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THE DAILY TEXAN

ON THE WEB Texas Book Festival authors share motives, inspiration behind work bit.ly/dt_video

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

Hump Day dives into condom usage

UT English professor talks about his experiences and poetry

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

LIFE&ARTS 12 >> Breaking news, blogs and more: www.dailytexanonline.com

@thedailytexan

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

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Grad student insists loaner abolish extra service fees

TODAY Calendar

In the Studio Dylan Ratigan, MSNBC political commentator and author, is this week’s guest on “Overheard with Evan Smith.” Attend the free taping at 10 a.m. in KLRU’s Studio 6A. RSVP at klru.org/ overheard.

By Alexa Ura Daily Texan Staff

‘10 Things I Hate About You’

The SEC Film Committee is continuing their Late Night Film Series tonight with “10 Things I Hate About You” in the SAC auditorium. The film will begin at 9 p.m. and is free + one guest with UTEID.

Today in history In 1952

After King George VI dies, Elizabeth takes the throne in England. This will be her 60th year of reign.

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

Government senior James Blaise walks past construction on the East Mall Tuesday afternoon. Blaise, who lost his sight as a child, said that he is frequently frustrated by construction on campus which impedes his normal route.

Disabled students seek further support By Bobby Blanchard Daily Texan Staff

WATCH TStv ON CHANNEL 15 9 p.m. The Current The Night Nite crew tries to raise money with a telethon while their writers and director are out on a double date and lead producer is stuck in another dimension!

9:30 p.m. College Crossfire Our sports panelists analyze the Superbowl and Longhorn basketball.

7-8 p.m. In The Know The biggest news stories at the national and local level.

7-9 a.m. When Roots Attack! Classic dub and roots reggae from the heart of Jamaica.

In the past five years, the number of students registering with the Services for Students with Disabilities has doubled, and the University is making efforts to better accommodate them. Students registered with disabilities brought up issues about iClickers and gaining accommodations from professors at a meeting Tuesday night hosted by staff of SSD. Only six students attended the event. The meeting was held to gain feedback from students about how the University is doing at providing accommodations to students who

are suffering from disabilities, said Stephani Wolfe, director of SSD. Senior Pamela Lagos said quizzes done by iClickers cause her anxiety because they are only 30 seconds long and factor into her final grade for one of her classes. “I’m trying to read the questions and the answers and they’re timed so I feel like it hinders my response,” Lagos said. “I would be much better taking the quiz on paper.” Linda Millstone, associate vice president for Institutional Equity and Workforce Diversity and director of Equal Opportunity Services, said she wants to see the SSD respond by putting information about

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

Executive director of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement Stephani Wolfe, left, and coordinator Justin Rogers, midDISABILITY continues on PAGE 2 dle, listen to students at an open forum Tuesday night in the SSB.

A recent college graduate struggling with loan repayment is pushing a major loan corporation to change forbearance terms for private loans. Stef Gray, who graduated from Hunter College in New York last may, started a petition against the corporate loaner Sallie Mae, which charges a $50 per loan fee for every three-month forbearance period granted to private loan customers. Sallie Mae collected the fee as profit until more than 110,000 individuals signed Gray’s petition and rallied in support. Last week, the loan corporation announced they would readjust the terms of loan repayment to accredit such payments toward the loan balance. Sallie Mae only charges this fee to its private loan customers and not to federal loan customers. By charging the fee, Sallie Mae is not giving the debtor any option but to pay or default, Gray said during a phone press conference. “All I want is for Sallie Mae to give the same rights and protections to its private loan customers that is guaranteed free of charge to its federal loan customers,” she said. Gray said she will continue to push Sallie Mae for further reform through consolidation, safety nets or incomebased payments that could help student borrowers avoid default and enhance consumer protection. Her ultimate

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Nonprofit proposes housing iPhone app promotes good night’s sleep for low-income downtown By Bobby Blanchard Daily Texan Staff

By Kayla Jonsson Daily Texan Staff

The first low-income resident apartment complex in the heart of downtown may soon begin construction, which will provide a refuge for Austin’s starving artists and those looking to get back on their feet. Foundation Communities, an Austin nonprofit organizat ion w hos e mission is to end poverty, is proposing to build a low-income apartment complex at Trinity and 11th streets named Capitol Terrace, said Foundation C ommunities executive director Walter Moreau. The goal of the location is to offer residents who may not have a vehicle an easy commute to work because so many people work at the restaurants and hotels downtown, he said. The organization is awaiting approval of a $10 million tax credit this summer to fund the new complex, Moreau said. If approved, they will conduct

additional fundraising, and construction will start in about one year. The complex will open in two years, he said. “We are ver y hopeful and excited this is going to work,” Moreau said. “We already own the property where we want to build the complex so that makes things easier.” Moreau said 135 efficiency apartments, big enough for one resident each, will be offered. Prices will range from $400 to $650 a month, focusing on people making less than $27,000 a year, he said. Ten of the apartments will be reserved for artists and musicians, Moreau said. “Austin prides itself as being the “Live Music Capital of the World” and lots of musicians play downtown but can’t afford it,” he said. “We want to support Austin being a music city.” Twenty-s e ven apar t ments will be designated for those

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Students with hectic schedules may find solace with the Sleep Cycle alarm clock mobile app, which could potentially help students wake up feeling more refreshed. This app, which is currently the most frequently bought iPhone app in the iPhone health and fitness categor y on iTunes, is one of many apps students can use in order to help with their l i fe s t y l e s . T h e S l e e p Cy cle app claims it helps users wake up in a better mood by waking them up in one of their lighter sleep phases. As s o c i at e nu r s i n g pro fessor Patricia Carter, who t au g ht an Und e rg r a du ate Studies class on sleep in past semesters, said people go through four sleep phases. Each phase lasts 90-120 minutes and varies in lightness and heaviness. Carter said the best time to wake up was during phases one and two. When people wake up in phases three and four, it can take them up to an additional

Illustration by Wes Haynie | Daily Texan Staff

30 minutes to really wake up, Carter said. “You feel like you’re drunk, you feel like it’s all foggy,” Carter said. “We actually call it sleep drunkenness.” Biology freshman Jewel Benn said it takes her time to adjust when she wakes up from deep sleep.

“Usually I want to go back to sleep or I reach for the snooze button,” B enn said. “I think about how many extra minutes I can get away with.” This is where Sleep Cycle comes in — the app’s website claims it uses motion sensors on the

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NEWS 2

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

NEWS BRIEFLY

THE DAILY TEXAN

UT high in Princeton Review public college value ranking

Volume 112, Number 112

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Viviana Aldous (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Audrey White (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

Zen Ren | Daily Texan Staff

Two women walk past a parking lot Tuesday afternoon where construction for new low income apartments may begin. Nonprofit organization Foundation Communities is proposing 135 living spaces for the homeless and musicians on a budget and aims to have the affordable complex up in two years.

HOUSING continues from PAGE 1

coming from homeless shelters. Moreau said Capitol Terrace will work closely with the Austin Resource Center for the Homeless as well as other local homeless shelters. “This complex is unique in that it is downtown, but it is not Foundation Communities’ first ball game,” said ARCH sp oke s m an Mitchel l Gibb s .

FOR THE RECORD Correction: A Feb. 7 article about the Belo Center for New Media should have said the center will be open for classes for the fall 2012 semester. Correction: A Feb. 7 review of Van Halen’s new album, A Different Kind of Truth, should have identified Wolfgang Van Halen as Eddie Van Halen’s son.

LOANS continues from PAGE 1

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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“They have successfully helped us get people on their feet and moving in the right direction towards independent living for a long time at other locations.” Gibbs said the downtown location will provide an easier commute for those who have been chronically homeless and still need support from case workers located downtown.

goal is to get rid of the $50 forbearance charge that is not realistic for unemployed students like herself. “There’s so much talk about personal responsibility on the part of the debtor,” Gray said. “What about the responsibility of the lender to protect their client?” Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of the FinAid and FastWeb websites that provide financial aid and scholarship information to students, said education on private loans is vital in protecting a student’s financial future.

“Students should exhaust all federal loan resources before even considering a private loan because federal loans are provided by the government which wants to advance higher education and will protect the student,” he said. Sallie Mae is a for-profit organization and was up-front about the charge for forbearance in their promissory note that individuals such as Gray sign at the time they accept the loan, Kantrowitz said. “While the level of unemployment of recent graduates has changed and it may seem

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iClickers in accommodation let“For some students it doesn’t ters professors receive at the start seem to be working very well,” of the semester. Millstone said. “I think we probably will see more faculty using This newspaper was printed with pride the iClicker across the campus, Daily Texan and Texas HE AILY EXAN by The Student Media. so it’s good to get that informaPermanent Staff tion in the accommodation letEditor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Daley, Samantha Katsounas ter.” Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White BUMMER

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Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jillian Bliss Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Pagan, Colton Pence, Nick Hadjigeorge Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kayla Jonsson, Sarah White, Liz Farmer, Jody Serrano Enterprise Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Huma Munir, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexandra Feuerman, Arleen Lopez, Klarissa Fitzpatrick Wire Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Myers Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Benavides Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins, Bobby Blanchard, Betsy Cooper Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simonetta Nieto Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Edwards Multimedia Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackie Kuenstler, Lawrence Peart, Fanny Trang Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thomas Allison, Elizabeth Dillon, Shannon Kintner, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rebeca Rodriguez, Zachary Strain Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demi Adejuyigbe, David Castaneda, Jorge Corona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ashley Dillard, Andrea Macias-Jimenez Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Stroh Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christopher Nguyen Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jessica Lee, Anju Mehta, Eli Watson, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sameer Bhuchar Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nick Cremona, Austin Laymance, Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Grace Elliot Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William Snyder, Stefanie Schultz Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Rachel Thompson, Alexa Ura, Sylvia Butanda Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maria Arrellaga, Zen Ren Sports writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield, Sara Beth Purdy, Anthony Mannino Life&Arts writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clayton Wickam, Karin Samulson Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rui Shi Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Holly Wu, Kristine Reyna, Luis San Miguel Editorial Cartoonists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Blair Robbins Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Caitlin Zellers, Nick Gregg, Xiu Zhu Shao, Anne Le . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .John Massinghill, Katie Carrel, Jessica Doung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Rodrigues, Wes Haynie Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar J. Longoria, Michaela Huff, Kayla Moses

