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THE INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COMMUNITY SINCE 1868

Monday, April 8, 2013

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Mission Creek wraps up

UI gets suicide program The UI will utilize a webbased suicide-prevention program that is becoming more popular nationwide. By Nick Hassett nicholas-hassett@uiowa.edu

Mish Way, the lead singer of White Lung, performs at Gabe’s on April 3. White Lung was the headline act as part of Mission Creek Festival. (The Daily Iowan/Callie Mitchell)

By Emily Burds emily-burds@uiowa.edu

The bass rocked the walls at the Mill last night as the Mission Creek Festival came to an end with bands Love Songs for Lonely Monsters, Wet Hair, and the world-renowned indie-rock band, Deerhoof.

Hundreds of people participated in this past week’s plethora of events ranging from an extensive literary crawl, a lecture lineup, dinners, brunches, and nearly 15 music performances. One of the festival’s main organizers, Andre Perry, said the festival seemed to be a “pretty smooth affair.”

“People were generally excited about everything going on,” said Perry. “It will take us awhile to really get a good assessment of how things went. We take months to talk to people and look at everything before we truly know what went well, what didn’t, and what can be changed for next year.”

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On average, more than two students at the University of Iowa die in suicides every year. It’s a number that those at the UI Counseling Service hope to reduce through a program that is gaining traction at colleges throughout the nation. At-Risk, an interactive, online training simulation from developer Kognito, is designed to help students and faculty identify common indicators of psychological distress and how best to approach an at-risk student to refer to counseling. It is used at more than 100 campuses nationwide. Through a grant, the program is coming to the UI. The Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act Suicide Prevention Grants Program funds a three-year project to expand suicide prevention networks on and off campus, increase communication between the UI and community partners, and develop new materials and trainings focused on high-risk groups. “We’re trying to build a caring campus community network,” said Sam Cochran, the director of the University Counseling Service. “Rather than dwell on the negative, it’s about keeping a positive spin and mobilizing our efforts to make sure nobody slips through the cracks.” The grant provides around $270,000 total over three years, which Cochran

for full coverage and a multimedia piece from this year’s mission creek festival

Breath machines growing in Iowa An Iowa State junior hopes to bring more breath-test machines to Iowa City in the next two months. By Cassidy Riley cassidy-riley@uiowa.edu

There are currently 10 breath-test machines in bars and liquor stores in the Iowa City area, and officials say alcohol consumers may not be using the recently installed machines for their intended purpose. However, one Iowa State University junior says he hopes to increase the number of such machines in bars in Iowa City in the near future. T.J. Elbert has placed five breathtest machines in bars in Ames and Des Moines, and he hopes to expand to Iowa City in a few months. “My dream would be to have them in every state,” he said. “The whole point of why I started this is just to save lives.” Elbert’s business is not the first of its kind. Be SAFE [Supporting Alcohol-Friendly Establishments] Iowa began putting machines in bars in Iowa City area in May 2012. Be SAFE Iowa currently has 10 machines placed in bars and liquor stores throughout Iowa City, Coralville,

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Group wants districts The Committee for Fair Representation wants the Board of Supervisors to be based on a district system. By Quentin Misiag quentin-misiag@uiowa.edu

another group is already doing the same thing as him in Iowa City. “I would love to get in contact with them to see if we could work something out to see if together, we could work to get machines into bars,” he said. “I honestly

On the heels of a special election that placed a Republican on the Johnson County Board of Supervisors for the first time in more than 50 years, one local group is aiming to gather 10,000 valid signatures in hopes of changing the way future supervisors are elected. Some local Democratic leaders, however, are calling into question the legality and practicality of the district-based alternative. Members of the Committee for Fair Representation, an area nonpartisan

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A breath-test machine is seen in the Airliner on Sunday. There are 10 such machines in bars and liquor stores in the eastern Iowa area. (The Daily Iowan/Sarah Sebetka) North Liberty, Cedar Rapids, and Tiffin. “The more machines we can have, I think it’s better for everybody,” said Bill Schmooke, a cofounder of Be SAFE Iowa. “If it’s coming from my company or if it’s coming from [Elbert’s] company, it really doesn’t matter. The more the merrier.” Elbert said he is not bothered to learn

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2 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013

News

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Cultural center marks 10 years

