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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

APublishing NOVEL IDEA industry struggles affect

WEEKEND RECAP

Rowing, women’s track fair well over weekend

local independent booksellers

SPORTS PAGE 7

SURE HANDS Horns handle the competition

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10 >> Breaking news, blogs and more: dailytexanonline.com

@thedailytexan

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SPORTS PAGE 6 Monday, February 14, 2011

THE WEEK AHEAD

UT Arabic senior reflects on time in violent Egypt during protests

TODAY

By Jody Serrano Daily Texan Staff

Healthy Hearts Carnival The Natural Sciences Council will hold a carnival to raise cardiovascular awareness at the Spanish Oaks Terrace in Jester. The event is from noon to 4 p.m.

TUESDAY Jimmy Carter Former President Jimmy Carter will speak at the LBJ Auditorium at 5:30 p.m. Free tickets are no longer available, and a standby line will begin at 4:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

Corey Leamon | Daily Texan Staff

‘Stupid is as stupid does’

Samir Taha, who has two brothers in Egypt, chants with supporters, “Show us what democracy looks like. Egypt’s what democracy looks like!” Power has been ceded to the military who ensure that democratic elections will occur in six months.

The UT Film Committee will screen “Forrest Gump” at 10 p.m. in the Texas Union Theatre. Tickets are free with a UT ID.

Texas Revue The audition sign-up period for UT’s talent show, Texas Revue, closes at 5 p.m. Auditions will be held on Feb. 19 at 9 a.m.

THURSDAY

EGYPT BY THE NUMBERS Hosni Mubarak was 30 Years President of Egypt the Emergency Law 44 Years has been in place of protest leading to 18 Days Mubarak’s resignation 50,000

People present at the initial Jan. 25 protest in Tahir Square

335 Civilians killed

‘Dancing on my own’ Robyn will perform with Natalia Kills & Diamond Rings at ACL Live at the Moody Theater. The show begins at 8 p.m., and tickets are $15.

FRIDAY ‘Midnight train to Georgia’ Gladys Knight plays the Paramount Theatre at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $30.

‘‘

Civilian participants in Feb. 1 March of the Millions:

2 million + in central Cairo 400,000 in Alexandria 250,000 in Sinai and Suez

We’re surviving; there’s no thriving. Anyone and everyone that’s involved in putting books out, it’s a labor of love. — Russell Etchen Creative director at Domy Books LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

By Molly Moore Egyptian citizens celebrate president’s resignation

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gyptian people took to the streets in celebration rather than protest Friday morning when the historic announcement of 30-year President Hosni Mubarak’s resignation hit the airwaves. Austin supporters of the movement hit the streets as well Friday evening in an event spearheaded by the International Socialist Organization and members of the Austin

Arab community. People gathered in front of the Capitol to demonstrate their solidarity with the Egyptian movement for democracy through chants, speeches and song. But with the morning’s triumph, celebration was also in order.

RESIGN continues on PAGE 2

INSIDE: Read more about Egypt in the aftermath of Mubarak’s resignation on page 3

Rival universities unite to preserve state funds By Matthew Stottlemyre Daily Texan Staff

Quote to note

FREELAST AT

Rivals in the stands, on the hardwood and on the gridiron, UT and Texas A&M alumni will collaborate Tuesday to ask the Texas Legislature to invest in the state’s higher education budget for future prosperity. About 150 alumni and student volunteers from around the state will represent the Texas Exes and The Association of Former Students, UT and A&M alumni groups, for the fifth biennial Orange & Maroon Legislative Day. The volunteers will ask legislators to preserve as much of the state’s higher education funding as possible, said Leticia Acosta, public policy director for the Texas Exes. The Legislative Budget Board — a joint committee that recommends appropriations for state agencies — proposed a $93.2-million budget cut to the University, which includes the state-mandated 5-per-

cent reductions, said Kevin Hegarty, UT vice president and chief financial officer. “Our top priority is certainly protecting as much funding as we can in the appropriations process,” Acosta said. “We understand cuts will be made, and we want to do our share, but we hope they will consider that every dollar this campus receives is a wise investment.” Divided into small groups combining both Aggies and Longhorns, the volunteers will visit the offices of all 181 members of the Texas Congress on Tuesday afternoon. “We are certainly targeting every member of the House and Senate,” Acosta said. “It will be a tough environment to ask for funding, but we’ll get the point across that every dollar is well spent.” She said the athletic rivalry between the schools fades for the day and manifests itself in a

ALUMNI continues on PAGE 2

EGYPT continues on PAGE 2 Architect Wes Blaney assists students in building, leveling and filling planters for the UT community garden on Concho Street on Saturday morning.

Corey Leamon Daily Texan Staff

Student group opens first community garden By Jasmin Sun Daily Texan Staff

Green thumbs on campus will soon have a garden to call their own. After a semester’s worth of delays, UT’s Gardening Committee held their first community garden workday in East Austin on Saturday.

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On the first day of the protests in Egypt, Jordan Bellquist spent an ordinary day at home with Mama, her Egyptian host parent. Bellquist, a radio-televisionfilm and Arabic senior and Arabic Flagship Program participant, knew there were protests in Alexandria, but everyone expected them to be peaceful. On Jan. 28, or the “Day of Wrath,” police turned violent and started using tear gas against the protesters in Egypt. The next day, Mama called Bellquist and told her not to go outside because then President Hosni Mubarak had released Egypt’s criminals to scare the protesters into submission. The criminals set fire to the police stations, Bellquist said. The situation changed drastically two weeks after the “Day of Wrath.” On Friday, Mubarak announced he would step down from his 30-year reign, relinquishing power to the military until Egypt’s elections six months from now. Mahmoud Al-Batal, the director of the flagship program and Middle Eastern studies professor, said Egypt had long suffered from Mubarak’s regime, which included using martial law, rigging elections, stealing the wealth of the country and limiting power to a small group of cronies. “[The government] lost the trust of the people,” Al-Batal said. “And no one challenged them, including the U.S. [In 30 years,] anyone who ran against him was thrown in jail; that is why he was disliked.” After the “Day of Wrath,” Bellquist received a call from her program officials who informed her she had to move to the U.S. resident director’s apartment with other flagship students. Not

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More than 50 people showed up throughout the day to help ready the site for use. Some volunteers pulled weeds, while others constructed and filled raised garden beds that portioned the 5,873-square-foot tract of land into plots to be rented out to University organizations and community members.

“We wanted to create a place for people to pursue their gardening desires,” said Daniella Lewis, the student coordinator heading the project. “I think there are a lot of people in dorms or apartments who want to be able to garden but obviously don’t have a yard.”

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Monday, February 14, 2011

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The Daily Texan Volume 111, number 146

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Claire Cardona (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

Corey Leamon | Daily Texan staff

A man erupts in joy Friday at the Texas Capitol with news of Mubarak’s resignation from the presidential office. Most gatherers were cautiously optimistic, recognizing the difficult steps ahead in forming a true democracy for Egypt.

Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com

RESIGN continues from PAGE 1

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COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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Council of the Armed Forces, is the highest-ranking figure in Egypt and will remain so for the next six months, according to Al Jazeera English. The military promised a smooth transition to a democratic system following the hiatus. Although the military dissolved the Parliament on Sunday, they failed to retract the emergency law that is governing Egypt. The law grants the government the ability to extend police powers, suspend constitutional rights and practice censorship. Its abolishment remains one of the core demands of Egyptian protesters. The future therefore remains uncer-

EGYPT continues from PAGE 1

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

“I’m more excited today than I have ever been in my entire life,” said English and pre-med senior Sara Rady. “The Egyptian people accomplished something that no other country ever has. They showed that a nation of people could unite to bring about freedom and democracy.” The Egyptian revolution is unique in several ways — the most prominent being its lack of a single uniting ideology or leader for the millions of people who broke out in strike or protest for days at a time, said Roy Casagranda, an associate government professor at Austin Community College. Currently, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, the head of the Supreme

all of the students had landlines, the primary method of communication because of the lack of Internet and cell phone service. At the director’s apartment, the students had no access to any news sources. The director did not have a television set, and the government cut off Al Jazeera — one of the only stations broadcasting the protests — the day before. Despite Bellquist’s lack of communication, one thing was clear from all of the Egyptian people she talked to: It wasn’t because of the curfew or the protesters that she couldn’t go out at night. It was that Mubarak had let out all of the

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Issue Staff Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marty McAndrews, Lauren Giudice, Jasmin Sun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katrina Tollin, Molly Moore Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Yuen, Benjamin Miller, Kaine Korzekwa Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott Eshbaugh Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrence Peart, Corey Leamon, Andrew Edmonson Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy, Sameer Bhuchar, Blake McAdow, Julie Thompson Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jody Serrano Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brandon Curl, Holly Heinrich Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lara Kirkham Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Barajas, Gabe Alvarez, Claudine Lucena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lin Zagorski, Rory Harman,Riki Tsuji . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aron Fernandez, Laura Davila Videographers/Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gary Hsu

worst people in Egpyt, she said. “It’s hard for Americans to believe that,” Bellquist said. “But that’s what it was. He was the one that was destroying the country, and he did it because he wanted to scare the protesters into submission.” The accusation did not come as a surprise to Middle Eastern studies senior Jasmine Bogard. Bogard studied abroad in Cairo for six weeks last year. During her short time in Egypt, Bogard said that it was obvious the Egyptian people did not want Mubarak in power even before the protests started. “He was a dictator. It was the huge elephant in the room that people avoided talking about,” Bogard said. “He’s been sick. It’s been the unvoiced question: What’s going to happen when Mubarak dies?” In addition to an unpopular

tain, Casagranda said. “This is going to sound strange because I’m Egyptian, but this is not the happiest day of my life,” he said. “The happiest day of my life will be when Egypt puts in place a successful and stable democracy.” A stable democracy means a president is elected into office by the votes of the Egyptian citizens alone, said event organizer Karen Burke. “[Mubarak’s resignation] is amazing and a huge victory for the people of Egypt,” she said. “However, it answers only one of their demands. They wanted Mubarak to leave but they also want all of his cronies gone.” This “good job, but the work’s

not over yet” sentiment was echoed up and down the blocks of Congress as the mass of about 200 marched to the lively beat of both drums and a steady chanting of “Hey, hey! Ho, ho! The people made Mubarak go! Hey, Hey! Ho, ho! One down, lots more to go!” But as the group returned to their meeting place in front of the Capitol gates, the exhilaration from the day’s victory could no longer be stifled by concern for what lay ahead. Instead, spontaneous bursts of Egyptian national song, bolstered by instruments and honks of camaraderie from passing cars, rang throughout the rally.

president and national government, Egypt also was home to a corrupt police force, reviled by most of the Egyptian population. The police worried about U.S. citizens’ safety in Egypt. Nothing dangerous could happen to someone from the U.S. because it would affect Egypt’s livelihood, Bogard said. To prevent anything from happening, her group had Egyptian police as bodyguards. For Bellquist, however, the experience with Egyptian police ran much deeper. She encountered Egyptian police while out one night with a male friend. While there is no law in Egypt banning public affection, Bellquist said the police could put people in jail if they demonstrated a public display of affection. Although they did not show any affection, Egyptian police stopped Bellquist and her

friend and harassed them, asking Bellquist for her passport and her friend for a bribe. In light of the corruption and authoritarian rule, Bogard, who followed the situation on Al Jazeera, BBC and Twitter, said the protests against Mubarak and the police’s totalitarianism unified the Egyptian people. “It wasn’t, ‘I’m a Muslim, I’m a Christian, I’m this, I’m upper class or I’m lower class,’” Bogard said. “One chant that was being said a lot on the Internet and on Twitter was, ‘Muslim, Christian, we’re all Egyptian.’” To Al-Batal, the youth protests, in particular, signify a new understanding in Egypt. “These protests indicate that there is a new generation in Egypt, the young people, and they are sending the world a message that they are not willing to live under the oppression and dictatorship of the Hosni Mubarak regime,” Al-Batal said. On Friday, Egyptians and their allies all over the world rejoiced, optimistic that one day soon, they would have the democratic elections and official representation many had dreamed of for 30 years. For Bellquist, the announcement meant she was one step closer to going back to Alexandria, back home.

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healthy, collaborative respect even if they have to schedule the event around the UT versus A&M basketball games. “Both sides just understand that we have more in common than we like to admit,” Acosta said. “It makes complete sense for us to be arm-inarm together, especially in this budget cycle we’re facing.” Marty Holmes, vice president for marketing and programs at A&M’s alumni group, said legislators regularly hear from the universities themselves, but this more personal effort allows legislators to connect with alumni constituents often from their own legislative district. “These two flagship institutions need to be properly funded and supported for our state to continue to grow and prosper,” Holmes said. He said before the volunteers go to the Capitol to speak with the legislators, the presidents of both universities will address the group. After UT President William Powers Jr.’s recent health problems and hospital stay for a pulmonary embolism, University spokesman Don Hale said Powers’ doctor has given no indication of whether he will be able to appear at the Legislative Day as planned. “We just really have no way of knowing at this point,” Hale said.

GARDEN continues from PAGE 1 The committee was scheduled to begin work on the garden last semester, but its plans were put on hold when surface soil test results revealed trace amounts of lead present on the property. The top six inches of the site’s dirt have since been reconditioned to remove the lead. The committee hopes the garden will raise awareness of food sustainability while providing organic produce for the UT community. “Food is an important component of life,” said Mark McKim, a Campus Environmental Center recycling intern. “This is a great opportunity for students to not only learn about where food comes from but to grow it themselves.” The committee is currently working with Jester Center executive chef Robert Mayberry to see if herbs grown in the community garden can be used in the building’s dining hall. “We’re hoping to get a market started on campus to sell the produce grown here,” Lewis said. “The ultimate goal is to one day be able to provide 5 percent of UT’s fresh produce with our community gardens in a few years’ time.” For the volunteers, the workday was a chance to learn a valuable skill while also helping to create something new and useful. “I definitely didn’t know how to lay a planting bed before,” said mathematics junior Kuroush Nezafati. “I feel good about getting involved in something that you can see results in. The fact that some of the produce here could be used in campus cafeterias gives it more of a relativity to my life.” The individually divided plots are available to either organizations or individuals in the community for $20 or $10 per semester, respectively. If the garden does well, it could expand to include additional plots of land.

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Monday, February 14, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Sydney Fitzgerald, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

Yemeni protests continue despite police opposition By Ahmed Al-Haj The Associated Press

SANAA, Yemen — Yemeni police armed with sticks and daggers on Sunday beat back thousands of protesters marching through the capital in a third straight day of demonstrations calling for political reforms and the resignation of the country’s U.S.-allied president Ali Abdullah Saleh. The protests have mushroomed since crowds gathered Friday to celebrate the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak after an 18-day revolt fueled by similar grievances. Police used truncheons to stop protesters, many of them university students, from reaching the capital’s central Hada Square. Witnesses said plainclothes policemen wielding daggers and sticks also joined security forces in driving the protesters back. Much is at stake in Yemen — a deeply troubled nation strategically located at the mouth of the Red Sea and next door to the world’s largest oil reserves. Saleh’s weak government is already under pressure from a southern separatist movement and disaffected tribesmen around the country.

