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WHAT’S INSIDE: International students face heavy restrictions when looking for jobs in the United States, but UI officials are trying to ease the process. Page 5 A new proposal could allow Iowa school districts to hire unlicensed instructors to fill teaching positions. Page 7 Outsized by most of their Big Ten opponents, the Hawkeye volleyball players use a crew of taller men to practice against. Page 12

CLARIFICATION The Sept. 13 story “Patel’s quitting sparks dispute” made it unclear that council candidate Raj Patel had quit his University of Iowa Student Government post but not the City Council race. Patel is still a candidate for the City Council.

UI ranks 28th in U.S. News report The University of Iowa ranks 28th among the best public univiersities in the nation according to a new report from U.S. News & World Report. The new ranking is an improvement from its previous ranking at 29th. The UI was also ranked 71st National the “Best in Universities” category, compared with last year’s ranking of 72nd. “We continue improving our programs to meet the needs of our students, which these and other rankings clearly reflect,” UI President Sally Mason said in a press release. The UI Tippie College of Business is ranked 17th among public universities in 2012, tying with four universities, Arizona State including University and the University of Florida. These rankings are based on data obtained from questionnaires filled out by administrators at roughly 1,500 universities and colleges, which are then submitted to a national archive. The data are scored on up to 16 indicators of academic quality in categories, including graduation and retention rates, financial resources, and undergraduate academic reputation. U.S. News also lists the UI as one of a number of schools making writing a priority. — by Jordy n Re ila nd

DAILY IOWAN TV To watch Daily Iowan TV go online at dailyiowan.com.

UI President Sally Mason speaks at a UISG meeting on Tuesday. Mason discussed a range of topics affecting students such as freshman class sizes, flood recovery, and sustainability efforts on campus. (The Daily Iowan/Jules Pratt)

Mason lauds UI’s recovery President Sally Mason says flood recovery is still a main priority for the university. By KRISTEN EAST kristen-east@uiowa.edu

University of Iowa President Sally Mason lauded campus flood recovery and talked about rising tuition during her State of the University address on Tuesday night. Mason told UI student leaders the university will continue to rely on increased enrollment of out-of-state students for increased funding as state appropriations lag. Masono also said students will be able to attain more grant and scholarship money to meet rising tuition. Mason’s speech came before a joint meet-

ing Tuesday of the UI Student Government and Executive Council of Graduate and Professional Students. Mason said flood recovery and campus renewal remain a major priority for the UI, noting anticipated completion dates for damaged campus buildings. “We have rebounded wonderfully,” she said. She compared the monetary damages of the 2008 flood to that of Hurricane Katrina. She estimated the flood caused about $1 billion worth of damage to the UI campus. “[Recovery is] not moving as fast as any of us

Iowa City officials received 20 noise complaints during a recent concert in Hubbard Park. melissa-dawkins@uiowa.edu

Classifieds 11 Crossword 8 Opinions 4

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students shouldn’t worry about the price of their education. “Don’t be fooled by the price,” she said. “We’re willing to negotiate.” She said scholarships will help alleviate some of the costs of tuition. This year, the UI has increased the funds set aside for scholarship funds from $33 million in the 2009-10 school year to $46 million in the 2011-12. “[There are] more and more opportunities to offer scholarships,” Mason said. “We’ll have more ways of making up the difference by other means of support.” One of the UI’s strate-

UI, city to discuss noise

By MELISSA DAWKINS

INDEX

would like, but it is moving,” she said. Hancher Auditorium and various music buildings have estimated completion dates of 2015 and 2016, while the lowerlevel of the IMU will likely reopen in 2013 or 2014, Mason said. “I’ve seen the designs, and it’s spectacular. It’s going to knock your socks off,” she said. “[The changes] really will transform this campus in a way that no other campus has the opportunity to do.” She also addressed increasing tuition rates. Though UI tuition has steadily increased every year since 1981, she said

In light of concerns raised by Iowa City community members, University of Iowa and Iowa City officials intend to re-evaluate policies on noise. Iowa City officials received 20 noise complaints about the UI’s Aug. 20 concert in which the White Panda performed in Hubbard Park, said Iowa City police Sgt. Denise Brotherton. Bill Nelson, the director of IMU administration and the Center for Student Invovlemen & Leadership, said officials will discuss guidelines

for outdoor events, concerts, public notification regarding these events, law enforcement, and communication between the university and city. A Sept. 20 meeting will consist of UI and city officials, as well as representatives from the Iowa City and UI police departments, Nelson said. “The events of White Panda and other [events] just again show the need to continue those conversations,” he said. Judy Pfohl, who lives in the southwestern Iowa City — roughly three miles from campus — said the noise was quite audible, even at a distance. “I live so far away, and for the music to be bothering us, it was louder than it usually is … I thought it was a neighbor’s party,” the longtime Iowa City resident said. Pfohl called the city to find out the noise’s origin — she was told it was a universitysponsored event.

‘That’s the responsibility of the university.’ — Dale Helling, Assistant City Manager But Assistant City Manager Dale Helling said officials could not respond because the UI campus is not under the city’s jurisdiction. “Our noise ordinance covers the city of Iowa City … there would be an exemption for any noise originating from a source on campus,” he said. “That’s the responsibility of the university.” Pfohl was advised to contact UI police about the issue. When Pfohl contacted UI police, officials told Pfohl the university didn’t have a rule about noise level but instead a time period in which noise would be acceptable. “The university is in the middle of the city. If they SEE NOISE, 3

gic plans is to use enrollment increases as a way to offset in-state appropriations, she said. The UI receives $200 million in state appropriations each year. “Our state appropriations are still … critical to our university,” she said. Mason urged the leaders to maintain open communication in the coming school year.“Partnership has been essential to my leadership policy,” she said. “Working together … it should always be one of our common goals.” UISG President Elliot SEE MASON, 3

Four new faces for School Board The last time turnout was as high was in 1995, with a total of 5,814. By JORDYN REILAND jordynreiland@uiowa.edu

Only one incumbent School Board member will return to the Iowa City School Board following Tuesday’s election, which brought a near-record number of voters to polls in Johnson County. Johnson County Auditor Tom Slockett said the 4,485 voters is the second highest turnout for a school election in 32 years. School Board President Patti Fields was the only incumbent running for reelection in Tuesday’s race. She said the increased turnout is a positive sign. “One year when I ran, I saw a 5 percent turnout; the next year I saw 3 percent, so it’s really encouraging to see votSEE SCHOOL BOARD, 3


2 - The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011

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The Daily Iowan Volume 143 BREAKING NEWS Phone: (319) 335-6063 E-mail: daily-iowan@uiowa.edu Fax: 335-6297

CORRECTIONS Call: 335-6030 Policy: The Daily Iowan strives for accuracy and fairness in the reporting of news. If a report is wrong or misleading, a request for a correction or a clarification may be made.

PUBLISHING INFO The Daily Iowan (USPS 143.360) is published by Student Publications Inc., E131 Adler Journalism Building, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-2004, daily except Saturdays, Sundays, legal and university holidays, and university vacations. Periodicals postage paid at the Iowa City Post Office under the Act of Congress of March 2, 1879.

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Hawkeye Marching Band Director Kevin Kastens stands on the field before the football game with Iowa State on Sept. 10 at Jack Trice Stadium. Kastens previously conducted at the University of Missouri and Indiana University. (The Daily Iowan/Rob Johnson)

At the heart of the brass Hawkeye Marching Band Director Kevin Kastens loves the Big Ten traditions. By BEN SCHUFF benjamin-schuff@uiowa.edu

A framed poster titled “Bands of the Big Ten” hangs on the wall in Kevin Kastens’ office. The poster features photos of Big Ten bands in their signature formations — the Hawkeye Marching Band spelling “Hawks,” Michigan’s block “M,” and Ohio State’s script “Ohio,” for example. It is these formations, these bands, and these traditions that brought Kastens to the University of Iowa in 1998. “There is something very special about the Big Ten as far as traditions go,” he said. “Every program has great traditions — whether it is their formations [or] their music — and Big Ten football is very exciting.” He is in his 14th year as the director of the Hawkeye Marching Band. Before coming to the UI, the 56-year-old held three other directing positions. He spent five years at the

University of Missouri — a program he rebuilt and increased involvement by around 100 students — and six years before that at the University of Indiana. It was his time at Indiana, coupled with his undergraduate experiences in college at Illinois, that groomed his appreciation for Big Ten football and marching bands. Kastens Originally, attended the University of Illinois to become a highschool band director, something he did from 1980-87 at his alma mater of Wheeling High School in Wheeling, Ill. But during his time at Illinois as a TA with the marching band, he discovered college bands was where he was meant to be. “Working as a TA with the Marching Illini and being on [the director’s] side of the podium, I then knew that someday I wanted to be a college-band director,” Kastens said. “Had it not been for that, I

probably wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing right now. I’d probably be teaching [high school] in central Illinois some place.” Aside from directing the “Iowa Fight Song” on fall Saturdays, he also teaches two courses in the school of music on marching-band techniques and band arrangements. UI senior Paul Upmeyer is a former student of one of Kastens’ classes and current leader of the sousaphone section in the Hawkeye Marching Band. Upmeyer first met Kastens at an all-state music camp at Iowa when he was in seventh grade. While their relationship has developed and changed over the years, one thing has remained the same. “He always sets us up for success,” Upmeyer said. Hawkeye drum major Joe Piasecki has also grown close to Kastens in his time with the band. Piasecki said he appreciates Kastens’ ability to connect on a

be looked at by Rice and the Faculty Senate officers and will be brought up again at the next Faculty Council meeting, Oct. 4. — by Jordyn Reiland

Possession of LSD (first offense) is a serious misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of $1,875. Keeping a drug house is an aggravated misdemeanor punishable by up to two years in jail and a fine of $6,250. — by Matt Starns

Kevin Kastens • Age: 56 • Hometown: Wheeling, Ill. • Position: Hawkeye Marching Band director • Biggest inspirations: Highschool band director Jack Williamson and Illinois director Gary Smith • Favorite show: Beatles or Earth, Wind and Fire • Hobbies: Golfing, vacationing in Arizona Know someone we should shine a light on? E-mail us at : di-spotlight@uiowa.edu. Catch up with others from our series at dailyiowan.com/spotlight.

personal level with members of the band and that it makes being in the band that much more enjoyable. “Once I got into actually working with band and working as drum major, it went from a studentteacher relationship to almost like a professional friendship,” Piasecki said. “When I think of [Kastens and myself], I think we’re friends.”

