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THE INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COMMUNITY SINCE 1868

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

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Proposed center still divisive

Panel members voiced concerns about the revised Johnson County justice-center proposal Tuesday. by Brent Griffiths brent-griffiths@uiowa.edu

Opponents of the proposed Johnson County Justice Center say the revised cost is still too high, and that changes made to the plan are insufficient. “This is a nominal reduction, and they have essentially thrown a bone to the public,” said Aleksey Gurtovoy, a local activist. “[Proponents] don’t know what causes these rates, and they think by throwing some money, they hope it will make it better.” The concerned community members met at the hotel Vetro Tuesday evening for a panel discussion about their qualms with the revised justice center plan. The original proposal for the center received 56 percent of the vote in November 2012, failing to pass the 60 percent threshold necessary. Following the vote, the county agreed to a new plan, which trimmed $3.3 million off the bond referendum. Specifically, the amended proposal includes 195 jail beds instead of 243, four courtrooms instead of six, and $325,000 less in exterior design changes and other “soft” costs, coupled with $2.7 million in county funding. Despite the changes, critics of the proposal believe the main problems they have described all along remain. Gurtovoy said people who are opposed to the proposal for cost reasons are not satisfied, and neither are those who oppose the center for additional reasons, including racial disparities in jailing. “The sheriff and other county officials went on the record just minutes after the proposal failed in November and said they were going to bring it back again,” Gurtovoy said. “They are trying to con- Harney vince us they were right supervisor all along.” Johnson County Supervisor Pat Harney said the Board of Supervisors continues to look at jail alternatives and encourages officers to be “as lenient as possible.” He said the opponents had the chance to get involved in the discussion of racial disSee Justice center, 5

General manager of Buffalo Wild Wings Stephen Taylor stands in the gym on April 4. Taylor was preparing for the Best in Illinois all natural bodybuilding competition on April 6 in Darien, Ill. (Daily Iowan/Callie Mitchell)

by Callie Mitchell callie-mitchell@uiowa.edu

F

or the past few months, Stephen Taylor, the general manager at the Old Capitol Town Center’s Buffalo Wild Wings, has trained to be a natural bodybuilder — an exercise regimen that prohibits any performance-enhancing drugs. His passion for the sport began when he was 26 years old and has carried him to competition. The 30-year-old participated in the 2013 Amateur Bodybuilding Association’s Natural Illinois Bodybuilding, Fitness, Figure, Bikini, and Men’s Physique Championships in Darien, Ill., on April 5 and 6, in which he earned fifth place in both the Novice Men’s and Open Men’s competition. “I wanted to compete on a level playing field

in something I was comfortable doing and not take those steps to go the synthetic route,” he said. “At the end of the day, I wanted to say, ‘That was me. I did that naturally. I didn’t take the easy way.’ ” Although becoming a natural bodybuilder has been rewarding, the decision didn’t come without its challenges. The time, effort, and commitment was a two-person decision. “The whole bodybuilder decision was probably a weeklong conversation between the two of us to make sure we could handle all that went into it,” said Claire Ryan, Taylor’s fiancée. See bodybuilding, 6

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for a multimedia piece and more photos

Driver charged in accident

Courtney Nichols allegedly hit UI senior Nicole Ruffolo with her car early on April 20. by Rebecca Morin rebecca-morin@uiowa.edu

A Purdue University graduate student was formally charged Monday after reportedly hitting two people with her vehicle on April 20, including University of Iowa senior Nicole Ruffolo. Nichols Courtney Nichols, 25, charged was charged Monday with two counts of OWI, two counts of leaving the scene of an accident resulting in injury, two counts of operating a vehicle while intoxicated causing serious bodily injury, and three counts of leaving

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2 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013

News

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‘Granny’ power stays strong By Hillary Rosencrants hrosencrants@uiowa.edu

Celebrating one year of activity, the members of 100 Grannies hope for an even more productive second year as they focus on stopping the Keystone Pipeline and outlawing single-use plastic bags in Iowa City and surrounding areas. “We want to have them banned in surrounding areas, so that other towns nearby don’t gain an advantage by still having them,” said Barbara Schlachter, who founded 100 Grannies in April 2012. Single-use plastic bags are only used for an average of 12 minutes before they are discarded, which the group sees as a shameful waste. “We’re going to start campaigning more actively again for the plastic bags,” said Becky Hall, an advocate and a member of the 100 Grannies Steering Committee. The Iowa City City Council has considered the 100 Grannies’ requested ban of single-use bags, but such action has been denied by the staff’s recommendation. The 100 Grannies

members hope that in the coming year, they can successfully ban plastic bags, create a citywide standard for eco-friendly construction, and work toward a fee and dividend tax on carbon. “We can’t imagine why we’re getting so much opposition on environmental issues,” Ann Christenson said. “It’s all just greed.” The group has not quite reached 100 members. However, it stands strong at 65. Fortunately, not all members have to be grannies — many of the members of the collective group do not have biological grandchildren. The group met on Tuesday in honor of its first anniversary. The meeting took place in North Liberty at the “green house” of Carol and Jim Christensen. The house was built in 2010 following a fire. Once construction was complete, the Christensens decided they needed to stop talking about making a difference and start doing it. The Christensen home in North Liberty is equipped with enough solar panels to sustain 75 percent of the power they use. This green house is a

lauren-n-coffey@uiowa.edu

The newly inaugurated leaders of the Executive Council of Graduate and Professional Students plan to keep graduate and professional students influential, not only at the University of Iowa but in the state of Iowa as well. The Executive Council met Tuesday night in the IMU to hold its annual end-of-the-year reception, as well as hold an inauguration for the incoming president and vice president. Michael Appel was the president in the 20122013 school year, and he will continue until May 20. Graduate student Ben Gillig will take over as president for Gillig the 2013- 2013-14 president 14 school year, with law student Matt Enriquez as his vice president. Appel said, although

major stride in terms of sustainability. “We also have a propane-powered generator, but we don’t use a lot of propane,” Jim Christensen said. “When there isn’t enough sunlight to power our house, we have an automatic system that turns the generator on.” Don’t mistake the members’ age for weakness — the 100 Grannies, which holds monthly meetings, has been through a lot. Schlachter, who was an advocate before founding the group, was arrested for her outspokenness at the President’s Day Rally in Washington, D.C., in

August 2011. The official police report listed loitering as her crime. But Schlachter isn’t afraid, and neither are the other grannies. “We’re really trying to get older women more active in issues of the future, starting with climate change,” she said. “If we don’t address climate change, all of the other things that we know are wrong within our society will cease to matter.” Schlachter said there’s strength in numbers. “Our feeling was that if you have 100 grannies working together, then you have a real force,” she said.

the organization accomplished many things throughout the year, one of his favorite achievements was creating short, informational videos for each college at the UI. “We were able to accomplish a lot this year, and I know Matt and Ben will also accomplish many things,” Appel said. “During my time, we discussed moving students’ success forward, and one way we did that was creating seven promotional videos highlighting the colleges. It showed the importance of graduate and professional students on the university and the state.” Other programs the council formulated throughout the year were the “One Biggest Improvement” initiative, focusing on working on an area within each college that they hoped to improve. Some improvements included being able to help fund a new bone-density machine for the College of Pharmacy, and the College of Law will receive new chairs for the fall semester. Gillig said he hopes to

continue Appel’s strides in making professional and graduate students’ roles important at the UI. He said he has a few main points he will bring up to both UI officials and the state Board of Regents to consider. “I’m really hoping to encourage both the UI and the regents on three components,” Gillig said. “Those would be affordability, degree completion, and career success. There’s always room for improvement.” Enriquez said he is excited to continue to work with the council, and both he and Gillig have created an idea in which students that are involved with the Executive Council give their stories for the organization to use when presenting topics to UI officials or the regents. Their hope is to give the success stories a personal face, rather than providing statistics. “We have a two-prong approach, external approach,” Enriquez said. “We want to look at the needs of other [student] governments and go out and get success stories

from students. That’s crucial, because those are the types of things that put a face [to a success story].” UI President Sally Mason also spoke to the graduate and professional students, commending the importance of the graduate programs at the UI. “The University of Iowa has a very special trait,” she said. “We take shared government seriously. The faculty is involved, the staff is involved, and also there are respective student groups. Graduate and professional students represent one-third of the student body, which is highly unusual in a research university. It really is a thing of hallmark for the university.” The students will continue to work throughout the summer and school year to show their abilities and ideas to the community. “I feel honored to be chosen as the head of [the Executive Council],” Gillig said. “Graduate students are one-third of the student body, and I feel excited to be able to work with both new and old members.”