Saleh — in power for three decades — is quietly cooperating with the U.S. in efforts to battle the al-Qaida franchise, but his government exercises limited control in the tribal areas beyond the capital. The U.S. is funneling him military aid and training. Since 2004, the country’s security forces have struggled to contain a serious rebellion in the north by members of the Zaidi sect of Shia Islam who complain of neglect and discrimination. At the same time, police and army forces are clashing with a secessionist movement in southern Yemen, which was a separate country until 1990. Opposition parties set several conditions for joining talks with the government, including a definitive timetable for “constitutional, legal and economic reforms.” Saleh has tried to defuse the unrest by promising not to run again when his term ends in 2013 and guaranteeing that he will not seek to pass power on to his son. The Interior Ministry, which oversees the internal security forces, accused the protesters of “spreading sabotage and chaos” and “threatening security and stability.”

Hani Mohammed | Associated Press

Yemeni anti-government protesters shout slogans during a demonstration demanding political reform and the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, on Sunday.

NEWS BRIEFLY Process turns brewery waste into natural gas for brewing SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. — Before he started “saving the earth, one beer at a time,” all inventor Eric Fitch knew about home brewing was that it could make quite a mess. Once, he accidentally backed up the plumbing in his apartment building by dumping into his garbage disposal the spent grain left over from his India Pale Ale home brew. The oatmeal-looking gunk choked the pipes in his Cambridge, Mass., building, flooding the basement. These days, he’s doing something more constructive, fulfilling the dream of beer lovers everywhere by recycling the stuff: The MIT-trained mechanical engineer has invented a patented device that turns brewery waste into natural gas that’s used to fuel the brewing process. The anaerobic methane digester, installed last year at Magic Hat Brewing Co. in Vermont, extracts energy from the spent hops, barley and yeast left over from the brewing process — and it processes the plant’s wastewater. That saves the brewer on waste disposal and natural gas purchasing. — The Associated Press

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An anti-government protester holds a makeshift crucifix during a demonstration against the evacuation of Tahrir Square in Cairo on Sunday.

Egypt will face long road to stability By Sarah El Deeb The Associated Press

CAIRO— Egyptian troops scuffled with holdout protesters in Tahrir Square on Sunday as they moved in to dismantle the protest camp after the fall of President Hosni Mubarak, but outbreaks of labor unrest, including a demonstration by police, reflected the challenges of steering Egypt toward stability and democratic rule. About 1,000 police who protested in front of the Interior Ministry scuffled with soldiers who tried to disperse them. Some troops fired gunshots in the air but later withdrew to avoid antagonizing the protesters. “This is our ministry,” the police shouted. They demanded better living conditions, but they also sought to absolve themselves of responsibility for

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an attempted crackdown by police in late January that killed many demonstrators. The anti-government crowds prevailed, and police vanished from the streets of Cairo for a time. “All these orders were coming from senior leaders, this is not our fault,” said Abdul-Rahim, a lowranking officer. “You have done this inhuman act,” a bystander said. “We no longer trust you.” Hearing the accusations, AbdulRahim broke down in tears. The demonstrating police, whose force has been resented for corruption and brutality under a decadesold emergency law, appealed for sol-

idarity with Egyptians whose protests forced Mubarak to resign on Friday. Egypt’s new military rulers promised Saturday to abide by the peace treaty with Israel and eventually hand power to an elected government, but many protesters worried long-sought reforms would be stalled if they give up. A few thousand people still remain in Tahrir Square down from a peak of a quarter-million at the height of the demonstration. With Mubarak gone, Egypt’s future will likely be shaped by three powers: the military, the protesters and the sprawling infrastructure of Mubarak’s regime that remains in place, dominating the bureaucracy, the police,

state media and parts of the economy. Demands of protesters include lifting of the emergency law, which grants wide powers to the police and restricts the right to assemble; creation of a leadership council, made up of a military representative and two other figures of authority; dissolution of the parliament, which is dominated by the ruling party; and the formation of a committee to either amend or rewrite completely the constitution. The Armed Forces Supreme Council is now the official ruler after Mubarak handed it power. It consists of the commanders of each military branch, the chief of staff and Defense Minister Hussein Tantawi.

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Monday, February 14, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Lauren Winchester, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

QUOTes TO NOTe:

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“Colleges are going to get smaller; there is going to be less access; there’s going to be fewer employees; there’s going to be fewer programs. And that has ramifications for the state’s economy.” — Steven Johnson, spokesman for the Texas Association of Community Colleges, on the decline of community college funding, according to The Texas Tribune.

“We have to invest in the young people that are coming through the pipeline...They are largely poor, largely first generation, largely of color. They will drive the economy of Texas.”

— Raymund Paredes, Higher Education Coordinating Board Commissioner, testifying to the Texas Senate Committee on Finance.

“Instead of running to the courtroom, the governor should focus on our classrooms, drop his phony legal excuses and sign a simple, threepage application that would mean about $830 million for our Texas schools facing the dire consequences of a grossly mismanaged state budget.”

— Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, on his public feud with Gov. Rick Perry regarding federal education funding in Texas, according to the Texas Tribune.

The path to more affordable textbooks By Holly Heinrich Daily Texan Columnist

It’s a beginning-of-the-semester occurrence that most students experience: the instant in front of a computer screen or bookstore counter when you realize you’re about to fork over hundreds of dollars for a single textbook. It could be a custom edition, both expensive to buy and difficult to sell back. Perhaps it’s a heavy, comprehensive textbook that the class is unlikely to complete during the course of the semester. Or maybe the price isn’t as upsetting as the fact that older versions of the book appear remarkably similar to the new one — but you’re required to purchase the updated, more expensive version. Maybe you’ve wondered why your professor would assign such an expensive textbook or why they couldn’t find the time to list required textbooks until a few days before class began, eliminating the option of ordering it online. The latter may be attributed to thoughtlessness or poor planning. But the former — the price — that’s a different issue altogether. When textbook companies market their books to professors, they frequently omit two important details from their presentations: the price and the changes to the most recent edition. Chances are that the professor will select the newest book, unaware that he or she is placing a financial burden on students or that the new edition’s updates are fairly insignificant. A bill authored by Rep. Dan Branch, RDallas, would prevent textbook companies from keeping professors in the dark about textbook costs and updates, and it would require the University to provide a complete book list to students 30 days before the start of the semester, giving them time to order books online or compare campus bookstore prices. The bill also requires Texas universities to make book lists available to all campus-area bookstores. If UT follows the spirit of the law, the University Co-op — which currently compiles the book list — would receive the list from the University when other local bookstores such as Austin Textbooks and Book Holders do. In a legislative session when the state is facing an estimated $27 billion budget deficit, HB 33 will probably pass because it saves money for students without costing the state. The bill fixes problems in the system that keep textbook prices high. The University should have instituted many of these reforms, particularly the policy that requires professors to submit book lists in a timely manner, years ago. My own experience with buying books from varied sellers leads me to believe that these measures will have a positive impact on students’ finances. This semester, shopping around Amazon.com and independent campus bookstores allowed me to spend $111 less than if I had bought all new textbooks from the Co-op. If HB 33 passes, thrifty students will quickly feel the benefits to their bank accounts. Heinrich is a government freshman.