METRO Faculty Senate discusses tenure revision During the University of Iowa’s Faculty Senate meeting Tuesday, officials discussed revisions to the Tenure-Clock Extension Policy. The Faculty Council made suggestions to changes proposed Aug. 30 in a Faculty Council meeting, and the most revised edition was brought to the Faculty Senate’s attention. Associate Provost Tom Rice said the revisions were necessary because of an issue in the past, in which the policy was deemed unclear. While Rice made an effort to make this policy more concise in the most recent revision, the Faculty Senate still posed questions on its wording and its ability for all staff to be able to comprehend these changes. After a long discussion, Faculty Senate President Richard Fumerton called for a motion to approve the Tenure-Clock Extension Policy, excluding the second paragraph, which previously stated “notification that a faculty member qualifies for an automatic extension shall be initiated by the faculty member.” The highlighted paragraph will

UI student faces numerous drug charges Iowa City police charged a UI student after allegedly finding marijuana, LSD, prescription pills and drug paraphernalia in his apartment. Benjamin Nadler, 20, 220 Lafayette Apt. 202, was charged Aug. 22 with possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, possession of LSD, and keeping a drug house. According to police complaints, officers conducted a consent search of Nadler’s apartment at 1 a.m. March 3 during which they allegedly located marijuana, lysergic acid diethylamide (commonly known as LSD, an hallucinogenic schedule I controlled substance), prescription drugs, and marijuana smoking devices. Officers also located a small amount of cash, complaints said. Possession of marijuana with intent to distribute is a Class-D felony punishable by up to five years in jail and a fine of $7,500.

Man charged with assault

a serious misdemeanor publishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of $1,875. — by Matt Starns

Woman complains of treatment after being removed from plane

Iowa City police arrested a local man after he allegedly assaulted a 14-year old-boy. Curtis Kemp, 44, 1100 Arthur St. Apt. M8, was charged Monday with assault causing bodily injury. Kemp allegedly argued with his wife’s grandson about a bicycle. According to a complaint by Iowa City Police, Kemp grabbed the neck of the 14-year-old and threw him to the ground. Complaints said the alleged victim then stood and pushed Kemp, and Kemp retaliated by grabbing the 14-year-old by the neck, choking him, and punching him in the face. Authorities say the 14-year-old had cuts on the inside of his bottom lip and a scratch on his neck, which he contended were both caused by Kemp. Assault causing bodily injury is

DETROIT — An Ohio woman said Tuesday that she endured nearly four hours in police custody that included being forced off an airplane in handcuffs, strip-searched and interrogated at Detroit’s airport on the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks — all, she believes, because of her Middle Eastern appearance. Shoshana Hebshi, 35, told the Associated Press she was one of three people removed from a Frontier Denver-to-Detroit Airlines flight after landing Sunday afternoon. Authorities say fighter jets escorted the plane after its crew reported that two people were spending a long time in a bathroom — the two men sitting next to Hebshi in the 12th row. Hebshi said she didn’t notice how many times the men went to the bathroom. “I wasn’t keeping track,” she said. — Associated Press

Spencer Porter, 21, P.O. Box 772,

Church St. Apt. 5, was charged

was

April 15 with posession of mari-

BLOTTER Andre Brock, 23, 2401 Highway 6 E., was charged Monday with posession of marijuana and criminaltrespass. Edith Jones, 21, 810 E. Jefferson

St., was charged Sept. 10 with disorderly conduct. Ryan Leavy, 26, 17 Riverview Drive N.E., was charged Tuesday with OWI.

charged

Sunday

with

obstruction of an officer.

juana and posession of prescrip-

Nathan Schloss, 20, 735 E.

tion drugs.

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SCHOOL BOARD CONTINUED FROM 1

ers come out and become more engaged in their community,” she said. Four of the board members-elect — Marla Swesey, Jeff McGinness, Patti Fields, and Sally Hoelscher — will serve four-year terms. Karla Cook will have a two-year term to fill a seat vacated by Mike Cooper’s resignation. “I feel a combination of relief and a little bit overwhelmed knowing that while this process was hard — but I am looking forward to serving the community,” McGinness said. The Iowa City native said his motivation to run came from having three children who will go through the School District. He is looking forward to giving back to the community that gave so much to him. McGinness said transparency is key on a School Board because it will help to prevent problems from occurring twice. Positively is another goal of McGinness’ who wants the board to consider each issue as an “opportunity, not a challenge,” he recently told the DI . a former Swesey, teacher in the Iowa City area for 26 years, shared her excitement for the increased number in voters and her victory. “I am very happy and proud of the community for showing up to the polls, and for believing that I was one of the right candidates,” she said. Her main concerns are

NOISE CONTINUED FROM 1 h av e s e p a r a t e o r d in a n c e s f o r n o i s e, i t makes it more difficult for the security and for the people that live there,” Pfohl said. “If the c i t y h a s n o i s e o r d inances that are supposed to be good for the population, they should be good enough for the university that has a population of younger ears that could be more damaged.” U I s p o k e s m a n To m Moore said adjustments were made to reduce the volume following complaints about the White Pa n d a c o n c e r t b e f o r e the Hawkpalooza con-

‘I am proud of the last six years that I have had on this board, and I am looking forward to being able to meet my new fellow board members and getting these next four years started.’ — Patti Fields, Iowa City School Board Member making sure the community input is always heard regarding decisions the board makes. She also wants to make sure the board practices fiscal responsibility, allocating money so it does not become wasted. Cook, a former teacher for 29 years, feels very happy and honored that voters believed she was the right candidate. “I didn’t exactly come with an agenda in mind, although communication within the community is a big priority,” Cook said. She wants to make sure the community and students understand why and how the School Board members make their decisions. Fields was almost beaten by candidate Phil Hemingway, who finished only 367 votes behind her. “I am proud of the last six years that I have had on this board, and I am looking forward to being able to meet my new fellow board members and getting these next four years started,” she said. She hopes to focus on long-range plans for enrollment facilities and increasing achievement.

cert Sept. 1. Those adjustments included noise level and stage position. “We are committed, however, to trying to be good neighbors,” Moore said. Though the UI doesn’t h av e a s p e c i f i c n o i s e rule, there are guidelines in place, Nelson said. Currently, amplified sound is allowed over the noon hour and a f t e r 4 : 3 0 p. m . a n y where on campus to avoid class disruption, Nelson said. H o w e v e r, f r e s h m a n Brianna Zumhof said she did not feel the noise was unreasonable. “The noise level was fine,” she said. “I was in the front row.”

The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3

MASON CONTINUED FROM 1

Higgins expressed his gratitude for Mason’s support over the years. “She has provided a high level of support [for student governments],” he said. Executive Council President Kelli Todd had a similar opinion. “It’s wonderful that we have the opportunity to have direct communication with our president,” Todd said.

UI President Sally Mason speaks to student leaders on Tuesday night. Mason said the university will rely on increasing numbers of out-of-state students to fill budget gaps. (The Daily Iowan/Jules Pratt)

Passengers are escorted off a Frontier Airlines plane on Sunday at Detroit’s Metropolitan Airport. Police detained three passengers in Detroit after the crew of the Frontier Airlines flight from Denver reported suspicious activity on board, and NORAD officials sent two F16 jets to shadow the flight until it landed safely, the airline and federal officials said. Frontier Flight 623, with 116 passengers on board, landed without incident in Detroit after the crew reported that two people were spending “an extraordinarily long time” in a bathroom, Frontier spokesman Peter Kowalchuck said. (Associated Press/Joey Mentzer)


4 - The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Opinions

ADAM B SULLIVAN Editor • EMILY BUSSE Managing Editor • SAM LANE Managing Editor • CHRIS STEINKE Opinions Editor HAYLEY BRUCE Metro Editor • SAMUEL CLEARY, SARAH DAMSKY , BENJAMIN EVANS MATT HEINZE, JOE SCHUELLER, Editorial writers EDITORIALS reflect the majority opinion of the DI Editorial Board and not the opinion of the Publisher, Student Publications Inc., or the University of Iowa. GUEST OPINIONS, COMMENTARIES, and COLUMNS reflect the opinions of the authors and are not necessarily those of the Editorial Board.

Editorial

Local resources should not fund federal immigration law If Iowa City doesn’t perceive illegal immigration as detrimental to its community, its taxpayers shouldn’t have to fund federal initiatives with its resources. Later this month, a subcommittee of the Iowa City Human Rights Commission is to present city councilors with recommendations that would effectively designate Iowa City as an immigrant “sanctuary city.” This term may trigger alarm in some who think that the city will be forced to actively protect illegal immigrants from being arrested or deported, but that is not necessarily the case. A sanctuary city is loosely defined as a city that doesn’t allocate funds to enforce federal immigration laws, though the term seems to implicate more than just that. If the city doesn’t wish to be call itself a “sanctuary city,” that’s understandable. But when the Human Rights Commission recommends barring city resources and personnel from enforcing federal immigration laws, city councilors should listen. The perceived problem with such an ordinance, as Iowa City Mayor Matt Hayek said: “The punishment for ignoring federal law on the issue is losing access to the federal crime database, which would be a terrible idea for any law-enforcement association.” The potential change in policy has been often thought to contradict a federal program the state is participating in, called Secure Communities. If Iowa City implemented a common-sense and nondiscriminatory immigration program similar to that of Minneapolis, most, if not all, instances of identification and prosecution would be consistent with the Secure Communities program — not that it should matter. Under Minneapolis’ program, “Employee Authority in Immigration Matters,” city employees are prohibited from using city resources “solely for the purpose of detecting or apprehending persons whose only violation of law is or may be being undocumented, being out of status, or illegally residing in the United States.” Not only is this policy more than reasonable, it reflects those of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution: “… nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Minnesota City Council President Barbara Johnson offered more practical reasoning for the city’s immigration policies.