flower, was charged April 19 with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of controlled substance with the intent to deliver. Raymond Delaney, 20, Palos Heights, Ill., was charged April 20 with PAULA. Tara Dunne, 18, Evergreen Park, Ill., was charged April 20 with presence in a bar after hours. Kara Frost, 19, 837C Mayflower, was charged April 20 with presence in a bar after hours. Mitchell Hall, 23, address unknown, was charged Nov. 25, 2012, with violating a domestic-abuse protective order and interference with official acts. Tina Hutchinson, 18, Evergreen Park, Ill., was charged April 20 with presence in a bar after hours. Mercedes Kabrich, 22, 2113 Hollywood Blvd., was charged April 20 with public intoxication. Kelsey Kamperman, 21, Summerville, S.C., was charged Sunday with OWI. Lauren Knight, 19, Normal, Ill., was charged April 20 with presence in a bar

after hours. Aun Lim, 20, 201A Mayflower, was charged April 19 with PAULA, public intoxication, presence in a bar after hours, and providing false identification information. Nicole McCombs, 19, 836C Mayflower, was charged Sunday with presence in a bar after hours. Logan McConnell, 19, Geneva, Ill., was charged April 20 with possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Ken Morgan, 25, 914 Benton Drive No. 24, was charged Monday with fifth-degree theft. Matunda Mukumbilwa, 27, 2656 Roberts Road No. 2A, was charged Monday with driving with a suspended/canceled license. Aaron Oechsle, 22, Lindenhurst, Ill., was charged April 20 with public intoxication. Samantha Oyen, 20, Dubuque, was charged April 19 with public intoxication and presence in a bar after hours.

Brent Paulsen, 24, 445 Highway 1 W. No. 10, was charged Tuesday with interference with official acts and public intoxication. Juan Pizarro, 34, 2239 Taylor Drive, was charged Monday with fifth-degree theft. Michael Rogers, 26, East Moline, Ill., was charged Sunday with OWI. Kayla Spriegel, 20, 600 S. Capitol St. No. 104, was charged April 19 with presence in a bar after hours. Scott Stalo, 19, 328 E. Washington St. No. 2922, was charged April 19 with presence in a bar after hours. Yean Tan, 19, 3310 Hawks Ridge, was charged April 19 with presence in a bar after hours. Michael Westen, 30, 265 Paddock Circle, was charged Tuesday with public intoxication. Megan Williams, 20, 127 E. College St. No. 4, was charged April 20 with presence in a bar after hours. Tyler Wright, 18, 2017 Davis St., was charged Monday with OWI.

title is Food Bank & Emergency Assistance director. The story also incorrectly reported the name of the referenced program, which is the Crisis Center Food Bank. The Daily Iowan also incorrectly

reported Witry’s views on the situation. Further, the story should have said 60 percent of donations to the Crisis Center Food Bank are received from Table to Table. The information concerning

the number of people who are food insecure was obtained via the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website and not from Witry’s comments. The DI regrets the errors.

correction In the April 22 article, “Legislature considering greater appropriations for Iowa food banks,” The Daily Iowan incorrectly reported the job title of Sarah Benson Witry. Her correct

sTaff

Phone: (319) 335-6063 Email: daily-iowan@uiowa.edu Fax: 335-6297

Publisher William Casey 335-5788 Editor-in-Chief Emily Busse 335-6030 Managing Editor Sam Lane 335-5855 Metro Editors Kristen East 335-6063 Jordyn Reiland 335-6063 Opinions Editor Benjamin Evans 335-5863 Sports Editors Benjamin Ross 335-5848 Arts Editor Alicia Kramme 335-5851 Copy Chief Beau Elliot 335-6063 Photo Editors Rachel Jessen 335-5852 Adam Wesley 335-5852 Design Editor Haley Nelson 335-6063 TV News Director Allie Wright 335-6063 Web Editor Tony Phan 335-5829 Business Manager Debra Plath 335-5786 Classifed Ads/Circulation Manager Juli Krause 335-5784 Advertising Manager Renee Manders 335-5193 Advertising Sales Staff Bev Mrstik 335-5792 Cathy Witt 335-5794 Production Manager Heidi Owen 335-5789

Publishing info Barbara Schlachter (left) and Becky Ross respond to questions at Carol Christensen’s home in North Liberty on Tuesday. Schlachter and Ross are members of the Steering Committee of 100 Grannies. (The Daily Iowan/ Joshua Housing)

Issue 181

Breaking News

Call: 335-6030 Policy: The Daily Iowan strives for accuracy and fairness in the reporting of news. If a report is wrong or misleading, a request for a correction or a clarification may be made.

BLOTTER Alex Abbott, 20, C326 Hillcrest, was charged Sunday with possession of drug paraphernalia. Nicholas Amato, 28, 332 Camden Road, was charged Monday with driving with a suspended/canceled license. Ivan Arce, 19, 201 Hawks Ridge No. 2113, was charged April 20 with public intoxication. Brian Baloun, 19, 3227 Burge, was charged April 20 with public urination, public intoxication, and fifth-degree criminal mischief. Nathanial Bentley, 20, C304 Hillcrest, was charged Sunday with possession of controlled substance. Angelo Bronzino, 21, 300 Melrose Court, was charged April 20 with public intoxication. Shatani Buck Jr., 20, 2537 Clearwater Court, was charged Tuesday with possession of marijuana. Kara Collins, 23, address unknown, was charged April 20 with public intoxication. Alexander Costigan, 19, 635C May-

Volume 144

Corrections

New grad leaders detail plans By Lauren Coffey

The Daily Iowan

The Daily Iowan (USPS 143.360) is published by Student Publications Inc., E131 Adler Journalism Building, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-2004, daily except Saturdays, Sundays, legal and university holidays, and university vacations. Periodicals postage paid at the Iowa City Post Office under the Act of Congress of March 2, 1879.

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The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013 | 3

News

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city council Wedge wants smooth transition A coffee shop in Iowa City slated for eviction will change ownership in early May, and the new owner hopes for a smooth transition. Capanna Coffee & Gelato was in the process of being evicted from its space in the Iowa City Public Library building after failing to meet certain financial obligations with the city, according to city documents. However, the owner of the neighboring Wedge Pizzeria will take over the space with little change. “There’ll be a new name for the businesses, but the face is going to stay the same,” Wedge owner-operator Steve Harding said. “The physical layout, staff, and for the most part, the product, will remain.” The Iowa City City Council approved an interim lease agreement for the Wedge Tuesday night, covering the period of time until Capanna vacates the space. One Capanna manager said the store may even remain open for business during the transition, and Harding hopes the change won’t result in any loss of service. “From [the Wedge’s] side, we’ll continue on as we have been,” he said. “We hope to take over smoothly and have it function at least as well as it has.” — by Nick Hassett

Council OKs UISG liaison The Iowa City City Council approved the new University of Iowa Student Government City Council liaison. The council appointed Alec Bramel, currently serving as the UISG representative, to the position again until May 1, 2014. An alternate to Bramel will be named in the near future. — by Nick Hassett

Rezoning Hawkeye Court passes 1st vote

The Iowa City City Council approved the first consideration to rezone the University of Iowa’s Hawkeye Court. Approval of the measure would allow Hawkeye Court, publicly owned land, to be leased and developed for privately owned multifamily buildings. The resolution rezones the area from Institutional Public (P-2) to Institutional Public/Medium-Density Multi-Family (P-2/RM-20). An ordinance requires three considerations to pass into law. The apartment buildings, first occupied in the 1960s, primarily

accommodate graduate students, international students, and students with families. The rezoning goes along with the state Board of Regents’ decision to approve the UI’s private contract for the apartment complex. The regents passed its first contract with a private construction firm in March, charging Dallas-based Balfour Beatty Campus Solutions with the task of replacing the aging apartments in Hawkeye Court. The replacement, however, will increase rent, which currently rests around $450. — by Nick Hassett

Council OKs historic-landmark rules The Iowa City City Council approved several amendments related to historic landmarks and the Vine building by a 7-0 vote. The amendments will change rules regarding historic landmarks to allow apartments on or below the street level, as well as designating the Vine building as an Iowa City historic landmark. The Planning and Zoning Commission recommended approval of the first amendment, and the Historic Preservation Commission joined the Planning and Zoning Commission in recommending approval of the historic designation. — by Nick Hassett

Council approves transit collection change The Iowa City City Council approved a replacement for a transit collection system at its meeting Tuesday. The joint request for Iowa City and Coralville will replace the existing collection system, including 29 fare boxes, management software, pass-encoding equipment, and vault and fare media. City staff recommended that the city award the contract to SPX Genfare Inc. at a cost of $504,284. The project will be partially funded by a federal grant for 50 percent of the cost, with the remaining funding coming from a transit equipment replacement reserve. — by Nick Hassett

Council to consider Chauncey rezoning After the Iowa City Planning and Zoning Commission shot down the rezoning effort of a group against the 20-story Chauncey building, the City Council will consider the rezoning.

