids might come in contact with usable groundwater. Fluids no longer contain components like diesel, but with disclosure not required, it is difficult for citizens to judge

exactly how dangerous the fluids might be. The Texas proposal to publicly disclose fracture fluid composition is a good step. We cannot assess risks without knowing what the risky components are. I’ve written reasonably extensively on natural gas hydraulic fracturing as part of my research, and my in opinion, while the practice is not sufficiently dangerous to stop, it is also nowhere near sufficiently benign to justify keeping the fracture fluid chemicals secret. For now, any claims of safety are difficult to support, as there is little public information as to exactly what goes into hydraulic fracturing water. It’s difficult to write about hydraulic fracturing without bias since many of the more informative reports are industry reports. While I feel that industry reports should be included in research — after all, it is the industry that houses the most expertise about these activities — it would be much more academically comfortable to not rely primarily on these sources. Independent verification is vital. Hydraulic fracturing poses some risk to groundwater, as does any activity that involves puncturing an aquifer. Most importantly, fluid spills at the surface can have serious impacts on local water. Accident rates are extremely low, but the impact of a single accident can be severe. This is especially true if important aquifers that supply large numbers of people are exposed. While the risk of contamination from a single well might be tiny, some aquifers host hundreds or thousands of wells, increasing the risk that one of them could fail. Still, the benefits of replacing coal with natural gas outweigh the risk of water contamination

from hydraulic fracturing, in part because coal mining and combustion have serious implications for water as well. Knowing what is in hydraulic fracturing fluids will be a major benefit to researchers trying to assess the full environmental and social consequences of different types of energy use. If hydraulic fracturing is low risk, having public evidence to verify will only strengthen the claim that natural gas use is beneficial. If it is not low risk as it is currently practiced, public outcry could move the industry towards more environmentally acceptable fluids. As it stands, people assume the worse, so public opposition to hydraulic fracturing is building both here and abroad. Given that hydraulic fracturing, partnered with horizontal drilling, have enabled the cheap extraction of vast amounts of a fossil fuel cleaner than the one we currently burn (coal), many expected that the technology would be welcomed as an energy savior. Instead, because the industry has clumsily handled the chemicals issue, people have begun to view natural gas with considerable suspicion. Public chemical disclosure should be required as soon as possible so that environmental problems can be better anticipated and addressed before they escalate. The flavor of hydraulic fracturing that has become a major part of the United States’ energy supply chain started in Texas, and many other states look to Texas for guidance on how to regulate. Texas needs a chemicals disclosure law. Grubert is an environmental and water resources engineering graduate student.

A farewell from Student Government By scott parks & Muneezeh Kabir Daily Texan Guest Columnists

We set out to make Student Government a more relevant, transparent and impactful organization under the collaborative philosophy of “together students can.” On the campaign trail, we promised to advocate for affordability, reform Student Government, improve legislative accessibility, promote social justice, improve city relations, increase freshmen representation and pursue environmental sustainability. With the help of the hardworking student leaders in SG this year, we accomplished all of our goals and then some. Critics claim that SG does not work for students. This year, we proved them wrong by producing tangible results during a historic crisis for our institution. At a time when it is increasingly difficult for students to afford a quality education at UT, we reduced our own stipends to create a $4,000 Executive Board Scholarship, revamped the appropriations process in order to appropriate more than $21,000 in funds to a more diverse array of organizations than ever before and distributed more than $30,000 in scholarships. We understood the impact of textbook costs and worked with the University Co-op to launch the textbook rental program in the same way we looked for ways to cut costs off campus and laid the groundwork for a citywide student discount program. We faced the potential loss of the E-Bus service, increased presence of parking meters in West Campus and lackluster representation of students in important city issues such as transportation and housing. We responded by establishing the Mayor’s Student Advisory Council, offering UT students the opportunity to give input. With the help of knowledgeable representatives in the assembly, we delayed the West Campus parking meter proposal indefinitely, secured a student seat on the Central Austin Neighborhood Planning Advisory Committee and worked on a publicity campaign with Capital Metro to promote proper E-Bus behavior to preserve the service.

And to directly address the criticism that SG was an insider-only institution that wastes student fees, we authored the most comprehensive reform in SG history. With the consolidation, elimination and reconstruction of agencies, we were able to cut wasteful spending and increase avenues of student involvement in SG with a new, tiered leadership structure. And for the first time, freshmen will be able to participate as representa-

After hours of debate, the state House passed its $164.5 billion budget bill Sunday, and massive cuts to higher education funding aside, state representatives are trying to place an additional burden on universities such as UT. Of the more than 200 amendments the House considered before passing the bill, members passed an amendment Friday that targets higher education institutions that teach “alternative sexual behavior,” as amendment author Rep. Wayne Christian, R-Center, put it. If the Senate passes the budget bill with the amendment, universities with gender and sexuality centers such as UT would have to spend at least as much in appropriated funds on a family and traditional values center that promotes heterosexual behavior. It is clear that the state would not provide additional funding to support these new centers, and with the millions of dollars of funding already cut from higher education, this new requirement would undoubtedly place a substantial burden on universities that promote diversity, acceptance and support for students encountering identity and sexuality issues. Student fees from the University provide the Gender and Sexuality Center with about $180,000 each year, said Ixchel Rosal, the center’s director. Public funds, however, do not directly support UT’s center. As a result, this amendment will probably not affect UT, Rosal said. However, Jon McClellan, Christian’s chief of staff, disagrees. “We obviously take a broader view of [what can be considered ‘appropriated funds’].” He said the state will have to leave the technical details “to the lawyers” but that the amendment was written with the intention of affecting UT, among other public universities in the state with gender and sexuality centers. If the amendment achieves what Christian intends, the effect it would have on a university is two-fold: It would significantly impact budget allocation at universities as well as substantially minimize support for the GLBT community and its allies. As the state reduces financial support for institutions of higher education, universities are struggling to make budget cuts disrupt as few academic areas as possible. If they are required to allocate funding to a new traditional values center, that transfer would mean cuts to funding in other areas. In all likelihood, those cuts may very well start with the gender and sexuality center to inversely reduce the amount necessary to allocate to the new traditional values center. Despite Christian’s claim that he is not “treading on their rights to that, to teach alternative sexual behavior,” as quoted by The Dallas Morning News, Christian is, with this amendment, attempting to minimize resources and support for the GLBT community. It is unfortunate that an amendment that considerably burdens universities and students such as this was passed with a 110-24 vote, while several amendments that were proposed to preserve higher education funding, including several that attempted to minimize cuts to the TEXAS Grant program, failed to garner the support needed to pass. — Viviana Aldous for the editorial board