“We want all our citizens to not be concerned about calling police for some of the issues that all of us experience,” she said. “We don’t want people to be afraid to call if there’s domestic abuse going on inside their house or if there are issues about child abuse. We don’t people to be fearful of calling the police when they need help.” Johnson made it clear that Minneapolis was not to be considered a “sanctuary city.” When asked if its immigration policies have conflicted with federal programs, she said, “We have a number of task forces with which our police participates with federal law enforcement. It certainly hasn’t been a problem.” Johnson County was added to the U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement’s Secure Communities database in March. It automatically sends to the agency the fingerprints only of those charged or convicted of any serious crime — not dissimilar to the police checking for outstanding warrants of individuals they arrest. Any persons the immigration agency wishes to pursue would likely be held by Johnson County, anyway, which means no extraneous, local resources would need to be used. In the hypothetical scenario that Secure Communities did actually mandate that Iowa City resources be used to enforce immigration laws, it would be condemnable. Different districts, on both the state and local level, prioritize issues differently. Residents of Arizona perceive marriage differently from New Yorkers; citizens of Des Moines prioritize agriculture differently from Iowa City residents. And, following the same line of logic, Iowa City perceives illegal immigration differently from the federal government — and Des Moines, for that matter. If Iowa City doesn’t want to divert resources to federal initiatives it deems unnecessary, its resources shouldn’t be subject to federal mandates. Federal mandates should be carried out with federal funds. Iowa City may not want to be considered a “sanctuary city” because of the negative connotations the term carries, but a lot of what the Human Rights Commission is recommending is commendable.

Your turn. Should local resources fund federal immigration laws? Weigh in at dailyiowan.com.

Letter LETTERS TO THE EDITOR may be sent via e-mail to daily.iowan.letters@gmail.com (as text, not as attachment). Each letter must be signed and include an address and phone number for verification. Letters should not exceed 300 words. The DI reserves the right to edit for length and clarity. The DI will publish only one letter per author per month. Letters will be chosen for publication by the editors according to space considerations. No advertisements or mass mailings, please. GUEST OPINIONS that exceed 300 words in length must be arranged with the Opinions editor at least three days prior to the desired date of publication. Guest opinions are selected in accordance with word length, subject relevance, and space considerations. READER COMMENTS that may appear below were originally posted on dailyiowan.com in response to published material. They will be chosen for print publication when they are deemed to be well-written and to forward public discussion. They may be edited for length and style.

Redistribution makes sense Ryan Swanek’s opinion piece (DI, Sept. 13) is so silly as to be a caricature. Not ever have personally known any poor people, I’ve no idea as to whether they’re lazy or not. Crime seems to be an inappropriate way to battle one’s poverty, so I don’t want to live in or near communities with sig-

nificant low-income populations. Normally, low-income areas have higher crime rates than do areas populated by people with more earned income, and I do not want to be a victim of crime. Ever. However, I certainly don’t hate poor people. I just don’t want to be around them and their problems. Earning money is very difficult, so I don’t want the govern-

ment to forcibly take some of the money that I’ve earned and redistribute it to other people. Hatred has nothing to do with my opposition to income-redistribution government programs. It comes from my wanting to keep as much as possible of the money that I’ve earned as I can so that my life, and the lives of my family members, will be comfortable.

That’s really the whole thing, and sad stories about poor children are just that: sad stories. I wish the poor people well and hope that they will be able to overcome their difficult circumstances. I don’t want to be forced to chip in and have my money given away to people I don’t know. Mike Norton UI alum

SHOULD GARY JOHNSON BE GIVEN MORE PRESS?

Read today’s guest column, and email us at daily.iowan.letters@gmail.com.

Living with chronic disorders A few weeks ago, I submitted an opinion in response to someone who wrote about his lack of help for schizophrenia. It made me realize, even after working with the patients and gamut of brain disorders, paranoid schizophrenia is likely the hardest and most misunderstood to diagnose and treat. To get a glimmer of what this does to parents of an schizophrenic adult child, I urge you to read Peter Earley’s book, Crazy: A Father’s Search Through America’s Mental Health Madness. This book deals with personal and legal issues for these parents and offspring, with a focus on how it is to help a psychotic child who thinks nothing is wrong, along with the poorly interpreted laws about care these patients. Factor in the incredible costs for psychotropic drugs and treatment, and people go untreated. With indigent victims, doctors often use the cheapest drug available, such as Haldol. More harm than help can be the outcome. Newer drugs, Clozaril, Zyprexa, Risperdal, and Abilify, etc., control symptoms better, are costly, and are rife with rotten side effects. Caregivers, parents, and friends have to be well-informed about these drugs and their effects on patients. One effect, for example, is obesity, because patients always feel hungry, desire unhealthy foods, and are lethargic, putting them at high risk for becoming diabetic and/or obese, suffering liver function abnormalities, etc. Adhering to a drug regimen is extremely difficult, and most of us don’t have a clue! The few number of psych beds available also add to the difficulty. When a bed is urgently needed, there will likely be none available, because the public hasn’t demanded it and governments still make cuts to this pressing need. Every citizen needs to become aware and let our legislators know about the unfortunate segment of sick people who are let

down. I care deeply about mentally and emotionally ill folks because of my nursing work and having friends with mental disorders. Think of the awful use of incarceration of mentally ill people, instead of adequate therapies. Plus, incarceration is far more costly than good treatment in a supervised setting. Another personal interest is because of a dear cousin committed suicide because of inappropriate treatment for bipolar disorder. I also have a good friend who has had to have her medication used in her bipolar regimen adjusted many times because of awful side effects to her eyes and thyroid. As for living with chronic situations, I’ve dealt with those, although mine are nothing like a person with a psychiatric disorder. For years I’ve had chronic tinnitus, vertigo, dizziness, and have had to follow a restrictive diet and meds to control this. This can be very hard; nothing has worked for years. About three years ago, I had polymyalgia rheumatica, terribly painful. The treatment was Prednisone, starting with heavy doses and titrating down to zero for around 22 months. My life of mood swings, concerns about the possible loss of vision, crying jags, insomnia, depression left me feeling as if an alien had invaded me. Please understand: I’m very grateful that I learned how difficult a long-term illness is and what it does to the patient and family. My illness wasn’t a lifelong sentence that schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and related brain disorders are. We all need to be help and hope to those who receive such a diagnosis and what it does to victim and family. Please help raise awareness, write and call your legislators, foster hope for such people who have lifelong brain disorders. Be their hope. Bobbie Paxton is a retired nurse who lives in Iowa City.

Guest opinion

CNN’s Gary Johnson exclusion ‘bewildering’ Gov. Gary Johnson is the anti-establishment Republican presidentialnomination candidate. He is committed to cutting spending, balancing the budget, rooting out special interests, and protecting liberty for all Americans. A CNN poll two weeks ago showed him tied with Herman Cain and ahead of Sen. Rick Santorum and Gov. Jon Huntsman. It’s disappointing, then, that Johnson’s established credibility as a presidential-nomination candidate has not earned him the opportunity to present his message in the nationally

televised debates. Our campaign has been respectful when questioning the media’s decisions to exclude Johnson, but credible observers have speculated that there may in fact be a “Gary Johnson Rule” to ensure that he doesn’t appear on stage. While the national media may have devised polling “criteria” to determine who is invited and who is not, those criteria become a lot less objective if the polls they’re based on don’t include all the candidates. How can you qualify for the debates when you’re

not included in the polls? The irony, of course, is that many of the same media outlets who decide the debate participants are also the same people who devise the national polls. While they may say that their debates are open to anyone, their carefully restricted polls effectively play the role of gatekeeper. When Johnson *was* included by CNN in its last nationwide survey, he placed ahead of Jon Huntsman and Santorum and tied with Cain — all three of whom have been invited to every debate,

including Monday night’s. But Tuesday morning, despite his previous inclusion — and despite polling ahead or even with three other candidates — CNN released its latest poll without Johnson as an option. We find this truly baffling, and we have been left scratching our heads. And so we ask: Why? What is it that CNN is afraid of? Is a candidate with fresh ideas — and a track record as a successful two-term governor — too much for the establishment to deal with? Or is it that CNN can’t

‘It’s time for the establishment media to admit that Gary Johnson speaks for a lot of Republicans and Independents whose views are simply not being heard on their invitation-only stages.’ understand how Johnson can poll competitively with other candidates who’ve spent millions — possibly 10 or 20 times the amount Johnson has spent?

Why does it seem so infeasible that an authentic message from a former governor with a true record of fiscal conservatism would resonate with real voters? We don’t know what’s going on, but something is. It’s time for the establishment media to admit that Gary Johnson speaks for a lot of Republicans and Independents whose views are simply not being heard on their invitationonly stages. Ron Nielson is the senior campaign adviser for Gary Johnson’s 2012 presidential-nomination campaign. This piece was originally produced as an email to Johnson supporters.


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News

Int’l students seek jobs There are 484 first-time international students at the UI this fall.