V-day is D-day for relationships By Brandon Curl Daily Texan Columnist

Coupled men and women of the University of Texas at Austin: You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which you have striven these many weeks, months and — for some of you — years. As you may already be aware, today is Valentine’s Day. It is a date, which depending on your actions, may live in infamy. The eyes of the world and, more importantly, your significant other are upon you. Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well-trained, well-equipped and battle-hardened. She has seen Love Actually and those Zales commercials. She will fight savagely. Which brings me to my point: Not all of you will come back alive. Research performed by Katherine Morse and Steven Neuberg at Arizona State University confirms that Valentine’s Day is in fact harmful — and often fatal — to many relationships. Morse and Neuberg surveyed college students in relationships in the week prior to and following Valentine’s Day regarding their happiness, satisfaction and commitment to their partner. Comparing this data to samples during three other two-week periods, they found that couples are more than five times more likely to break up

around Valentine’s Day than any other time during the year. The cause, they believe, is that Valentine’s Day is a catalyst for the dissolution of already troubled relationships. Expectations of relationships and their partners who shirk Valentine’s Day duties can plummet in the face of other couples’ successful public displays. Even those who follow the script — dinner, exchange of gifts and general romanticism — may fall victim. Unfortunately, we tend to perceive the behavior of our own partners as forced while overrating that of others as authentic displays of true love. Disturbing, still, is the fact that not only weak, but also moderately strong relationships are affected. Morse and Neuberg have demonstrated that Valentine’s Day can cause the breakup of a relationship that would have otherwise recovered. Unfortunately, the battles waged today are but a fraction of a larger campaign sure to stretch into the coming month. The data is staggering. Using Facebook status updates, writer David McCandless and designer Lee Bryon have charted peak breakup times over the full course of a year. Noticeable in their infographic is a large peak beginning right after Valentine’s Day and extending into spring break. McCandless and Bryon call this “spring clean.” While Valentine’s Day may be the nudge your partner has needed to give

you the boot, they may procrastinate that decision until March. Residents of this University should take note that the high water mark will come March 14 — one month from today. Finally, to the married couples, the brave veterans of this great adventure, I must also give warning. Last week, avvo.com, an online directory of doctors and lawyers in the United States, issued a press release supporting the notion that Valentine’s Day is the most prolific time of year for divorce. According to the release, the site witnesses a 40-percent increase in requests for divorce lawyers and a 36-percent increase in questions about divorce around Valentine’s Day. The odds of success today are long and victory is anything but assured. For some of you, I recognize that today is also your partner’s birthday or perhaps your anniversary. May the blessings of the Almighty God be upon you. But should we win the day, Valentine’s Day will no longer be known as a commercialized holiday but as the day when all couples declared in one voice: “We will not go quietly into the night. We will not be dumped without a fight. We’re going to buy roses. We’re going to survive.” Today we celebrate our Valentine’s Day! Curl is an advertising graduate student.

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sUBMIT a FIrINg lINe E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

legalese Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.


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NEWS 5

Monday, February 14, 2011

Ceremony recognizes fallen workers By Marty McAndrews Daily Texan Staff

The Workers Defense Project student initiative held a remembrance ceremony Friday for three workers that fell from the 11th floor of the 21 Rio luxury apartments during its 2009 construction. Students demonstrated and solicited signatures for a petition to improve construction working conditions in Texas. “We want to raise awareness on campus and within the student community,” said group outreach coordinator Katie Cullather. “Our emphasis is on safety training and worker autonomy.” The performers shook bottles filled with rocks while they evoked the names of the fallen workers and recognized them as fathers, brothers and sons. William Throop, director of project management and construction services for UT, said the University takes numerous measures to ensure the safety of construction workers on UT-funded projects. “First and foremost, safety on the project is the responsibility of the contractor,” Throop said. “But the contracts we issue require that the contractors follow safety requirements. Furthermore, safety records are used as a basis for selecting contractors.” Eric Slape, UT project safety co-

oBITUARY

Public broadcasting advocate remembered for perseverance on administration set out to close it down,” Vanderwilt said. “Bob was able to lead public broadcasting though Friends of Robert F. Schenkkan, that period, and [it] came out the othfounder of Austin public radio sta- er side a much stronger service.” Vanderwilt said he doesn’t tion, KUT, and TV station, KLRU, remember him as kind and determined. know where KUT or public He died on Wednesday at 93 from de- broadcasting would be without Schenkkan. mentia complications. “He got the license, Clinical professor of helped find the first journalism Wanda Cash transmitter and he litersaid Schenkkan, who ally led the effort to put worked as a radio-televiit on the air,” he said. “He sion-film professor at UT helped it become as selffor more than two decades, sustaining as possible.” was an advocate of indeSchenkkan had a dream pendent journalism and that KUT would offer a set the standards for public Robert F. professional service with broadcasting today. Schenkkan an educational purpose, He advocated for the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, Vanderwilt said. “He wanted KUT to be a place to which led to congressional funding for broadcasting, said Cash, who learn,” he said. “I’d say he put us on the path that KUT is continuing to was a friend of Schenkkan’s. “The College of Communica- grow from.” Vanderwilt said he is disappointed tion owes so much to Bob Schenkkan,” she said. “He was a wonderful he did not know Schenkkan longer. “He was exceedingly gracious, and professor; he was a force to be reckI think what could be overlooked in oned with back then.” KUT station director Stewart that is that he had a very strong resolve Vanderwilt said Schenkkan contrib- in anything that he was committed to and believed in,” Vanderwilt said. uted to public broadcasting. The College of Communication is “There was a time shortly after the modern context of public broadcast- scheduled to hold memorial services ing had been created that the Nix- for Schenkkan on March 6 at 2 p.m. By Lauren Giudice Daily Texan Staff

Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

RTF senior Juan Elizondo shouts to passersby to bring attention to the issues of Texas construction workers.

ordinator, emphasized the importance of advanced planning, such as ensuring that workers have the right equipment and apparel, developing handbooks for safety guidelines and holding weekly meetings. Slape said UT’s project management and construction services evaluated more than 250 projects on campus since 2009. The average safe-

ty performance rating is 92 percent. The student group’s mission addresses not only Texas’ high rate of construction deaths — more than any other state in the country — but also wage theft. Cullather said students who live in luxury complexes where contractors owe workers hundreds of thousands of dollars in back pay should be more

aware of workers’ rights issues. Student volunteer Alma Buena said she was drawn to the cause because of her uncle’s experience in construction in Houston. “He worked on a project for about three weeks,” Buena said. “When he was finished with the job, they told him he’d get paid, but he would wait and wait and nothing would come.”

Volunteers come together to clean up Lady Bird Lake By Katrina Tollin Daily Texan Staff

Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

Michelle Rice collects trash from the Lady Bird Lake shoreline with the Keep Austin Beautiful organization.

Lady Bird Lake received a makeover Saturday morning at the Keep Austin Beautiful volunteer cleanup day. Keep Austin Beautiful organized six different cleanup sites around the lake. More than 200 volunteers collected trash either on the 10-mile hike-and-bike trail or on the water in boats, kayaks and paddleboards. Trash accumulates on the shoreline after heavy rains, as well as on trails and parkland during nice

weather when the park areas are more heavily trafficked, said Felix Padron, Austin Parks and Recreation Department’s park grounds supervisor. Floating barriers trap some trash before it enters the lake, and both the Watershed Protection Department and the Parks and Recreation Department have crews that work to clean and maintain the trails, banks and waterways, Padron said. “What [the volunteers] are offering is more manpower,” he said. The majority of the trash in and around the lake arrives from one of

the nine area watersheds, each associated with a different creek. Trash that ends up in storm drains and creeks will eventually find its way to Lady Bird Lake, said Jessica Wilson, Keep Austin Beautiful’s community programs manager. “You can’t go to one of these cleanups and come away thinking the same way about plastic and Styrofoam,” Wilson said. “The lessons that people learn go a lot deeper, hopefully changing their habits overall and making them better stewards.” UT history professor Leonard

Moore brought his three young children to the cleanup. He said they came to give back a little bit, spend some time outdoors and try to make an impact cleaning up. Keep Austin Beautiful repeats the cleanup effort every two months, with volunteers usually collecting about 2,000 pounds of trash at each cleanup, Wilson said. “It’s an amazing city and the more people that take ownership of their little piece, the better it’s going to be for everybody,” said Austin park ranger Jim Stewart.