It is our sincere hope that our work will renew students’ faith in Student Government.

tives in the assembly by way of an annual special election in the fall. We worked with various campus entities to establish the Green Fund Committee so that monies collected from the new Green Fee have the proper oversight to fund effective sustainability projects. We worked with students and university officials to help make UT a smoke-free campus and a more inclusive one both by establishing the sale of discounted breast pumps for student parents and by making significant changes to university policies affecting GLBT-identified faculty and staff with the new soft benefits working group commissioned by President Powers at our urging. We tackled the bureaucratic process of contracting student talent to overhaul the SG website to make the site more informative and accessible to students, the final product of which will be

launched in the coming weeks. When students expressed concerns about the lack of student involvement in the University’s budgeting discourse, we worked with the Senate of College Councils to create the College Tuition and Budget Advisory Councils to increase the student voice in the budgeting process. We altered the function of the Student Services Budget Committee by spearheading the creation of two new student seats — one guaranteed for a graduate student and the other reserved for the Tuition Policy Advisory Committee’s at-large student representative — reallocating $1.2 million back into SSBC reserves and prioritizing units like the Counseling and Mental Heath Center whose demand far outweighs their supply. For far too long, SG leaders worked in isolation without mobilizing the incredible resource that is our talented and diverse student body. Our proudest examples of collaboration and student empowerment were our Hook the Vote and Invest in Texas campaigns. Between the two initiatives, we collaborated with well over 40 student organizations, including an unprecedented alliance with the Senate of College Councils and Graduate Student Assembly. We registered more than 5,000 students to vote in a 14-hour-long registration drive. We marched a diverse coalition of hundreds of students to the Capitol on multiple occasions to urge lawmakers to keep UT safe, competitive and affordable. We know that even after we are gone, we have set up the infrastructure for thousands of students after us to participate in the legislative process and be influential during session. It is our sincere hope that our work will renew students’ faith in Student Government. We hope the newly elected SG administration will forge ahead and build upon the framework of transparency, effectiveness and collaboration we’ve provided. As we reflect on our terms in office, we can at least be certain of one thing — together, students did. Parks and Kabir are the outgoing SG president and vice president.


UNIV P5

NEWS 5

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Researchers celebrate latest supercomputer By Yvonne Marquez Daily Texan Staff

The Lonestar 4 supercomputer was dedicated at a ceremony at the Pickle Research Campus on Monday. Multiple technology partners, including the National Science Foundation and Dell, commissioned $12 million to Texas Advanced Computing Center to acquire the supercomputer. Research associate Karl Schulz, who worked on the last three Lonestars, said supercomputers must have fast central processing units. The Lonestar 4 works on 22,656 cores, which is 5,000-10,000 more processing power than an average laptop. The network capability of the computer is 500 times more powerful than a typical wireless network and uses eight miles of cable. Through the TeraGrid, an infrastructure that links scientific institutions, researchers from around the world can connect to the supercomputer to compute information or retrieve specific data. President William Powers Jr. said the supercomputer is criti-

Karl Shulz of the Texas Advanced Computing Center gives UT employees Cindy Corn and Celeste Alexander a tour of the new Lonestar 4 supercomputer at the J.J. Pickle Research Center.

Tamir Kalifa Daily Texan Staff

cal to the University’s competitiveness in the 21st century. He said it is also a key ingredient to collaboration, especially within Texas institutions. “Computing is the fuel that powers vast areas of research across the country and certainly research at the University of Texas,” Powers said. “It lets us tease out patterns and find order which,

to the naked eye, would just be chaos. It helps us makes sense of the world we live in.” Michael Dell said he was at an event in China and was surprised to find the chief information officer for the Chinese power grid relied on Dell’s servers. “We don’t get to solve the problems, but we get to provide the tools that solve the world’s most interesting

problems,” Dell said. Center researcher Chris Jordan said the supercomputer’s resources are a way to bring in more researchers from a wider range of disciplines. “You think of it being a geeky thing, but we want to involve more people from social sciences and economics, in addition to astronomy and physics,” Jordan said.

APD experiences decrease in rate of resolved burglaries By Joe Layton Daily Texan Staff

Burglary rates haven’t changed but police are solving them at a slower rate, public safety commissioners said in a meeting Monday. The actual rate of burglaries during the past three years has remained static, but the clearance rate of the crimes — the number of criminals actually prosecuted versus the number of crimes recorded — has dropped, said APD chief of staff David Carter. “We think [the clearance rate] is actually better than what we reported but still not good enough,” Carter said. “Offenses are reported at the regional level, and we’ve come to the conclusion that we need to recen-

tralize the reporting methods.” The clearance rate last year was 5 percent, well below the national average of 13 percent, said Ronnelle Paulsen, APD’s manager of planning and analysis. “I want to see APD focus more on the risky criminals,” said Public Safety Commissioner Kim Rossmo. “Those who are disproportionately committing more crimes than others.” The commission allowed a public forum period, and Austin resident Heather Fazio expressed concern about what she called the “misallocation of police resources.” “Victimless crimes are getting too much attention,” Fazio said. “We are still arresting people for possession of marijuana and focusing too

much on traffic violations. We have enough money to allocate resources to crimes with victims.” The citizens in attendance seemed to agree with Fazio on the issues, muttering in approval. “Possession charges are, for the most part, secondary citations for other crimes,” said Public Safety Commissioner Ramey Ko. “And most burglary evidence is discovered in traffic stops.” Ko ended the discussion on burglary, advising the best way to prevent burglaries is for members of communities to communicate and report suspicious activity. Paulsen presented material to prepare the council for the next meeting concerning APD’s budget. “Right now we’re in the process

of reviewing the unmet needs of the budget for 2012, such as adding more detectives,” Paulsen said. Assistant city attorney David Douglas then represented a pub crawler owner requesting the city’s ordinance banning open containers for passenger vehicles include an exception for pub crawlers — moving bars pedaled by up to 15 people — in the downtown area. The council made no recommendation to bypass the ordinance. Gena Curtis, APD Lieutenant of Victim Services, concluded the meeting with an appeal for the commission to recommend to City Council that the city fund victim services full time instead of with grants. The council approved the recommendation unanimously.