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(512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman, Adrian Lloyd, Morgan Haenchen, Ted Moreland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paola Reyes, Fredis Benitez, Tyrell Elegonye, Zach Congdon Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Student Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Allison McMordie Student Buys of Texas Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Buys of Texas Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Suzi Zhaw, Esteban Rivera Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron Rodriguez Special Editions Adviser & Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Imperatore

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“Those folks who are chronically homeless still need additional help after leaving the ARCH,” Gibbs said. “You can’t just put them in a home and expect them to support themselves. They will have to see a case worker for a while, so this location will make that easier for them.” Olivia Beck, co-chair of UT’s

that lenders must adjust to this, it seems that Gray is asking for Sallie Mae to accommodate her need after she agreed to specific terms when she signed for the loan,” he said. Gray, who took out three student loans during her college career, said there is not enough education about private lenders. She said that these lenders are painted in a certain light of reliability, which is inaccurate because of their dual role as lender and collector. “The student debt crisis ultimately is just a hair y, awful tangled mess and I feel like

this is just starting to unravel,” she said. Mohammed Murtuza, a human development and family sciences senior, said he would never consider a private loan despite the fact that he already accumulated $30,000 in federal loans and still has a semester left at UT. “Education costs are on the rise and even public schools like UT are becoming harder to afford,” he said. “Learning ab out loans and the f inancial burden of college needs to be taught to students before college.”

Wolfe said most professors have used the iClicker just for polling, but lately she said she has seen more classes use them as part of a grading system. “We’ve been case-by-case addressing it, but we’ve been working on ways to respond systematically,” Wolfe said. “The solution isn’t the same from class to class or student to student, so that is where it gets challenging.” Social work senior Carol Gilson said she wants professors to

be taught how to deal with accommodations better because she and fellow SSD registered students should not have to work to get their accommodations every year. “Accommodations is part of doing a professor’s job,” Gilson said. “I don’t think that’s our job as a student.” Government senior James Blaise, who is blind, said while he is frustrated with navigating construction on campus, accommodations for blind students have improved greatly since his freshman year. “Most professors are very accommodating,” said Blaise, who did not attend the forum. “Dealing with some of the less ac-

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10 BEST VALUE PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES 1. University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill 2. University of Virginia 3. New College of Florida 4. State University of New York at Binghampton 5. University of Wisconsin 6. College of William and Mary 7. University of Florida 8. University of Georgia 9. University of Washington 10. University of Texas at Austin

List courtesy of Princeton Review

commodating professors can be a hassle.” Wolfe said law mandates promising equal access to students are granted and guaranteed by the SSD, but she is hoping attitude towards accommodations moves forward to something more. “At the end of the day we can say you have to give students extra time and they will give extra time because we said so,” Wolfe said. “What I would hope as we continue this dialogue and it gets better across campus, professors will have no problem providing extra time because they would understand the intent of the law is so every student have equal access, because it is the right thing to do.”

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Hunger and Homelessness Outreach (H2O) and chemical engineering senior, said Capitol Terrace is a good start to assisting low-income Austinites, but there are many more who will still need help. “Ultimately, 27 apartment [rooms] is nowhere near enough to house Austin’s homeless population,” she said.

The Princeton Review named UT-Austin one of the top 10 Best Value Public Colleges in the nation for 2012. The list featured 150 schools and 37 states overall and assessed their rankings from institutional data collection in the primary areas of academics, cost of attendance, financial aid and student opinion surveys from fall 2010 through fall 2011, according to the Princeton Review website. Princeton Review also considered the percentage of graduating seniors who borrowed from any loan program and the average dollar amount of debt those students had at graduation. Although included in the expanded list, UT failed to break into the top 10 last year. The Office of Student Financial Services’ website estimated the approximate cost of attending UT to be from $12,133 to 12,829 per semester — including room and board, tuition and other expenses — for full-time in-state students. University spokesman Gary Susswein said this status is just the latest in a series of higher education rankings that highlight UT’s value. “Our tuition is lower than at most of our peer schools and we spend less in-state money than almost all of them,” Susswein said. “Yet we still rank among the top public research universities in the nation and world. We do more with less and serve our students incredibly well. It’s great to be recognized for that.”

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SLEEP continues from PAGE 1

p h on e t o t r a c k a p e r s on’s movements throughout the ni g ht . C ar ter s aid b e c aus e people become paralyzed in their heavier sleep phases, the app can predict when a person is in their lighter sleep phases. Then, using a 30 minute window set by the user, an alarm goes off at the time when the user is in their lightest sleep phase. “That is the time you want to wake up, because you’re closest to being awake already anyway,” Carter said. Carter said the app should work for users as long as they pl a c e t he i r phone b e ne at h their sheets and not their mattress or pillow. Carter also said other problems can come to those who are restless sleepers or anyone who feels anxiety from using the app. “Any t h i ng t hat i nc re as es

your anxiety around sleep is going to make it harder for you to sleep,” she said. Carter said it is important for users to realize they need to be getting enough sleep to begin with in order to wake up feeling refreshed. “You need a minimum of six hours of sleep per night in order to have your body not feel like it’s star ving for sleep,” Carter said. “Chances are if you’re only getting four hours of sleep it’s going to be really hard for it to find a time when you’re not in deep sleep.” Business sophomore Victor Rodriguez said he used the app for about two weeks before it helped him set a more permanent sleep schedule. “I would wake up feeling great,” Victor said. “I would recommend it to any student.”


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World&NatioN

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Wednesday, February 8, 2012 | The Daily Texan | Austin Myers, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

NEWS BRIEFLY Strike could interrupt Carnival as Brazilian police expect raises SALVADOR, Brazil — About 300 striking police officers and their relatives held out Tuesday as soldiers blockaded a state legislature building in northeastern Brazil, and public worker leaders threatened a strike in Rio de Janeiro that could threaten the world’s largest Carnival celebration. About 1,000 soldiers and officers from an elite federal police unit ringed the legislature in the Bahia state capital of Salvador, Brazil’s thirdlargest city with 2.7 million people and a scheduled host for matches during the 2014 World Cup. Negotiations failed to end the strike in Salvador, officials said, and authorities in Rio de Janeiro also were preparing for police discontent there. Officials put up protective fences and posted riot police around Rio’s state legislature as lawmakers prepared to vote on a 39 percent raise for police, firefighters and prison guards, all of whom were threatening to strike Friday. The raise would increase an officer’s starting salary to $964 a month. Discontent among police is widespread across Brazil. Many officers complain of low pay and dangerous conditions in a country that recorded nearly 50,000 homicides in 2010.

New austerity deal almost done as Greeks lament their situation ATHENS, Greece — Greece’s prime minister negotiated late into the night Tuesday with the country’s international creditors, finalizing a proposal for new austerity measures to avoid a disastrous bankruptcy. Prime Minister Lucas Papademos kept talking with senior debt inspectors from Greece’s bailout creditors — other countries that use the euro and the International Monetary Fund — which meant his meeting with Greek party leaders was postponed until Wednesday. The EU and the IMF insist that Greece must pass further harsh austerity measures — including private sector salary cuts and civil service firings — if it is to secure a second $170 billion bailout to avoid defaulting next month and possibly leaving the eurozone. The impending cutbacks have angered Greek unions, who organized a nationwide strike Tuesday that stopped train and ferry services, closed schools and banks and put state hospitals on short staffing.

Lebanon’s Hezbollah won’t fight for Iran should things get there BEIRUT — Iran will not ask Lebanon’s Hezbollah to retaliate if Israel attacks Iran’s nuclear facilities, the leader of the militant group said Tuesday. Sheik Hassan Nasrallah told thousands of supporters by video link that in case of such an Israeli attack on Iran, his leadership would make a decision about a response. Hezbollah is funded by Iran. “There is speculation about what wound happen if Israel bombed Iran’s nuclear facilities,” Nasrallah said. “I tell you that the Iranian leadership will not ask Hezbollah to do anything. On that day, we will sit, think and decide what we will do.” Hezbollah holds the balance of power in Lebanon’s coalition government.