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Monday, February 14, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Will Anderson, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

TEXAS

SIDELINE

LOUISVILLE NBA

Knocking Louisville out of park with power

HEAT

Texas floors competition with flood of home runs, starts season perfect 5-0

CELTICS

By Sara Beth Purdy Daily Texan Staff

Home runs are a rare occurrence in college softball. Even rarer is when a team can produce multiple throughout a weekend, much less in one game. This weekend, Texas went beyond expectations by tallying eight home runs that accounted for 17 total points. “It is fairly rare,” said Texas head coach Connie Clark. “You never go up to the plate trying to hit a home run. You go up to the plate trying to get the pitch that you want to hit, and if you end up squaring up and it gets out, then that’s icing on the cake.” Sophomore Taylor Hoagland led the Texas offense this weekend. She alone accounted for half of the home runs produced by Texas, and picked up 11 RBIs. During the championship game on Sunday, Hoagland stepped up to the plate with bases loaded and cleared the back fence by at least 50 feet for a grand slam, the first of the season. Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff “There’s no secret,” she said. “I Above, Texas sophomore Taylor Hoagland prepares to swing on Sunday against the Louisville Cardinals. Hoagland’s performance in the game just stay focused. I can’t really tell aided in a 14-4 victory. Below, sophomore Torie Schmidt slides into second trying to break up a double-play attempt. Schmidt had two hits you where it comes from — legs, and the Longhorns had 15 overall. I guess.” Hoagland wasn’t the only one with a homer — freshman Taylor Thom, sophomore Lexy Bennett, junior Nadia Taylor and senior Amy Hooks each hit one over the By Chris Hummer and two home runs. weekend. None of the shots were Daily Texan Staff Louisville finished second in the in doubt as they all cleared the back tournament, Tulsa third and Northfence by at least 10 feet. The Longhorn offense exploded ern Illinois fourth. Home runs were especially sig“I think it was a great start to for 14 runs on 15 hits in the Texas nificant during the championship our season,” Hoagland said. “Our Classic championship game Sunday game on Sunday afternoon. Out in a 14-4 mercy-rule shortened win team intensity was up, and I think of the 14 points scored by Texas, it’s going to be a good year for us. against the Louisville Cardinals. eight came from the three homEach Longhorn in the start- I think our offense was impeccaers that the team hit in the second ing lineup had a hit, led by Tay- ble this weekend. Our defense did inning. Both Taylor and Thom’s lor Hoagland, Lexy Bennett, Nadia well, and we have some things to Taylor and Amy Hooks who comAndrew Edmonson | Daily Texan Staff bined to go 8-11 with eight RBIs OFFENSE continues on PAGE 7 POWER continues on PAGE 7

Horns swing big in championship with hits from all eight starters

FOOTBALL

Gray accepts Titans job after brief time in Austin as, and high school junior recruits were in Austin for official visits to the university. Gray replaced Duane Jerr y Gray was Akina as defensive supposed to be a backs coach 26 days perfect fit for Texas ago, after filling the as its new defensive same position for the backs coach. But the Seattle Seahawks last lure of a promotion season. and a pay raise was Gray took a pay cut too tempting to keep to leave Seattle, and him at his alma matwas going to make er, and Gray accept$425,000 with Texed the defensive coas. He will reportedordinator position ly make over 1 milJerry Gray for the Tennessee lion annually with Tennessee Titans’ Titans on Saturday. Tennessee. Gray re“I know the tim- defensive coordinator turns to the Titans, ing of this isn’t ideal, where he spent four but this was someseasons as the defenthing that I couldn’t turn down,” sive backs coach a decade ago. Gray said in a statement. Saturday was junior day at TexGRAY continues on PAGE 7 By John Parrett Daily Texan Staff

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Baylor’s Griner helps expose team’s lack of inside presence By Sameer Bhuchar Daily Texan Staff

When Baylor’s Brittney Griner snagged one of her 12 rebounds over the Longhorns on Saturday afternoon in Waco, she held the ball high above her 6-foot-8 head and played a game of keep away, reminiscent of the big kid on the playground messing with youngsters who just don’t belong. Texas (16-8, 5-5 Big 12), the children of the blacktop, was too short in every sense of the

ORLANDO

WOMEN’S GOLF UCF CHALLENGE

THROUGH ROUND ONE 1

Tulane 284 (-4)

2

Coastal Carolina 285 (-3)

3

UCF 286 (-2)

4

Kentucky 287 (-1)

5

Minnesota 288 (E)

6

Texas 290 (+2)

7

Mississippi 291 (+3)

8

Kennesaw State 292 (+4)

9

South Florida 293 (+5)

10

South Carolina 294 (+6)

11

Augusta State 296 (+8)

12

Baylor 297 (+9)

13

Georgia State 299 (+11)

14

East Carolina 299 (+11)

15

Memphis 302 (+14)

16

UTSA 302 (+14)

17

Illinois State 306 (+18)

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Team hesitant of No. 1 ranking with six games left in Big 12 play By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff

Who would not want to be considered the best at what they do? “We don’t want No. 1,” said Texas forward Jordan Hamilton after Saturday’s 69-60 win against Baylor. “I don’t want to be No. 1,” echoed freshman Tristan Thompson. Not yet at least. Whether they like it or not, it is possible that when the rankings come out today, the Longhorns will be the No. 1 team in the nation after Ohio State fell to Wisconsin on Saturday. For this to happen, Texas would have to leap frog over No. 2 Kansas, who the Longhorns

beat in January. The Longhorns, who have now won 10 straight, are playing like one of the best teams in the country. Nevertheless, they continue to say that the entire team can still get much better. Much of the team is aware of what is possible once reaching that top spot. They witnessed it firsthand last season when a collapse — in which they lost 10 of their final 17 games — began after they were crowned the top team in the nation 13 months ago. While college football coaches may start lobbying for first-place votes this late into a season, mum’s the word for Texas head coach

Rick Barnes. “We haven’t talked about any of that stuff,” Barnes said. “We haven’t talked about anything but trying to get better.” Barnes said that every team will be looking to beat his team no matter what the rankings say. Teams such as Baylor, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas State and Oklahoma State — all of which are considered on the bubble — remain on the Longhorns’ schedule. For those teams, that matchup with a top-three ranked Texas team helps boost a tournament resume. The games are still important for the Longhorns as well.

RANK continues on PAGE 7 Gary Johnson, left, and Alexis Wangmene celebrate after a hard-fought victory against Baylor on Saturday. Texas won 69-60.

word. They were too short to defend Griner’s sky-high presence in the paint. They were short on their jump shots, and they ultimately fell short on the scoreboard. “We couldn’t do anything with her,” said Texas coach Gail Goestenkors of Griner. “We really got beat in every way, shape and form — inside, outside and their penetration.” T h e L on g h or n s’ 9 6 - 6 8

BENCH continues on PAGE 7

LAKERS

Michael Thomas Associated Press

BIG 12 MEN’S BASKETBALL 1

Texas 22-3, 10-0

2

Kansas 24-1, 9-1

3

Texas A&M 19-5, 6-4

4

Baylor 6-5, 16-8

5

Missouri 19-6, 5-5

6

Colorado 16-10, 5-6

7

Oklahoma St. 16-8, 4-6

8

Nebraska 16-8, 4-6

9

Kansas State 16-9, 4-6

10

Oklahoma 12-12, 4-6

11

Texas Tech 11-14, 3-7

12

Iowa State 14-11, 1-9

BIG 12 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL 1

Baylor 20-3, 10-0

2

Texas A&M 21-2, 9-1

3

Oklahoma 18-6, 8-3

4

Kansas State 16-7, 6-4

5

Iowa State 16-7, 5-5

6

Texas 16-8, 5-5

7

Texas Tech 17-7, 5-5

8

Oklahoma St. 15-8, 3-7

9

Colorado 12-11, 3-7

10

Missouri 11-13, 3-7

11

Kansas 16-9, 3-8

12

Nebraska 12-12, 2-8


SPTS/CLASS P7

SPORTS 7

Monday, February 14, 2011

GRAY continues from PAGE 6 Current Titans head coach Mike Munchak was offensive line coach while Gray was in Tennessee, and began recruiting Gray for the job as soon as he was hired as Jeff Fisher’s replacement. “I am excited to have this opportunity,” Gray said in his statement. “I have known Mike for a number of years and if he is a head coach like he was a player or a position coach, we are going to be in great shape.” Texas head coach