Refugee tells of war atrocities in Sudan, promotes activism By Huma Munir Daily Texan Staff

James Garang had to leave his home in southern Sudan at the age of 10 when a civil war broke out in the country in 1983. “About 2.5 million people were killed and 7 million were displaced both internally and externally,” Garang said. “Four million were displaced externally.” Sudan has faced two major civil wars in the late 20th and 21st century, including an ongoing conflict in Darfur, Garang said at the White Rose Society’s Human Rights Symposium on Monday. Corrupt politicians split the country into south and north. The northern region was given access to more economic resources while people in the south suffered extreme neglect from 1955 to 2003, when the civil war ended, Garang said. The army had the power to unleash horror upon Sudanese citizens if they rebelled against government policies. It took Garang three months to reach the Ethiopian border safely, where he received education for three years before undergoing military training. After a civil war broke out, he fled back to Sudan only to be attacked by the Sudanese government troops in the southern Sudanese village where he was living.

Finally, he reached Kenya, where U.S. delegates decided to bring 3,000 men like him to the United States in 2000. During the conflict, the militia killed people and wiped out villages indiscriminately. “They [would take] a lot of people and put them in a house and set it on fire,” Garang said. Sometimes, they would tie people to running horses and watch them die or dump dead bodies in the wells so that people wouldn’t be able to drink water. Garang said he often wonders why the world looked the other way while all this was going on. He encouraged students in the U.S. to become more involved in spreading the word about what’s going on in Darfur. African history professor Oloruntoyin Falola said people like Garang help mobilize efforts against genocide. Looking at the Holocaust and genocide in Rwanda, we must realize that the situation in Sudan should have never happened, Falola said. International relations sophomore Lauren Guerrant said it is hard for people to relate to atrocities happening far away from their homes. “I did a project about Darfur, and it is something that people really need to know about,” Guerrant said.

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

James Garang spoke of the atrocities committed by the Sudanese government, such as being forcibly removed from his home, at the first event of the White Rose Society’s Human Rights Symposium.


SPTS P6

SPORTS

6

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Will Anderson, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

CONNECTICUT

SIDELINE

BUTLER

WHAT TO WATCH

Connecticut holds off Bulldogs for third title By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

HOUSTON — The only thing that could stop Kemba Walker and Connecticut’s amazing run was the final buzzer. On a night when the massive arena felt like a dusty old gym, UConn made Butler look

like the underdog it really was, winning the national championship Monday night with an old-fashioned, grinding 53-41 beatdown of the Bulldogs. Walker finished with 16 points for the Huskies (32-9), who won their 11th straight game since closing the regular season with a 9-9 Big East record that foreshadowed none of this.

They closed it out with a defensive showing for the ages, holding Butler to a 12-for-64 shooting. That’s 18.8 percent, the worst ever in a title game, which made for an ugly overall night but turned into the kind of game a grizzled old coach like Jim Calhoun could love. At age 68, he became the oldest coach to win the NCAA championship and joined

John Wooden, Adolph Rupp, John Krzyzewski and Bob Knight as only the fifth coach to win three NCAA titles. He did it by accepting the reality that the rim was about as wide as a pancake on a defensive-minded night in Houston, by making

TWEET OF THE DAY

Longhorns take lead following first round at local tournament by Hudson, who won the event in 2008 as a redshirt freshman, had a 5-over round, and Cody Gribble sits at 6-over. The two are tied for 13th and 18th, respectively. Johnathan Schnitzer had the least impressive day of the White team, registering a 10-over 81. The Longhorns will look to hold on to their early lead as TCU sits only four strokes behind in second place. Texas has an Orange and a White team in the field for this event, with the White team serving as the first team. The White team consists of Hudson, Fritelli, Vegas, Schnitzer and Gribble. The Orange team will compete only as individuals and is made up of senior Chris Causey, freshman Toni Hakula and juniors Adam Wennerstrom, Alex Moon

Gary Johnson @GaryJohnson44 What is there to do in Austin on a Monday night?

BIG 12 NEWCOMER OF THE WEEK LUCAS KEPHART #39

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore Johnathan Schnitzer hits out of a sand trap on Monday in the first round of the Morris Williams Intercollegiate. Schnitzer and the Longhorns hold the lead entering Tuesday’s play.

and Brett Spencer. The 54-hole, two-day tournament is held in memory of former Texas golf standout, Morris Williams, Jr. Williams, an Austin native, was revered as one of the best

local golfers for years, and even went on to help Texas claim three Southwest Conference titles in 1947, 1948 and 1950. He finished second in the 1950 NCAA Championships, and upon enlisting in

the Air Force after graduation posted an undefeated record in service academy tournaments. Williams died in a plane crash in 1953, and the memorial tournament was founded in 1966.

Position: Catcher Height: 5’ 11” Class: Junior Hometown: Arroyo Grande, Calif.

The junior college transfer from Sacramento College in California went 4-for-10 this past weekend against Missouri, including a two-hit, five-RBI performance in Texas’ 5-2 win Saturday.

TRIVIA TUESDAY

?

What is the only Texas school to ever win a NCAA men’s basketball national championship? Answer. Texas Western 1966

The Longhorns played host to the first round of the 45th-annual Morris Williams Intercollegiate golf tournament Monday. Texas made itself right at home in the first round, shooting 12-over as a team to finish the day in first place. Fueled by a 1-under round from Julio Vegas, the Longhorns gained a firm lead over their group, which included No. 16 Stanford and No. 17 Arkansas. Vegas finished the round tied for first place with teammate Toni Hakula, who also carded a 1-under. Dylan Frittelli also had a solid first round, finishing at 2-over and sitting in a tie for third on the individual leaderboard. Bob-

Date: Tonight Time: 7:30 p.m. On air: ESPN

UCONN continues on PAGE 7

MEN’S GOLF

By Nick Cremona Daily Texan Staff

Notre Dame @ Texas A&M

SPORTS BRIEFLY

UT Athletics reveal name, logo for new ‘Longhorn Network’ ESPN Senior Vice President Burke Magnus and UT athletics directors DeLoss Dodds and Chris Plonsky announced the name and logo for the 24-hour television network at the Longhorns’ annual spring football game during the weekend. The aptly named Longhorn Network will be dedicated to covering all Texas athletics events, along with a variety of other content, including original series and studio shows, historical programming and academic and cultural happenings. The network’s logo incorporates the traditional Longhorn silhouette on a backdrop of orange and black. “We plan on bringing great Longhorn content to fans right from the launch, which will drive demand for LHN from viewers, advertisers and affiliates,” said Dave Brown, vice president of programming for ESPN, including the Longhorn Network. The website LonghornNetwork. com is the broadband companion to the television network and will broadcast live games not offered on TV due to scheduling conflicts. GetLonghornNetwork.com debuted, along with the logo, to serve as a place where fans can get information on how to get the network in time for its August 2011 launch. “We are the first individual school network and we are looking forward to developing a channel that the University of Texas and Longhorns everywhere can be proud of,” Brown said.