The Planning and Zoning Commission rejected the rezoning request from the group Iowa Coalition Against the Shadow by a 5-2 vote. The rezoning would have prevented the 20-story building from filling the space at the intersection of College and Gilbert Streets, which is currently public land. Iowa Coalition Against the Shadow members Rockne Cole, Jon Fogarty, and Mark McCallum submitted the application, which would have rezoned the parcel of land from Public (P-1) zone to Central Business Support (CB-5) zone. CB-5 zoning would allow up to 75-foot buildings. The Chauncey development would need to seek CB-10 zoning, which has essentially no height limit outside of Federal Aviation Administration standards. — by Nick Hassett

The Chauncey is seen in an artist rendering. The development is set for construction at the corner of College and Gilbert streets, but some in Iowa City are intent on stopping the development.


4 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Opinions The Daily Iowan

What do you think about the College Republican’s stance on gun control?

Read today’s Guest Column, and email us at: daily.iowan.letters@gmail.com.

Editorial

Compromising Iowa integrity

I

t seems that Iowa’s politicians, not its people, may be compromising the integrity of the state’s elections. In a sworn affidavit filed Monday, Andy Parrish, the former chief of staff for Michele Bachmann during her run for the Republican presidential nomination, admitted that, in 2011, the Bachmann campaign paid Iowa Sen. Kent Sorenson, R-Milo, $7,500 per month to lead Bachmann’s campaign in Iowa. Sorenson faces an ethics investigation in the Iowa Senate regarding that payment by the Bachmann campaign, which may have violated Rule 6 of the Senate Code of Ethics, which prohibits senators from accepting employment from a political-action committee or any tax-exempt entity that “engages in activities related to the nomination, election, or defeat of a candidate for public office.” Sorenson has previously denied that he was paid by the Bachmann campaign, but emails provided as evidence with Parrish’s affidavit dated from March through May 2011 indicate that Sorenson was indeed employed and paid by the campaign. Parrish filed his affidavit in support of the original ethics complaint filed against Sorenson on Jan. 28 by Peter Waldron, another former Bachmann staffer. Waldron alleges that Sorenson received personal compensation for his work on the Bachmann campaign from Bachmann for President and MichelePAC, two political-action groups forbidden from employing Iowa state senators under Rule 6. Waldron also alleges that Sorenson admitted to stealing a private home-school list from a coworker’s private computer with the intent to distribute that information for unauthorized use by the Bachmann campaign. It is clear, based on the testimony of Parrish and Waldron, as well as the testimony of other former

Bachmann staffers, that Sorenson probably skirted the Senate’s ethics rules and stole crucial voter information in order to get a leg up at the polls. Meanwhile, in Des Moines, Iowa Secretary of State Matt Schultz, a Republican, continues to push his proposed “reforms” to Iowa’s voting laws. Schultz, who made waves in the lead-up to the 2012 election with his ultimately failed effort to crosscheck Iowa’s voter lists with a potentially outdated immigration database, is an outspoken advocate of a statewide voter-ID law. In a speech to the Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition earlier this month, Schultz implored his fellow partisans to fight for his voter-ID plan. “[Y]ou have to start caring about voter ID and election integrity … because if you don’t have that, you’ll never be able to make a difference in any other issue you care about. Never,” he said. “Because they will cheat. They’ll cheat. And we need to make sure we stop them.” It is unclear who Schultz believes will cheat if voter-ID laws are not instituted in Iowa. In March 2012, he claimed to have identified 1,208 foreign nationals in Iowa who illegally voted in the 2010 election. Since then, only around 10 individuals have been charged with voting illegally, according to Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation releases. The existential threat to democracy posed by fraudulent voting that Schultz has warned us about pales in comparison with the threat posed by the unethical behavior of politicians such as Sorenson. It is the machinations of politics, not of the public, that threaten the integrity of Iowa’s elections. Fraud hawks such as Schultz would be wise to turn their attention inward. Your turn. Were Sen. Kent Sorenson’s actions ethical? Weigh in: dailyiowan.com.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR may be sent via email to daily.iowan.letters@gmail.com (as text, not as attachment). Each letter must be signed and include an address and phone number for verification. Letters should not exceed 300 words. The DI will publish only one letter per author per month. Letters will be chosen for publication by the editors according to space considerations. No advertisements or mass mailings, please. GUEST OPINIONS that exceed 300 words in length must be arranged with the Opinions editor at least three days prior to the desired date of publication. Guest opinions are selected in accordance with word length, subject relevance, and space considerations. READER COMMENTS that may appear below were originally posted on dailyiowan.com in response to published material. They will be chosen for print publication when they are deemed to be well-written and to forward public discussion. They may be edited for length and style.

phil’s Day 2013 Phil up your days Phil — it’s all about you. Let’s consider how Phil (short for “philanthropy”) affects your life on the University of Iowa campus. Hawkeye athletics features both men’s and women’s Big Ten competitions in seven core sports, plus five additional sports for women and three others for men. Our Hawkeyes rely on Phil not only for state-of-the-art sports venues and scholarships to recruit top talent, but also for myriad recreational facilities and intramural athletics. Phil is all about sports and fitness. The deans of the UI’s 12 colleges and academic units depend on Phil to improve curriculum, support new programs, and provide the cutting-edge research necessary to attract and retain outstanding students and faculty. Phil also helps

students afford their Iowa education. Nearly 80 percent of UI students receive some form of financial aid — including grants, scholarships, loans, and student employment — and that makes a real difference in their lives. Finally, the UI just introduced a pioneering undergraduate program focused on philanthropic studies. Phil is all about quality academics. Phil makes it possible for international students to attend the UI, improving diversity and providing exciting opportunities for all students to explore our cultural similarities and differences. Phil also provides Iowa students with the chance for international studies and supports life-changing humanitarian travel that sends UI students to Romania to work with children with various disabilities and special needs. Phil is all about

international experiences. Phil supports the medical and dental services that the UI provides to the Iowa City community. Phil also helps maintain outstanding educational opportunities for our students and provides medical research of national and international acclaim. The construction of the new University of Iowa Children’s Hospital facility is an excellent example of how Phil will improve the lives of our region’s children. Phil is all about community service. The rebuilding of the Iowa campus after the flood of 2008 continues, thanks to a major assist from Phil. The rebuilt facilities will help create one of the most beautiful “green” and modern campuses in the nation and will serve as a great source of pride for Iowans. Further, they will enhance the UI as a destination school for students from

throughout the United States and the world. Phil is all about outstanding facilities. As state funds continue to decline as a percentage of university spending, Phil, provided by countless UI alumni and friends, becomes more important than ever. Phil is all about the future. Phil is also all about you. You depend on Phil, and Phil depends on you. Whether your Phil is dollars, Dance Marathon, Habitat for Humanity, or any number of other philanthropic activities, Phil is a lifelong pleasure that you will treasure. Make Phil personal, and Go Hawks. Longtime philanthropists: Dale Baker (1968 B.B.A.) UI Foundation Board of Directors Linda Baker (1968 B.A.) UI Alumni Association Board of Directors

guest column

GOP gun view sound We are writing in response to an editorial that appeared in your paper on April 15 titled “Second Amendment Week Welcomed but Not Ideas.” Although we are appreciative of The Daily Iowan’s coverage of our events during Second Amendment Week, we are also disappointed — but by no means surprised — by your editorial’s misleading, uniformed, and unintelligent response to the position we presented on the issue of gun control. In your editorial, you quoted our head, Mary Kate Knorr, who stated, “Any efforts on the part of the government to make it more difficult to obtain firearms is a breach of our Constitutional rights.” The Editorial Board then went on to say “This absolutist stance — the notion that any type of gun-control legislation is a violation of the Second Amendment — is both dangerous and fatally suspect.” Dangerous? Fatally suspect? What do you mean, exactly? One can hardly say that by showing our support for an amendment written into our Constitution by the founders of this country we have somehow made the world a more dangerous place. The amendment states, “A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” While some argue modern police forces render this amendment unnecessary, nothing could be further from the truth. Just as early American colonists had to use firearms to defend themselves from attacks by hostile powers, so, too, must modern Americans use weapons to defend themselves from criminals and others who wish to do them harm. When access to firearms becomes restricted, law-abiding citizens (by definition) abide by the government’s mandates. However, those who have no respect for our laws (namely criminals, terrorists, and the mentally ill) actively seek illegal access to these weapons. Thus, by putting more restrictions on gun ownership, the government is doing nothing more than taking weapons out of the hands of responsible citizens and putting them into the hands of violent and irresponsible individuals, making our society more dangerous, not less. Additionally, expanded background checks prior to firearm purchases — which you seem to support — would hardly be effective when it comes to keeping weapons out of the hands of dangerous individuals. The gun-control measures that have been debated in Congress — and rightly defeated in the Senate — were drafted in response to the recent tragedies in Newtown, Conn., Aurora, Colo., and elsewhere. But we must remember that guns do not kill people — people do, and that these horrific events