Industry tries to rebrand corn syrup By THOMAS WATKINS Associated Press

By RISHABH R. JAIN rishabh-jain@uiowa.edu

University of Iowa departments are teaming up to improve job opportunities for international students. And with a record number of international students at the university this fall, students said they’re happy to have more options. “There has been a really nice transition in this last year,” said Scott King, the director of the Office of International Students and Scholars. “Services for international students aren’t all in this office.” Students on an F1 visa, the most common for international students, are only allowed to work on-campus jobs. After one year at the UI, international students can apply for curriculum practical training, which allows them to take internships in their field of study. King said the Students/Scholars Office has received around 200 U.S. Social Security number applications this fall, meaning approximately one-quarter of newly enrolled international students at the UI may have a job. “Job seeking is different from culture to culture,” he said. “How one finds jobs varies. How you would go about getting a job on campus — say in India — is

The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 5

International UI student Josue Velasquec works in the IMU River Room on Tuesday. (The Daily Iowan/Jackie Couppee) very different from how you would get one here.” International students often need to be briefed about such basic things as writing résumés, preparing for interviews, and presenting themselves to better their job prospects, King said. The Women’s Resource and Action Center at the UI has also started a jobsearch support group for international students this fall in hopes of providing a forum for international students searching for employment to discuss their problems and benefit from other students’ experiences. And while the UI is working to improve the job search process for international students, the students themselves said the extra assistance would be welcome. “I don’t want to rely on my parents for everything.

I should at least be able to feed myself,” said Sheyu Yan, a UI freshman who has been trying to find a job for more than five months. UI freshman Devanshi Mishra a said many oncampus jobs listed on jobnet require technical skills and experience in certain fields which some freshman students such as herself don’t have. But others said they haven’t struggled to find employment. “Timeliness and being organized can help you secure an on campus job easily,” said UI sophomore Kirti Mann, who works at the University Bookstore. The job has not only enabled her to pay her rent, she said, it has also improved her communication skills and helped her make many friends. On Thursday, the Pomerantz Career Center, in partnership with the Stu-

dents/Scholars Office, will launch a new Career Series to help international students increase their job prospects. “The Career Series for International Students offers international students the opportunity to learn important information and practice key skills that will enhance their job and internship search,” said Amanda Wilson, a career adviser and international-student specialist at Pomerantz Career Center. “Students who attend these sessions will be better prepared to conduct their job and internship search.” The new series is aimed at improving employment prospects for international students by educating them on legal and cultural aspects of employment in the United States. It will feature workshops on various aspects of the hiring process.

LOS ANGELES — The setting sun splashes warm hues across a ripening cornfield as a man and his daughter wander through rows of towering plants. Like any parent, the dad says in the television commercial, he was concerned about high fructose corn syrup. But medical and nutrition experts reassured him that in essence, it’s the same as cane sugar. “Your body can’t tell the difference,” he says. “Sugar is sugar.” That key claim, made last year by the corn industry as it tries to rebrand high fructose corn syrup as simply “corn sugar,” was weighed for the first time by a federal judge Tuesday after a group of sugar farmers and refiners sued corn processors and a lobbying group. Their lawsuit alleges the father-in-the-cornfield advertisement and other national television, print and online commercials from the corn industry amount to false advertising because sugar is not the same as high fructose corn syrup, the sweetening agent now found in the bulk of sodas and many processed foods. Sugar makers say there are numerous differences between the white, granular product and the sticky liquid that is high fructose corn syrup. Attorney Adam Fox claimed the syrup industry has even acknowledged as much in the past. At a hearing on the corn industry’s motion to dismiss

the lawsuit, Fox showed U.S. District Judge Consuelo Marshall the papers from a case in Mexico filed by the Corn Refiners Association that carefully outlined how sugar and high fructose corn syrup are different. That case in 1997 was related to the export of high fructose corn syrup to Mexico. “Like the horse and the automobile, sugar and (high fructose corn syrup) are two different products in terms of their physical and functional characteristics, as well as in their production process, distribution and commercial application,” corn industry expert Peter Buzzanell stated in an affidavit at the time. Corn industry lawyers counter that Fox was taking such statements out of context because the Mexico case dealt merely with the physical properties of high fructose corn syrup and never addressed the manner in which the body processes it. “Sugar and high fructose corn syrup are equivalent as far as how they are metabolized by the body,” attorney Dan Webb said. Webb and other lawyers had filed a motion to dismiss the sugar makers’ lawsuit on the grounds that the advertising campaign is protected speech because it forms part of a national conversation about the merits and pitfalls of high fructose corn syrup and sugar in general. “At the core of this case is clearly a lawsuit filed by the other side that is attempting to stifle debate,” Webb said.


6 - The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011

City spending $15k on survey By JENNY EARL jennifer-earl @uiowa.edu

A community survey is the most recent step in Iowa City officials’ data collecting to improve the downtown area. The survey is designed to allow community members, faculty, staff, and students to provide input on what retail they would like to see downtown. Though John Millar, the head consultant for Iowa City, knows there will be input from community members, he said he is concerned there will not be enough students will participate. The 17-question survey — which costs roughly $15,000 — has been active since Labor Day weekend and has had 250 respondents. Millar said he hopes to have roughly 1,200 respondents by the end of September. As of Tuesday, he said, only 17 students have taken the survey. “We really need a massive response from the student population because we value their input because the downtown is theirs as much as anyone else’s,” he said. Millar is the executive vice president and principal of Divaris Real Estate Inc., the firm hired by the Iowa City City Council to lead the downtown project. “In a sense, [the survey is] a fishing expedition to get a feeling of what the community believes needs to be present in the downtown that may or may not already be there,” said Iowa City City Councilor Mike Wright. But the data collected will not be the only information officials consider. “When you give folks in Iowa City an opportunity for input, you usually get a pretty good response,” said Wendy Ford, the city economic-development coordinator. “This survey, however, only represents a part of the research being done.” Millar said he has completed another set of economic data exploring the city’s “hidden economies.” He said the retailers often look at census data to determine where to open businesses. The census data from university towns

do not accurately reveal what Millar says are postive economic impacts students bring in, because they write in zero on their annual household income on census forms. In order to appeal to retailers who look at these factors, Millar made a new demographic analysis by researching zip codes of the average income of families in those areas into the census. Though Millar did not disclose his research, he said his research significantly improves the city’s data. “I pretty much understand the hidden econonmies that do not show up in the census,” he said. Millar said the survey serves as a “psychographic” that should further support the data he has collected. Though Millar hasn’t spoken to students personally, he said the survey will provide more accurate input than talking to a few students. He said he hopes to present the data to city officials before the end of the year.

News

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Heights dispute boils on By JANET LAWLER janet-lawler@uiowa.edu

Development controversy in University Heights continued to broil Tuesday night over development issues with One University Place and the Tax Increment Financing plan Maxwell Construction wants to fund the development. Residents planned to ask city councilors during the University Heights City Council meeting Tuesday, some passing around signs emblazoned with “Let UH Voters Decide.” The public concern follows the council approving rezoning last year, allowing a large-scale development project to move into what was a mostly residential community. “There are three councilors and the mayor who want to put this through against the will of the people,” University Heights resident Mary Mathew Wilson said. “The property hasn’t even been purchased by the developer yet; obviously, they’re trying to get as much done before the election in

November.” In order to go through with the development, Maxwell Construction is asking for a TIF plan. “This is an irresponsible use of TIF, which is generally used for areas you want to promote for development, bringing in community services or jobs, and this would do none of that,” Councilor Rosanne Hopson said. “This would strictly be for a private developer’s profit, a misuse of tax dollars.” Councilor Pat Yeggy disagreed, contending that the development would provide tax dollars University Heights wouldn’t have had after the 10 to 20 years of the TIF. “We want a community space, and we’ll have one now; we don’t have an uptown or a downtown, but this will help,” Yeggy said. The Johnson County assessor, an independent law firm, and an independent financial firm presented new information to the council. “[The development is] extremely different from the old residential area, and I’m quite opposed to

Alice Haugen discusses the tax-increment financing in the University Heights development plan on Tuesday. (The Daily Iowan/Jackie Couppee) the development and TIF,” University Heights resident Alice Haugen said. Hopson said Maxwell Construction asked for a $6.5 million TIF, which would exceed the city’s debt capacity of $5 million; however, the city plans on giving $4 million up front and appropriating $2.5 million over the period of 10 to 20 years. “Without the TIF, the developer would only get 5 percent profit; with the TIF, it would get 10 percent,” Hopson said. “This is just using public money for

private profit.” Hopson and Councilor Brennan McGrath agree this decision should not be taken lightly and requires more work sessions on behalf of the council. “By far, this is the biggest decision ever for this great, little small town in Iowa City that usually deals with such problems as game-day trash and the occasional mountain lion,” McGrath said. “This will affect the community for at least 20 years, and we must be mindful of the risks.”


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The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 7

METRO UI pitches in on Big Ten mission statement The Hawks Nest collaborated with at least nine of the 12 Big Ten schools this summer to adopt the new Big Ten mission statement. More than 50 delegates attended the conference in the summer to produce the document, which was adopted July 23 at the Big Ten Sportsmanship and Spirit Conference. The Hawks Nest partnered with the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, as well as officials from the Athletics Department and the administration. At a joint meeting on Tuesday, Hawks Nest President Kevin Velovitch and Vice President Lauren Whalen asked the University of Iowa Student Government to pledge its support for the document and display it around campus. Hawks Nest officials would like to see the document displayed in such places as the University Bookstore, the IMU, and athletics

facilities. Last week, the University of Nebraska started to display the agreement in its athletics facilities, Velovitch said. — by Kristen East

Faculty Senate OKs Anti-Retaliation Policy UI officials voted on and approved faculty and Senate committee replacements as well as updates to the AntiRetaliation Policy during Tuesday’s first Faculty Senate meeting of the semester. Kevin Ward, the UI assistant vice president for Human Resources, gave a presentation regarding redesigning the compensation and classification. The changes to the AntiRetaliation Policy were originally made in light of a previous Supreme Court case ruling. The wording was revised yet again after a Faculty Council meeting Aug. 30. The changes encompassed the