Volume 144

By Rebecca Morin

Breaking News

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rebecca-morin@uiowa.edu

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Publisher William Casey 335-5788 Editor-in-Chief Emily Busse 335-6030 Managing Editor Sam Lane 335-5855 Metro Editors Kristen East 335-6063 Jordyn Reiland 335-6063 Opinions Editor Benjamin Evans 335-5863 Sports Editors Benjamin Ross 335-5848 Arts Editor Alicia Kramme 335-5851 Copy Chief Beau Elliot 335-6063 Photo Editors Rachel Jessen 335-5852 Adam Wesley 335-5852 Design Editor Haley Nelson 335-6063 TV News Director Allie Wright 335-6063 Web Editor Tony Phan 335-5829 Business Manager Debra Plath 335-5786 Classifed Ads/Circulation Manager Juli Krause 335-5784 Advertising Manager Renee Manders 335-5193 Advertising Sales Staff Bev Mrstik 335-5792 Cathy Witt 335-5794 Production Manager Heidi Owen 335-5789

Students, alumni, and faculty gathered for brunch at the Asian Pacific American Culture Center on Sunday with their shoes off and a sense of relaxation. The weekend’s exciting events were finished, but planning for the future had just begun. This particular University of Iowa cultural center was established in 2003, and it celebrated its 10-year anniversary this past weekend. The threeday celebration brought together a variety of people, who helped plan for the future of the center. “Wed like to focus on more quality services that encourage students to interact with different groups and programs to create events in collaboration,” said Moo Kyong Jeon, the manager of the center. The Center for Student Involvement and Leadership and the UI Alumni Association cosponsored the events. Throughout the past 10 years, the center has experienced new leaders and a growth of students. Whit France-Kelly, an assistant director of Alumni Programs, said the Alumni Association wants to be a part of the continued growth at the center. “The cultural center has done a fantastic job growing, and we want to be a part of the growth . . . we are looking forward for ways that the alumni could give back to the centers,” he said. Jeon said that since he has been with the center, the number of students

Corrections Call: 335-6030 Policy: The Daily Iowan strives for accuracy and fairness in the reporting of news. If a report is wrong or misleading, a request for a correction or a clarification may be made.

Publishing info The Daily Iowan (USPS 143.360) is published by Student Publications Inc., E131 Adler Journalism Building, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-2004, daily except Saturdays, Sundays, legal and university holidays, and university vacations. Periodicals postage paid at the Iowa City Post Office under the Act of Congress of March 2, 1879.

Subscriptions UI students Priscilla Chao and George Winland study in the Asian Pacific American Cultural Center on Sunday. (The Daily Iowan/Juan Carlos Herrera) being served has doubled each year — 3,600 students have been served at the cultural center since its inception. Numbers for yearly funding allocations were unavailable as of Sunday evening. “We started supporting students to have their own programs to attract more people and let them know about Asian culture,” Jeon said. Officials say small renovations here and there have prompted an increase in the number of students participating in the center’s activities. “Since we’ve had more students, we have gotten a new carpet, a new TV, a new stove, and a new refrigerator,” Jeon said. UI sophomore Diane Pham, the program coor-

dinator for the center, said she wants to continue programs that attract a variety of students. “I’m going to continue to work here and host more events that appeal to a larger crowd and also collaborate with other organizations,” she said. Steven Mather, an officer for the UI United Nations, hopes to hold an event that not only involves the Asian Pacific American Cultural Center but other multicultural organizations. “I would like to have a multicultural night with many organizations on campus to make food and get to know each other and the different cultures better,” Mather said. Jeon encourages his students to create events that will invite more people to

the center. “The most effective tool is to spread our services is by word of mouth,” he said. “The more people that come, they will spread the services more.”

Asian Pacific American Cultural Center The University of Iowa Asian Pacific American Cultural Center just celebrated its 10-year anniversary. • The center was established in 2003. • 3,600 students have been served. Source: Moo Kyong Jeon, manager of the Asian Pacific American Cultural Center