Last known WWI veteran dies, one more page of history closes LONDON — Florence Green never saw the front line. Her war was spent serving food, not dodging bullets. But Green, who has died aged 110, was the last known surviving veteran of World War I. She was serving with the Women’s Royal Air Force as a waitress at an air base in eastern England when the guns fell silent on Nov. 11, 1918. It was not until 2010 that she was officially recognized as a veteran after a researcher found her service record in Britain’s National Archives. She was born Florence Beatrice Patterson in London on Feb. 19, 1901, and joined the newly formed Women’s Royal Air Force in September 1918 at the age of 17. Compiled from Associated Press reports

Court strikes down California’s gay marriage ban By Lisa Leff The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Samesex marriage moved one step closer to the Supreme Court on Tuesday when a federal appeals court ruled California’s ban unconstitutional, saying it serves no purpose other than to “lessen the status and human dignity” of gays. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals gave gay marriage opponents time to appeal the 2-1 decision before ordering the state to allow same-sex weddings to resume. “I’m ecstatic. I recognize that we have a ways to go yet. We may have one or two more legal steps,” said Jane Leyland, who was gathered with a small crowd outside the federal courthouse in downtown San Francisco, cheering as they learned of the ruling. Leyland married her longtime partner, Terry Gilb, during the fivemonth window when same-sex marriage was legal in California. “But when we first got together, I would have never dreamed in a million years that we would be allowed to be legally married, and here we are.” The ban known as Proposition 8 was approved by voters in 2008 with 52 percent of the vote. The court said it was unconstitutional because it singled out a minority group for disparate treatment for no compelling reason. The justices concluded that the law had no purpose other than to deny gay couples marriage, since California already grants them all the rights and benefits of marriage if they register as domestic partners. “Had Marilyn Monroe’s film been called ‘How to Register a Domestic Partnership with a Millionaire,’ it would not have conveyed the same meaning as did her famous movie,

Photo courtesy of Bay Area News Group & The Tribune

Brian Keeton and Jay Dwyer, of San Francisco, celebrate outside City Hall in San Francisco on Tuesday after a federal appeals court declared California’s same-sex marriage ban (better known as Proposition 8) unconstitutional. It has been 18 months since a lower-court judge struck down the law, and its defenders will likely appeal to the Supreme Court. Same-sex weddings might not continue until the case has been fully appealed.

even though the underlying drama for same-sex couples is no different,” the court said. The appeals court focused its decision exclusively on California’s ban, not the bigger debate, even though the court has further jurisdiction. Whether same-sex couples may ever be denied the right to marry “is an important and highly controversial question,” the court said. “We need not and do not answer the broader question in this case.”

Six states allow gay couples to wed - Connecticut, New Hampshire, Iowa, Massachusetts, New York and Vermont — as well as the District of Columbia. California, as the nation’s most populous state and home to more than 98,000 same-sex couples, would be the gay rights movement’s biggest prize of them all. The 9th Circuit concluded that a trial court judge had correctly interpreted the Constitution and Supreme Court precedents when he

threw out Proposition 8. Legal analysts questioned whether the Supreme Court would agree to take the case because of its narrow scope. California is the only state to grant gays the right to marry and rescind it. Douglas NeJaime, an associate professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, said the Californiaspecific scope of the 9th Circuit panel’s decision means the Supreme Court can uphold it without ruling

“on marriage for same-sex couples on a national scale.” Weddings appeared unlikely to resume anytime soon. The ruling will not take effect until the deadline passes in two weeks for Proposition 8’s backers to appeal to a larger panel of the 9th Circuit. Lawyers for the coalition of conservative religious groups that sponsored the measure said they have not decided if they will seek a rehearing or file an appeal directly to the Supreme Court.

Russia pushes Syria reforms with Assad staying in power By Elizabeth Kennedy The Associated Press

BEIRUT — Days after blocking a U.S.-backed peace plan at the U.N., senior Russian officials pushed for reforms Tuesday during an emergency meeting with Syrian President Bashar Assad, promoting a settlement to end the uprising without removing him from power. Thousands of flag-waving government supporters cheered the Russians in the Syrian capital of Damascus, while to the north, Assad’s forces pounded the opposition city of Homs — underscoring the sharp divisions propelling the country toward civil war. The violence has led to the most severe international isolation in more than four decades of Assad family rule, with country after country calling home their envoys. France, Italy, Spain and Belgium pulled their ambassadors from Damascus, as did six Gulf nations, including Saudi Arabia. Germany, whose envoy left the country this month, said he would not be replaced. The moves came a day after the U.S. closed its embassy in Syria and Britain recalled its ambassador. Turkey, once a strong Assad supporter and now one of his most vocal critics, added its voice to the international condemnation, with Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan saying his coun-

try cannot remain silent about massacres in Syria. He said Turkey would “launch a new initiative with countries that stand by the Syrian people instead of the regime.” Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov flew into Damascus on Tuesday, accompanied by his foreign security chief, to try to boost a plan that would keep Assad in power, even though many prominent members of the opposition reject that entirely. The visit was also a sign that Moscow wanted to get a firsthand assessment of the situation on the ground in Syria — and the raucous welcome the diplomats received from thousands of regime supporters appeared aimed at showing that Assad’s grip is firm, at least in Damascus. Syria has been a key Russian ally since Soviet times, and Moscow remains a major arms supplier to Damascus even as Assad unleashes his forces to crush not only peaceful protesters, but army defectors who are fighting the regime. In Washington, White House spokesman Jay Carney said the U.S. was not considering arming opposition groups in Syria, despite calls from some U.S. lawmakers to consider such an option. U.S. senators John McCain and Joe Lieberman urged the U.S. to explore the prospect of arming opposition forces. “It’s an option that now should be on the table,” McCain said.

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4

OPINION

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Viviana Aldous, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

HORNS UP, HORNS DOWN

DEADLINE TO FILE TO RUN IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS

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Increasing student representation in city politics Austin’s 2012 Charter Revision Committee approved a plan at its final meeting last week that could mean increased representation for students on the City Council. The committee, charged with drafting recommendations to alter the city’s constitution, recommended a 10-1 proposal for City Council representation, with 10 geographic, single-member districts and one at-large mayor. The recommendation is in response to criticism of Austin’s antiquated at-large system of council representation. That system has made it easier for student issues to slip through the cracks because of each council member’s wide, varied constituency. Though the 10-1 plan is not perfect, adopting it would likely mean that one council member would specifically represent the UT area, giving UT students leverage to get their voices heard at city hall. But given the quarrelsome and time-consuming legal battles surrounding redistricting at the state level, the committee tied the call for single member districts to a call for an independent committee to draw the maps to avoid subjecting Austin to a similar situation if the plan is approved by both the city council and the voters in November. This committee could present a unique opportunity for students in Austin. According to the committee’s recommendation, members of that independent map-drawing committee must be fully diverse, and the committee considers student status a form of diversity. This move is a significant departure from current practice, which typically limits student involvement in city business. Moreover, the very idea of an independent committee is an important step on the path to creating single-member districts, since tying a pre-made map to the proposal would decrease the likelihood that the city council would vote to pass the plan. Similar plans have failed before the council six times before. Although each student may only attend UT for four years, the University is enduring; student needs do not disappear every four years. Regardless of whether single-member districts pass, this change in approach is a positive step toward expanding student representation on the city level. Students are crucial, contributing members of the city, and it’s time to respect the role they play.

days COUNTDOWN TO THE FIRST DAY OF STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS

21 Revamping the energy curriculum By Rui Shi Daily Texan Columnist

Altering the Texas DREAM Act Late last month, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board voted unanimously to update the state law that grants instate tuition to undocumented students attending college. The rule change would require universities to send undocumented students annual reminders of their obligation to seek legal status and would require universities to keep affidavits of that obligation on file. Its widespread impact would affect more than 16,000 students who receive in-state tuition because of the law. The law, recently criticized during Gov. Rick Perry’s presidential campaign, attracted controversy over the summer because critics feel it does not follow through on whether students are actually pursuing legal status. Though this rule change does not alter the eligibility for in-state tuition, it creates a dangerous situation for undocumented students. The annual reminder has the potential to confuse students and put them in jeopardy of deportation if they ask for clarification from the wrong official. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund specifically criticized the board’s decision because it does not add any recommendation for students to seek legal counsel before contacting an immigration official. The coordinating board has summarily dismissed these claims as unimportant. Its spokesman, Dominic Chavez, said that “nothing should be read into” the rule change, according to The Texas Tribune. However, this mentality disregards the sensitive nature of the topic and its importance to students in a precarious legal situation, and the board should not diminish the potential impact the rule will have on thousands of Texas students.

days

Blair Robbins | Daily Texan Staff

As the Republican primary rages on, the polarization of the political scene is as evident as ever. From health care to the tax code, Republicans and Democrats can’t seem to come together on any important issue. One such issue is the future of American energy. But the public’s perception of energy remains distorted — a problem that the Republican candidates have done little to alleviate. There is a need to revamp our understanding of energy, starting at the university level. The energy field has been moving forward at a rapid pace as the world races to find alternatives to fossil fuels. However, these advances must clear a variety of hurdles in the current political environment. Innovations must be environmentally friendly, economically viable and politically uncontroversial. With these limitations, the current approach to energy education is lacking and must find a way to catch up with recent developments. The rigid undergraduate curriculum in today’s universities makes it hard for students to venture outside of their majors. Students who wish to go into the energy field usually choose one of a few narrow areas of study such as petroleum or chemical engineering. These majors offer the techni-

cal know-how to solve a very specific set of problems that encompass only a small portion of the energy sector. It’s clear that traditional energy studies do not provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the ever-expanding sector. The compartmentalization of curricula has forced students to specialize in certain areas, and this specialization undermines students’ abilities to undertake a multidisciplinary course of study. The creation of an interdisciplinary energy curriculum would greatly aid in the push to modernize energy studies. A single energy department would help bring connected fields together under the same roof. For example, an engineering class might offer a student the technical knowledge he or she needs to tackle a domain-specific problem; a government class might provide the student with an understanding of government policy; a biology class might help the student understand the environmental impact of certain practices; and an economics class might solidify the student’s understanding of the market forces that drive innovation. Like any other interdisciplinary program, a unified energy department would have to overcome major hurdles. All of the involved colleges would have to wade through the logistical mess of creating a curriculum. And funding is always an issue in determining whether such a program is worth pursuing.