Mack Brown now has yet another coaching void to fill on his staff, and will make his seventh hire this offseason. He said he was “obviously disappointed” with Gray’s departure in a statement released Saturday. “But at the same time, we’re really excited about the wonderful opportunity he had to be the defensive coordinator of the Titans,” Brown said. “That’s the only place he would have left here for,

BENCH continues from PAGE 6

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OFFENSE continues from PAGE 6

loss to the top-ranked Bears (23-1, 10-0) was more indicative of Texas’ weaknesses than it was of Baylor’s obvious strengths. After the game, Ashleigh Fontenette, the Longhorns’ leading scorer, said she believes that Baylor has it all. “They have every piece that you need to be a great team,” Fontenette said. “They have shooters, inside attack, they play great defense. That is why they are No. 1.” In other words, they have depth. Texas, on the other hand, lacks that luxury, and it’s never been more apparent than it was on Saturday. Texas lacks a formidable inside presence, which creates problems for the whole team. Though Ashley Gayle has been a defensive nightmare for opponents, her inability to score inside forces Texas’ guards to shoulder the load of scoring points in the paint. Six Bears accounted for 12 team blocks, with Griner swatting seven of them. Griner also scored 29 points in 30 minutes. “We usually do a really good job of drawing her out and finding somebody else [to pass to], but [today] we were going right at her and that wasn’t something we really wanted to do,” Goestenkors said. “So I am sure that seven people regret their decisions.” When they couldn’t score inside, the Longhorns relied on their jump shooters. Texas made only 26 of 89 field goals. Essentially, the Bears rendered the Texas offense one dimensional. Furthermore, the Longhorns only used four players off the bench, whereas Baylor used eight. Baylor’s bench out-scored Texas 24-18. After the game, Goestenkors told Baylor’s head coach Kim Mulkey that if her team continued playing with that type of chemistry, they would go all the way. The Longhorns, whose next five games feature three ranked opponents, have to hone their bench players and work on their play inside and out to even manage to stay in the top half of the Big 12. day, month day, 2008

WEEKEND RECAP

and we want to wish him the best of luck. ”Where Brown looks to replace Gray is unclear, but there are a few names on the table. Former Nebraska secondary coach Marvin Sanders resigned earlier this month, citing personal and family reasons. If he is still willing to coach, he may be a good fit for the Longhorns, as the Cornhuskers have had one of the best secondaries in the country the past two seasons.

work on, but our offense definitely shined through this weekend.” All of the Longhorns’ scoring came in the first two innings where they jumped on Louisville starter Chelsea Leonard for five runs in the first. “It sets the tone. If you can lead off the game with a home run or a runner on base, it sets you up. That puts the momentum on our back to continue to push forward,” Taylor said. In the second inning, Texas continued its scoring barrage with nine more runs, sending 11 batters to the plate capped off by a grand slam by Hoagland. The team’s offensive performance helped pitcher Blaire Luna, who allowed four runs in completing her

third game of the weekend. “The offense playing as well as it did relieves stress for her and gives her a cushion, allowing her to work through things and grind through stuff,” Hoagland said. Only one more run was scored during the rest of the game. The win over the Cardinals gave Texas a 5-0 start and a victory in their first tournament of the season. Giving the team something to build on, and momentum for the rest of the year. “It was a good weekend all the way around. This group is obviously very focused on finishing. We’ll talk a lot about that through the year, so it’s good to be able to talk about that today and get the outcome,” Texas coach Connie Clark said.

crease in home runs to the Texas fan base. “It’s a great feeling,” Taylor said. “It’s awesome to feel your fans yelling and screaming [for you] and to feel your teammates coming to pat you on your head.” Texas proved it had batting power over the weekendh. Clark described it differently: pride, saying each batter wants to prove that they have the stuff to hit it high and long.

RANK continues from PAGE 6 “We are looking for wins to get us in a great position at the end of the year,” Barnes said. A No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament would likely mean a favorable road to the Final Four for the Longhorns. But Barnes knows nothing about it. “I think someone told me the Final Four is in Houston,” he said. Barnes heard correctly. In addition, favorable tournament locations which the Longhorns could land include Tulsa in the opening

Rowers sweep top five spots in first regatta of spring By Blake mcAdow Daily Texan Staff

POWER continues from PAGE 6 blasts each brought in a second runner, with Hoagland’s grand slam capping it off. The nine runs helped seal the ball game and bring it to an early end as the result of a mercy-run rule. “When I am at the plate, I just relax. I don’t think about anything,” Thom said. “When you hit it and it’s gone, you know it’s gone, it’s the [most] perfect feeling ever.” Taylor also attributed the in-

Lauren gerson | Daily Texan Staff

Texas’ first varsity boat competes in the Fighting Nutria regatta over the weekend in Austin. The boat finished with the fastest overall time and Texas won 14-10.

two rounds and San Antonio for the regional. That’s closer than the last time the Longhorns reached the Final Four in 2003, when they stayed in the South and played in front of plenty of burnt orange in Birmingham, San Antonio and New Orleans. For now, this is all speculation for the fans and media to discuss. “There is so much that can be 1 done,” Barnes said. “If you start thinking and talking about that stuff, you can really get sidetracked.”

The wind chill was below freezing, and they hadn’t competed in the water since November, but the Longhorns still put on an impressive performance Saturday at Lady Bird Lake. Texas claimed the top five spots and won its second consecutive Fighting Nutria title, beating Texas Crew 14-10. The team equaled its margin of victory from last year, when it defeated Texas Crew 13-9. This was Texas’ first regatta since the Head of the Hooch in November. After a tremendous fall, the

sPoRTs BRieFLY Behm places sixth in Seattle as others run in New Mexico Distance runner Mia Behm automatically qualified for the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships on Friday night after posting 15:58.34 in the 5,000 meter. Longhorn distance runners competed at the Husky Classic in Seattle this weekend, and the remaining events took place at the Don Kirby Invitational in Albuquerque. Behm placed sixth overall and re-

CLASSIFIEDS

Longhorns picked up right where they left off. “This was a good, hard race and a great way for the coaches and I to evaluate the team’s strengths,” said head coach Carie Graves. “It’s not easy to win this. We did win last year, but we hadn’t won it for three years before that.” The first varsity boat earned the top spot with a time of 28 minutes, 56.9 seconds, and the top novice boats and other two varsity boats wiped away the competition as well. “We have much more depth this year that we haven’t had in the past and that’s really what the team is built around,” Graves said.