were caused by mentally disturbed people. It is already illegal for those who have been diagnosed with a mental illness to purchase a firearm. However, neither of the perpetrators in the aforementioned tragedies had received such a diagnosis, although it is clear that they were mentally ill. This is why we believe that before any further restrictions on gun ownership are debated, the government must make serious efforts to reform our mental-health system. Our society must devote more resources to the prevention, identification, and treatment of mental illness. By doing so, the background checks that are currently being done would be more effective at identifying those who are mentally ill and barring them from purchasing firearms, thus preventing mentally disturbed individuals from committing horrible acts of violence. Your presentation of two Supreme Court cases actually further illustrates the lack of effort on the part of the Editorial Board to become informed on this important issue. The cases you mention, United States v. Miller and Caron v. U.S., are neither the most recent nor the most pertinent to the current debate. First of all, sawed-off shotguns are usually created through modifications made by gun owners. Any change in weapon design made by nonprofessionals is unsafe and rightly illegal, as upheld in the 1958 Miller case. Second of all, we do not believe that the 1998 Caron decision is an infringement on the right to bear arms. By committing crimes, convicted felons by definition lose many of the rights the rest of us enjoy. Thus, we hold that felons were never entitled to the right to bear arms in the first place. More recent and relevant Supreme Court decisions, including decisions in the 2008 case District of Columbia v. Heller and the 2010 case McDonald v. Chicago, have held that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution protects an individual’s right to possess a firearm for lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home and for hunting and recreation, regardless of local, state or federal laws stating otherwise. These decisions have made it clear: A law-abiding, mentally stable citizen has the irrevocable right to keep and bear arms, and any further infringement on this right is a violation of our Constitution. In other words, our stance on this issue is exactly right. We hope that the Editorial Board makes a greater effort to become informed before announcing their opinion on matters of national importance in the future. Mary Kate Knorr Quentin Marquez Megan La Suer Dennis McWeeny Executive Board, UI College Republicans

EMILY BUSSE Editor-in-Chief • SAM LANE Managing Editor • BENJAMIN EVANS Opinions Editor JON OVERTON, SRI PONNADA, and ZACH TILLY Editorial Writers EDITORIALS reflect the majority opinion of the DI Editorial Board and not the opinion of the Publisher, Student Publications Inc., or the University of Iowa. GUEST OPINIONS, COMMENTARIES, COLUMNS, AND EDITORIAL CARTOONS reflect the opinions of the authors and are not necessarily those of the Editorial Board.


The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013 | 5

News Justice center Continued from 1 parities and other issues a long time ago, but did not. He also said he thinks they are blaming supervisors for overarching societal issues outside of the supervisors’ jurisdiction. “The Board of Supervisors handles facilities … so those changes are above us,” he said. Gurtovoy said he believes more voters who oppose the proposal will come out to the polls on May 7, but both he and Harney said the overall special election turnout will most likely be lower than the general election in November. Gurtovoy said the grassroots efforts should help the opponents overcome the smaller numbers.

ruffolo Continued from 1 the scene of an accident after committing the offense of operating while intoxicated and causing serious bodily injury. While Purdue University police Officer Kevin Balzer was performing a routine patrol at approximately 3:06 a.m. on April 20, he witnessed a gold four-door car strike two females and continue without stopping. Balzer immediately attended to the pedestrian who was badly injured and unconscious. The victim was later identified as Ruffolo. The second pedestrian, Tara Sathaye, suffered minor injuries. Ruffolo was transported to Indiana University Arnett Hospital. Ruffolo, 22, is currently recovering at Arnett Hospital from several injuries, including a fractured skull. A donation page through fundly.com aims to help with hospital bills and ex-

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“It’s hard to get people to get out a vote for the jail unless they have a personal connection,” Harney said. “People care about the jail when they have been affected by a crime or on jury duty. Otherwise, it’s more difficult.” University of Iowa history Professor Jeff Cox said his biggest concern continues to be what he believes is a racially disproportionate number of minorities being arrested, which to some extent is a local problem. “We have a slope of arrests and an even steeper slope of drug arrests, and we have got to turn it around,” he said. “If we build a bigger jail, that conversation is not going to happen.” One official who works at the Johnson County Jail spoke about the conditions there during the question section. While he admitted he didn’t really have a question, he believes the

panelists were ignoring the current conditions at the facility. “You don’t take into consideration the living conditions in the jail,” Deputy Sheriff Brent Buszka told the panelists. “Yes we can clean it and mop it … and do the best we can with what we got, but it’s substandard for the people who live there.”

penses during Ruffolo’s recovery. The website had raised $15,687 toward the new goal of $20,000 as of 11:20 p.m. Tuesday. Police officials located Nichols a few minutes after the accident. According to Tippecanoe County court documents, when the two police officers made contact with her, she smelled of alcohol and her eyes were glassy in appearance. Nichols initially refused the offered field sobriety tests; however, later, she agreed and gave a statement to police, according to the affidavit. Her blood alcohol content was .184, according to documents. Nichols failed two of the three field sobriety tests and told police officials that she thought “a person punched” her vehicle, and she was afraid, so she did not stop. She admitted that she had a glass of wine and two “bomb” drinks while out with friends, but that she only felt “good” and not too impaired to drive home,

according to the affidavit. Nichols’ driver’s side windshield was shattered, and the driver’s side mirror and front panel were damaged as well. Police officials obtained a search warrant and collected blood. Two pedestrians, Sameer Saiya and Viraj Gokhale, also witnessed the accident. They told police officials that Nichols’ vehicle was “swerving in the roadway,” was “driving too fast,” and was “not in control.” Ruffolo’s friends will host a fundraiser at Which Wich, 23 S. Dubuque St., from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. The local business has agreed to donate 10 percent of lunch sales and 15 percent of dinner sales to the fundraiser. Ruffolo’s family hopes to use the money to not only help with her hospital bills, but also with traveling from Illinois to Indiana. They also hope to use the money for any rehabilitation Ruffolo will need once she is out of the hospital.

New Proposal After the proposed Johnson County justice center failed to pass in November, the Board of Supervisors cut $3.3 million from the proposal that people will vote on May 7. • 48 fewer beds • 2 fewer courtrooms • $325,000 less in exterior design changes • $1.4 million more in county funding Source: County proposal

metro Reynolds will not run for Harkin’s seat

UI OKs conflict-ofinterest plan for Barnes

Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds announced today she would not seek the Senate seat that will be vacated after Reynolds next year by lieutenant Sen. Tom Har- governor kin, D-Iowa. “I truly believe that my focus needs to remain on being lieutenant governor and working with Gov. Branstad as we continue to move Iowa forward,” Reynolds wrote in an email. Reynolds becomes the second Republican to decline running for the open Senate seat; Rep. Tom Latham, R-Iowa, previously announced he would stay out of the race. Currently, Rep. Bruce Braley, D-Iowa, is the only candidate running to replace the five-term senator. — by Brent Griffiths

University of Iowa officials recently approved a conflict-of-interest management plan regarding the employment of head football coach Kirk Ferentz’s future son-in-law. University officials last month called for a review of Athletics Department procedures related to Ferentz’s hiring of Tyler Barnes as an administrative assistant in 2012. Barnes was hired in January 2012 as a temporary administrative assistant and became engaged to Joanne Ferentz, Kirk Ferentz’s daughter, six months later. UI officials began a review of Barnes’ employment last month. The UI Committee on Conflict of Interest in Employment approved a conflict-of-interest management plan for Barnes on April 19. Barnes will now report to Steven Roe, the UI director of athletics communications. — by Kristen East

Man charged with assault with weapon An Iowa man has been accused of hitting two teenage victims with a saw blade. Courtney Michel, 23, was charged Monday with assault using/displaying a weapon. According to a Johnson County Sheriff’s Office complaint, Michel struck a 13-year-old in the upper arm with a saw blade. The victim suffered a minor laceration, which caused pain and bleeding. Michel also allegedly struck a 15-year-old in the forearm causing a laceration, the complaint said. Michel continued to torment the victim by holding the saw blade to the victim’s neck, the complaint said. Both teens fear Michel will retaliate against them once he is released from jail, the complaint said. Assault using/displaying a weapon is an aggravated misdemeanor. — by Rebecca Morin


6 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013

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bodybuilding Continued from 1 Mentality Taylor’s life began to change drastically the moment he started his bodybuilding workout. The rush, he recalls, was powerful. His workouts increased, his diet was strict, but his willpower pulled him through. In the life of a bodybuilder, any spare moment is spent depriving and restricting; control is paramount. Failure doesn’t exist. Every physical aspect is accounted for and meticulously calculated. From calorie intake to the number of repetitions at the gym, there is no room for error, and once at the gym, there’s no time to rest. His only competitor is himself. He lies across the bench and grips the metal bar suspended above him. As he lifts the bar off its stand, he gains full control of the 250-pound weights. He brings the bar down to his chest and pushes it back up until his arms reach a full extension. He repeats this motion 25 times, consciously controlling every movement.