However, in an economy desperate for viable sources of alternative energy, a comprehensive energy major would equip students to solve this problem. UT is among several research universities that have moved toward a unified energy program. The Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy (CIEEP) has brought together faculty from the College of Engineering, the Jackson School of Geosciences and the LBJ School of Public Affairs to collaborate on developing solutions to current energy problems. The CIEEP has several graduate-level programs that deal with energy research in an interdisciplinary way. Another resource for students interested in the energy sector is UT’s Energy Institute. Composed of several affiliated colleges, the institute is uniquely positioned to address complex problems through research. The institute’s mission also includes the development of certificate and degree programs across disciplines. These efforts represent an excellent start by UT in the direction of a unified energy curriculum. Expanding programs such as CIEEP and the Energy Institute to undergraduates would move UT beyond the starting line and into a position of innovative national leadership. Shi is an electrical and computer engineering junior.

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

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5 UNIV

NEWS

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Graduate student examines classic Texas twang accent By Sylvia Butanda Daily Texan Staff

In Texas, it isn’t unusual to hear a “y’all” tossed around in casual conversation, but the tone of language we use differs depending on whom we’re talking to, according to a new study. Linguistics graduate student Kathleen Points examined differences in dialect through her project “Language Use in East Austin,” in which she researched language use and examines how it relates to identity. She looked at different ethnic groups that make up East Austin to determine what causes these subtle changes. “I was interested in researching language and how people use language at a local level,” Points said. “I looked at how we use accents selectively to highlight our identity.” Points said differences in the way certain groups speak are subtle but produce different kinds of sounds. “I’m observing what could be the beginning of larger sound change — it’s the vowel in the word ‘goose,’” Points said. “In Texas and the South, it’s the traditional stereotypical Southern sound. In Hispanic English, the sound is typically more backed, where the tongue is more in the back of the mouth.” Points said these differences in dialect change depending on

For WEB

ExCluSIVE

simple subject matters. “It’s related to the topic of conversation,” she said. “When people are talking about negative things, their tongues are in the backs of their mouths. When they talk about things close to their heart, like cooking with their grandmother, they use the traditional white-Anglo sound.” Linguistics professor Nora England said there’s a strong tendency to try to alter our speech slightly to sound more like those we admire. “If you look at communities of speakers and how speech changes, there’s a correlation of how people talk and how other people talk that they hold in esteem,” England said. “We have powerful motivation to speak in ways that put us in the middle of the group we want to be part of.” Social work freshman Emma Thompson said she speaks differently when she’s at home in Texas than she does when she ventures elsewhere. “When I go out-of-state I definitely talk in a thicker accent, because people think the accent is cool,” Thompson said. She also said talking to others that have the signature Texas twang helps to bring out her own. “If I’m talking to someone who has a really thick accent then my accent tends to come out more,” she said.

STORIES VIDEOS PHOTO GALLERIES & MORE @dailytexanonline.com

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Dale Smith admires a mirror decorated with magazine pages from Indonesia in the window of Ten Thousand Villages on South Congress Avenue Tuesday afternoon.

Thomas Allison Daily Texan Staff

Fair Trade USA fights poverty through business By Sylvia Butanda Daily Texan Staff

With a one-way ticket to Nicaragua, Paul Rice left the U.S. fresh out of college with the mentality that he could change the world. Now 29 years later, he is the founder and CEO of Fair Trade USA. Fair Trade USA is a nonprofit organization with a mission to alleviate poverty and promote sustainable development around the world through partnership with businesses and more direct trade. Rice presented an overview of the company and its goals at the Global Civil Society Speaker Series, an event hosted by assistant public affairs professor Joshua Busby of the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service. Rice said his 11 years in Nicaragua working alongside farmers led him to discover the idea of a fair trade market. “I worked on several projects

funded by well-intentioned aid agencies,” Rice said. “Out of that experience I came to believe aid doesn’t help farming communities develop their own capacity to solve their own problems.” After adopting a fair trade philosophy in 1990, Rice organized Nicaragua’s first fair trade coffee co-op. Rice founded Fair Trade USA in 1998. “Fair trade was big in Europe, so it was my calling to come back here and plant the seed and see if I can get fair trade going in the States,” he said. Rice said the company initiated a program last year, Fair Trade for All, which is estimated to double the impact of the company’s mission by 2015. “We want to deepen the meaning of fair trade,” Rice said. “In the past, fair trade was about transaction and the price. We want to enhance that core value proposition we offer to farmers with an array of other services and support to

make sure farming communities thrive.” In 2011, Fair Trade USA began Fair Trade Universities where students form committees to initiate the selling of fair trade products on campuses. UT-Austin is not on the map yet as a fair trade campus but should be because of the large number of students that can make a difference, Rice said. “A school this big goes through so much coffee, tea, chocolate and other products that the impact would be huge,” he said. Austin’s fair trade market includes the South Congress Avenue shop Ten Thousand Villages, which carries handmade artisan-crafted products — a proponent for inspiring Austinites to support fair trade, said the store’s volunteer coordinator Alice May Berthelsen. In addition to Ten Thousand Villages, Austin has several other locations that are fair trade product carriers, including the

Austin-based Fortune 500 supermarket chain Whole Foods Market, which is the top retailer of Fair Trade products in the country, Rice said. In 2009, Fair Trade USA started Fair Trade Towns USA where ordinary people in their communities began spreading the word about fair trade products to the businesses in town, he said. There are currently 26 declared Fair Trade Towns in the country and Austin is one of the 100 cities that are in the process of becoming one, Rice said. In order for the city to be an active Fair Trade town, Austin needs one more step, said William Goldsmith, the national coordinator for Fair Trade Towns USA. “The final item is to pass a Fair Trade Resolution that should reflect an intention of the municipality to use and serve Fair Trade products by city government and for city functions,” Goldsmith said.

Applications Now Being Accepted The Pal – Make a Difference Award

The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award

University Unions

University Unions

Each year the J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award is presented to a student whose cumulative, notable contributions to campus life over a period of time exemplify the commitment to public service and the high standard of leadership that were the hallmarks of the life and career of U. S. Congressman J. J. “Jake” Pickle. The 2012 recipient of the J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award will receive a certificate, a copy of Congressman Pickle’s autobiography, Jake, and a $4000 check at a luncheon on Friday, April 20, 2012. Candidates must be in good academic standing, be currently enrolled full-time, and must complete an application comprising:

One-page personal statement, highlighting UT campus involvement and leadership activities and describing organization and club memberships

The Pal—Make A Difference Award annually recognizes a student whose single initiative “made a difference” to the University or broader community. The award was created in 2006 by University Unions Advisory Council member Jaspreet Singh Pal (BBA ’95) to inspire students to engage in a lifelong commitment to public service. The 2012 Pal—Make A Difference Award recipient will receive a certificate and a $1000 check at a luncheon on Friday, April 20, 2012.

Candidates must be currently enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin and complete an application comprising: Biographical Information Form

Résumé

Personal statement describing a single program or initiative that benefited the campus or broader community

750-word essay on a specified topic

Letter of recommendation from a UT faculty, staff, or student

Two letters of recommendation supporting campus leadership and involvement (Note: The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award application period runs concurrent with the Pal—Make A Difference Award. Eligible students may apply for both awards.)

(Note: The Pal—Make A Difference Award application period runs concurrent with the The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award. Eligible students may apply for both awards.)

February 6 thru March 2 Application packets available in UNB 4.124 (Must be picked up in person)

February 6 thru March 2 Application packets available in UNB 4.124 (Must be picked up in person)

March 2 Applications due

March 2 Applications due

April 20

April 20

Presentation of the J.J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award

Presentation of the Pal - Make a Difference Award

For more information megan.mcmillin@mail.utexas.edu or 475-6604


6 S/L

NEWS

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

NEWS BRIEFLY

LOOK OUT BELOW!

Soccer player shows progress after being hit by drunk driver UT soccer player Kylie Doniak is still in critical condition but is showing signs of improvement, according to an Austin American-Statesman article released today. Doniak, an award-winning forward, was struck by an intoxicated driver Feb. 3 at around 2 a.m. and suffered a major head injury, multiple rib fractures, a punctured lung, two broken bones and lacerations to the back, according to the article. Nicholas Ray Colunga, the hitand-run driver, was charged with intoxicated assault and two counts of failure to stop and render aid, according to the Statesman. He is currently in Travis County jail on $60,000 bail. The article said Doniak’s parents arrived on Friday from Chino Hills, Calif. Friends, family and classmates have poured out their support through Facebook and Twitter, according to the Statesman’s website. Through CaringBridge.org, Kylie’s family is keeping the community updated on her condition. “It will be a long, long road, but eventually we will get our Kylie back,” the most recent post said. “We know people are praying around the clock, so keep your faith because God is good!” In the hospital room, surrounded by friends, Kylie “ ... opened her eyes and blinked a few times. She also slightly moved her fingers ... considering she is on paralytics, that’s a pretty huge step toward recovery,” according to the website. A prayer vigil was held last night on campus to honor Kylie and to allow community members to pray for her recovery. — Rachel Thompson

Kylie Doniak Forward

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Terri Michaels works underground on the installation of a new pipe in front of Sutton Hall Tuesday afternoon on campus. He said that some of the oldest pipes are 40 years old and need to be replaced.

Maria Arrellaga Daily Texan Staff

University Leadership Initiative discusses DREAM Act, immigration reform By Alexa Ura Daily Texan Staff

The future of 600 undocumented students at UT remains in the hands of the national political system despite efforts to lobby for their naturalization by those who will be affected by any type of immigration reform. Members of the University Leadership Initiative discussed the shift in political perspective of immigration and the progress that has been made towards successful reform through laws like the DREAM Act during a panel sponsored by Senior Fellows, the College of Communication’s honors program.

University Leadership Initiative, a student organization made up primarily of undocumented students, works to push for political support of a law that would put them on the road to becoming citizens. House Bill 1403, the law that allows undocumented students to pay in-state tuition in Texas, passed April 2001 with only two votes against it. Daniel Olvera, government senior and president of the ULI, said the passing of the bill was a step forward for immigrants, but social regard for immigration has changed for the worse since 9/11. Olvera said he crossed the border from Mexico into what he now calls his country when he was 11 years old.