GOP health plan draws criticism By Brent Griffiths brent-griffiths@uiowa.edu

Details of Gov. Terry Branstad’s alternative to Medicaid expansion were introduced last week, offering a peek at what legislators say will be the focus of much of their time. Rep. Walt Rogers, R-Cedar Falls, will be tasked to oversee the bill, which would cost $23 million from the state’s general fund in its first year. One House Democrat was dismayed with how long it took Republicans to propose their plan. “What in the Sam Hill have you been doing for two years?” said Rep. Dave Jacoby, D-Coralville. “There’s four weeks left in

session, and they’re proposing a new health-care bill which should have been something that was worked on in the interim.” Rep. Dave Heaton, R-Mount Pleasant, also expressed frustration with timing — although he is upset with progress from the Governor’s Office. “We’re waiting … it’s up to the governor to give us his bill,” he said. Heaton said it’s difficult to determine what Republicans will do, because securing federal funds will require federal approval. This means Republicans could potentially vote on a bill that fails to secure federal funding. Branstad’s Healthy Iowa Plan would cover

approximately 89,000 uninsured Iowans earning below 100 percent of the federal poverty line, or around $11,500 income per year for a single individual. The bill would require every approved member to pay some amount of money for the plan, although the amount required would change based on her or his income. The plan would also create “my health rewards accounts,” which would be used for payment of required contributions, cost sharing, and health improvements by members. Members would be offered cost incentives for their plans if they completed various things such as efforts to quit smoking

or nutrition counseling. The cost of the plan — originally estimated at $162 million a year — would be covered through the general fund, property taxes, and possibly federal money. The plan would replace IowaCare, which currently serves uninsured Iowans who cannot get Medicaid. IowaCare is set to expire at the end of this year, and representatives from both parties want to replace it. Senate Democrats approved an expansion of Medicaid on March 25 under the Affordable Care Act. The federal government has pledged to pay for the expansion with decreasing support over time.

John Derry, 20, 702 N. Van Buren St., was charged April 4 with keeping a disorderly house. Robert Dixion, 21, 1100 Arthur St. No. L5, was charged April 5 with criminal trespass. Jarell Donaldson, 20, address unknown, was charged April 4 with presence in a bar after hours. Zachary Dowling, 24, 1324 Muscatine Ave, was charged April 5 with fifth-degree criminal mischief. James Ernst, 23, Cedar Rapids, was charged Sunday with interference with official acts, disorderly conduct, and public intoxication. Maria Flores, 21, S104 Parklawn, was charged April 5 with public intoxication. Robert Gatewood, 25, Coralville, was charged April 4 with disorderly conduct. Amber Gee, 31, Bloomfield, Iowa, was charged April 4 with fifth-degree theft. Aleksandras Geoly, 21, 841 Normandy Drive, was charged Sunday with making alcohol available to minors and keeping a disorderly house. Brieanna Hastings, 19, Marion, was charged April 5 with sale of an alcoholic beverage to a minor. Drayton Heather, 21, 526 S. Johnson St. Apt. No. 7, was

charged April 6 with public intoxication and unlawful use of authentic driver’s license/ID of another. Rachael Jones, 22, 1100 Arthur St. No. L5, was charged April 6 with interference with official acts. John Kaminski, 53, Willowbrook, Ill., was charged April 5 with OWI. Caesar Landry, 22, 128 Westside Drive Apt. 7, was charged Sunday with disorderly conduct and interference with official acts. Jeffrey Larak, 20, address unknown, was charged Feb. 17 with fifth-degree criminal mischief. Andrew Lettow, 31, 319 N. Van Buren St., was charged April 6 with public intoxication. Taylor Lombardo, 20, St. Charles, Ill., was charged Sunday with domestic assault. Justin McKanna, 20, 410 E. Market St., was charged April 5 with public intoxication, unlawful use of authentic driver’s license/ ID of another, and assault. Olusegun Osayemi, 18, Chicago, was charged Sunday with public intoxication. James Palasz, 19, 320A Mayflower, was charged April 4 with possession of drug paraphernalia. Thomas Randall, 42, 1020 Kirkwood Ave., was charged April

6 with assault. Joseph Roden, 20, Madale, Iowa, was charged April 6 with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. Jordan Shay-Ellington, 18, 706 Carriage Hill No. 1, was charged March 27 with fourth-degree theft. James Temeyer, 21, 414 S. Lucas St., was charged April 5 with public intoxication. Jackson Theisen, 19, Medina, Minn., was charged April 4 with public intoxication and interference with official acts. Trey Tjarks, 18, 76 Stanwyck Drive, was charged April 6 with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jesse Walker, 24, Chicago, was charged April 4 with consumption of alcohol in public. Troy Wixom, 28, address unknown, was charged Sunday with keeping a disorderly house and making alcohol available to minors. Nickolas Woodbury, 23, Marshallton, Pa., was charged April 5 with OWI and possession of prescription drugs. Jason Yasko, 20, 333 S. Gilbert St. No. 2114, was charged April 6 with public intoxication and fourth-degree criminal mischief.