— Joe Layton


SPTS/CLASS P7

SPORTS 7

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 BASEBALL

Longhorns look for revenge on the road against Islanders By Trey Scott Daily Texan Staff

Eric Gay | Associated Press

Connecticut’s Kemba Walker goes around Butler’s Matt Howard for a layup in the second half of Monday’s NCAA Championship.

UCONN continues from PAGE 6 his players pound the ball inside and insisting on the kind of defense that UConn played during this remarkable run, but which often got overshadowed by Walker’s theatrics. Connecticut outscored Butler by an amazing 26-2 in the paint. The Bulldogs (28-10), in their second straight title game and hoping to put the closing chapter on the ultimate “Hoosiers” story, went a mind-numbing 13 minutes, 26 seconds in the second half without making a field goal. During that time, a 25-19 lead turned into a 41-28 deficit. This for a team that never trailed Duke by more than six during last year’s epic final. That time, Gordon Hayward’s desperation halfcourt heave bounced off the backboard and rim, barely missday, month day, 2008

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

E! E R F d wor

ad s

on l y

VEHICLES FOR SALE

020 Sports-Foreign Auto NISSAN 350Z CONVERTIBLE Sunset Orange, 2D, 6 cyl manual 6 speed, Only 27,000 miles, Leather Ventilated Seats, Front Seat heaters, 18î Wheels cruise control, kept in garage since new 214-215-3187

HOUSING RENTAL

360 Furn. Apts.

THE PERFECT LOCATIONS! Five minutes to campus, pool, shuttle and Metro, shopping, parking, gated patio, summer rates available. Century Plaza Apts. 4210 Red River (512)452.4366 Park Plaza and Park Court Apts. 915 & 923 E. 41st St. (512)452.6518 V. I. P. Apts. 101 E. 33rd St. (512)476.0363 apartmentsinaustin.net

400 Condos-Townhouses OAKVIEW CONDO Walk to CAMPUS $900, 1/1, Balcony, security gate, parking, pool, quiet! call or text James. 512-4175636

recycle

ing. This time, UConn was celebrating before the buzzer sounded, Calhoun pumping his fists and hugging an assistant while the Huskies ran to the sideline and soaked in the confetti. The version of “Hoosiers” with the happy ending is still available on DVD. UConn, meanwhile, gets the real celebration. Joining Walker in double figures were Jeremy Lamb with 12 points, including six during UConn’s pullaway run, and Alex Oriakhi with 11 points and 11 rebounds. It’s been a rough year for the Huskies and their coaching lifer, whose season was tarnished by an NCAA investigation that found Calhoun failed

Texas catcher Jacob Felts, left, waits on deck next to assistant coach Skip Johnson in Sunday’s win over Missouri.

ers (20-11). “This game is definitely a revenge game,” said catcher Jacob Felts. “Last time against them we came out flat; we underestimated them.” A common trend in most of the Longhorns’ defeats has been a slow start. In five of their seven losses, they’ve fallen behind before the third inning. Sam Stafford (30, 1.78 ERA) will be the starting pitcher for Texas. Stafford needs to start the game out well so that the Longhorns don’t have to go to the bullpen early and often, a strategy that plagued them last time out

420 Unf. Houses

1/2 MILE TO CAMPUS Nice 4Beds/2Baths for $1,800/mon. 5Beds/2Bath for $2,000/mon. Celling fans, Central AC/ Heat. Wash/Dryer. 3009 Cherrywood Rd. Owner Pays water & Yard Care. Pre-Leasing for August. John/512-809-1336

By Michael Marot The Associated Press

Kelly Krauskopf still remembers those tough old days at Texas A&M. Back then, the women’s basketball coach was buying paint for the players to renovate their own locker room. The team’s preseason trip was to J.C. Penny’s for discounted travel bags, and when things got cold during the winter, players simply put on extra clothing in the unheated practice gym. Three decades later, the Aggies

CLASSIFIEDS

HYDE PARK 3/2 CA/CH, W/D, deck, cats OK, no smokers, available now. $1600/month. 512-6637836 LARGE HYDE PARK 3/2 Two Living Areas, Screened-in Porch, TwoCar Garage, Fenced Yard, Hardwoods, CA/CH, All Appliances and washer / dryer. Ave H, August 1, $2,100/mo. 512-231-1007

REAL ESTATE SALES

760 Misc. Services

790 Part Time

120 Houses

HARRY LORAYNE’S MEMORY POWER will guide you through How To Remember Everything You See, Hear or Read! Trust the course millions of students, businesspeople, actors and people from all walks of life have turned to with Harry Lorayne’s expert interactive training. It’s the closest thing to personal instruction by Harry himself!

BRAND AMBASSADOR

NOW PRELEASING 6/4.5

-

$4200

Built in 2005

5/2

-

$2700

Hyde Park, wood flrs

4/2

-

$2400

HOT TUB

4/3

-

$3200

West Campus House

4/2

-

$3000

North Campus House

2/1

-

$1200

Pool/Yard

3/2

-

$1900

Yard, Hardwood Floors

440 Roommates

WALK TO UT! Large furnished rooms, 4 blocks from UT-Fall prelease. Private bath, large walk-in closet. Fully equipped, shared kitchen and on-site laundry. Central air, DSL, all bills paid. Private room from $535/mo. Quiet, nonsmoking. For pictures, info, apps. visit www. abbey-house.com or Call 512-474-2036.

Now Preleasing!

Starting at $225 per RM. • Sand & Water Volleyball • Vaulted Lofts w/ Ceiling Fans • 6 Min. to Downtown & Campus

AUSTIN APART. ASSOC. PROPERTY OF THE YEAR!