Dialogues on

Free Speech Press Freedom & the Publication of Government Secrets

“The current political system has impacted undocumented students’ ability to pursue higher education,” he said. “We want to foster equality, and the solution is comprehensive immigration reform.” The struggle for a good education begins after high school graduation for most undocumented students, said government junior Adrian Reyna. Before coming to UT, Reyna applied to MIT and was waitlisted until he could prove he had the financial ability to pay for tuition at an international rate, he said. He was eventually denied the chance to attend. “It’s important to shine a light on the narrative end of this struggle,” he

said. “We hope our stories motivate others to make a difference — not just for the 600 undocumented students at UT or the 1600 students in Texas, but for the millions of individuals in the same situation.” The immigration system is broken when 2.2 million individuals brought here as children are charged with breaking a law, said Ainee Athar, international relations senior. Athar moved from Pakistan to the United States when she was two. Her parents were detained after a lawyer made a mistake in their asylum form. “We need to introduce comprehensive immigration reform, but we know it will take the same political capital

that it took to pass health care reform,” she said. Athar said the Obama administration has been supportive of the struggles of undocumented immigrants, but the impending election is a serious concern to ULI. She said politicians are supporting “self-deportation” as a means for getting undocumented immigrants out of the country, claiming that if they make staying here difficult enough they will simply leave. “When the word ‘self-deportation’ is thrown around by presidential candidates like Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich, the idea of denying basic rights to individuals becomes terrifying,” she said.

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SPORTS

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Sameer Bhuchar, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

7

Texas great Ricky Williams retires from NFL

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By Lauren Giudice Daily Texan Staff

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Texas legend and 1998 Heisman Trophy winner Ricky Williams has decided to retire after 11 seasons in the NFL. Williams, 34, played with the New Orleans Saints, Miami Dolphins and spent his final year with the Baltimore Ravens. He ends his career as one of just 26 players in NFL history to rush for more than 10,000 yards. He passed Earl Campbell in rushing, becoming Texas’ most productive rusher in the NFL. “The NFL has been an amazing page in this chapter of my life,” Williams said. “I pray that all successive adventures offer me the same potential for growth, success and most importantly fun. I want to thank all my fans, teammates, coaches and supporters for the strength they’ve given me to overcome so much.” He was selected fifth overall by the New Orleans Saints in the 1999 NFL Draft, and he became the first Saints 1,000 yard rusher in more than a decade. In 2002, while on the Dolphins, Williams led the NFL with 1,853 rushing yards. In his final season, his season with the Ravens, he rushed for 444 yards and two touchdowns. Baltimore went 12-4 this season and lost to New England in the AFC championship game. He originally retired in 2004 when facing a suspension for

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Former Longhorn Ricky Williams retired from the NFL after 11 seasons on Tuesday. Williams 34, had one of the greatest careers ever in school history, winning the Heisman trophy in 1998. He also had a strong NFL career, rushing for over 10,000 yards.

violating the league’s drug policy. But he returned in 2005 and then played with the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League in 2006. His last NFL start was in 2009; he played backup for Ray Rice this season.

“I have to thank coach [John] Harbaugh and the Ravens organization for the opportunity they gave me this year,” Williams said. “I had so much fun and really appreciated the chance to finish on such a great note.” As a Texas player, Williams

was the winner of the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award and the Associated Press College Football Player of the Year award. He finished as one of the best players in college football history with 21 NCAA records and 26 University of Texas all-

time marks. Williams said he now plans to continue his education and running the Ricky Williams Foundation. “We’re so proud of Ricky and everything he accomplished,” said head coach Mack Brown.

RETIRE continues on PAGE 8

NBA CAVALIERS

BIG 12 WOMEN’S NOTEBOOK

Baylor still undefeated, dominating in Big 12 By Stefan Scrafield Daily Texan Staff

Photo courtesy of The Associated Press

Ricky Williams served as the backup running back in Baltimore in his final season in the NFL. Williams rushed for over 10,000 yards in his career and is 26th overall on the all-time rushing list.

Horns legend an idol, enigma By Sameer Bhuchar Daily Texan Columnist

Ricky Williams was Texas’ best football player of the last two decades, and arguably one of the best in school history. He ran for 7,206 yards and 72 touchdowns, won a Heisman Trophy and earned back-to-back NCAA rushing and scoring titles. He

played 11 seasons in the NFL, a rarity these days, and is currently 26th on the all-time rush leaders list with more than 10,000 yards behind him. However, Ricky Williams’ biggest accomplishment as a football player was that he humanized the sport. Much was made of the 34-year old’s NFL career, which came to an end after Tuesday’s announcement. The scrutiny started in New Orleans where he was good, but

never explosive. It was then that he began to really feel the effects of his later revealed social anxiety disorder, a mental illness that acts like a tenacious gnat in the brain. It’s characterized by a persistent and irrational fear that people are constantly judging the sufferer, and it makes social situations unbearably painful to handle. Williams was always shy, but

WILLIAMS continues on PAGE 8

secutive year at the start of the season, appears to be a lock to win the award come March. The Baylor post has had her way with opposing defenses this year, averaging a conferenceleading 23 points a game while shooting 63 percent from the field. Her 128 blocks lead the nation and her average of 9.7 rebounds a game makes her and Iowa State post Chelsea Poppens the only two Big 12 players averaging a double-double. “[Brittney] Griner has gotten better every year,” said Oklahoma head coach Sherri Coale after her team’s loss to the Bears on Monday night. “That summer that she spent with USA Basketball is obviously paying off. She is a much more mature player, has so much more depth to her and so many more things she can do.” Griner became the first player in NCAA Division 1 women’s basketball history to score 2000 points and record 500 blocks over the course of their career in a win over Kansas State on Saturday afternoon.

The Baylor Bears (24-0, 11-0 Big 12) are having the best year in school history and are showing no signs of slowing down as they cruise through their conference schedule. The Bears, whose perfect record leaves them and Green Bay as the only undefeated teams left in the country, appear unstoppable at this point. They have won each of their last six games by at least 27 points and lead the Big 12 in 13 of the 21 team statistics. Baylor’s incredible success has been no surprise to Missouri head coach Robin Pingeton. “They have a roster full of McDonald’s All-Americans,” Pingeton said. “They have a high basketball IQ and great athleticism. They have explosiveness and quickness. They can guard on the perimeter and they can score a variety of ways.” The Bears have already defeated each of the seven teams left on their schedule and, barring a couple huge upsets, should have no trouble holding on to Big 12 continues to be best their No. 1 ranking as the season conference in the nation comes to a close. We are now through more than three quarters of the reguGriner still conference Play- lar season and deep into conferer of the Year Favorite ence play, and the Big 12 is provBrittney Griner, who was ing to be the toughest league in named preseason Big 12 Player of the Year for the second conBAYLOR continues on PAGE 8

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Longhorns try to break their road funk By Nick Cremona Daily Texan Staff

The road hasn’t been kind to the Longhorns so far this season. In conference games Texas is 1-4 away from home with losses coming to both Oklahoma schools, Texas Tech and most recently Iowa State. The Longhorns (13-9) will hit the road again in search of what could be a seasonsaving win at Kansas. At 3-7 in Big 12 play, the Longhorns have a lot to ground to make up if they expect to be among the field in this year’s NCAA Tournament. After losing its last three games,

Texas needs a win in Lawrence more now than ever. Texas will face Kansas (16-6, 5-5 Big 12), a team that defeated the Longhorns 72-67 in Austin in early January. The Jayhawks were led by a 22 point effort from Angel Goodrich that enabled them to win their first conference opener in six years. In total, four Jayhawks scored in double-digits compared to just two Longhorns. Kansas forced 18 Texas turnovers and held the Longhorns to just 3-of-10 shooting from 3-point range. While the Longhorns struggled to shoot the ball in the first

matchup with the Jayhawks, a lot can change in a month. Sophomore guard Chassidy Fussell has continued her scoring barrage

ROAD continues on PAGE 8

WHAT TO WATCH Texas @ Kansas

Date: Today Time: 7 p.m.

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore guard Chassidy Fussell and the rest of the Longhorns will look to stop their road woes in Kansas today. Fussell is leading Texas on the scoring front, averging 15.9 points per game in Big 12 play.

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SPORTS BRIEFLY Rangers, shortstop Andrus agree to three year extension

FORT WORTH, A person familiar with the deal tells The Associated Press the Texas Rangers and shortstop Elvis Andrus have agreed to a three-year contract, avoiding a salary arbitration hearing. T h e p e r s o n s a i d Tu e s day night the deal that runs through the 2014 season is pending a physical. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the deal hasn’t been finalized. The agreement comes two days before a scheduled arbitration hearing. The two-time defending American League champions are still talking with catcher Mike Napoli and outfielder Nelson Cruz, who have salary arbitration hearings scheduled next week.