That depth will need to shine down the stretch. Texas is trying to become one of the 16 teams selected to the 2011 NCAA Championships for the first time since back-to-back appearances in 2003 and 2004. “It’s not just one boat that goes to the NCAAs [Championships],” Graves said. “It’s a team. So even if you’re the fastest varsity in the country, and the other boats are slow, you’re not gonna’ go.” Even with its strong start, Texas is still looking to improve. “What every team needs to improve on is to maintain their focus,” Graves said. “That’s the most important thing.”

corded the second-fastest time ever at Texas in the 5,000.In Albuquerue, long jumpers A’Lexus Brannon and Beverly Owoyele both posted personal bests. In the high jump, freshman Shanay Briscoe placed first, clearing 5-11.50. — Julie Thompson

17 but finished the 18th hole with a bogey. Still, she was one of only 13 players out of all 17 teams to card a sub-par round. Stephen’s scoring average of 69 marked the best round of her sophomore year, and she leads Texas with a 71.6 firstround scoring average this season. The team ranks sixth after two days and a score of 290. The second round of the tournament resumes this morning at 7:30 a.m, and, like Sunday, will be in a shotgun start off of all 18 tee boxes, with Texas playing alongside fourth-place Kentucky and fifthplace Minnesota. — Stephanie Yarbrough

Stephens leading Longhorns after second day of tourney Sophomore Haley Stephens led the Longhorns on Sunday with a 3-under-par 69 after day one of the 2011 UCF Challenge in Sorrento, Fla., earning her fourth place. She had a four-under after hole

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ENT P9

LIFE&ARTS 9

Monday, February 14, 2011

PARODY continues from PAGE 10

Puppy performers raise funds

The Austin Humane Society raised about $200 Friday by holding “I ‘Ruff ’ You: A Circus Valentine Story.” The event consisted of tricks, juggling and acrobatics by the Circus Chickendog troupe — a puppy performance group based in Austin that performs at birthday parties and other events. The group, along with trainer Darren Peter-

Society spokeswoman Lisa Starr said the performance helped by bringing people to the shelter who might consider adopting pets in the future. The Humane Society has a budget of $2 million generated entirely by private contributions and houses 10,000 animals a year. —Andrew Edmonson

son, appeared on the “Late Show with David Letterman” and Animal Planet’s “Pet Star.” The Friday show sold out, but the troupe performed a smaller version of the program on Sunday at Ruta Maya House. Although $200 only provides one night of shelter for 10 animals, Humane

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Song of the Year Need You Now Lady Antebellum

Best Electronic/Dance Album La Roux La Roux

Best Female Pop Vocal Performance “Bad Romance” Lady Gaga

Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance “Helter Skelter” Paul McCartney

Best Male Pop Vocal Performance “Just The Way You Are” Bruno Mars

Best Rock Instrumental Performance “Hammerhead” Jeff Beck

Best Rap Song “Empire State of Mind” Jay-Z and Alicia Keys Best Urban/Alternative Performance “Fuck You” Cee Lo Green

cided on our friend Andrew Allen,” use his office for the final scene in Andrew said. the trailer. They also convinced him “He has the strong jaw line and to act in it. long hair we could slick back,” Ben After filming three days in Dallas for “The Brocial Network,” the brothers decided to shelf the project until Oscar buzz would give them a window for more recognition. During that time, they shot footage in Austin, including scenes at Spider [‘The Brocial Network’] House Cafe, the Flawn Academic Center and the Texas Governor’s hits a lot of points and Room in the Union on campus. The brothers were able to bypass a lot of different niches, the “no filming rule” for this locaand independent of tion by filming with their small Ti2 Cannon camera. A friend stood on what people think of a table, holding a lamp taken from a room down the hall, while Ben shot drinking, I think it really a scene that parodies the boardroom meetings of Fincher’s film. is relatable and that’s When the brothers faced mowhy people like it. ments of conflict on set — like when — Ben Adams, they convinced Arrington to shave Atomic Productions producer his head in a sewer (“B-roll” for “The Brocial Network” he was told) — they always are able to reflect back with humor shared by friends. “They have been working together for so long, they know each other adds. “And he was willing to do it.” so well,” Arrington said. “They can Whenever applicable, Ben and choose their words wisely and get Andrew include their roommates, things done — that’s not to say we family and friends from Dallas in don’t argue. Being brothers, they can their productions. They even con- bicker quite a bit, but we all get along vinced their father, Paul, to let them at the end of the day.”

BOOKS continues from PAGE 10 Recycled Reads

Although not technically an independent bookstore, Recycled Reads is a treasure trove for bargain book hunters. Recycled Reads is the retail outlet of the Austin Public Library. The store is fueled by used book donations and a staff almost entirely composed of volunteers, which helps keep book prices stunningly low — hard covers all sell for $2, soft covers for $1 and children’s books for a mere 50 cents. “We like to distinguish ourselves because we are a used bookstore,” said Mindy Reed, manager of the store. “We make sure that people have access to recycled material that the library can’t use be-

Andrew Edmonson | Daily Texan Staff

Darrren Peterson performs at the Austin Humane Society in “I Ruff You: A Circus Valentine Story” on Friday.

tos of Facebook users and the rapid fire of memorable quotes in the trailer of David Fincher’s Oscar-nominated film seemed ripe for parody. In their places is a choral parody of “Creep” — containing lines such as, “I just want a keystone” — photos of drunk, passed out college students and lines that poke fun at what many think college is about: drinking and partying. “Everyone, whether they like it or not, is in a group of friends that is in some way elitist toward other people or are into ‘broing out,’ right?” Ben said. “Introducing alcohol to that just adds to the comedy value. I think [‘The Brocial Network’] hits a lot of points and a lot of different niches, and independent of what people think of drinking, I think it really is relatable and that’s why people like it.” “Did you really just quote that? That’s a comment on our YouTube page,” Andrew said. His brother blushes and goes quiet. The Adams twins speak with a confidence and speed akin to Aaron Sorkin’s characters, so it was debated very early whether they would play the Winklevoss twins who sue Zuckerberg in the trailer. “There was a minor discussion about us playing these fratted-out, lazy versions of twins, but we de-

cause they have too many copies or material from people that are cleaning out their houses. We focus more on keeping material out of the landfill and keeping those books accessible to people.” The neatly kept shelves, which are clearly organized into distinct sections — just like at the library — make the store easy to navigate, something many other used bookstores sorely lack. Customers can also rest easy knowing that all of the money they spend at Recycled Reads goes to support the Austin Public Library. While independent booksellers may be a dwindling breed, they’re still a vital part of the unique cultural fabric of a city. Store opera-

tors such as Etchen and Post continue to take an active role in Austin’s vibrant community, despite the withering publishing business, by hosting and participating in events around Austin and in their stores. “We’re surviving; there’s no thriving,” Etchen said. “Anyone and everyone that’s involved in putting books out, it’s a labor of love. Where we do thrive is at things like creating events, getting people from all disciplines in here at the same time and hopefully, developing a relationship with these folks so they’ll want to come back. It grows slowly but it grows. I think over time, good things tend to stick around.”

Outstanding Student and Cactus Goodfellow Awards

LAST CHANCE!

CACTUS YEARBOOK

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DON’T MISS THE LAST CHANCE TO HAVE YOUR PORTRAIT TAKEN FOR UT’S CACTUS YEARBOOK!

The Cactus Yearbook is soliciting nominations for their Outstanding Student and Cactus Goodfellow Awards. For your convenience, we have placed the nomination forms on the Cactus web page: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/media/cactus/ All rules and instructions are included, so all you have to do is either print the nomination form or pick up one at the William Randolph Hearst Building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Avenue, Room 3.304.

FEBRUARY 14-25, 2011

UNDERCLASSMAN? JUST WALK IN! SENIOR? MAKE AN APPOINTMENT!

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The deadline for nominations is Feb. 25th. Send us your applications today! If you have any questions, please call 471-1084 for more information. Recognizing extraordinary UT students for over 75 years.