• Free DVD Library • Spacious Floor Plans & Walk-in Closets • 2 Pools w/ Sundecks

Pointsouthbridgehollow.com

444-7536

1910 Willow Creek - Models Available WATCH FOR

LONGHORN LIFE/ CAREER GUIDE APRIL 15

ANNOUNCEMENTS

560 Public Notice

IT’S THE END OF THE WORLD (but only as we’ve come to know it)! Very soon, one titanic person prophesied by ALL major world religions will speak to all of humanity. He will NOT come across as a religious figure. He will inspire humanity to see itself as one family and to rebuild the world based upon the principles of co-operation, sharing, justice, & love. Read all about it: Share-International.org

SERVICES

760 Misc. Services BIKE MAPS! Get a free map catalog & magazine. Over 40k mapped routes. www.adventurecycling. org

RECYCLE

HarryLorayneOnline. com

EMPLOYMENT

790 Part Time

with one of the newest and coolest beverage brands in the country. Must be 21, have an extensive network of friends and contacts. Must be extremely active in social media sites. Position will require an outgoing individual that can manage time, budget and be proficient in reporting. Position requires abiding by a strict code of conduct. All interested please send resume to ccomjobs@ gmail.com

BARTENDING! 791 Nanny Wanted $300/DAY PART-TIME POTENTIAL NANNY (NEAR No experience necesCAMPUS) sary. Training provided. Age 18+. 800-965-6520 ext. 113

STARTUP SEEKS WEB/ UI TALENT Vbrag is looking for two smart students to work part time on a temporary basis with long term potential. Some meetings in N. Austin and night time con calls. 10hrs/wk max. CSS/HTML/JAVA UI/Graphics - Facebook/iPhone Shopping cart -HTML5/Sproutcore a plus Web experience only please. 1099 pay and/ or stock shares to match talent. Starts on or before 4/15/11. Must have your own computer (prefer Mac) email resumes to info@ vbrag.com

REMEMBER!

you saw it in the Texan

No. 8 Texas at Texas A&M Corpus Christi Date: Tonight Time: 6 p.m. Where: Corpus Christi

against the Islanders. Corpus Christi rolls into Austin fresh off a 10-8 defeat to UTSA — a common opponent that Texas defeated 8-5 on March 8. The Islanders blew an eight-run lead in San Antonio over the weekend to slip to sixth in the Southland Conference.

Aggies take on Notre Dame for title are drawing more than 6,100 fans to games, and the program that Krauskopf called one of the nation’s worst has become one of the nation’s best. “Bob Gates said when he hired me that he wanted us to have the best sports program in the country,” athletic director Bill Byrne said, referring to the former university president who is now the U.S. defense secretary. “We work to do that every day.” Mission accomplished. The Aggies women’s basketball team will play for its first national title Tuesday night against Notre

Are you responsible, energetic, creative, and LOVE working with young kids? Nanny needed M-Th, 4/5 - 8 pm & some weekend hours as necessary for 4 year old and 1 year old. Must have references and experience. Excellent pay. E-mail arihagerty@yahoo.com or call 512-5876246

792 Temporary Holiday Help FULL-TIME SUMMER CLERKS Job No. 036 Assists with filing, copying, faxing and other general clerical duties as needed. Must be very familiar with personal computers, general office equipment and ten key. Reliability and punctuality required. Works 40 hours per week. Position is temporary, for the summer only. Salary $10.00 per hour. All applications must be received by 1:00 p.m. CST April 15, 2011. To receive an application and complete job description call 512/427-1562, visit our website at www.texasbar.com/jobs or come by 1414 Colorado. 512-4271489

875 Medical Study

PPD Study Opportunities

PPD conducts medically supervised research studies to help evaluate new investigational medications. PPD has been conducting research studies in Austin for more than 25 years. The qualifications for each study are listed below. You must be available to remain in our facility for all dates listed for a study to be eligible. Call today for more information.

Men 18 to 45

Up to $3500 Healthy BMI between 18 and 32 Sat. 9 Apr. through Mon. 11 Apr. Fri. 29 Apr. through Sun. 1 May Multiple Outpatient Visits

462-0492 • ppdi.com text “ppd” to 48121 to receive study information

800 General Help Wanted

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid Survey Takers Needed In Austin. 100% FREE To Join! Click On Surveys. EARN $1000-$3200 A month to drive our brand new cars with ads placed on them. www. AdCarDriver.com

SWIM GUARDS & INSTRUCTORS Great Hills Country Club seeks qualified guards and instructors for 2011 season. Current Lifeguard and CPR certifications are required. WSI is recomended for Swim Lesson Instructors. 527-2718

Dame. The softball, women’s swimming and diving teams and track and field teams are already national powerhouses. The women’s soccer team finished the season ranked in the top 10 and the equestrian team is ranked No. 1. It hasn’t been easy changing attitudes at a university that began as an all-male military school. Some alumni opposed the decision to begin admitting women in 1963, and school administrators didn’t always see the advantage of funding men’s and women’s sports equally when Title IX passed in 1972.

3B

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

Self-serve, 24/7 on the Web at www.DailyTexanOnline.com

EFF. & 1-2-3-4-BDRMS

Point South & Bridge Hollow

Andrew Edmonson | Daily Texan Staff

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

370 Apts

• Gated Community • Student Oriented • On UT Shuttle Route • Microwaves

to create an atmosphere of compliance in the program. He admitted he wasn’t perfect and has begrudgingly accepted the three-game suspension he’ll have to serve when the Big East regular season starts next year. Then again, given this performance, it’s clear UConn does its best work when it’s all-or-nothing, oneand-done. Counting three wins at the Maui Invitational, Connecticut finished 14-0 in tournament games this year — including an unprecedented five-wins-in-five-nights success at the Big East tournament, then six games — two each week — in the one that really counts, one of 1 the most unpredictable versions of March Madness ever.

Texas plays Texas A&M Corpus Christi today in a rematch of a February loss, and there’s one thing for certain: There is no way the Longhorns are overlooking the Islanders again. The postgame dugout was not a pretty sight the last time these two teams met on Feb. 22. The Islanders rolled into Austin and caught an overconfident Texas team by surprise. By the time the Longhorns had snapped out of their funk and added some runs in the sixth and seventh innings, it was too late. Texas A&M Corpus Christi walked away with the 8-7 victory, and the home team was left to lament the defeat. “If you start to dig into it piece by piece, the more layers you unfold and the uglier it gets,” said Texas head coach Augie Garrido after the February game. It was indeed an off game. Texas allowed two runs in the first inning and didn’t get a hit of its own until the third. It employed eight pitchers and got quality outings from just two of them. The Longhorns struck out nine times and had six players go hitless. They were embarrassed, their pride was bruised. Safe to say, Texas (21-7) wants payback tonight against the Island-

870 Medical Seeks College-Educated Men 18–39 to Participate in a Six-Month Donor Program

Donors average $150 per specimen. Apply on-line

www.123Donate.com

keep an eye out for the super TUESDAY COUPONS clip and save!

every week


COUPON/SPTS/ENT P8

8

LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

ACTIVE continues from PAGE 1

cd review

french phrantana

Rapper’s potential falls short on latest album By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff

French Phrantana

After his success in the Texas and the national battle rap scene, Austin rapper, Phranchyze decided to come back to put out two mixtapes, the wittily titled Gucci Phran and French Phrantana, the latter being the better of the two. With his fusion of speedy flow, oldschool rap stylings in conjunction with contemporary elements more fit for the radio-friendly masses, Phranchyze represents a unique niche within rap. In this regard, he is certainly unique within the sphere of Texas rap. French Phrantana is composed of a higher level of variability, allowing Phranchyze not to get locked into certain flaws that plague his more static Gucci Phran. Regardless, over-arching inadequacies still remain within French Phrantana. Among these exist Phranchyze’s performance of southern and Texas elements in his raps, slowing the beats down, as well as his verses, placing more emphasis on lyrical punch lines than technical performance. Texas and southern rap, however, is not where the self proclaimed “Black Larry Bird” of Austin hip-hop excels. On the battle circuit and in his previous releases, Phranchyze

Phranchyze

Genre: Rap Tracks: 9 For those who like: Curren$y, Yela-wolf, J Cole

ON THE WEB: listen to phranchyze’s whole new album French Phantana and download the album for free @dailytexan online.com

Grade: Csticks to intelligent-yet-quick rapping, drawing distinctions between himself and the rest of Texas rap. His style is something the artist should embrace, not repress. Texas rappers such as Z-Ro and Trae tha Truth both have exceeding levels of talent, however, compared to their quick, aggressively minded counterparts in Brooklyn and Chicago, the technical abilities of their music is laughable at best. Phranchyze has that sort of style and ability to embarrass other Texas rappers, and it’s unfortunate that he didn’t demonstrate it on French Phrantana. His first release, Group Therapy: The Diagnosis, as well as The Black Larry Bird album, illustrate the rapper’s talent in so many ways that are not visible on French Phran-

a mat, but also, this is their chance to be in a class where they’re treated like normal kids in a fun environment.” Originally, the class placed more of an emphasis on gymnastics skills, but the volunteers quickly noticed Bravo Team could also serve as a social outlet. Since a majority of the kids are required to spend many hours out of the week in physical therapy, this is their chance to spend time with other kids like themselves and engage in playtime. Laudenheimer acknowledged that the communication between the volunteers and children is made possible largely because of the one-on-one environment that helps keep the class productive and safe. The volunteer is responsible for asking what the child wants to do that day and is prepared for many “no’s” along the way. “I try to incorporate things my partner already likes into new activities,” said Jamie Barstein, psychology senior and student volunteer. “My girl likes ‘the hot dog game,’ so I’ll try to get her to do that on the balance beam or somewhere new.” Most of the children require extra patience, understanding and positive energy from the student volunteers. “I’ve been working with the same girl for the last two years, and when we started she would only go on the air track, but now she even asks to go on the high beam,” Barstein said. “In life you have to be willing to try new things, and this prepares them for that.” The lesson plan changes every two weeks when a new skill is emphasized for the kids to attempt. Last week was backwards week, and the volunteers taught their partners how to do backward somersaults on cheese mats.

tana. His brilliant lyrical craftsmanship and creativity are exemplified on his rap narrative “Eva Angelina,” in which he stalks the famous pornstar. In the sparsely populated Austin rap scene, the mixtape is on the higher end of releases worth listening to. Few can match Phranchyze’s nationally acclaimed flow, which is probably one of the best in Texas, and iscertainly among the best in the city. For the few tracks on French Phrantana where he demonstrates this, the mixtape ends up warranting some attention, but this is ultimately diluted by Texas pop-rap influences. Phranchyze is certainly an artist worthy of attention, however his latest efforts are not emblematic of this.

cd review

rolling papers

Anticipated Wiz Khalifa album fails to impress By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff

In the pot-ridden world of rap, Wiz Khalifa is by far the most invested in the movement. Khalifa goes far beyond subject matter in regards to pot. He lives and quite literally breathes the stuff, claiming to spend $10,000 dollars monthly to support his hazy habits. Unfortunately, on his appropriately titled album debut, Rolling Papers, the weed might have clouded his artistic visions. Rolling Papers was anticipated to be the record to finally launch the young rap phenom’s career into the arena of superstardom. Like 2011’s earlier highly anticipated rap album, Lupe Fiasco’s Lasers, almost every song is designed to be a catchy radio hit appealing to the relatively hip-hop illiterate masses, but will let down anyone else involved in the scene — especially Khalifa’s fans. Not to say that catchy pop-esque styles are categorically bad. “Black and Yellow,” perhaps one of the catchiest songs on the record is also one of the greatest, a track worthy of being cemented among the best of modern hip-hop. The following track, “Roll

TV continues from PAGE 10

ON THE WEB:

Rolling Papers

from the solving of the crime, not relieving the survivors’ pain. But here, the Larsens’ grief feels real: consuming, numbing and constant. Also unlike network crime dramas, “The Killing” lacks the bizarre, over-thetop necrophilia approach to crime. There’s nothing sexy about this murder or investigation. There are no hyper-zooms on carpet fibers, technology-defying computer programs, or scenes of chatty rapport between the lab techs. “The Killing” leaves the brunt of the work to the storytelling, so far compelling in its gloom and hopelessness. In a lot of ways, “The Killing” owes much to “Twin Peaks,” David Lynch’s short-lived ’90s ABC kook-fest that became definitional “Lynchian”: the grizzly murder of teen queen Laura Palmer reverberating through the eponymous logging town, opening up its bizarre characters and otherworldly secrets to the viewer. While “The Killing” might not have any supernatural twists ahead, it does portend to offer deeper insight into its characters through the lens of Rosie’s murder. “Forbrydelsen,” which premiered in 2007 in Denmark, became an unexpected trans-

check out Wiz’s favorite song from “Rolling Papers,” the race,

Wiz Khalifa

Genre: Hip hop Tracks: 13 For those who like: Mac Miller, Big Sean, Curren$y

@dailytexan online.com

Grade: C Up,” is a disgusting example of the exact opposite — complete with cheesy, substanceless R&B lyrics and a fuzzy, horn-ladened, simple beat. The most embarrassing moment on the album occurs on “Fly Solo.” The song sounds like it belongs more on a wannabe Beck album from 1998 than on a Wiz Khalifa record. Worthy tracks still remain scattered about the record, including Khalifa’s proclaimed personal favorite, “The Race.” This is how the album should have been made: pensive, airy beats that lay on top of easygoing stoner verses upon with a meaningful R&B hook bringing it all together.