Pre-bodybuilding workout Prior to Taylor’s intense training, he had maintained a healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise and a healthy diet. Before those last 12 weeks, he had a diet of high carbohydrates and high protein to help him gain weight. At the three-month mark, his new diet and intense workout regimen began. His protein intake dropped to 300, and he curbed his calories from 4,000 to 1,200. His workouts consisted of working different body parts each day of the week. “Bodybuilding is about training for muscular symmetry and size,” said Adam Means, a co-owner of Iowa City Fitness and Taylor’s personal trainer. “Everything has to be in balance and flow with each body part.”

A Day in the Life of Taylor’s Training Taylor’s day begins at 6 a.m. with a weigh-in. For competition, the goal is for him to weigh 215 pounds. Because he is a natural bodybuilder, he is not allowed to take any kind of self-enhancements. Each morning, he takes only a multivitamin and a vitamin C tablet. Ryan, Taylor’s fiancée, prepares his breakfast of five eggs and four strips of bacon. After breakfast, it’s off to his first session at the gym. The morning session includes 45 minutes of cardio on the treadmill at a moderate pace and on a moderate incline. Two hours into his workday at Buffalo Wild Wings, Taylor eats 10 ounces of unseasoned chicken breast. Four hours later, he is allowed another 10-ounce unseasoned chicken breast. Toward the end of his workday, Ryan meets Taylor at work and waits for his shift to end. The couple heads to the gym for his workout. While keeping him company at the gym, Ryan studies for classes. She sits on the gym floor with her books open as he starts another round of cardio and an hour or so of weight

Buffalo Wild Wings general manager Stephen Taylor competes in the Novice Men’s Tall and the Open Men categories at the 2013 ABA Natural Illinois Bodybuilding Championships on April 6. Stephen took fifth place in both categories. (Daily Iowan/Callie Mitchell)

‘At the end of the day, I wanted to say, “That was me. I did that naturally. I didn’t take the easy way.” ’ Stephen Taylor, bodybuilder training. For bodybuilders, weight training consists of continuous repetitions of low-weight and high-intensity training. As a competition date gets closer, Taylor dedicates an hour a day to perfecting his posing in front of a mirror, and a tanning regimen is added. After training, Taylor and Ryan head home to make dinner and relax for three or four hours before Taylor once again heads to the gym for the third and final time. The last session of the day is again spent doing 45 minutes of cardio at a moderate pace and on a moderate incline. Christina Johnson, a UI lecturer in sport and exercise psychology and health psychology, said strict bodybuilder schedules, such as Taylor’s, often tug at relationships. “That kind of restriction in your life can be more hurtful then helpful,” she said. “Definitely, their social life suffers.” However, Ryan said she knew they could get through it. “It definitely tested [our relationship], but there was no point where I thought we couldn’t be together because of this,” she said. “My role through it all was trying to be as supportive as I could be and keep our lives going — letting him know how proud I was of him because none of this was easy.”

Competition and the future The day before the competition, all contes-

tants report for a polygraph test. Because this is an all-natural competition, measures are taken to ensure no one has used enhancements to gain a leg up on the competition. On the other hand, those who aren’t tan enough to compete are signed up for a sprayon tanning session the night before the competition. Early Saturday morning, lean, dark contestants start to filter through the doors of Hinsdale South High School in Darien, Ill. The contestants are welcomed and given a description of how the day is going to proceed. The first morning show is spent showcasing each participant. Each group enters the stage for only a few minutes at a time, and the members line up to present a series of poses called out by the announcer. Each pose is selected to accentuate different muscles. Before Taylor enters the stage, he does three repetitions of pushups to pump up his physical appearance. On stage, he stands on the left hand side of his five competitors as they simultaneously showcase their poses. After the Novice Men’s group event, the participants prepare 90 seconds of freestyle posing for the Open Men’s competition, if they choose to compete in both. Taylor performs his routine to the song “Cult of Personality.” Taylor took fifth place in both the Novice Men’s and Open Men’s competition. “I hope he walks away

proud of all he just went through and accomplished,” Ryan said. Taylor said he wants to try competing in a Strong Man competition (in which contestants perform feats of strength for judges) as well as compete again in the Natural Illinois Competition next year “and win.” For weeks after the competition, Taylor spent his time resting — letting his body recuper-

ate after such a strenuous regimen. But now he’s back at it again. As of Monday, Taylor is in the gym, beginning training for his next

competition. “I want to continue competing and being active until I am over 50, so that I can be active with my kids when they are older,” he said.

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The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013 | 7

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City passes fraternalhousing rule change One developer who hoped to construct a new fraternity may be unable to under the new measure. By Nick Hassett nicholas-hassett@uiowa.edu

The Iowa City City Council approved a change for group housing rules in hopes to help neighborhood stabilization, but one fraternity developer may be left in the dust. The measure amends the city zoning code to better define rooming-house cooperatives, such as fraternities and sororities. The amendment allows such group housing to exist within RNS-20 zoned areas, used for older neighborhoods in proximity the University of Iowa campus, but it also spells out rules and limits on such housing. Existing fraternities and sororities will be grandfathered in under the new ordinance. Tuesday’s reading was the first consideration of the ordinance, which passed unanimously, 7-0. An ordinance requires three readings to pass into law. Karen Howard, an associate city planner, said that prior to this amendment,

density standards for multifamily uses were not being applied to group-living houses in the same area. “There was a mismatch between the density standards that may cause problems with new standards because of the inconsistency,” she said. Howard said in a memo to the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission that inconsistency can “reduce the effectiveness of the city’s neighborhood-stabilization efforts.” She said it is important new rooming houses, fraternities, and sororities are located and designed in a manner “compatible with the surrounding neighborhood.” The Planning and Zoning Commission recommended approval of the measure on a 7-0 vote at its March 21 meeting. However, a developer of a new fraternity who hoped to get an exception was denied at the meeting. Justin Mulford, a prospective developer of a fraternity on the northeast corner of Governor and Burlington Streets, said he could comply with all of the standards from the city except a density reduction. “The new standards would change the building and make it not feasible to build,” he said. “[It would be] taking the number of roomers from 18 down to 13.”

Mulford said there were options available for neighbors that have problems with fraternities or sororities. “Right now, those that would be affiliated with the university are required to provide a live-in adult, so if there’s a problem, there’s a responsible adult on the property,” he said. “Any neighbor can call that person at any time with problems they’re having.” However, councilors said without a building permit or a building-site approval for Mulford’s development showing that construction is underway, they could not issue an exemption. “We have to have some definitive line in place,” Councilor Susan Mims said. “But that has not been met in this case.” Mims said officials must focus on the bigger picture. “For the developer, it’ll have a negative impact, but in terms of neighborhood stabilization, we’ve made a lot of progress, and we need to continue in that direction,” she said. Mayor Matt Hayek said the ordinance was consistent with other council efforts. “Density matters, and with respects to other measures we’ve taken, this plugs up a gap,” he said. “There’s still the special exception route [for the developer].”