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Life&Arts

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Monday, February 14, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Amber Genuske, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Double Feature Twins’ Hollywood parodies become viral hits

Students create trailer for ‘The Brocial Network’

Creator shares history in film

By Allistair Pinsof “I can’t wait to stand over your shoulder and watch you buy us a keg.” With the creation of one silly line, Ben Adams had come up with the idea for “The Brocial Network,” a trailer that parodies one of this year’s most acclaimed films. After posting the video on YouTube last month, the video has almost half a million views. The parody is a part of Adams’ film company, Atomic Productions, a company he and his identical twin brother Andrew Adams, along with four friends from Dallas, started when they were 12 to make music videos and dramatic short films. “It was just incredible how they pulled it together,” said the twins’ father Paul Adams, recalling the first video they shot — with a Lego video camera in sixth grade — but providing little detail out of embarrassment. “Without the ability to edit things, they could just see this picture of how things were going to go together and film it.” Now, the brothers are 21-year-old film students at UT and are making rap music videos for MTV3 Dallas when they aren’t convincing their acting friends to get drunk and dress like Leonardo DiCaprio for a school project. As an assignment for Andrew’s summer school class at Dallas Community College, his professor told him to break away from dramatic films and do something funny. Andrew found inspiration one day at his father’s office. ON THE WEB: “I thought his hallway really looked To view videos or for like the one in ‘Inception,’” Andrew more information on said. “I thought, ‘If I have to do someAtomic Productions, go thing really funny, let’s do something to ben3308.com or their about ‘Inception.’’” YouTube site at youtube. “I put my camera on my tripod,” com/user/ben3308. Ben interrupted. “I turned it, and I got the effect.” Ben oversees the cinematography of Atomic Productions’ projects, while his brother Andrew, younger by one minute, edits and writes the scripts. They both have their hand in creating the story and directing the film. “We found early on that I like to shoot, and he likes to edit,” Ben said. “Inebriation” was shot, edited and uploaded over the course of three days in Dallas, the twins’ hometown. Six months later, the video is 75,000 short of a million views on YouTube. “I needed that A,” Andrew said, laughing. “And, of course, I got it.” When media sites such as GQ.com started writing about them, they knew it was time to parody another potential hit. They kicked around the idea of a stoner take on “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” for an afternoon and instead settled on “The Social Network.” The choral cover of Radiohead’s “Creep,” the opening pho-

paroDY continues on page 9

By Andrew Adams Atomic Productions producer

Splinter Cell (2005) In 2005, we worked on our first ‘big’ project, a fan film for the video game Splinter Cell. We called property managers and got location permits and costuming and everything. [The project] ultimately didn’t really go anywhere, and we had been doing short films for years before then. But it was our first legitimate building ground for doing serious filmmaking work and taking chances on things, and it’s paid off in all of our other work since.

Afternoon Delight (2006) My junior year of high school, I had to make a music video for a speech class. My buddies and I decided to do ours to the song “Afternoon Delight” and go as flamboyant and over-the-top as possible: highly saturated colors, vague homoeroticism and embarrassing shoots at public parks. The video was an instant hit at our high school and cemented comedy as something fun to do.

Marathon (2007) Marathon was for a 48-hour contest in the summer of ’07 that our team worked on. The project was arduous — filled with problems, shooting conflicts and high stress. But in writing the script, we ended on the closing lines, “It’s not about winning, but finishing.” And the same was true for “Marathon’s” creation itself. We didn’t win anything big for it, but we did end up getting the audience choice award and a really great reception when people watched it.

Inebriation (2010)

Erika Rich | Daily Texan Staff

The Adams brothers, the force responsible for the viral Internet sensation “The Brocial Network,” began making films together when they were 12 years old. Since then, the brothers and their friends who make up their film company, Atomic Productions, have made short films and music videos.

What to say about this? “Inebriation” is notable as probably our biggest hit ever. It got picked up by Time Magazine, New York Magazine, GQ, Tosh.0 and thousands of others. The exposure and accolades we received for it are just completely unreal, and we really never saw any of it coming. It’d be silly to say it’s not one of the most notable developments in our growth as filmmakers.

Indie bookstores work to survive in declining publishing market By Katie Stroh Daily Texan Staff

Mega bookstore chain Borders Group Inc. is on the verge of filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, with plans to cut thousands of jobs and close about 200 of its 674 stores, according to a Wall Street Journal report made on Friday. Don’t mistake this as a victory for neighborhood independent bookstores, however. These closings are indicative of the entire publishing industry’s decline, including the decline of small local booksellers. Austin is notorious for pushing its citizens to shop locally, which may account for a number of small Austin bookstores that have been able to survive in the eBook age. But these stores are still in danger of suffering the same fate as their bigbox bookstore counterparts. Austin book lovers can do their part to keep bookstores alive by exploring and supporting these and other independent booksellers in the Austin area. Customers may find that indie bookstores offer a much more personal, distinctive experience than can be found at a typical Barnes & Noble.

BookPeople No discussion of Austin’s local book scene is complete without mention of BookPeople, the city’s largest and most well-known independent bookstore. BookPeople is an Austin institution for book lovers. Boasting a multi-level layout with four floors

of space and its own cafe, BookPeople claims to be the largest independent bookstore in Texas. The store’s calendar is packed with events such as signings, guest-speaking authors and local book clubs. Notable past guest speakers include Jimmy Carter, Jonathan Franzen, Rachael Ray, Rick Riordan, Anthony Bourdain and David Sedaris. There are indie bookstores in Austin other than BookPeople, however, and many accommodate a specific niche, with material that may be difficult to find in a store such as BookPeople, which tends to carry a broad range of books to cater to the general public.

butting up against each other that don’t belong together, at least not in the traditional sense,” said Russell Etchen, creative director at Domy Books. “We’re really pushing people to browse and consider things they may not have ever looked at. You can’t come to the store knowing exactly what you’re looking for.” Etchen said that he draws upon his own creative interests and passions to keep the store interesting for himself and his customers. “I come from kind of this punkrock ethos of do-it-yourself and keep it fun,” Etchen said. “If you do things well and you do them right, people will respond positively. It’s Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff rare when anybody actually steps out of that mode of just working Liz Alexander stands before one of the many pieces of art shown at Domy Books on East Cesar Chavez Domy Books and actually takes the time to hand- Street. Domy features contemporary art alongside an eclectic collection of books and figurines. If you’re not sure what you’re sell something to you, which is sort philosophy because of price or ease looking to read but you know you of a dying art.” or whatever reason,” Post said. want something offbeat and totalPost is most interested in conly unique, check out Domy Books. versing with her customers and in BookWoman Domy specializes in books and othsharing differing ideas and perspecBookWoman, which has exer products relating to contempotives with the diverse range of peorary art, design, architecture and isted in Austin for more than 36 ple that come though BookWomphotography, as well as under- years, prides itself on emphasizan’s doors. ground zines, fiction, graphic nov- ing female-centric material and fe603 North Lamar Blvd. 5501 North Lamar Blvd. #A-105 “The thing that’s most interels and an array of colorful toys and male authors. Current owner SuAustin, TX 78703 Austin, TX 78751 esting to me is picking the cussan Post joined BookWoman early knickknacks. 512-472-5050 512-472-2785 A clean, minimalist interior in its inception, when it was located tomer’s brain about their experibookpeople.com ebookwoman.com ences and ideas because we’re all makes the store itself an aesthet- on Guadalupe Street and called the in it together,” Post said. “I like ic feast. Books and toys are care- Common Woman Bookstore. Post has led the store through bringing the community together. fully arranged in short stacks or by 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 5335 Burnet Rd. themselves on tables and shelves, multiple campaigns to keep the That’s as good as putting the right book in someone’s hands. WomAustin, TX 78702 Austin, TX 78756 backed by a pristine, snowy white store financially afloat in wake of 512-476-3669 512-323-5123 wall space, which makes the books’ the recent downward trend in pub- en are lost in the world in lots of domystore.com .recycledreads.org ways, and we really want to show lishing, most recently in 2007. designs all the more eye-popping. women their legacy. ” “Books have kind of become ex“We have loose, vague sections booKS continues on page 9 in the store, but there are books empt from the whole ‘shop local’

bookstores

BookPeople

BookWoman

Domy Books

Recycled Reads

The Daily Texas 2-14-11  

The Feb. 14 edition of The Daily Texan

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