Blotter Michael Adams, 22, 529 S. Lucas St., was charged Sunday with keeping a disorderly house. Cody Allen, 22, Muscatine, was charged April 5 with sale of an alcoholic beverage to a minor. Victor Batie, 55, Coralville, was charged Jan. 27, 2009, with fourth-degree theft and tampering with records. Bartlomiej Bosak, 21, 841 Normandy Drive, was charged Sunday with making alcohol available to minors and keeping a disorderly house. Jacob Brown, 19, Washington, Iowa, was charged April 6 with PAULA. Daniel Carroll, 20, 212 S. Johnson St., was charged April 6 with PAULA. Anthony Carter, 27, 1324 Muscatine Ave., was charged April 5 with fifth-degree criminal mischief. Catherine Claybon, 25, 1100 Arthur St. No. P4, was charged April 5 with assault causing injury. Robert Culberson Jr., 24, 2203.5 Muscatine Ave. Apt. B, was charged April 5 with domestic assault. Daniel Legaspi, 20, Coralville, was charged April 5 with presence in a bar after hours. Sarah Davis, 22, Coralville, was charged April 5 with OWI.

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Issue 169

MORE ONLINE Go to dailyiowan.com: Read about how participants raised over $40,000 for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life April 5-6. Also, read what Wild Bill’s Coffeeshop is doing to celebrate the 100th birthday of its namesake, Bill Sackter.


The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013 | 3

News

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Dashing for health care Transparency panel to host public hearings

By Lauren Coffey lauren-n-coffey@uiowa.edu

Dogs pull at their leashes, an elderly couple begins stretching, and people gather in groups, laughing and chatting. The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Doc Dash 5K was about to begin. And this year, organizers hoped to diversify the race by reaching out to children with incentives such as medals. The Doc Dash has existed for roughly 25 years but has only been open to the public for the past two years. The race took place April 6, and roughly 500 participants raised money for the UI Mobile Clinic and the Iowa City Free Clinic. “It gets the community involved and helps people become more aware,” said Robert Ingram, the race coordinator. “It also helps the underprivileged population. Our goal for next year is to have even more participants.” Doc Dash officials said they hoped to reach out to more children this year. “We tried to make it a little more open for youth,” said Michael Takacs, a UI clinical associate professor of emergency medicine. “It’s a good cause, and it promotes healthy kids, having fun and running with their parents.” Twelve-year-old

By Stacey Murray stacey-murray@uiowa.edu

Participants walk in the Doc Dash 5K on April 6. The race aims to raise money for the UI Mobile Clinic and the Iowa City Free Clinic. (Contributed Photo/Tiffany Lim) Stephan Vera of Engelton, Texas, came to the race to spend time with his sister, who is a UI medical student and run in the 5K. “I’m excited; it’s a fun event,” Vera said of his first year at the Doc Dash. Fourth-year medical student Chloe Mellecker has been involved with the race for the past three years. As a medical student, she emphasized the importance of a healthy lifestyle for children. “It’s always important to stay active, and if it takes a medal to encourage kids, it’s a small price to pay,” she said. The Doc Dash’s larger goal remains raising funds to help underprivileged people with health care. Mike Catney, a nurse at the Free Medical Clinic, said the 5K has raised thousands of dollars for the organizations over

the years and offered help in other ways as well. “They do raise quite a bit for our clinic,” he said. “We get support through other ways like United Way and Johnson County, but they bring a great deal, and it’s very much appreciated. Many of the medical students offer their time and volunteer at the clinic, and without that, it probably wouldn’t be possible to run the clinic.” The UI Psychiatry Department has supported the race for the past two years, winning the award in 2012 and 2011 for having the most participants. “[Health care in Iowa City] is incredibly important, and obviously not everyone has health care. The Free Medical Clinic and the mobile clinic are both important parts of health care,” said UI psychiatry professor David Moser.