Everett Dutschke, including some in hazmat suits. No charges have been filed against him, and he hasn’t been arrested. Both men say they have no idea how to make the poisonous ricin and had nothing to do with sending them to Obama, U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi. and a state judge. Referring to officials’ questions for him about the case, “I thought they said rice, and I said I don’t even eat rice,” 45-year-old Paul Kevin Curtis said after he was released from

custody Tuesday afternoon. “I respect President Obama. I love my country and would never do anything to pose a threat to him or any other U.S. official.” A one-sentence document filed by federal prosecutors said charges against Curtis were dropped but left open the possibility they could be reinstated if authorities found more to prove their case. Prosecutors were not immediately available for comment. — Associated Press

nation Charges dropped in ricin case TUPELO, Miss. — Charges of sending ricin-laced letters to President Obama and others were dropped Tuesday against an Elvis impersonator from Mississippi who has said since his arrest last week that he had nothing to do with the case. Meanwhile, in Tupelo, numerous law-enforcement officers converged on the home of another Mississippi man,

Police board questioned By Cassidy Riley cassidy-riley@uiowa.edu

Concerns from the community at the Iowa City Police Citizens Review Board forum ranged from the treatment of service dogs to reactions to the Iowa City Diversity Committee’s recently suggested changes. The review board held its annual forum at the Iowa City Public Library on Tuesday night. Community members were given the opportunity to ask questions they may have about performance of the Iowa City police or the board. One subject that was discussed at length was the treatment of service animals by police officers. Catherine Moore, the president for the Johnson County Coalition for People with Disabilities, said she uses service dogs for a variety of purposes. She has had incidents in which officers demonstrated they did not know how to act around them. “As soon as he saw my dog, he pulled his gun,” she said about one incident where an officer came to her home. “People get so afraid of the animal. If it is indeed a service animal, it is not going to attack.” Sherry Christoffer, also with the Johnson County Coalition for People with Disabilities, said she had offered her services of helping train officers in the past. “I try to educate the police officers because of incidents, but they refuse,” she said. “I would be more than happy to come in and do the educating or be a part of it.” Board member Donald King said questions were raised a year or two ago.

“They have … let’s say, a 15-minute video on working dogs,” King said. “There was an officer in the audience who said they do have sensitivity training for the dogs.” University of Iowa law student Nicholas Harper asked questions concerning the board’s consideration of recommendations made by the Iowa City Diversity Committee. The committee was commissioned in June 2012 by the City Council to look into the interactions between the city and minority groups. The full report from the committee was published in March, and some of its recommendations included that the board change its name and some structural elements. Board Chairman Joseph Treloa said they made a recommendation to the City Council a year ago that its name be changed to the Citizens Police Review Board after hearing recommendations as last year’s forum. “The recommendation is being made and submitted to City Council,” Treloar said. “We’re going to wait to see what they have to say and see if they have recommendations for us. “I think they just thought it would just be more repre-

sentative of what we do.” Harper also inquired about the forum and how the board addresses concerns about citizens being too intimidated to make complaints. “Do you believe [the forum] is conducive in encouraging citizens to make reports, or do you think it’s intimidating in some ways,” he asked. Treloar said the board members are aware that some citizens may be reluctant to report concerns, but that they hope the forum is a more inviting venue. “Some citizens might be intimidated to go to the police station to make the complaint,” he said. “That’s why we’ve chosen different avenues, such as here at the Public Library [to hold the forum].” Johnson County prosecutor Janet Lyness encouraged citizens to file complaints to not only the board but also with police departments themselves, because they all have offices designed to handle them. “The police are doing a lot more recording,” she said. “There’s going to be more and more ways to check [the facts of an incident]. If they don’t hear about it, they can’t make changes.”


8 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Daily Break The Daily Iowan

the ledge This column reflects the opinion of the author and not the DI Editorial Board, the Publisher, Student Publications Inc., or the University of Iowa.

The Daily Iowan www.dailyiowan.com

Andrew R. Juhl, Professor of Letters: • Dear All Fast-Food Restaurant Management: Do not hold job interviews in the booths in front of customers. It depresses the shit out of us, thanks. • Dear Noise in My Neighborhood: You are either (a) a colicky newborn getting poked in the eye with a stick all day long or (b) a cat in heat not getting poked in the anything with an anything all day long. Whatever you are, please cease and desist. For the record, I somewhat like babies and absolutely adore cats, but this has been going on for about two weeks ago, so I’m about to go on a serious baby-punching/ cat-kicking expedition. I mean that in the nicest way possible. • Dear A Tribe Called Quest: Yes, of course you can kick it. The more important question is: “May you kick it?” And … yes, I believe you may. • Dear Costco: Thank you for your excellent battery selection and low-low battery prices, yet I did incur an issue with my battery purchase that I thought you’d want to know about. I only required three AAA batteries. I was, of course, prepared to buy four AAA batteries, because that’s usually how slimy battery companies choose to operate. However, your lowest quantity package included 60 HILLION-JILLION AAA batteries. NOBODY needs 60 hillion-jillion AAA batteries. That’s literally 20 HILLION-JILLION TIMES AS MANY BATTERIES AS I NEEDED. This is obviously too many batteries. Thank you for your time. Andrew R. Juhl thanks Jayne Sanderson and Matt Gorman for material in today’s Ledge.

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Darkness cannot drive out darkness. Only light can. — Martin Luther King Jr.

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today’s events

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• RiverFest, all day event • Laughter Yoga Interactive Session, 10 a.m., Body Moves Fitness & Wellness Center, Upper level Clock Tower Plaza, Coralville • Iowa City Hospice, Tips to Organize your Documents and Reduce Stress, noon, Elder Services Inc., 1556 S. First Ave. • Anatomy/Cell Biology Seminar, “The roles of Csk, Src Family Kinases, and the FGF Receptor Heartless in Synaptic Homeostasis,” Ashlyn Thorn, 1 p.m., 1-561 Bowen • Open Studio with Mary Wall, 1 p.m., Senior Center, 28 S. Linn • Overcoming Procrastination, University College, 3:30 p.m., 61 Schaeffer • RiverFest: Ice Cream Night, 4 p.m., Pedestrian Mall Sheraton Stage • T’ai Chi Interactive, 4 p.m., Body Moves Fitness & Wellness Center • Michael Eckert discusses Handel’s Giulio Cesare,

5:30 p.m., 2520D University Capitol Center • Scheels Running/Walking/Biking Club, 5:30 p.m., Scheels, Coral Ridge Mall • Alyssa Bell, piano, 6 p.m., University Capitol Center Recital Hall • Bicyclists of Iowa City Wednesday Evening Rides, 6 p.m., Carl & Ernie’s, 161 Highway 1 • Coastwest Unrest, 6 p.m., Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington • “Live From Prairie Lights,” R. Clifton Spago, fiction, 7 p.m., Prairie Lights, 15 S. Dubuque • Open Mike, 7 p.m., Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque • Sound City, 7 p.m., Bijou • Carnaval Artist Talk, Clary Salandy, designer, 7:30 p.m., Old Capitol Senate Chamber • Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m., IMU Main Lounge • Trade of Innocents Screening, 8 p.m., 101 Becker • Jams, 8:30 p.m., Gabe’s • Jam Session, 9 p.m., Yacht Club, 13 S. Linn • Neighbouring Sounds, 9:15 p.m., Bijou

UITV schedule 1 p.m. Where is that Confounded Site? The Search for The Rummells-Maske Clovis Cache 2 Iowa Dance Encore 3:30 UI Band Extravaganza, Dec. 2, 2012 5 Where is that Confounded Site? The Search for The Rummells-Maske Clovis Cache 6 Iowa Football Press Conference

horoscopes

Campus channel 4, cable channel 17 7 Exploring the Ancient Climate of Mars 8 Iowa Football Press Conference 9 Iowa Magazine 9:30 Daily Iowan TV News Update 10 Old Gold 1960 Football Highlights 10:30 Daily Iowan TV News Update 11 Iowa Football

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Adapting to what’s going on around you is the best way to proceed. Once you get into the rhythm of the day you will encounter positive results. Re-evaluate partnerships, and back away from anyone who appears to be holding you back. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Refrain from making an impulsive decision based on emotional factors that can disrupt your position or earning power. Focus more on your attributes and how you can use them in order to get ahead. The power of persuasion will lead to victory. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Get involved, be a participant, and reach out to bring about changes in your community that you feel are necessary. Don’t let uncertainty at work stop you from doing your best. Show versatility and set a good example. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Indecisiveness will work against you. Size up your situation, consider your options, and go forward without hesitation. Participating in an event or activity that brings you in contact with old colleagues or friends will enhance your day and your life. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Stay busy, and avoid trouble. A short trip will bring about change. Don’t let anyone bully you into something you don’t agree with. Do your part by contributing knowledge, ideas, and plans for the future. Make positive alterations at home. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You will be entertaining, fun to be with, and a major contributor. Focus on love, romance, and socializing. The more interactive you are, the better. Relationships can be enhanced with a little effort. Self-improvement projects will pay off. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Expand your interests and your friendships, but don’t go over budget. Protect your assets, and put more into your long-term investment. Strive to stabilize any contracts, settlements, or medical issues you face. Don’t let emotions separate you from the people you love. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Recognize a problem, and do something about it before someone else does. Losing control of a personal situation will be to your detriment. Nurture what you have, and eliminate what isn’t working for you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Put greater emphasis on home, family, and what you know and do best. Make the domestic changes required to enhance your relationships with the people you live with. Networking will bring about a great opportunity. Offer your skills. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Unpredictable or emotional instability is apparent. Stick close to home, and take care of matters that will add to your security. Love is on the rise, and doing something nice for someone special will improve your relationship. Home improvements will pay off. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Keep a close eye on how the people around you react. Protect your belongings, and refrain from lending or borrowing possessions. A positive change in your position will develop if you take care of responsibilities swiftly. Don’t neglect your health. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Taking care of money matters should be your mission. Changing your job or redoing your résumé will lead to bigger opportunities. Back away from anyone asking for too much and offering too little. Stick to a set budget.