— The Associated Press


8 SPTS

SPORTS

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

ROAD continues from PAGE 7

and is shooting lights out from beyond the 3-point arc. Fussell leads the team with 15.9 points per Big 12 game. Senior guards Yvonne Anderson and Ashleigh Fontenette have contributed regularly in conference play as well, averaging 11.4 and 11.2 points, respectively. Consistency is what the Longhorns have had issues with down the stretch. If these three players don’t score, the Longhorns have a tough time keeping up with any team, let

alone any Big 12 team. The Jayhawks have a number of players that can fill up a stat sheet, as evidenced by their win over the Longhorns earlier this season. In order for Texas to turn things around, they have to defend well and convert any Kansas mistakes into baskets. The Longhorns have turned the ball over far too many times in recent games and must take care of the ball to stay in this game. In games

WILLIAMS continues from PAGE 7

many saw his aloof nature as something to scoff at. The truth was that he honestly couldn’t handle the basic task of confronting people. He used to wear his helmet into the press room when talking to reporters because he felt safe behind it. Williams sometimes literally ran away from fans as they approached him, not because he was cold, but because he was feeling incredibly anxious. He often barely associated with his New Orleans teammates. “Most definitely [my social anxiety disorder] affected my ability [to be a leader]. I didn’t want to talk to the guys much,” Williams said in a 2005 interview just before making his comeback into professional football. “A lot of what makes a good leader on a team happens off the field.” Most of off-the-field-Ricky became on-the-front-page-Ricky. His multiple failed drug tests were publicly scrutinized and fans saw him as selfish and a burnout. His durability was called into question, and his passion for the sport was swept under the rug for media types to attack only what they saw on the outside. To Williams though, his first disappearance from the game in 2004 was the “most positive thing” he said he did in his life, because it allowed him to confront his anxiety and seek treatment. No one saw this as courageous even though fewer than 15 percent of the one in five Americans that suffers from some form of a mental disorder will seek treatment. “They should not feel that they are weird or not normal,” Wil-

liams offered as advice to those with anxiety in that same 2005 interview. “Confronting it and getting help are the key.” At Texas, Williams ran with such gusto and passion that it was easy to forget that behind the longhorn logo and the retired jersey number that hangs in the heavens of Darrell K Royal-Memorial Stadium, there was a kid with more than just the everyday fears that afflict college students. Social anxiety disorder goes beyond being unable to handle public situations. Sufferers say it is a 24-hour cycle of stress. Williams braved it while at UT, and Mack Brown is one of the people to thank. He understood Williams’ on and off the field better than most. “Ricky had a tremendous football career, and we’re looking forward to seeing a lot more of him notw that he’s retired,” Brown said. “One thing I know for sure, Ricky accomplished a lot on the football field, but he aspires for even more in his career after football.” We have a tendency when we are younger to idolize our sports heroes, and we should, because they are our role models who can do extraordinary, super-human things. But its easy to forget what it is that makes us all human. Sports stars are afforded a sterile form of celebrity when they first step on the scene, and then any actions that occur thereafter, good or bad, are judged in a vacuum. His retirement is sad, because the game will miss him. But make no mistake, Williams lives for things beyond football now even

BAYLOR continues from PAGE 7 decided by five points or less this year the Longhorns are 3-2 overall and 2-2 in conference. When games come down to the wire, little things like rebounding and making free throws become paramount, two things the Longhorns have had issues with lately as well. If Texas can fix these things, they’re on their way to a win in Kansas. Be prepared for another close affair, as is the case every game in the Big 12.

though it was one of his greatest loves. I had a chance to speak to him a little less than a year ago during the NFL lockout and when I asked him how what the downtime afforded him a chance to do, he said pretty much everything. He wasn’t focused on football any more than he was on his disorder. Instead he said he wanted to spend more time with his children, something he said he was unable to do before seeking treatment for his anxiety, and focus on his charity work. “My football career has been filled with many great memories going back to pee wee football,” Williams said in a statement yesterday. “It has been a big part of my life and blessed me with so many wonderful opportunities and the chances to connect many people who have helped me grow and mature. I love the game and leave it feeling fulfilled, proud, in great health and excited about the future.” The future for Ricky should be celebrated as a story as big as his football career. It represents the very real narrative of resilience conquering hardship, and it does it in an intangible way that will never require us sports writers to scrutinize his statistics, his injuries or his productivity. We can finally examine him as simply human as we should have done all along. “As for what’s next, I’m excited about all the opportunities ahead,” Williams said. “Continuing my education, running the Ricky Williams Foundation and whatever other opportunities

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the country. The conference leads the nation in both the Jeff Sagarin and College Basketball News’ RPI ratings. It is the only conference with each of its team’s strength of schedule in the top 80 and Big 12 teams lead the nation with a .868 winning percentage against nonconference opponents. One nonconference game remains as Connecticut travels to Oklahoma on Feb. 12. With the exception of undefeated Baylor on top and winless Missouri at the bottom of the standings, competition within the conference has been incredibly close all

year. More than half the games in conference play have been decided by single digits, and 14 have been won by a margin of five or less. “The Big 12 is such a war and we’re so evenly balanced throughout the conference,” said Texas head coach Gail Goestenkors. “Many of the games are going to come down to the wire. There are going to be a lot of games that are going to be decided by six points or less. If the teams that can execute down the stretch hit their free throws and make the big plays, they’re going to win the big games.”

RETIRE continues from PAGE 1

“He’s always been a great player, but in recent years I watched every week with amazement at how much speed, power and quickness he still had despite his age.” Williams’ No. 34 jersey was retired in September 2000 and he is in the Longhorn Hall of Honor. “He is a special football player and will always be remembered as one of the best to ever play the game,” Brown said.

STAT GUY

Texas breaks road skid at Texas A&M On the road again

With the win against the Aggies, Texas got its first win on the road against a conference opponent. It was also Texas’ second win on the road this season, bringing its record to 2-5 on the road and 2-7 away from home. Texas’ next three road opponents have a combined record of 32-37 with only Oklahoma being over .500. Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Texas Tech have a combined 8-24 record in Big 12 play. But the Longhorns will finish the season on the road In Lawrence, Kansas, where Texas has one win in 10 attempts.

Close calls

Texas’ two point win was the 10th game it has played that ended in a single digit margin, and the Longhorns are 3-7 in such games. Texas had leads in three of those games in the last five minutes of regulation. Texas lead Oregon State with two minutes left

in regulation before the Beavers forced overtime, where they ended up winning by five points. The Longhorns also had a four point lead over Kansas with three-anda-half minutes to go before the Jayhawks closed out on a 7-2 run to escape Austin with a three point win. Most recently, Texas took a one point lead over Missouri with under a minute left to play in Austin before the before a Tiger layup with 30 seconds left gave them the one point win.

Conference battles

Texas has six losses in conference play this season, and while under head coach Rick Barnes, Texas has won at least nine conference games every season. In order to match that number, the Longhorns will have to win six out of their final seven games which include four road games, and matchups between Baylor and Kansas, who at press time were ranked

sixth and seventh in the AP Top 25 poll, respectively.

Impressing the committee

In the past three seasons, of the 192 teams that made the NCAA tournament, only six teams made the tourney with less than 20 wins as non-automatic qualifiers. All six teams came from a “Big 6” conference: Arizona in 2009, Wake Forest in 2010 and Illinois, Penn State, Michigan State and Tennessee all made the tournament in 2011. With a 15-9 record, and no quality wins to speak of, Texas is a fringe tournament team at the moment. In order to make the tournament, the Longhorns will most likely have win five of their final seven games, and at least one of their final two matchups with top 10 teams. If they cannot manage that, then they will have to take their chances in the conference tournament, which Texas has never won under Barnes.

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Wednesday, February 8, 2012 Softball

Three Horns on USA watchlist by Sara beth Purdy Daily Texan Staff

Senior Lexy Bennett along with juniors Taylor Hoagland and Blaire Luna have been named to the watch list for the 2012 USA Softball Collegiate Player of the Year award, which is given by the Amateur Softball Association of America (ASA) each year. Texas is one of only five universities to have three athletes named to the watch list. A combination of 50 sophomores, juniors and seniors are named to the watch list prior to the start of each season. At this time in the season, freshmen are ineligible to be considered for the watch list. In April, 25 finalists will be chosen for the national player of the year award. To be chosen, athletes do not need to be part of the original 50, and freshmen who have played at the collegiate level are eligible for consideration. Of these 25 finalists, the pool will shrink to the top 10, top three and finally on May 29, the national player of the year will be selected. Luna, the right handed All-American hurler from Austin, was a top 10 finalist each of the past two seasons. Last season, Luna went 28-7 and finished

with a 1.27 season ERA. She finished the 2011 season ranked third in the NCAA and first in the Big 12 with 16 complete game shutouts. Her long list of national and conference accolades includes several mentions as conference player of the week as well as two national player of the week honors. As an outfielder, Hoagland is fresh off her first season as a member of the 2011 USA National Softball Team. The Flower Mound native started in all 56 games for the Longhorns’ last season and posted a .335 batting average that included 36 RBIs and a team high 15 home runs. Hoagland has been named to the All-Big 12 first team each of the past two seasons. Despite an injury toward the end of the season, Bennett is returning for her final year of eligibility after a strong 2011 outing. Bennett posted a .438 season batting average, a team high and accounted for 51 runs and 41 RBIs, another team high. Last season, Bennett was a Top 25 Finalist for USA Softball Collegiate Player of the Year, but the injury to her right arm prevented her from finishing any higher. The Longhorns will begin their 2012 season against Cal State FullerDaily texan file photo ton at 7 p.m. on Thursday at Red & Three Longhorns have been named to the watchlist for the 2012 USA Softball Player of the Award: senior Lexy Bennett, juniors Taylor Hoagland Charline McCombs Field. and Blaire Luna (above). These three players will look to lead Texas to a Big 12 title and an appearance in the Women’s College World Series.