SUPER SUPER

The worst part about the release is it’s not indicative of Khalifa’s talent. Former mixtape releases “Flight School” and “Kush & Orange Juice” are all proof the rapper has a signature style distinct to him. Elements of that are visible on Rolling Papers but simply not as clearly as they should be. In his defense, Wiz Khalifa paid his dues pioneering the wave of rappers who rose to prominence through vigorous and committed self-branding and advertising on the Internet, within social media sites and deserves the fame that Rolling Papers will inevitably bring him. It’s unfortunate that he couldn’t do this with more quality and tact.

“Even if they can’t complete the physical activity, every child leaves learning something new,” said Cara Greenstein, education freshman and student volunteer. “Whether it be making a new friend or going under the parachute, everyone gets something out of it.” While most of the physical activities keep the kids engaged, many of them have a special love for the air track, which is made of the same material as a bounce house. The volunteers said this is particularly therapeutic for kids who can’t walk. Children who are restricted to wheelchairs can lay on the air track and be bounced by other kids jumping around them. “It’s different than just a playground,” Greenstein said. “It’s the one area where all of the kids can do something, anything from racing to jumping to just laying on it.” While the class gets the children moving, Laudenheimer reminded interested parents that the class is not a replacement for physical therapy. The purpose is to give the kids a variety of activities they can accomplish in an hour, while also giving parents the chance to spend time with their kids. As the class came to a close, the kids all returned to their familiar spots on the mat and a parachute was brought to the center. With the help of the volunteers, Laudenheimer and some parents, the parachute was lifted and the kids scurried underneath shouting, “We are champions!” “One girl told her mom ‘in school I have to be this role model, but in gymnastics I just get to be me,’” Laudenheimer said. “If that’s how they feel when they leave, we’ve done our job.”

European hit when aired in the UK. Its ratings surpassed “Mad Men,” and the show sparked what the Guardian described as an English fascination with all things Scandinavian, which now includes adaptations of Henning Mankell’s crime novels and Steig Larson’s “Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.” Will a similar obsession travel across the pond? Unlikely. While AMC has built itself a fine roster of programs (which include “Mad Men,” “Breaking Bad” and “The Walking Dead”), all of them garner only a fraction of the audience network shows command. Without that stylistic edge, it’s doubtful “The Killing” will be the kind of nationwide sensation “Mad Men” turned out to be. But that’s just how the show wants it: a lean production to make way for maximum ON THE WEB: headiness. Solving the murder of Rosie Watch the entire first Larsen is almost be- and second episodes side the point — the of “the Killing” psychosis of dealing with her death is the @dailytexanonline.com main event.

print COUpOnS Online at:

http://www.dailytexanonline.net/coupons/

TEXAS STUDENT MEDIA

The Daily Texan • TSTV • KVRX • The Cactus • The Texas Travesty

SUPER

SUPER

$5

$1

00

59

OFF

Plain Laundered Shirts

Dry cleaning of $20.00 or more

Please present coupons with incoming orders. Coupons not valid with other offers or 3 Pant Specials. Only one coupon per visit.

Please present coupons with incoming orders. Coupons not valid with other offers or 3 Pant Specials. Only one coupon per visit.

• All Work Guaranteed • Same Day Laundry & • Dry Cleaning Service (M-F)

• Household Items Cleaned • Alteration Services • Same Day Saturday Service (selected locations)

Open Monday - Friday 7am - 7pm Saturday 9am - 3pm

3637-B Far West Blvd.

338-0141

SUPER

501 W. 15th @ San Antonio

236-1118

3207 Red River

(Next to TX French Bread)

472-5710

SUPER Point South Point South& & Bridge Hollow Bridge Hollow APARTMENTS

A P A R T M E N T S

3120 Guadalupe Austin, Texas 78705 512-451-2696

$3 off any Car Wash / Oil Change with coupon or student id

www.arborcarwash.com

$0 DEPOSIT $0 APPLICATION $0 ADMINISTRATIVE FEES $250 OFF 1ST MONTH RENT Coupons Expires: 5/2/11

• STUDENT ORIENTED • MODELS AVAILABLE • GUARANTEED PRE-LEASING-NO WAITING LIST • ON UT SHUTTLE ROUTE • APARTMENTS STARTING @ $225 PER PERSON • SPACIOUS EFF, 1, 2, 3, 4 BEDROOMS 12 Month Lease

PointSouthBridgeHollow.com

5/6/2011

512-444-7536

SUPER

ON “THE DRAG” 3025 GUADALUPE ST.

(NEXT TO WHEATSVILLE CO-OP)

512-476-4255

�������������

$3OFF www.supercuts.com

Coupon valid only at participating locations. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. One coupon valid per customer. Please present coupon prior to payment of service. ©2011 Supercuts Inc. Printed U.S.A. Expires: 5/31/11 DLYTX

25 AUSTIN AREA SALONS FREE WI-FI �������������

$10OFF www.supercuts.com

Coupon valid only at participating locations. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. One coupon valid per customer. Please present coupon prior to payment of service. ©2011 Supercuts Inc. Printed U.S.A. Expires: 5/31/11 DLYTX


COMICS P9

COMICS 9

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU

7

2 7

1 6 3 5 4 2 6 7 3

2 2 9 6 8 3 7 2 6 5 8 7 2 9 5 3 3 7

Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

9 1 5 7 2 8 4 6 3

6 8 2 9 4 3 1 7 5

3 7 4 1 6 5 2 8 9

7 4 6 8 9 1 5 3 2

1 3 9 2 5 7 6 4 8

5 2 8 4 3 6 9 1 7

4 5 3 6 8 2 7 9 1

8 9 1 5 7 4 3 2 6

2 6 7 3 1 9 8 5 4

Yesterday’s solution

1 3 5 6 8 7 4 2 9

2 7 9 3 1 4 8 6 5

4 8 6 9 2 5 3 7 1

7 9 8 5 3 6 1 4 2

5 6 1 2 4 8 7 9 3

3 4 2 7 9 1 6 5 8

6 2 3 8 7 9 5 1 4

8 5 4 1 6 2 9 3 7

9 1 7 4 5 3 2 8 6


ENT P10

LIFE&ARTS

10

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Amber Genuske, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