Radio, Music, News & Sports 89.7 FM • www.krui.fm Wednesday • 9-10 a.m., Soul Self-Satisfaction • 11-noon, Rainbow Veins • Noon-1 p.m., You Can Put it on the Board • 1-2 p.m., Sports Squawk • 3-4 p.m., The Lit Show • 4-5 p.m., Key of Kate

• 5-6 p.m., Little Village Live • 6-7 p.m., Yew Piney Mountain • 7-8 p.m., Live from Prairie Lights • 8-10 p.m., Standing on the Verge • 10-midnight, Theater of the Mind • Midnight-2 a.m., Mo and Johnny Blade

No risk (no, really)

Paul Embrechts, a professor of mathematics at ETH Zürich specializing in actuarial mathematics and quantitative risk management, gives a lecture in the Becker Communication Studies Building on Tuesday. Embrechts was selected as the lecturer for the 42nd-Annual Craig Lecture Series. (The Daily Iowan/Chris Willauer)


The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013 | 9

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Frosh pitcher sparkles Iowa freshman Micaela Whitney tossed a successful five-plus innings in Game One of Tuesday’s doubleheader against Illinois. By Cody Goodwin cody-goodwin@uiowa.edu

Four miserable outs of pitching by Kayla Massey forced Iowa softball coach Marla Looper to hand the pitching duties to an inexperienced freshman. The Hawkeyes dug themselves a steep hole in the second inning during Tuesday’s first game against Illinois. Massey surrendered 8 runs to the Illini in just 1.1 innings pitched, prompting Looper to send Micaela Whitney to the circle for just her 13th appearance of the season. The freshman didn’t shy away from the challenge. Whitney shut down Illinois for the remaining

5.2 innings of Tuesday’s early game to the tune of allowing 3 hits and 0 runs, while striking out six batters. “I came in focused, and I had a plan,” Whitney said. “That’s kind of a lot of what my role on the team has been this year, is coming in for relief. I just wanted to help my team out.” Whitney had only pitched 25.2 innings of college softball before Tuesday’s appearance, playing in just 12 games — and only one as a starter. She had a 3-0 record but had surrendered 12 earned runs while collecting just 17 strikeouts. All of those stats were tossed aside when Looper called upon Whitney Tuesday evening. The native of Omaha kept her poise and controlled nearly all of her 93 pitches, 60 of which were strikes. There was a stretch in which she retired 12 of 14 batters between the second and sixth innings. This performance was not a surprise to her head coach. “[Micaela] came in and

shut them down,” Looper said. “She made them really work hard to just try to put a ball in play … When you get hot in the circle, you just go until your fire burns out.” Whitney’s appearance in a game that ended up in Illinois’ favor — an 8-5 victory for the Orange and Navy Blue — excited her teammates. Whitney is a more vocal pitcher in the circle than Massey and Chelsea Lyon, who regularly pitch for Iowa. Talking more with the defense allows her to think through pitches more thoroughly and to relax while in high-pressure situations, she said. Her voice also better connects her with the defense behind her, helping with that relaxation. It’s something the defense appreciates as well. “When she gets in the circle, you can see it in her eyes, she’s ready to take down every batter she faces,” shortstop Megan Blank said. “It’s a different look. It’s exciting to see, especially from a freshman.”


10 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013

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Hawkeye fans bundle up for a cold spring game at Banks Field on April 9. (The Daily Iowan/Sarah Sebetka)

Baseball Continued from 12 difficult to get into a routine than if the weather were warmer. He noted that if the day’s matchup were with a Big Ten opponent, the game would still be on. “It’s just hard to get better,” he said. “You don’t want to make excuses, but it’s just been difficult to get into any type of groove. You can get a little bit of

batting cages to practice indoors and the football team was often using the Bubble. “We’re lucky to have this facility,” he said. “It’s really nice to be able to come in here and get some work in. At least we can come in here and get some swings in when the weather’s not too great.” If Mother Nature decides to give the team a break, the squad will face Northern Illinois today at Banks Field. If not, then the team will probably be

stuff accomplished coming inside, but when you’ve been outside for so long, it’s kind of tough to come in here and get much accomplished.” The one constant for the team this season and the one thing the club has been thankful for came from an unexpected place: the Iowa football team. The new indoor practice facility has been almost more of a home to the team than Banks Field. Dahm said that in years past, they didn’t have any

footwear Continued from 12 For junior hammer thrower Jasmine Simpson, the amount of traction on the shoe is not as important as performing in a shoe that is comfortable and broken in. “I’ve had these ones for so long that they’re kind of a halfway in between,” she said about her shoes. “I like where these have gotten, that halfway, Arnold Palmer of shoe,” referring to the half iced tea, half lemonade drink named after the famous golfer. Foor, who handles equipment for the track teams, said the Iowa Athletics Department supplies two pairs of spikes and three pairs of sneakers to an average sprinter, along with a pair of racing flats — a

Athletes compete in a distance event during the Musco Twilight meet at the Cretzmeyer Track on April 20. (The Daily Iowan/Rachel Jessen) Roberts said part of the beauty of track and field is the minimal amount of equipment needed to compete. “You don’t need too much,” the fifth-year coach said. “You really just need to have some shoes and have some willingness and desire to want to be better than you were the day before.”

lightweight shoe used for training in practice. However, he says that number can vary based on use and the number of events in which an athlete competes. The colorful and unique apparel are the most “important piece of equipment the track athletes can have,” Foor said. Assistant coach Clive

softball Continued from 12 The score stayed that way until the top half of the sixth inning, when the Illini took the lead for good with 3 more runs. Illinois wound up winning the game, 6-3, improving to 16-25 overall, 6-11 in the Big Ten. The wins gave the Illini five in a row. Heading in the opposite direction are the struggling Hawkeyes — who are just 2-9 at Pearl Field. The struggles cannot hide Blank’s performance as of late, although she can’t seem to figure out this season’s home struggles. “I don’t think anyone can figure it out right now. Ideally, you want to play at home and defend your home turf,” she said. “You don’t want anyone to take that from you.” It might be a blessing in disguise to get away from Iowa City for the next game. The Hawkeyes will have just one day to prepare for their next opponent. “You have to have amnesia; that’s exactly what we have to do,” Looper said. “You have to make the most of the opportunities that you have.” Iowa’s next game will

Illinois’ Jade Smith waits for a pitch against Iowa at Pearl Field on Tuesday. The Illini won both games of a double-header. (The Daily Iowan/ Tork Mason)

Game 2 Illinois

Iowa PLAYERS

AB

R

H

DOWLING, CF WALL, 2B BLANK, SS ZOELLER, 3B MASSEY, P HANSEL, PR HOFFMAN, C GENTILE, PR LUNA, 1B ERICKSON, RF AKERS, LF REPOLE, PH WHITNEY, P

3 1 1 3 4 0 3 0 2 4 3 1 0

0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

AB 25

3

6

3

PITCHERS

IP

H

R

ER

ILLINOIS IOWA

10 0

H

1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

TOTALS

WHITNEY (L, 3-1) 6.1 MASSEY .2

R

RBI BB

RBI BB

6 0

7

3 0

SO PLAYERS

AB

R

H

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0

4 4 4 3 3 0 3 3 2 0 0 3 0

1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0

2 1 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0

JOHNSON, RF SANCHEZ, CF BOOKER, LF PERKINS, 1B PEREZ, 1B ESTILL, PR DAVIS, SS BAUCH, DP/2B MYCHKO, C SMITH, PR SCHKADE, 2B REPOLE, PH/DP GAY, P

SO TOTALS

AB

5

BB SO PITCHERS 0 0

1 GAY (W, 8-15) 0

R

RBI BB 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

H

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

RBI BB

SO

29

6

10

6

IP

H

R

ER

7.0

6

3

3

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

R

H

E

0 0

0 0

3 2

0 0

0 0

3 0

0 1

6 3

10 6

0 1

be in Cedar Falls — the team will pay a visit to Northern Iowa. The key to victory may be easier than one might think.