Teacher rule blasted By LYNN CAMPBELL IowaPolitics.com

DES MOINES — People who were not trained to be teachers but have at least five years of work experience could get approval to teach high school in shortage areas such as math and science under a proposed new state rule. “This is a last-minute, emergency-type situation. This is not what we would consider normal procedure,” George Maurer, the executive director of the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners, which handles teacher licensing, told a panel of lawmakers. But the idea was blasted Tuesday by the state teachers’ union, which said the move would substantially lower standards for teachers who must understand how youth learn, how to manage a classroom and how to put together a lesson. “It is a significant departure from the expectations that we have had for licensed teachers that we have put in front of our public-school children here in the state of Iowa,” said Christy Hickman, the staff counsel of the Iowa State Education Association, which represents more than 34,000 educators. “This is going to be the first time that we are allowing non-educators to teach very high-level courses to our kids. … They shouldn’t have to be guinea pigs for three years.” The rule proposed by the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners received an initial review Tuesday by the Legislature’s Administrative Rules Review Committee. Under the rule, school districts that have unsuccessfully tried to hire a fully licensed teacher instead can hire someone with experience working in math, chemistry, physics, biology, foreign language, or music. Permission to teach would last for three years, during which the person must take classes in teaching methods, classroom

management, ethics, and diversity training. The person would be supervised by the principal and involved in a mentoring program. State Sen. Thomas Courtney, D-Burlington, sharply criticized the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners. “It seems you guys are over-reaching a ton. It seems to me that’s [the Legislature’s job] and not yours,” Courtney told Maurer. “I don’t think it’s your department that should be making these decisions. I think it’s much more than rule; I think it’s legislation. … And I think we’re looking for higher-quality teachers, not lower-quality teachers. …; I think we’re lowering standards in Iowa.” Maurer said that in a perfect world, he wouldn’t be proposing this. But the reality is the state has been trying to deal with these shortage areas in teaching for numerous years, and the situation isn’t improving. Burlington school Superintendent Jane Evans said her district struggled this past summer to find two math teachers for Burlington High School. Teachers finally were hired the first week of August, just weeks before school started Aug. 18. “It’s extremely difficult to find high school math and science teachers,” Evans said. “Unless something is done to recruit more teachers to become … math and science secondary teachers, I would be interested in seeing what could be done to get qualified business people trained, so they can be teachers in high school.”

DAILYIOWAN.COM Scan this code to go online to read an extended version of this story.

definition of retaliation as “any materially adverse action or credible threat of a materially adverse action taken by the university, or member thereof, against any faculty member, staff member, or student for having made a good

faith report of the universityrelated misconduct, or to deter such a report in the future, or against another covered individual because of a close association with someone who has made or may make such a report.”

The second item changed in this policy was the inclusion saying “adverse actions may also include actions or threats of action not related to employment or the workplace.” Ward gave his update presen-

tation to the Faculty Senate, iterating that the classification part of the plan has taken place in July 2010, and the compensation part of the plan will be implemented in October. — by Jordyn Reiland


8 - The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011

the ledge

Daily Break

EXPERIENCE ABROAD

This column reflects the opinion of the author and not the DI Editorial Board, the Publisher, Student Publications Inc., or the University of Iowa.

Academe, n.: An ancient school in which morality and philosophy were taught. Academy, n.: A modern school in which football is taught. — Ambrose Bierce

The Daily Iowan dailyiowan.com

BRIAN TANNER tannermojo@gmail.com

Signs Your Neighbors May Belong to a Satanic Cult: • Hotel California is their anniversary song. • Deliverymen go in but never come out. • They’re continually buying out the “Dark Rituals” section of Yankee Candle. • Their kids names Damien, Chuckie, Insidius, and Satan Jr. • They get Christmas cards from Charles Manson. • They keep stopping by to borrow a cup of sulfur. • Whenever you have little setbacks, like stubbing your toe, one of them always shouts over the fence, “A-ha. Where’s your God, NOWWWW?” • They keep referring to Rosemary’s Baby as a “feel-good movie.” • When you ask whatever happened to their little dog, they just coyly smile and say, “Sometimes sacrifices have to be made. LoL.” • They actually say “LoL.” • The only rule at their house parties is “stay out of the secret dungeon.” • When they play Pictionary, everything is drawn upside down. • Whenever you go over for tea, they always sit you atop a pile of animal offal in the center of the large pentagram drawn in blood (to be fair, this should have been your first clue). — Brian Tanner wouldn’t go in there if he were you. Think you’re pretty funny? Prove it. The Daily Iowan is looking for Ledge writers. You can submit a Ledge at daily-iowan@uiowa.edu. If we think it’s good, we’ll run it — and maybe contact you for more.

Sophomore Bailey Voss (left) talks about study-abroad opportunities with Tim Bernstein at the UI Study Abroad Fair on Tuesday. Bernstein represented Global Student Experience at the fair, in which more than 100 study-abroad programs participated. (The Daily Iowan/Adam Wesley)

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UITV schedule 12:30 p.m. School of Art & Art History Animation Info-session featuring Budcat & Grasshorse, animation techniques and styles, April 23, 2010 2 School of Art & Art History, lecture by artist James Siena, Feb. 11, 2010 3:30 Painting and Drawing Visiting Artist Lecture, Trevor Winkfield, Nov. 4, 2010 4:45 Hearst Castle, A Fabled History and Tour, Guest Lecture by Victoria Kastner, Oct. 27, 2009 6 School of Art & Art History, lecture by artist James Siena, Feb. 11, 2010 7:30 School of Art & Art History Animation

horoscopes

Wednesday, Sept. — by Eugenia Last

ARIES March 21-April 19 Stop waiting for a sign or for someone to give you a nudge. Practical application coupled with a dose of realism should get you moving in the right direction. Once you’ve taken the first few steps, you’ll be able to speed along. TAURUS April 20-May 20 Interact more with people in your field or with similar interests, and you will gather information and create opportunities to collaborate. Love relationships will develop if you are single; if you are with someone, you can enhance the connection. GEMINI May 21-June 20 Do your part, regardless of whether you feel up to it. It’s important not to rock the boat or to disrupt plans. Deal with money, legal, and institutional matters while they are fresh and you have momentum. Be careful not to let love cost you. CANCER June 21-July 22 Take care of personal and domestic matters. The more you put into home and family, the better you will feel. Talking to someone with helpful information will also encourage you to participate in a worthwhile cause that promises long-term benefits. LEO July 23-Aug. 22 Change your location if it will help you achieve your goals. Take care of responsibilities, and you will gain respect as well as greater control over a situation you are dealing with. A change of heart will occur because of someone’s change of plans. VIRGO Aug. 23-Sept. 22 Broaden your horizons. Get involved in something that interests you. Learn the ropes, and participate passionately. Interact with people from your past and present, and you will be introduced to those who will be important in your future. LIBRA Sept. 23-Oct. 22 Downsizing can help you get a handle on your financial situation. Creative accounting, coupled with some recommended advice from someone familiar with money matters, will help you get back on track. You have to face problems head-on. SCORPIO Oct. 23-Nov. 21 Offer favors, and ask for them in return. It’s giveand-take that will help you get ahead. Communication, technology, and travel can all help. Attend an entertaining event that will inspire you to follow your creative ideas. SAGITTARIUS Nov. 22-Dec. 21 Now is not the time to take chances with your health, lifestyle, or finances. Strive for greater stability to avoid damage to your reputation. Set up a reasonable budget and a vigorous regime that results in physical and mental strength. CAPRICORN Dec. 22-Jan. 19 Leaving a good impression will help you gain respect and clout, both personally and professionally. Investing in something you want to pursue will help you increase your money intake. A romantic adventure is likely to develop. AQUARIUS Jan. 20-Feb. 18 Tidy up loose ends. Don’t begin something new until you can give it your undivided attention. A sound plan that helps you combine old formulas that worked with up-to-date ideas should be put in place. Your progress will boost your reputation. PISCES Feb. 19-March 20 Stabilize your situation with compromise. A partnership can turn into a moneymaking venture. Your standard of living has potential to change rapidly. Open-mindedness will bring about greater opportunities and spectacular results.

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today’s events

Want to see your super special event appear here? Simply submit the details at:

• U.S. Constitution Day Celebration, all-day event, coffee shops downtown • College of Public Health Staff Council Coffee Break, 9:30 a.m., 2500 University Capitol Centre • Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m., North Liberty Community Center, 520 W. Cherry • Center for Student Involvement & Leadership Poster Sale, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Hubbard Park • Preschool Story Time, 10:30 a.m., Iowa City Public Library, 123 S. Linn • Do it Yourself Public Relations Media Panel, noon, Sheraton Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque • Biochemistry Faculty Meeting, 12:30 p.m., 6-559 Bowen • Inorganic Seminar, “Galvanizing the brain: exploring the role of zinc in synaptic transmission,” Alan Kay, 12:30 p.m., W323 Chemistry Building • Web Basics, 2 p.m., Iowa City Public Library • Staff Council Meeting, 2:30 p.m., S401 Pappajohn Business Building • Farmers’ Market, 5-7 p.m., Chauncey Swan parking ramp • Russian Folklore, 5 p.m., 2390 University Capitol Centre • Zumba, 5:30 p.m., Old Brick, 26 E. Market • Seed Saving: Part Two, 6 p.m., New Pioneer Co-op, 1101 Second St., Coralville • Bingo, 6:30 p.m., Eagle’s Club, 225 Highway 1 W.