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InternatIonal Soccer

Cinderella squad falls in Copa del Ray semis by anthony Mannino Daily Texan Staff

CD Mirandés’ fairy-tale run in the Copa del Rey ended with Mirandés — the Rojillos, as they’re called — losing to Athletic Bilbao in the second leg of the semifinal 6-2, and 8-3 on aggregate. Playing in the third division in Spain (Segunda B), Mirandés is comprised of semipro, never-was and has-been players, and most of the squad members either go to college or have a second job. The Rojillos were only the second team ever from Segunda B to make it to the semifinals of the Copa del Rey, and the first since 2002. Athletic Bilbao had a one-goal lead heading into the second leg of the semifinal, after beating Mirandés 2-1in the first match. A 90th minute strike from Ander Lambarri for the Rojillos meant the club only needed a 1-0 win to play in the finals of the Copa del Rey and earn a spot to play in Europe. Sadly for the Mirandés faithful, that did not happen. The Rojillos attacked early on in yesterday’s match trying to get the game’s first goal, but paid defensively. Poor defending by Mirandés allowed 19-year-old talent Iker Muniain to score the game’s first goal in the 11th minute. Three minutes later, Markel Susaeta found the net after a beautiful passing move from Athletic Bilbao. The game was essentially over by halftime when a Susaeta cross found defender Jon Aurtenetxe, and Athletic Bilbao was up 3-0. Mirandés would need divine inday, month day, 2008

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Mirande’s Ander Lambarri, left pulls the shirt of Athletic Bilbao’s Ander Iturraspe during the semi final. Mirandes lost 8-3 on aggregate.

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spiration, or somehow have Messi suit-up for them in the second half if they were going to score the four goals they needed to advance to the final; the little Argentinean did not suit up, but the Rojillos did score two goals after halftime. The work rate from Mirandés was superb, but Athletic Bilbao striker Fernando Llorente showed why he is a world-class striker. With a defender on his hip and the keeper coming out, Llorente chipped the goalie from outside the box to score his first goal.

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FORT WORTH — Rangers slugger Josh Hamilton visited doctors for Major League Baseball and the players’ association this week in New York following his admitted relapse with alcohol. General manager Jon Daniels said Tuesday night that Hamilton was accompanied by Shayne Kelley, the team’s newly hired major league staff assistant whose job includes being in a support role for Hamilton. The meetings with doctors were Monday, a week after Hamilton said he had “three or four” drinks during dinner in Dallas and then had more drinks later that evening. The recovering drug addict publicly apologized Friday without taking questions about what happened, saying he had a “weak moment” that stemmed from “personal reasons” involving a family member. Daniels said it was “unlikely” that the Rangers would discipline Hamilton, and that the team would defer to MLB’s handling of the situation. He said had had no indication of what would happen. “Given what’s happened in the past, at this point it’s at their discretion,” Daniels said before his appearance at a stop on the team’s winter caravan. “I think it’s kind of based on what the doctors find, and what they recommend, whether they feel like this was something bigger.” Daniels said he had not got-

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Llorente topped that goal with his second; the Spanish striker dove feet first for a cross and exquisitely finished with his first touch. The two goals provided evidence to why many believe Llorente could start to Spain in Euro 2012. The Athletico Bilbao striker is still a goal behind Copa del Rey’s top scorer, Mirandés’ Pablo Infante, who also works at a bank. Llorente and his teammates now 1 await the Barcelona-Valencia semifinal match to see who they will face in the final.

After alchol relapse, Hamilton vists MLB doctors for testing

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ten a report from the doctors that Hamilton had also counseled with in the past. Hamilton said he took no drugs, and never thought of doing so last week. He has had several drug tests since then as part of his regular mandated routine. When asked what was next for Hamilton, Daniels said the outfielder worked out at Rangers Ballpark earlier Tuesday. “He’s getting ready for the season,” Daniels said. But the Rangers last week put on hold talks about a contract extension for Hamilton, who can be a free agent after the upcoming season. After being the No. 1 overall draft pick by Tampa Bay in 1999, Hamilton got involved in drugs and alcohol. He missed the entire 2003, 2004 and 2005 seasons and served several suspensions. He didn’t make his major league debut until 2007 with Cincinnati, and was traded after that season to Texas, where he has become one of the best players in baseball for the team that won the last two American League pennants. He was the AL MVP in 2010. Kelley takes over in a support role for Hamilton that had been held by Johnny Narron, who left after last season to become hitting coach in Milwaukee. The Rangers announced last month that Hamilton’s father-in-law had been hired as a staff special assistant, but Michael Dean Chadwick later decided against accepting that position because of “family considerations.”

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10 COMICS

10 COMICS

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

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LIFE&ARTS

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

POETRY continues from PAGE 12 didn’t die that way. And it’s weird because I sort of had it checked off. Now, I’m sort of clueless. The one vague certainty that I had is gone. That’s not going to kill me. DT: Your poems deal with themes of randomness and chaos. These themes don’t necessarily seem positive, but in your poetry they are comforting in a way. Is that intentional? Young: I can see how this sense that everything is going every which way could cause panic. But, to some extent, I feel like ‘suck it up,’ because that’s the way reality is. If you haven’t had something come along in your life to completely upset all your systems of filing, then it’s going to, and when it does, it will completely destroy you unless you say ‘okay this is part of reality.’ Once you say that, it’s kind of a party. Random particle motion is what got us here, and it’s what’s going to do us in, but it also brings sudden beauty into life. You run into somebody you’ve never met, fall in love and your life is never going to be the same. DT: What do you learn from teaching poetry? Young: Teaching brings me in contact with the poetry of the future. It’s taught me to be perpetually open-minded and shown me again and again that I’ll never get to the bottom of everything poetr y can do, which makes me happy. DT: Among people my age, poetry isn’t culturally mainstream. Does that bother you? Young: It doesn’t bother me. We can whine and moan about the lack of attention paid to poetry, but there is still an enormous amount of people out there writing poetry, and there are an enormous amount of poetry books being published. I think poetry’s in an incredibly good position right now in our culture.

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‘Billion Dollar Movie’ attracts bizarre audiences, dismays conservative viewers By karin samelson Daily Texan Staff

If you’ve ever taken the time to watch “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!,” a comedy sketch show featured on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim, then you are familiar with the bizarre antics of cult comics Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim. The pair just came out with their first film, “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie.” In the film, Tim and Eric are indebted to a gangster after blowing his billion dollars on a three-minute movie and decide to earn back the money by renovating a decrepit shopping mall. “Billion Dollar Movie,” which is available for download on YouTube, is a mix of everything that’s awkward and isn’t intended for everyone, specifically children or any person offended by grown men holding up women and children to shield themselves from bullets. The sets look like they came straight out of a cheap ’90s movie and are filled with uncomfortable facial close-ups of characters. Starring and directed by the comics, “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie” is scene by scene exactly what you would expect if you were an avid Tim and Eric enthusiast, except long and drawn-out. The entire movie is filled with awkward pauses and inappropriate behavior

WHAT: “Time and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie” screening with Tim and Eric in attendance WHERE: Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar WHEN: Wednesday, Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m. TickETs: Tickets sold out WEB: drafthouse.com/movies/ tim_erics_billion_dollar_movie/ austin

which makes you ask yourself, “are they allowed to put this on TV?” Among many vulgar scenes in the movie, a Prince Albert piercing on a fake, rubbery male member is a modest example of content pushing the boundaries of an “R” rating. Unfortunately, prolonging their short clips from “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job” into a 94-minute movie has its downfalls, with scenes that seemed to drag on and moments that the film could have done without. During the first few scenes, Tim and Eric have long-haired wigs, fake tans and for some odd reason, Tim has a stringy goatee with a diamond imbedded in the center; the two normally look like they work a desk job with button down shirts tucked into khakis. The two comics are known for using run-of-the-mill actors to heighten and bring authenticity to

Photo courtesy of Magnet Releasing

the humor. But actor/comedians such as Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly and Zach Galifianakis are often featured in their clips and have significant roles in “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie.” The trio certainly devoted themselves to the roles they were given, bringing about a few good laughs and proving more neurotic than the already deranged main characters. Although some think the two

are too crude and disrepsectful of just about everything, Tim and Eric are funny. They know how to make people laugh and aren’t worried about offending anyone. According to EW.com, the duo was surprised that more people didn’t walk out at their Sundance premiere. On Wednesday, “Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie” will be showing at Alamo Drafthouse on South Lamar and the pair will be there for

the screening. Die hard fans: The show is sold out, so find another way to score some tickets. However, if you don’t find any delight in diarrhea jokes, this is hands down one of the worst movies to go out and spend your money on. Any appreciation for this exhausting movie is reserved for longtime viewers or cult comic aficionados. Surely, after a few drinks the movie could become much more clear — in an unclear kind of way.

Great Britain commemorates world renowned author’s 200th birthday By Jill Lawless The Associated Press

LONDON — He wrote about life in the modern city, with its lawyers and criminals, bankers and urchins, dreamers and clerks. He created characters still known to millions — Ebeneezer Scrooge and Tiny Tim, Pip and Miss Havisham, Fagin and Oliver Twist. And it made him a star, mobbed by fans on both sides of the Atlantic. On Tuesday, Britain marked the 200th birthday of Charles

Dickens, the first global celebrity author and chronicler of a world of urban inequality that looks a lot like the one we live in today. “You only have to look around our society and everything he wrote about in the 1840s is still relevant,” said Dickens’ biographer, Claire Tomalin. “The great gulf between the rich and poor, corrupt financiers, corrupt Members of Parliament ... You name it, he said it.” D i cke ns’ m i st r u st of t h e wealthy and compassion for the poor haven’t stopped him be-

ing embraced by Britain’s high and mighty. Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, joined Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, actor Ralph Fiennes, a host of dignitaries and scores of Dickens’ descendants at a memorial service Tuesday in London’s Westminster Abbey. A simultaneous event was held in Portsmouth, southern England, where Dickens was born, the son of a navy pay clerk, on Feb. 7, 1812. In a message read out there, Charles called Dickens “one of the greatest writers of the

English language, who used his creative genius to campaign passionately for social justice.” In London, the heir to the throne laid a wreath of white roses and snowdrops on the writer’s grave in Poet’s Corner — resting place of national literary icons — and two of Dickens’ youngest descendants added a pair of small white posies. Fiennes read from Dickens’ “Bleak House,” and there were prayers for the poor and marginalized, and for the writers, artists and journalists chronicling modern society.