SO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1

BB SO 7

5

“We need to remember why we play the game,” Whitney said. “We have to remind ourselves that it is fun.”

practicing yet again on the artificial football field that’s become its home away from home. “It’s been tough,” Dahm said. “But our guys have remained positive even though it’s been a very difficult situation because of the weather.”


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The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Wednesday, April 24, 2013 | 11

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Sports

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Weather strikes out baseball By Tommy Reinking Thomas-reinking@uiowa.edu

Iowa’s Michelle Zoeller misses an infield pop-up against Illinois at Pearl Field on Tuesday. The Hawkeyes lost both games of a double-header. (The Daily Iowan/Tork Mason)

Softball drops two to Illini in double-header Iowa dropped its sixth-straight game, and it has fallen to 4-13 in conference play.

GAME 1

By Nick Delaquila Nicholas-delaquila@uiowa.edu

Iowa softball dropped both games of a double-header Tuesday night against Illinois, watching its record fall to 24-21 overall, 4-13 in conference play. It was Iowa’s sixthstraight loss, and 3 runs decided both games. The Illini took the first game of the double-header, 8-5, after jumping out on top of the Hawkeyes early on. Illinois sent 11 batters to the plate in the top half of the second inning, scoring all of its runs and forcing starting pitcher Kayla Massey to the bench after only getting through 1⅓ innings. The big inning came right after the Hawkeyes jumped out on top 2-0 thanks to sophomore shortstop Megan Blank. She drilled the ball to right center for a 2-run shot, her 11th of the year. She later added an RBI double in the bottom half of the fifth to add to her team-leading RBI number. Her 56 RBIs are good for second in the Big Ten this season. Blank is now just 5 shy of the school record set in 1997 by Debbie Bilbao. After Massey gave up 8 runs in the second inning, freshman pitcher Micaela Whitney came in and shut down the Illini the rest of the way. Whitney, who came in during the second inning, pitched 5⅔ scoreless innings, holding Illinois to just 3 hits with 6 strikeouts. “[Whitney] did a nice job of changing momentum,” Iowa softball coach Marla Looper said. “She went right at the hitters, and that’s what we talk to the pitchers about every day. In the second game, she picked up right where she left off, holding the Illini scoreless through two. But the Illini final-

Iowa

Illinois

PLAYERS

AB

R

H

DOWLING, CF WALL, 2B BLANK, SS MASSEY, P HANSEL, PR ZOELLER, 3B HOFFMAN, C GENTILE, PR GYERMAN, RF REPOLE, PH LUNA, 1B AKERS, LF WHITNEY, P

3 2 3 3 0 4 3 0 3 1 4 3 0

2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

TOTALS

AB

R

H

29

5

7

4

3

IP

H

R

ER

BB SO PITCHERS

MASSEY (L, 13-11) 1.1 WHITNEY 5.2

8 3

8 0

8 0

3 2

PITCHERS

ILLINOIS IOWA

RBI BB 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

RBI BB

SO PLAYERS

AB

R

H

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

4 4 3 4 1 0 4 4 3 1 3 0 0

1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

3 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

AB

R

H

31

8

11

6

IP

H

R

ER

0 ARNOLD (W, 8-10) 4.1 6 GAY 2.2

5 2

4 1

4 1

JOHNSON, RF SANCHEZ, CF BOOKER, LF PERKINS, 3B PEREZ, 1B SMITH, PR DAVIS, SS BAUCH, DP/2B MYCHKO, C SCHKADE, 2B REPOLE, PH/DP ARNOLD, P GAY, P

SO TOTALS 3

RBI BB 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO

0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0

RBI BB

SO

5

6

BB SO 2 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

R

H

E

0 2

8 0

0 0

0 0

0 2

0 0

0 1

8 5

11 7

1 1

1 2

ly figured Whitney out and put up 3 runs in the third inning. Trailing 3-0 in the bottom half of the third, the Hawkeyes picked up 2 of their own courtesy of designated player Kayla Massey’s RBI single and an ensuing sacrifice fly from first basemen Brianna Luna.

Footwear has become a key decision for the Iowa tracksters. By Danny Payne daniel-payne-1@uiowa.edu

An athlete competes in the high-jump event at the Musco Twilight meet on the Cretzmeyer Track on April 20. (The Daily Iowan/Rachel Jessen) “You wouldn’t want to wear them on concrete walking downtown on a rainy day,” Iowa equipment manager Kevin Foor said. The shoe is so distinct because those events involve throwing from a concrete ring. The lack of traction helps the throwing motion go smoother than it would with a shoe with more grip. However, some throwers, such as se-

See baseball, 10

Iowa baseball vs. Northern Illinois Where: Banks Field When: 6:05 p.m. today Listen: AM-800 KXIC/AM-1360 KMJM

See softball, 10

If the Hawkeye track shoe fits … One of the first things a spectator will notice at any track and field meet is the seemingly endless array of colors on the athletes’ feet. Look at any given pair of feet, and you will see a unique pair of shoes — some green, some yellow, some blue, some orange. The rainbow of colors isn’t the only thing that makes this footwear stand out; each shoe is designed for a different event on the track or in the field. For example, sprinters race in a shoe with a stiffer sole to keep them on the balls of their feet, while middle-distance and distance runners wear a more flexible shoe with padding in the sole. Long-jumpers and triple-jumpers compete in a shoe similar to those of sprinters but with more support. High-jumpers wear a shoe with metal spikes in the heel to gain traction when pivoting in their approach. Perhaps one of the most interesting shoe designs is the one that discus, shot put, and hammer throwers wear. The shoe does not have spikes, as the footwear for other events do, but instead a very slick bottom.

At nearly 3 p.m. Tuesday on another cold, rainy day in the eerily quiet indoor football facility, the only sound was a constant, soft ping from the bat of the Hawkeyes’ first baseman, Trevor Kenyon, as he hit ground balls to teammate Nick Roscetti. The team was supposed to be readying for a game against Creighton, but Mother Nature again forced the Hawkeyes to spend their time indoors. “We’ve been here at the facility since 12,” sophomore outfielder Eric Toole said. “Then we got informed [that because of the canceled game] we were going to practice at 3. So we’ve been here the whole day. We had some free time but didn’t even know it until we got here.” A sporadic schedule has been the norm for Iowa this season. The Hawkeyes’ first regular-season game took place on Feb. 15. In the nearly two and a half months since then, the team has been able to practice outside on Banks Field only twice. The team was supposed to face Creighton Tuesday in a game that was originally scheduled for March 27, but it was again postponed because of rain. With that game being canceled, it brings the total number of games or series that have been canceled, moved to a new location, or shut out this season to 10. “It makes us upset, that’s for sure,” sophomore catcher/infielder Anthony Torres said. “We want to go out there and play. It does kind of throw off our routine a little bit, but it’s not that bad. We just keep pushing along.” Head coach Jack Dahm said that it’s because of these cancellations that the team has been struggling to find momentum. With the team seemingly moving around to somewhere else every other day because of the weather, the players have been finding it more

nior Rachel Curry, prefer footwear with a bit more traction. Because her distinct throwing motion requires her to push off the concrete, grip is advantageous. “Sometimes, you have to push off a bit,” the discus and shot-put thrower said. “So it helps me work with [differences in] other surfaces.” See footwear, 10

Two leave Hawkeye football team Iowa football coach Kirk Ferentz announced Tuesday that two more players will depart the program before the start of the 2013 season. Fortunately for Hawkeye faithful, neither is a running back. Kevin Buford, who saw solid action as a true freshman at defensive back in 2012, informed Buford the coaching staff that sophomore he will transfer to another institution, according to a release sent out by the Iowa Athletics Department. The Canton, Mich., native mostly saw time on special teams, but he appeared in nine games as a defensive back in passing situations, recording 5 Campbell tackles. sophomore Torrey Campbell, also a defensive back, red-shirted in 2011 and appeared in one game last year but recorded no statistics. He will continue to be a student-athlete at Iowa as a hurdler and sprinter for the track and field team. Campbell said he didn’t have any preference of one sport over the other, but that he just wanted to do what made him happy. “I’m happy running track at Iowa for the time being,” Campbell told The Daily Iowan. “I can’t speak about a lot of things that went into this decision. I’m happy, that’s all that matters.” — by Ben Ross

The Daily Iowan - 04/24/13  

The Daily Iowan's print edition for Wednesday, April 24, 2013.

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