• Know the Law — Know Your Rights, Student Legal Services, 6:30 p.m., IMU second-floor ballroom • Gray Knights Chess Club, 6:30 p.m., Senior Center, 28 S. Linn • Buddhist Meditation Classes, 7 p.m., Friends Meeting House, 311 N. Linn • Burlington Street Bluegrass Band, 7 p.m., Mill, 120 E. Burlington • “Live from Prairie Lights,” Tom Perotta, fiction, 7 p.m., Prairie Lights, 15 S. Dubuque • Peace Corps Application Writing Workshop, 7 p.m., 1117 University Capitol Centre • PJ Story Time, 7 p.m., North Liberty Community Center • The Trip, 7 p.m., Bijou • An Evening with Judy Collins, 8 p.m., Englert Theatre, 221 E. Washington • International Writing Program Cinémathèque, The Old Potter (Korea), 8 p.m., E105 Adler • Legal Cinema Studies Society Law Movie Night, Presumed Innocent, 8 p.m., 285 Boyd Law Building • Phone Calls from Home, 9 p.m. Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington • The Interrupters, 9:30 p.m., Bijou • A Hawk and a Hacksaw, 10 p.m., Mill • Jam Session, 10 p.m., Yacht Club, 13 S. Linn

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Info-session featuring Budcat & Grasshorse, animation techniques and styles, April 23, 2010 9 Iowa Magazine Program No. 9, UI Center for Media Production & Big Ten Network 9:30 Daily Iowan Television News 9:45 Kirk Ferentz News Conference, presented unedited by UITV and Hawkeye Video 10:15 Ueye, Student Life and Activities 10:30 Daily Iowan Television News 10:45 Hearst Castle, A Fabled History and Tour, Guest Lecture by Victoria Kastner, Oct. 27, 2009


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The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 9

Sports

From haggis to corn Morven McCulloch says the transition from Scotland to Iowa has been easy. ‘She’s an independent kid, and she’s traveled a lot on her own.I’m sure it’s helped her transition here,’ — second-year assistant coach Jesse Medvene-Collins

Iowa freshman Morven McCulloch practices at the Hawkeye Tennis & Recreation Complex on Tuesday. The 17-yearold from Scotland said her transition to Iowa City has been relatively easy. (The Daily Iowan/Ya Chen Chen)

By CONRAD SWANSON

her search for a U.S. school.

conrad-swanson@uiowa.edu

While she said she regrets

A new face on the Iowa women’s tennis team — and new visitor to this country — worked out this week at the Klotz Outdoor Tennis Courts in preparation for the first tournament of the year. Morven McCulloch, a native of St. Andrews, Scotland, is adjusting to her new life as a student-athlete at Iowa. Coming to Iowa was a last-minute development for McCulloch, who also visited Oklahoma during

the short notice and uninformed nature of her decision, she said she’s happy with her choice. The freshman said she prefers Iowa City to Norman, if for nothing more than the landscape — she said she appreciates Iowa’s rolling hills after seeing the vast flatness of Oklahoma. McCulloch’s sport of choice when she was younger was golf, but she started playing tennis for fun when she was 5 and moved to a more competitive level several years

later. “When I was 12, I went to Edinburgh [Scotland’s capital] in order to play a lot more tennis at a higher standard,” she said. She attended a boarding school in Edinburgh, where she learned to balance work, school, and tennis. Boarding school also helped her get used to living on her own, and now, even though she does miss home, it’s helped her transition to an new country. “It’s been quite easy, because everyone here has been so much more welcoming,” she said.

Jesse Medvene-Collins, the team’s second-year assistant coach, attributed some of McCulloch’s ease to a high level of autonomy she has been able to develop over her years away from home. “She’s an independent kid, and she’s traveled a lot on her own,” MedveneCollins said. “I’m sure it’s helped her transition here.” Medvene-Collins traveled to Europe to see McCulloch play, but there wasn’t much time for the two to interact. The same goes for head coach Katie Dougherty, who said the two never met each other in person until McCulloch came to Iowa City; they communicated through phone calls and emails. Now that she’s in Iowa, McCulloch said, she’s looking forward to experiencing a wide variety of opponents — a significant change from the small selection of players in the United Kingdom. “I’m excited to play new people and see what the

Running in the rehab lane Iowa’s Nick Holmes put in overtime hours to get ready for the crosscountry season. By BEN ROSS benjamin-d-ross@uiowa.edu

Nick Holmes’ list of running results at Iowa looks more like an injury report than a stat sheet. He has been held out of competition extensively each of his seasons at Iowa. Whether it be a stress fracture, a hip injury, tendinitis, iliotibial Holmes band synrunner drome, or shin problems, Holmes has experienced all the negatives of running during his tenure, but none of the positives. But Holmes is now working on his comeback. The Peoria, Ill.-native stayed in Iowa City this past summer so he could get himself prepared for the cross-country season. His agenda over the break included taking classes at Kirkwood, doing rehab exercises, and running sparingly. “I didn’t run much,” the junior said. “I had to go through eight weeks of no physical activity. After that, I only ran twice a week for a few weeks. I was able to rehab, use the training facility, ice, and see trainer

Terry Noonan … I loved his attitude of, ‘If you don’t want to get better, then I don’t want you here.’ ” Holmes met with Noonan, the Hawkeyes’ director of athletics training services, every day over the summer. Noonan has been an athletics trainer for more than 30 years and has seen all types of sports injuries. His expertise lies primarily with football and football-related health problems, but he said no sport has any more injuries than the next. “You stand a 50-50 chance of getting hurt no matter what you do, and around 10 percent of those injuries are serious,” he said. “[Holmes’] case just seemed like one injury after another. There were times when he got frustrated, but he stayed positive and started to see that light at the end of the tunnel.” Getting to that point involved long sessions of exercises in a swimming pool, deep muscle treatments, and a special softtissue massage called Active Release Technique. Head cross-country coach Larry Wieczorek, who recently underwent arthroscopic knee surgery, said he feels bad for his

runner but believes it’s just a part of Holmes’ and the rest of the team’s aggressive nature. “It’s been a combination of bad luck and other things for Nick,” he said. “It’s hard to pinpoint what exactly the injuries are. These are good athletes. They want to go their very hardest and finish up every race strong.” And while running has caused problems for Holmes, Wieczorek said, the activity will likely pay off in the long run. “I’ve been running all my life; I’m much healthier [than someone who hasn’t],” the longtime Iowa coach said. “They thought I was dead on the operating table because my pulse was so low. Running has been a fountain of youth for me.” Another factor that has helped Holmes in his rehab process is the arrival of a new Alter-G Machine. The equipment is essentially a treadmill that lets an athlete run at a percentage of her or his body weight, making the runner feel lighter so the knees, ankles, and other lower body parts don’t take the beating they normally would from traditional running. That machine may have

rejuvenated Holmes’ running career; he said it had the greatest effect on his rehab process of anything he did. “The Alter-G has been huge as of late,” the 21year-old said. “We got it in the midsummer, and I used it four or five weeks before the season started. When I run on it, I can’t feel the stress, the pounding on the shins. It has helped enormously.” And what a help it has been. In his first cross-country meet since 2009, Holmes placed third overall in the Iowa Open on Sept. 2. While Holmes said he isn’t back to full strength, this may be the best he has felt since becoming a Hawkeye. “I’m feeling pretty good,” he said. “Not close to 100 percent health, but this is the best I have felt in a long time. I’m running with minor aches and pains, but feel pretty positive. “I really appreciate what Coach Wiz has done for me; not many other Division-I coaches would still keep me around after all I have been through. I just let my faith keep me going, and if it’s meant to be, then it’s meant to be.”

level is,” she said. “We always play the same people in Britain, because there’s not a huge number of players in the age group.” McCulloch said that variety has helped her game as she has tried to improve her play from the back of the court. Dougherty said she’s happy to have McCulloch’s talent and experience on the team. The third-year head coach also said the freshman is interacting well with the team’s other athletes. “Everyone enjoys being around her,” Dougherty said. “She’s a positive and fun individual.”

Country Night


10 - The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011

FOOTBALL CONTINUED FROM 12 “I wish we could have scored some more touchdowns, maybe.”

Ferentz denies black balling DJK When Derrell JohnsonKoulianos — Iowa’s alltime leader in receptions and receiving yards — wasn’t invited to an NFL camp, some wondered if it was more than his December arrest that sealed his fate. Ferentz denied the idea he may have advised NFL scouts against drafting or signing Johnson-Koulianos. “Typically, players’ actions speak for themselves, and I haven’t

VOLLEYBALL CONTINUED FROM 12

we’ll ask the guys to block that same type. They really help us see what it’s going to look like, while at the same time giving us more practice with harder hits.” Clark, who has played

SOCCER CONTINUED FROM 12

in these games — even though the scores have been what they are — we’ve still proven we can come out and play hard each and every game, whether the teams are great or not.” The way the team has performed in nonconference games so far has been encouraging, despite lop-

Sports

Linebacker Dakota Getz will miss the remainder of

this season after suffering a knee injury on the opening kickoff against Iowa State. It was his first action of the season after a separate injury to his shoulder kept him out of the seasonopener against Tennessee Tech. Injuries also limited Getz to only three games in 2010. Ferentz said linebacker Tyler Nielsen — who suffered a minor ankle injury against Iowa State but returned — and defensive back Jordan Bernstine — who missed the game due to illness — will both be OK for Saturday against Pittsburgh. “[Bernstine] would have been fine Sunday,” Ferentz said. “We didn’t play Sunday, so that didn’t help us.”

volleyball since he was in junior high, comes to volleyball practice three days a week and participates throughout the entire practice. He treats his obligation like a job, he said, even though he doesn’t receive any compensation for his dedication. “We definitely appreciate them so much,” Husz said. “Sometimes, we’ll try to sneak them training [sup-

plies] and stuff, because they’re working just as hard as we are — they’re putting the time in, the hard work in. They’ve become so natural to us now in the second year that we don’t necessarily them as practice players. “I consider them my teammates.”

sided scores for the Hawkeyes. “We’re excited with our wins, but we always come off the field saying we have some things to work on,” senior goalkeeper Emily Moran said. “If we don’t improve these things, then we will get beat.” Tonight’s matchup will be the third game in five days for Iowa, but the Hawkeyes insisted they will be ready to come out hard against the Panthers. The Hawkeyes prepare

for a midweek game with intense practice sessions designed to put pressure on each other and to address weaknesses that arise during games. “Every team we play in the state is a rival for us, so it’s personal in that aspect,” junior midfielder Dana Dalrymple said. “[The Panthers are] going to come out, and they’re going to want to win. We have to be prepared to play a physical game and match their intensity.”

slammed any player to anybody since I’ve been here,” Ferentz said. “On that topic, I can unequivocally say nobody has asked me anything — since and including December.” Johnson-Koulianos was dismissed from the team and missed the Insight Bowl after being arrested Dec. 7 on seven drug-related charges. He later pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana. All other charges were dropped. “And the other thing I’d just add, I imagine most of the guys that ended up in NFL camps probably played in their last game as a senior on the team,” Ferentz said. “That would be my guess.”