‘The Killing’ brings relieving realism to crime drama genre TV TUESDAY

By Aleksander Chan

AMC’s “The Killing,” an adaptation of the Danish hit “Forbrydelsen,” premiered Sunday night with its first twohour episode. The American remake doesn’t diverge much at all from the source material: Other than relocating the story to Seattle and casting American actors, it is a faithful international reproduction in terms of basic skeletal structure. The producers have promised not all will be the same in this version (even hinting that they might change the killer’s identity), but what they’ve crafted so far is promising: a bleak, masterfully restrained drama with an excellent cast. Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) is working her last day as a detective in Seattle. She’s burnt out working homicide, and she’s ready to pack up her misbehaving teenage son and shack up with her fiance in California. Her last assignment is the disappearance, and later murder, of teenager Rosie Larsen. Each episode represents a single day of a murder investigation, and tells the story from three angles: Linden, working with her uncouth replacement, a former narcotics agent (played by Joel Kinnaman), to solve Rosie’s murder; the politick-

ing of trailblazing mayoral candidate Darren Richmond (Billy Campbell), who bears an uncertain connection to Rosie; and the devastation suffered by Rosie’s parents, who struggle to keep their family afloat amid the tragedy of their daughter’s murder. In its first two hours, “The Killing” does well juggling the interpolation of these plot threads, especially given how understated its heroine is. Linden is a refreshing Plain Jane: she shops at Ross, leaves her hair mostly unkempt and doesn’t have any of the “quirks” common to cable cop shows, either. She’s just good at her job. It’s an accomplishment that a character as unflashy and realistic as Linden made it on air. Mireille Enos, who first drew attention for her dual performance as fundamentalist Mormon twins Kathy and Jodean on HBO’s “Big Love,” quietly commands the screen. A reticent protagonist could spell doom in lesser hands; for Enos, the stoicism expresses Linden’s wisdom, the gears constantly turning in her head. In a single, wordless glance, Enos can convey a seasoned detective’s world-weariness. And as the Larsens, Michelle Forbes and Brent Sexton do something extraordinary: They hold your sympathy throughout. In network crime franchises such as “CSI,” the horror of learning of a loved one’s death is an isolated event, confined often times to a single scene. The tension is derived

TV continues on PAGE 8

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff

“The Charlena” sandwich is a sweet alternative to the regular dormroom snack. Cooked with a clothing iron, the everyday peanut butter sandwich can be toasted to perfection.

Dash of creativity expands dorm eats Room essentials, simple ingredients make culinary exploration easy Editor’s Note: This is the third in a four-part series looking at alternative ways to cook in your dorm, while being in accordance with the Division of Housing and Food Services’ rules. By Sara Benner Daily Texan Staff

This week’s recipe is a toasted peanut butter and a banana sandwich, paying homage to Elvis’ favorite snack and my boyfriend’s sister’s infatuation with The King. So, in her honor, this week’s recipe is a toasted peanut butter and banana sandwich — dorm-style — paired with crunchy homemade potato chips, fresh from your microwave.

“The Charlena” Sandwich Making this gooey, crunchy and slightly sweet sandwich requires a clothing iron to allow the peanut butter to thicken and cook down as it mingles with fresh slices of banana. First, preheat your iron to its hottest setting, usually the linen setting. To prepare the sandwich for toasting, spread enough margarine to cover the entire piece of bread. Be sure to spread it even to the very edges of the bread. If your margarine is too difficult to spread, you can microwave it for 20 seconds. Then, choose one slice, flip it over and spread one tablespoon, or a hefty dollop, of peanut butter on the side that isn’t buttered. Re-

Courtesy of AMC

AMC’s “The Killing” eschews crime drama conventions and powerfully conveys the pain caused by the murder of a young girl.

peat for the other slice of bread. Then, peel and slice your banana into roughly quarter-inch slices, or nine pieces, and spread them evenly on top of one of the peanut buttered slices. Put the second slice on top, peanut butter side down, buttered side up. So, your sandwich should have the buttered sides facing up, with the peanut butter and banana between the two slices. Now fold a sheet of aluminum foil in half, and place your sandwich inside. Fold the outer edges, sealing the sandwich inside of the aluminum foil. Place the iron on top of the aluminum foil for two minutes, covering as much of the sandwich’s surface with the iron as possible. Then move the iron in a circular motion for forty-five seconds, for an even heat distribution. Flip the aluminum foil over, and repeat for the opposite side. Turn off and unplug your clothing iron. Allow “The Charlena” to cool for a minute or two, slice and enjoy.

Potato Crisps (recipe adapted from FoodGal.com) Potato chips are a snacktime favorite. Although you can easily pick up a bag of preservative and fattening potato chips nearly anywhere, these preservative-free delicate and slightly salty potato crisps are the perfect complement to the rich Charlena. You just have to be willing to peel some serious taters. First, wash and dry your pota-

“THE CHARLENA” SANDWICH The Goods 1 tbsp. peanut butter 1 banana 2 slices of bread Margarine

The Tools • • • • •

Clothing iron Ironing board Plate Knife Aluminum foil Serves one..

POTATO CRISPS The Goods Red potatoes ¼ tsp. extra virgin olive oil Pinch of salt Nonstick cooking spray

The Tools • • • •

Potato peeler Cutting board Bowl Plate Serves two, maybe.

to. o. Then, begin using your potato peeler to peel off thin, transparent slices. If you don’t have a potato peeler, you can use a knife, but make your slices as thin and as uniform as possible, otherwise your cooking times may vary greatly from this recipe. After you have sliced your potato, put the slices in a bowl and sprinkle with a pinch of salt and 1/4 teaspoon of extra virgin olive oil. Mix the ingredients with your hand. Then, lightly coat a plate with nonstick cooking spray and place the slices on the plate, but make sure they do not touch each other. Microwave the slices for two minutes. Then carefully (because

the plate and the chips will be really hot) flip the half-baked slices over and microwave again for another two minutes. Pay close attention to your chips as they are baking the second time around, because they may get scorched if left unattended. If your chips are thicker because you had to use a knife instead of potato peeler, increase cooking time in the microwave. Again, keep careful watch over your potatoes. After they are finished, allow them to cool and let them become crunchier. It is also worth noting that russet potatoes can also be used for this recipe; however, they will require a longer cooking time than the red potatoes.

R E C YC L E YOUR COPY OF THE

DAILY TEXAN

THE BUYS OF TEXAS

COLLEGE JUST GOT CHEAPER SUBSCRIBE

your e-mail address to our list and we will send you the opportunity to

SHARE it with your friends and save even more!

SAVE

up to 50% off of local businesses

$7 for a ticket to The Bunny Trail — a Social Ding event

Subscribe at deals.dailytexanonline.com

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME


The Daily Texan 04-05-2011