Following the first meeting, the state Board of Regents’ Transparency Task Force has added additional goals and plans for the panel as it moves forward. The Transparency Task Force hopes for more discussion at its next meeting following the upcoming public hearings for Iowans, along with potentially adding more members to the group. “We did decide positively to have a series of public hearings and to get the pulse of the public on how they feel about transparency with the board and the institutions,” said John Johnson, the University of Northern Iowa representative on the panel. The task force listened to presentations from each of the regent universities and special schools to bring the members up to speed on the practices of the universities and the regents. “I think talking about those practices and ways we can do better will be a better thing for all these institutions,” said University of Iowa interim Vice President for Strategic Communication Mark Braun, the UI’s representative. “We did the initial

blush of the discussion we’re going to have.” The group members decided there would be a series of public hearings before the next meeting in which the public will have the opportunity to comment. “I think the public will perhaps play off of things that have appeared in papers,” Johnson said. While the regents and the task force plan to hold public meetings, Sen. Jeff Danielson, D-Cedar Falls, has introduced a bill in the Iowa Senate that would require the regents to hold four meetings around the state at places other than the regent universities with time allotted for public comment. The Iowa Senate passed the bill, and it will advance to the House. The end of the meeting raised the idea of adding more members to the nine-person task force to address a possible gap in the panel. “They did say at the end they were open to adding more people to the task force,” said Kathleen Richardson, a panel member and the executive of the Iowa Freedom of Information Council. “There was a gap that became apparent — there could be a proposal for additional people.”

Transparency The Transparency Task Force’s first meeting brought new goals and ideas. • The force’s first meeting was April 5 in Des Moines • It consists of nine members, ranging from legislators to representatives of the universities. • Regent Nicole Carroll leads the panel. Source: State Board of Regents

The group was first proposed by Regent President Craig Lang as a means to combat transparency issues. The group works on issues such as public-records requests and identifying information of critical interest to the public. The task force is composed of representatives from each university, the state Legislature, the regents, and the public. Regent Nicole Carroll leads the panel. It will present its first report at the June regents meeting. “There’s a lot that’s going to happen in the next month,” Johnson said. “There seems to be good support for this and an honest search for ideas and input.”


4 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013

Opinions The Daily Iowan

What do you think about legislation to protect social-media content?

Read today’s column, and email us at: daily.iowan.letters@gmail.com

Editorial

Waste audit shows new ways to recycle at University of Iowa A

team of University of Iowa students and faculty sorted through a day’s worth of garbage on April 4. The trash — from Burge and Daum Residence Halls — helped the group collect data that will help the UI Office of Sustainability better understand how students handle their waste. The previous waste audit, held in Burge in 2011, found that students had thrown away 361.4 pounds of trash, including recyclable, non-recyclable, and organic waste. The April 4 audit found only 208.2 pounds of waste, but it seems that recycling rates have held steady at the UI in the last year and a half. The audit found that 36 percent of the April 4 waste was recycled — down a little from 42 percent recycled in November 2011 — while the rest was made up of organic waste (30 percent) and trash (33 percent). It is impossible to use such limited data to come to any conclusion about upward or downward trends in recycling on campus, but the data do indicate that recycling programs alone may not be enough to meet the university’s goal of 60 percent waste diversion. Currently, the Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center takes in about 125,000 tons of trash every year, though a vast majority of the garbage — approximately 80 percent — could have been recycled or composted. According to the UI Sustainability Office’s 2020 Vision plan, which was announced in 2010, the university wants to keep 60 percent of its trash out of Iowa City’s landfill by the year 2020. Given that the April 4 waste audit found that about 63 percent of Burge and Daum’s waste is either organic or unrecyclable, it is clear that recycling programs alone will not achieve 60 percent diversion. The answer, it seems, is to increase composting ef-

forts to divert organic waste that need not be sent off to the landfill. Already, the university has something of a composting pilot program underway in the Hillcrest Marketplace. In August 2012, Hillcrest received a brand-new food pulper — an ingenious, $58,000 machine that grinds up dining-hall food leftovers, presses all the water out, recycles that water, and spits out an easily compostable mush that the university sends off to become fertilizer. Both the Burge Marketplace and the IMU compost their food waste, but the university would do well to expand the pulper initiative to further reduce waste and boost efficiency. These existing composting programs are great, but even after the pulpers are expanded, there is still a large amount of organic waste being thrown away outside the dining halls, as the April 4 trash audit indicated. To solve this problem, the UI Sustainability Office could expand its composting program to include post-consumer food waste; this change, according the Sustainability Office’s website, could divert up to 350 tons of food waste from the landfill every year. Such a program could be implemented by simply offering an organic-waste bin alongside the current trash cans and recycling bins available all over the campus. If the university expects to meet its ambitious goal of 60 percent diversion by the end of the decade, it will have to expand its efforts to reduce organic waste beyond the school’s dining halls. Your turn. Is the University of Iowa doing enough to meet its 2020 goalWeigh in on at dailyiowan.com.