Getz out for season

dailyiowan.com for more sports

CARDINALS 6, PIRATES 4

Cards rally for victory By WILL GRAVES Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Not even a shaky defensive performance by Albert Pujols could cool the redhot St. Louis Cardinals. Nick Punto hit a goahead double in the ninth inning, and the surging Cardinals overcame three errors by their superstar first baseman to beat the Pittsburgh Pirates, 6-4, Tuesday night. Trying to stay in the wild-card and NL Central races, the Cardinals won for the sixth time in seven games. “We still have a huge hole to climb out of, but at least we’re playing some meaningful baseball in September,” Punto said. The loss dropped the Pirates to 67-81. Once in the midst of a promising run, they are stuck with a non-winning season for the 19th-straight year. Pittsburgh is just 16-37 since briefly moving into first place on July 19. “We haven’t done enough things in a number of these games that have put us in position to have 81 losses, that’s where we are right now,” manager Clint Hurdle said. Working on the day he signed a $21 million, twoyear contract, Cardinal ace Chris Carpenter hit an early two-run single. He took a 4-2 lead into the seventh, but Andrew McCutchen tied it with a two-out homer. “I was battling all night, but I made some good pitches when I had to,” Carpenter said. “It was one of those nights … but it wasn’t like they were bashing it all over the

place. But we did what we needed to do, and that’s what’s important right now.” The Pirates brought in closer Joel Hanrahan (0-4) in the ninth inning of a tie game, and he struggled with his command. Daniel Descalso collected his third single with one out and was replaced by Tyler Greene. Punto has struggled with injuries this year but looked just fine drilling a Hanrahan fastball into the gap, and Greene scored easily. Pujols provided some insurance with a sacrifice fly to take some of the sting out of his woeful night in the field. The two-time Gold Glove winner now has 14 errors this season. “When you play this game, crazy things are going to happen,” Pujols said. “At the end, I just flip the page, and I’m glad we got the win and those three errors didn’t cause a loss.” The Pirates put runners on first and second with no outs in the ninth, but Pedro Ciriaco bunted into a forceout, and Neil Walker grounded into a double play to end it. Kyle McClellan (11-6) earned the win in relief, and Jason Motte worked the ninth for his sixth save. Carpenter, now signed to stay with St. Louis through 2013, allowed 10 hits, struck out six, and walked one. The 36-yearold right-hander appeared well on his way to his 10th victory of the season until McCutchen hit his 23rd homer, snapping out of a 1-for-15 slump. “I had good stuff tonight,” Carpenter said.

“I felt like I did the best I could, and I got beat by one pitch late in the game.” Pittsburgh, which rallied for a dramatic 6-5 win on Monday, couldn’t finish the job this time as the Cardinals kept their flickering playoff hopes alive. “It was a good, gutty hang-in-there type of win, especially after yesterday,” manager Tony La Russa said. “You get your heart broken, which means it wasn’t broken, it was just bruised a little bit.” Heartbreak is an all-too familiar feeling in Pittsburgh and some baserunning gaffes helped continue the team’s late-summer swoon. The Pirates lost an apparent run in the fifth after Ciriaco tagged up on a fly by Derrek Lee. Carpenter threw the ball to third and Ciriaco was called out on appeal for leaving too early. Hurdle came out to argue before heading back to the dugout, then took up the cause a half-inning later and was promptly ejected for the fifth time this season. “I couldn’t let Pedro wear it,” Hurdle said. “Everybody in the ballpark thinks he left early, and that’s not normal protocol to go in there after that, but I had someone I trust tell me, ‘No, he left right on time,’ and I just can’t let the kid wear it. I’ve got to have his back.” Lee singled and scored on Pujols’ error in the second, and hit a solo home run in the third. Still, it wasn’t enough to prevent the Pirates from coming within one loss of yet another losing season.


10 - The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011

FOOTBALL CONTINUED FROM 12 “I wish we could have scored some more touchdowns, maybe.”

Ferentz denies black balling DJK When Derrell JohnsonKoulianos — Iowa’s alltime leader in receptions and receiving yards — wasn’t invited to an NFL camp, some wondered if it was more than his December arrest that sealed his fate. Ferentz denied the idea he may have advised NFL scouts against drafting or signing Johnson-Koulianos. “Typically, players’ actions speak for themselves, and I haven’t

VOLLEYBALL CONTINUED FROM 12

we’ll ask the guys to block that same type. They really help us see what it’s going to look like, while at the same time giving us more practice with harder hits.” Clark, who has played

SOCCER CONTINUED FROM 12

in these games — even though the scores have been what they are — we’ve still proven we can come out and play hard each and every game, whether the teams are great or not.” The way the team has performed in nonconference games so far has been encouraging, despite lop-

Sports

Linebacker Dakota Getz will miss the remainder of

this season after suffering a knee injury on the opening kickoff against Iowa State. It was his first action of the season after a separate injury to his shoulder kept him out of the seasonopener against Tennessee Tech. Injuries also limited Getz to only three games in 2010. Ferentz said linebacker Tyler Nielsen — who suffered a minor ankle injury against Iowa State but returned — and defensive back Jordan Bernstine — who missed the game due to illness — will both be OK for Saturday against Pittsburgh. “[Bernstine] would have been fine Sunday,” Ferentz said. “We didn’t play Sunday, so that didn’t help us.”

volleyball since he was in junior high, comes to volleyball practice three days a week and participates throughout the entire practice. He treats his obligation like a job, he said, even though he doesn’t receive any compensation for his dedication. “We definitely appreciate them so much,” Husz said. “Sometimes, we’ll try to sneak them training [sup-

plies] and stuff, because they’re working just as hard as we are — they’re putting the time in, the hard work in. They’ve become so natural to us now in the second year that we don’t necessarily them as practice players. “I consider them my teammates.”

sided scores for the Hawkeyes. “We’re excited with our wins, but we always come off the field saying we have some things to work on,” senior goalkeeper Emily Moran said. “If we don’t improve these things, then we will get beat.” Tonight’s matchup will be the third game in five days for Iowa, but the Hawkeyes insisted they will be ready to come out hard against the Panthers. The Hawkeyes prepare

for a midweek game with intense practice sessions designed to put pressure on each other and to address weaknesses that arise during games. “Every team we play in the state is a rival for us, so it’s personal in that aspect,” junior midfielder Dana Dalrymple said. “[The Panthers are] going to come out, and they’re going to want to win. We have to be prepared to play a physical game and match their intensity.”

slammed any player to anybody since I’ve been here,” Ferentz said. “On that topic, I can unequivocally say nobody has asked me anything — since and including December.” Johnson-Koulianos was dismissed from the team and missed the Insight Bowl after being arrested Dec. 7 on seven drug-related charges. He later pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana. All other charges were dropped. “And the other thing I’d just add, I imagine most of the guys that ended up in NFL camps probably played in their last game as a senior on the team,” Ferentz said. “That would be my guess.”

Getz out for season

dailyiowan.com for more sports

CARDINALS 6, PIRATES 4

Cards rally for victory By WILL GRAVES Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Not even a shaky defensive performance by Albert Pujols could cool the redhot St. Louis Cardinals. Nick Punto hit a goahead double in the ninth inning, and the surging Cardinals overcame three errors by their superstar first baseman to beat the Pittsburgh Pirates, 6-4, Tuesday night. Trying to stay in the wild-card and NL Central races, the Cardinals won for the sixth time in seven games. “We still have a huge hole to climb out of, but at least we’re playing some meaningful baseball in September,” Punto said. The loss dropped the Pirates to 67-81. Once in the midst of a promising run, they are stuck with a non-winning season for the 19th-straight year. Pittsburgh is just 16-37 since briefly moving into first place on July 19. “We haven’t done enough things in a number of these games that have put us in position to have 81 losses, that’s where we are right now,” manager Clint Hurdle said. Working on the day he signed a $21 million, twoyear contract, Cardinal ace Chris Carpenter hit an early two-run single. He took a 4-2 lead into the seventh, but Andrew McCutchen tied it with a two-out homer. “I was battling all night, but I made some good pitches when I had to,” Carpenter said. “It was one of those nights … but it wasn’t like they were bashing it all over the

place. But we did what we needed to do, and that’s what’s important right now.” The Pirates brought in closer Joel Hanrahan (0-4) in the ninth inning of a tie game, and he struggled with his command. Daniel Descalso collected his third single with one out and was replaced by Tyler Greene. Punto has struggled with injuries this year but looked just fine drilling a Hanrahan fastball into the gap, and Greene scored easily. Pujols provided some insurance with a sacrifice fly to take some of the sting out of his woeful night in the field. The two-time Gold Glove winner now has 14 errors this season. “When you play this game, crazy things are going to happen,” Pujols said. “At the end, I just flip the page, and I’m glad we got the win and those three errors didn’t cause a loss.” The Pirates put runners on first and second with no outs in the ninth, but Pedro Ciriaco bunted into a forceout, and Neil Walker grounded into a double play to end it. Kyle McClellan (11-6) earned the win in relief, and Jason Motte worked the ninth for his sixth save. Carpenter, now signed to stay with St. Louis through 2013, allowed 10 hits, struck out six, and walked one. The 36-yearold right-hander appeared well on his way to his 10th victory of the season until McCutchen hit his 23rd homer, snapping out of a 1-for-15 slump. “I had good stuff tonight,” Carpenter said.