Historian Judith Flanders, who attended the service, said it was “enormously moving” — and Dickens would have hated it. “Dickens said in his will that he wanted no public ceremonies, no statues, no public acknowledgment,” said Flanders, author of the forthcoming book “Dickens’ London.” “He wanted to b e buried and die as a private man. He wanted his books to stand as his monument.” He got his wish. Dickens’ novels and characters are more popular than ever.

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Life&Arts

12

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 | The Daily Texan | Katie Stroh, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

the origins of

Hipster definition evolves with culture, dates back to Bebop generation

the hipster

1950s BEBOP CULTURE

The original hipsters. Young African - American males living in urban environments who found community in jazz music and developed a language called “jive.”

BEATS Intellectual poets who found no place in society. They lived a vagrant lifestyle in search of a community that understood them. Influenced by Eastern religions, including Buddhism.

1960s HIPPIES

Found community by living in communes and sharing their belongings. The word hippie is derived from the word hipster.

1970s PUNKS

Found community in anti-authoritative, antiestablishment ideals.

By Jessica Lee Daily Texan Staff

The word “hipster” instantly brings to mind a number of stereotypical images: Ray-Ban sunglasses, record players, moustaches and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer. The television show “Portlandia” on IFC has hipster-mocking down to an art. From the local grocers who snub you if you don’t bring your own bag to the bartender who wants to be referred to as a mixologist, the characters on the show are extreme examples of hipster subcultures. But although the word “hipster” is thrown around on a regular basis, it is hard to define what hipster actually is when the subculture is continually evolving. Each person has his or her own idea of what a hipster is, so giving the word “hipster” a concrete definition is virtually impossible. Rhetoric of Hipsterdom professor Christopher Taylor teaches how the modern day hipster came to be. The word “hipster” is a derivative of the word “hip,” and according to Taylor, the original hipsters were young African-American males who lived in urban environments during the ’50s. They found community in jazz music, specifically bebop and a language they developed called jive. From that culture sprung the Beats, poets who lived a vagrant lifestyle in search of brotherhood. Later, the hippies took that sense of community to the extreme by living in communes and sharing their belongings. The punks, on the other hand, used anti-authoritative beliefs as a means of coming together. But the question remains: What is the modern-day hipster? Taylor believes that to even begin to define a hipster, you must first

understand apriorism. “Apriorism is this instinctive knowledge where you evaluate something before it exists,” Taylor said. “It’s really important for a lot of people to have this uncanny knack to identify what is good before the rest of the world knows.” Apriorism serves as the hallmark of hipsterdom, and ”Portlandia,” of course, has tackled it with typical subtlety. One of Fred Armisen’s quirky Portland characters, the “it’s over!” guy, exhibits apriorism to

The hipster is one who does not create but instead consumes in all the right ways, whether it be eating the right food, wearing the right clothes or listening to the right music. an extreme degree. In one episode, he rides his bike up to a bar he had presumably previously patronized himself, and sees a man in a suit inside. He immediately exclaims that the bar is “over” because if a “mainstream guy” like that is inside, then it isn’t cool anymore. But there is more to the hipster than just knowing about something before the rest of the world does. The hipster is all about image. Editor and contributor to the book “What Was the Hipster?,” Mark Greif writes that the hipster is the “hip consumer.” According to Greif, the hipster is one who does not create but instead con-

sumes in all the right ways, whether it be eating the right food, wearing the right clothes or listening to the right music. Christina Lough, drummer for Austin band Foreign Mothers, echoes the belief that a hipster is someone who does not create anything original and merely recycles others’ interests and aesthetics to cultivate a hip persona. “Hipsters see an original person or a group of original people who have certain interests and hobbies and mimic it because they think those people are cool,” Lough said. Austin filmmaker Ryan Brown is currently working on a documentary about hipsterdom. Brown believes that hipsters started out as a group of people who believed adamantly in one particular thing such as eating organically and buying locally. It was when others began to pose as hipsters that the term lost its positive affiliation. “I think that the modern form of the hipster is people who have actual beliefs,” Brown said. “But then it became cool and gained this cool factor losing the philosophical part.” Brown has found the word “hipster” is now used as a derogatory term. As a result, no one wants to affiliate himself with that label. Taylor agrees. “People don’t like to be labeled,” Taylor said. “Who wants to be predictable? Who wants to be hipster? The most hipstery thing you can do is living your life constantly evading being labeled as a hipster.” Each generation has its own subculture, and it certainly appears that ours is this modern version of the hipster, as undefinable as it seemingly is. It will be interesting to look back 10 years from now and analyze what the hipster was, but for now, we can only theorize.

National Condom Month UT professor discusses influences on his poetry promotes contraceptive use everyone — extra thin, her pleasure, ultra ribbed, glow-in-thedark, condoms that warm or cool on contact, flavored condoms for oral sex and many more. Remember that condoms are By Elyana Barrera only effective if used consistently and correctly, so be sure you Take free condoms for read instructions and know exactly what you’re doing. Some things Valentine’s Day without to remember when using a male shame; learn to use properly condom are to use a new conWe’ve all been there before: dom for each sexual act, rememYou’re walking to class and an ea- ber to pinch the reservoir tip beger Healthyhorns representative fore rolling it down the erect penis and take the condom off after spots you in the West Mall. Intold the me Aleks this was by Ely! blink of an eye, he or she is right ejaculation but before the erection in front of you, asking you to take is lost. If you’re worried about the a free condom. The question is, do price, buying condoms shouldn’t you take it or leave it? Although you might be hesi- be a problem. UT students can tant to take the rubber-raincoat take up to three free condoms per because of the archaic social stig- day at the Health Promotion Rema associated with sexuality, you source Center in the Student Sershouldn’t ever hesitate to actually vices Building courtesy of Univeruse a condom. The American So- sity Health Services. Also, on Valcial Health Association recogniz- entine’s Day, student organizaes February as National Condom tion Get Tested Longhorn will be Month, and according to the Cen- passing out free assorted Trojan ter for Disease Control’s website, condoms complete with instruclab tests show that when used cor- tions and other information in the rectly, latex condoms provide an West Mall. So in honor of National Coneffective barrier against even the dom Month and, more importantsmallest STD pathogens. ly, in honor of yourself, take those Condoms vary extensively in condoms confidently. After all, shape, texture and size, so it’s important that you find the right Valentine’s Day is the day meant condom that’s going to work for for expressing how much you care you and your partner. The best for your loved one. And there’s no way to go about this is to buy sam- better way to show them you care pler packs of condoms. These as- than keeping them safe by insistsorted packs have condoms for ing on using a condom.

HUMP

DAY

Photo Illustration by Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff

Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

English professor and renowned American poet Dean Young was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 2005 and named the William Livingston Chair of Poetry at the Michener Center in 2008. Young’s poems, which draw from surrealist tradition, have been featured in numerous anthologies.

Editor’s note: This is part of a bi-weekly series showcasing the many fascinating members of UT’s faculty. By Clayton Wickham Daily Texan Staff

Dean Young is an influential, nationally recognized poet and the William Livingston Chair of p o e t r y at M i c h e n e r C e n ter for Writers here at UT. He is also a professor in the English department. If Young’s poems were animals, they would be the most improbable crossbreeds you can imagine. Exotic yet familiar, wide but narrow, friendly, terrifying and beyond taxonomy, his poems are like house mice bred with dinosaurs. Whichever way you approach them, you can expect to be surprised. Young crafts collages of illogic and seeming contradictions that transcend the sum of their parts and challenge how we classify

our world. “Do you think the dictionary ever says to itself/ ‘I’ve got these words that mean completely/ different things inside myself and it’s tearing me apart?’” he asks in one poem. Young is the author of 10 books of poetry, including “Elegy on a Toy Piano,” a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Last year, he received a life-saving heart transplant after living for over a decade with a degenerative heart condition. His most recent book of poetry, “Fall Higher,” was written before the transplant and was published last April. Daily Texan: Why do you write poetry? Dean Young: Because I started writing it when I first learned how to write and didn’t stop. It doesn’t seem to be a question that poses itself to me. The question would be “why not?” At this point in my life, I’ve

been doing it for so long that I write poetry the same way I exercise or do other things in my life that I’d feel incomplete without doing.

to waste. It’s not bad or good, but it does take some confronting because we live in a culture where death is primarily relegated to the periphery, unless it’s made into a kind of DT: What appeals to you cartoonish entertainment. about poetry? Young: The self-contained DT: You had a heart transquality to it. I like ends a lot plant a year ago, and your heart and poetry ends all time. It’s condition was something you defining characteristic is that it were aware of for a long time occurs in lines, and the defin- before the transplant. Has that ing characteristics of a line is influenced your fascination with limits? that it ends. Young: Absolutely. My faDT: Why do es it app e a l ther died when he was young to you t hat p o et r y has s o from a bad heart and I was always aware of it as a possimany ends? Young: This sounds over- bility. Then, when I got diagblown, but it is about con- nosed, it was irrefutable. I lived fronting our mortality and the for about 13 years with a pretty realization that all pleasures clear idea of how I was going to have duration and all agonies die. I thought, ‘Okay, my heart’s too. Most poetry is preoccu- going to give out and I’m gopied with the limited nature of ing to die,’ and I went through our current existence. Poetry the transplant, but it turns out I is concise, and its brevity suggests that we don’t have time POETRY continues on PagE 11

The Daily Texan 02-08-12  

The Feb. 8, 2012 edition of The Daily Texan