Privatize socializing By Brianne Richson brianne-richson@uiowa.edu

Having to worry about your mom, or even grandma, creeping on your Facebook or Twitter accounts is enough, but in the social-media age, this isn’t the only anxiety held by college students nearing graduation; many potential employers screen job applicants’ social-media accounts as well. Thankfully, 28 states have currently pending bills for 2013 that would prevent employers from being able to demand the usernames and passwords of job applicants for such accounts. Iowa is included in this count. The current bill proposed in Iowa would prevent employers from opting not to hire an applicant solely on the basis of that person’s refusal to provide information pertaining to social-media accounts. The bill would also give rights to those who have already been hired. However, the outline of the bill as it currently stands does not prevent an employer from accessing information that is in the public domain.

Obviously, once a company hires you, you are a representative of its brand. But as far as this pending social-media legislation is concerned, job applicants should not be discriminated against because of one lingering Halloween night photo. In the meantime, students and career advisers alike at the University of Iowa have taken a proactive approach. A common trend has been for students to beef up their privacy settings on such accounts; career advisers also reinforce the importance of this measure by encouraging students to Google themselves. Angi McKie, the director of marketing and operations at the Pomerantz Career Center, noted students should obviously not completely shy away from social networks for fear of scrutiny in the job-application process. “Establish a good electronic presence on positive networks, such as LinkedIn,” McKie recommended. Despite the bad rap that social networks often get for teens and 20-somethings, let’s face it: Navigating the web is a favorable skill in the job market. We are not pro athletes who could be fined thousands of dollars for a temper tantrum thrown via a tweet or Facebook status, but we should all do ourselves a favor and keep what we share in check.

online comments RE: ‘Tilly: Let the rhetoric games begin’

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR may be sent via email to daily.iowan.letters@gmail.com (as text, not as attachment). Each letter must be signed and include an address and phone number for verification. Letters should not exceed 300 words. The DI will publish only one letter per author per month. Letters will be chosen for publication by the editors according to space considerations. No advertisements or mass mailings, please. GUEST OPINIONS that exceed 300 words in length must be arranged with the Opinions editor at least three days prior to the desired date of publication. Guest opinions are selected in accordance with word length, subject relevance, and space considerations. READER COMMENTS that may appear below were originally posted on dailyiowan.com in response to published material. They will be chosen for print publication when they are deemed to be well-written and to forward public discussion. They may be edited for length and style.

RE: ‘Tilly: Bizarre remedies’

Zach [Tilly, DI, April 5] is right on the jail but wrong on the cameras. Traffic-light cameras really do result in safer intersections, and the science proves this conclusively in the large majority of studies. If one wants to oppose the cameras, oppose them because they represent a privatization of law enforcement — tickets written with the profit motive in mind as opposed to primarily for public safety. This is a more complicated argument, of course, but the U.S. model for traffic-light cameras is an open door for corruption, and there have been a few examples to show that.

I read this article in the hard print. This article is a bogus stealthy attack on Tom Harkin, a true stalwart of defending the little guy. This article seems to be selective in its reasoning to isolate and slant the complicated endeavor of seeking out alternative medicines. It fails to shine the light on the chokehold of the pharmaceutical industry has on our lives. It also fails to point out that minuscule amounts of monies are spent to research and validate alternative medicines and to conduct clinical studies compared to the amount of monies spent on producing pharmaceutical drugs. Let’s face it, without public money, research in alternative medicines cannot set roots because alternative medicines cannot be patented and cannot produce profit.

Donald Baxter

Maher A. Josephson

to incarceration could make the current jail adequate; this I do not believe. Some opponents would not design for the possibility of future expansion; to me it is essential. Our community has grown. It will continue to grow. We have outgrown our jail and our Courthouse. The current jail’s cells are less than safe for inmates and staff alike. The current Courthouse does not meet our expectations of safety from mass shooters, not to mention accessibility, and courtrooms are too few to allow for prompt scheduling. Injustice. The new justice center will increase safety for inmates, staff, and visitors. The new jail will meet

needs for capacity and allow for future needs to be met. Building the new courthouse and jail facilities together will give people their day in court, not over closed-circuit television, as envisioned in the jail proposed a few years ago, un-delayed by inadequate space. Justice. The opposition’s notion, “If you build it, they will fill it,” gives no regard to current needs and guarantees — 20 or 30 years from now — regret for today’s shortsightedness. I am voting “yes” on the justice center.