“I felt like I did the best I could, and I got beat by one pitch late in the game.” Pittsburgh, which rallied for a dramatic 6-5 win on Monday, couldn’t finish the job this time as the Cardinals kept their flickering playoff hopes alive. “It was a good, gutty hang-in-there type of win, especially after yesterday,” manager Tony La Russa said. “You get your heart broken, which means it wasn’t broken, it was just bruised a little bit.” Heartbreak is an all-too familiar feeling in Pittsburgh and some baserunning gaffes helped continue the team’s late-summer swoon. The Pirates lost an apparent run in the fifth after Ciriaco tagged up on a fly by Derrek Lee. Carpenter threw the ball to third and Ciriaco was called out on appeal for leaving too early. Hurdle came out to argue before heading back to the dugout, then took up the cause a half-inning later and was promptly ejected for the fifth time this season. “I couldn’t let Pedro wear it,” Hurdle said. “Everybody in the ballpark thinks he left early, and that’s not normal protocol to go in there after that, but I had someone I trust tell me, ‘No, he left right on time,’ and I just can’t let the kid wear it. I’ve got to have his back.” Lee singled and scored on Pujols’ error in the second, and hit a solo home run in the third. Still, it wasn’t enough to prevent the Pirates from coming within one loss of yet another losing season.


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The Daily Iowan - Iowa City, Iowa - Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 11

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INTRAMURALS Log on to DailyIowan.com for exclusive coverage of the intramural six-on-six sand volleyball semifinals.

THE DAILY IOWAN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2011

Soccer set for UNI tilt Iowa will look to win its final tune-up of the nonconference season before it begins Big Ten play on Sunday. By BEN WOLFSON benjamin-wolfson@uiowa.edu

Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz watches the action during the Hawkeyes’ spring game in Kinnick Stadium on April 16. (The Daily Iowan/File Photo)

Ferentz sticks by decisions Ferentz reaffirmed his decision to go to overtime against Iowa State on Tuesday. By JORDAN GARRETSON jordan-garretson@uiowa.edu

Kirk Ferentz isn’t new to having his decisions secondguessed. Most with 16 years of head coaching experience aren’t. That experience is why he couldn’t help but crack a grin at his Tuesday press conference when questions emerged regarding his decisions in last week’s loss at Iowa State, which drew heat from fans on various social media sites. Iowa began the last drive of regulation at its own 20-yard line with 1:17 remaining. Marcus Coker ran for 2 yards

Women’s golf finishes 3rd At the end of the day, the Iowa women’s golf team was in the same place it was in the morning at the Chip ’N’ Club Invitational: third place. But there was still a sense of progress in the way the team played. After a first day in which the Hawkeyes shot a combined 7-over par on the final three holes, they finished the last round in much stronger fashion. The team shot 2-over on the same holes in the final round. “I thought we finished a lot better today,” head coach Megan Menzel said. “It was a little rough early on the front nine, and I thought they held it together really well.” Junior Gigi DiGrazia, senior Chelsea Harris, and freshman Lauren English led the way for Iowa. DiGrazia finished in a tie for

Big Ten honors Scraper Field hockey forward Kim Scraper took home the Big Ten Offensive Player of the Week for the second-straight week after scoring six of Iowa’s 11 goals in two games in Providence, R.I. The sophomore tallied four goals in a 7-0 win over Brown on Sept. 10 and scored Scraper two more in a forward 4-1 win over Providence on Sept. 9. “Kim had a great weekend,” head coach Tracey Griesbaum said in a release. “She ran the field very well and was able to stretch out the defense. Her skills

before Iowa was set back five yards with a false-start penalty. Coker ran again, this time for 4 yards. Ferentz was content with letting the clock expire and heading to overtime but said afterward if they had “gotten the ball past the 30, we probably would have gone with it.” He was asked Tuesday if his strategy for road games was to play for overtime. “Our idea is to win the game typically,” he said. “That’s what we’re thinking, home or away.” Receiver Keenan Davis expressed confidence in the decision, even in retrospect. 11th place after carding a 4-over 76. She parred 15 of 18 holes on the day, and her total score of 230 matched her career-best. Harris fired a team-best 75 on Tuesday, which included two birdies and an eagle on the 11th hole. She finished tied for 13th place. English shot a 78 in the final round, good for a tie for 15th place in her first tournament as a Hawkeye. Junior Kristi Cardwell finished in a tie for 21st place after shooting an 80 on Tuesday. Freshman Shelby Phillips fell back from the pack after a strong start on the tournament’s first day, carding an 85 in the final round. While Menzel noted that Phillips did have a “rough” day, she said she’s confident the freshman will bounce back well at the next tournament. That chance will come at the Dick McGuire Invitational, in Albuquerque, N.M., on Sept. 2526. — by Tork Mason and finishing ability in the circle were very effective.” Scraper’s performance against Brown marked the first time an Iowa player scored at least four goals in a game since Pattie Gillern scored five in a 2003 win over Missouri State. The back-toback honors are also the first time a Hawkeye has won the Offensive Big Ten award in consecutive weeks since Caitlin McCurdy did in 2005. Thanks in large part to Scraper’s scoring, Iowa advanced three spots in the national polls and is ranked No. 12 in the country with a 5-1 record. The lone loss came to No. 1 North Carolina. Scraper shared this week’s Offensive Player of the Week honor with Penn State freshman Kelsey Amy. — by Nick Szafranski

“That’s our time,” said Davis, who posted career-bests in catches (five) and receiving yards (95) but dropped a crucial pass in the third overtime. “We should be able to come together in overtime and be able to get everything together.” The 13th-year Iowa coach did express some regret over his other criticized call. With a fourth-and-one at Iowa State’s 16-yard line in the third overtime, Ferentz elected for Mike Meyer to kick a field goal. The Cyclones had scored touchdowns on their first two overtime possessions, as well as on

two of their final three drives in regulation. They did it again after Meyer’s field goal to claim the 44-41 victory. “Obviously, I was banking on us being able to keep them out of the end zone,” Ferentz said. “Knowing what I know now, I would have done it differently for sure.” The nature of quarterback James Vandenberg’s regret was different. “I trust Coach’s decision,” he said. “Whatever he says, I’m going to believe, and we’re going to go with it.

The Iowa soccer team won’t overlook its final nonconference opponent in tonight’s matchup with Northern Iowa. The Panthers, led by head coach James Price, have a 3-4-1 record heading into tonight’s game. Northern Iowa has allowed more goals (12) than it has scored this season (eight), which bodes well for the Hawkeyes. Iowa’s offense has been potent in nonconference play, and the squad has benefited — as shown by Rainey the first 7-0-0 record in head coach school history. The Hawkeyes have scored 27 goals on the year, while conceding just five. Iowa will likely be favored, but head coach Ron Rainey said that doesn’t matter. “We have to play the team in front of us,” he said. “Northern Iowa wants nothing more than to beat Iowa; it would be a huge win for [the Panthers] as they get ready for their conference. We have to approach this game professionally. “We’ll look for that feeling again after the game and say, ‘Hey we really showed as well as we could do,’ and then we see what the score is and worry about the result after 90 minutes.” Players said they are eager to face another opponent from the state of Iowa less than a week after defeating Iowa State, 4-1, on Sept. 9. So far in his career, Rainey is 13-0-1 against Drake, Iowa State, and UNI. His teams have outscored the three other Iowa schools, 36-3. “We have a win against Iowa State, but we want to top it off and have that second win against UNI,” senior defender Morgan Showalter said. “The way we’ve come out

SEE FOOTBALL, 10

SEE SOCCER, 10

Iowa volleyball mans up The small-instature Iowa volleyball team uses male practice players to help prepare for Big Ten play. By MOLLY IRENE OLMSTEAD molly-olmstead@uiowa.edu

The Iowa volleyball team is smaller than rest of the Big Ten. Spenser Clark, at 6-3 and 225 pounds, isn’t. The Hawkeyes make up for their relative lack of size with speed and agility, but having only themselves to play against in practice means they would be unprepared to compete against the brawn of their conference competitors. Because of that, male volleyball players such Clark practice regularly with the Iowa women to help them prepare for the size and strength of the Big Ten. Clark and other two other players from the Iowa men’s volleyball club team practice with the women’s team two or three days a week. This is the second year the Hawkeyes have used the male players. “We give the girls a different look at things, because they just don’t

Iowa practice player Spenser Clark gets ready to serve during practice on Sept. 6 in Carver-Hawkeye Arena. Clark, a former member of the men’s volleyball club, is in his second year as a practice player for the Hawkeye volleyball team. (The Daily Iowan/Ricky Bahner) have the size,” Clark said. “We come in and put up bigger blocks, we swing a little harder at them, and we give them more gamesituation reps and experience they don’t have just on their own.” Bigger and more physical players make a difference in the game for reasons other than pure muscle. When a hitter can jump higher, the attacker can see around a defender’s block attempt. When they hit, the ball will come to the backcourt from a different angle. The male practice players set up an ideal level of competition for the Iowa

team, senior middle blocker Mallory Husz said. At 60, Husz is one of the smallest middles in the Big Ten — but she’s fast. “The boys really help us because they’re fast, too, so they can kind of match up against us instead of playing against a slow, big middle,” Husz said. “They mirror us, but they also can be that big hitter if they want to and definitely play both roles.” In addition to setting up bigger blocks, spiking the ball harder, and serving faster than the Hawkeyes can do on their own, the male practice players can mimic the roles of upcom-

ing competitors. After the team watches film, they note the consistent patterns, and then the male practice players adopt those strategies to simulate the game play Iowa will see in upcoming competitions. “We ask them to be better than the rest of the Big Ten players that we play against,” said assistant coach Ben Boldt, who works closely with the men. “If a player hits one shot, we’ll ask a practice player to hit that shot all week in practice. If somebody blocks a certain shot, SEE VOLLEYBALL, 10

The Daily Iowan - 09/14/11  

The Daily Iowan's print edition for Wednesday, September 14, 2011.

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