letters to the editor Build the justice center For 13 years, I have been with Mediation Services of Eastern Iowa. We are a nonprofit organization made up of volunteers and professionals who mediate small-claims cases in Johnson and adjacent counties. Our job is to facilitate open dialogues between parties engaged in a conflict. Over the years, our organization has helped many people resolve disputes, thereby freeing up court time for more serious cases. However, because of space constraints at the Courthouse, it has not always been easy to find a private space to

work in. We have mediated in both hallways and break rooms when rooms were not available. The issue of safety has also been a concern to us many times. Occasionally, there can be volatility between parties, which warrants a sheriff’s deputy to be present with us. It would be nice to know that while we are doing a service for the court system, we ourselves are not in jeopardy. We are very fortunate that a tragic accident has not occurred, thereby leaving people to ask why a better system had not been in place. At the current time, we all use the same entrances and exits, which have no security measures

in place. Inmates brought in from outside also use these same entrances. We need better facilities for handicapped and disabled people visiting our Courthouse, too. Our current design is not conducive to either handicapped individuals called for jury duty or there for legal purposes. While the new justice-center plan takes into account the future jail, we also need to remember that our neighbors who visit the Courthouse deserve a safe and secure building in which to conduct business. We need to think about the future of our aging Courthouse and make an investment for Johnson County now.

I urge you to vote yes in May for a better facility for Johnson County and its citizens. Judy Atkins Iowa City resident

I share the belief of justice-center opponents that non-white Americans are disproportionately and unfairly incarcerated. I share that alternatives to incarceration should be sought. But using opposition to the justice center to promote these beliefs guarantees a bad decision. I do not hear opponents claiming that if there were not racially disproportionate incarceration, the current facilities would be adequate. Some have suggested alternatives

EMILY BUSSE Editor-in-Chief • SAM LANE Managing Editor • BENJAMIN EVANS Opinions Editor MCCULLOUGH INGLIS, KATHERINE KUNTZ, BENJI MCELROY, SRI PONNADA, and ZACH TILLY Editorial Writers EDITORIALS reflect the majority opinion of the DI Editorial Board and not the opinion of the Publisher, Student Publications Inc., or the University of Iowa. GUEST OPINIONS, COMMENTARIES, COLUMNS, AND EDITORIAL CARTOONS reflect the opinions of the authors and are not necessarily those of the Editorial Board.

Dave Tingwald Iowa City resident


The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013 | 5

News alco-buddy Continued from front don’t care about competition. I’m just glad there are other people out there.” Elbert’s breath-test machines work much like vending machines. Consumers pay a dollar to use the machine, blow through a straw, and get a reading of their blood-alcohol con-

survey Continued from front said is typical of such grants. The bulk of the money goes to staff costs and the At-Risk program. “The two biggest categories are paying staff and the purchase of the Kognito program,” Cochran said. “It’s an expensive program, almost $30,000 a year. The other components [of the grant project] are modestly priced com-

supervisors Continued from front organization, wants to change the board’s current five at-large makeup to five geographically based districts. Roger Anderson, a central committee member for the Johnson County Republicans, said the end result is comprehensive county representation — something he believes has been missing following the departure of rural Johnson County Supervisor Sally Stutsman in 2012. He is spearheading efforts for an August special election. “The principal reason that we are doing this is that until this past election, the supervisors lived

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tent. Elbert said the hope is that people will use the readings from the machines to make informed decisions about whether to drive after drinking. He buys his breath machines from Alco-Buddy, a New York company that manufactures the machines, while he waits for his patent application to be approved, which could take up to a year. Elbert’s business is

called Safe Living. The major differences between his machine and the Alco-Buddy machine will be a dispenser for the straws, a screen for advertisements, and a printer for the results. Kelly Bender, the community harm-reduction-initiatives coordinator for Partnership for Alcohol Safety, said the partnership has not been actively promoting these

machines. The concern is some people may turn the machines into a drinking game to see who can blow the highest blood alcohol content level. “… I believe the intentions of these businesses are good,” she wrote in an email. “We just need to be aware that this kind of strategy may not have the kind of protective effect that one might intuitively think it would.”

Elbert said he is aware that some people will abuse the machines but that the benefits outweigh the concerns. “What I always say to that, is on the bottom of alcohol it says ‘Please drink responsibly,’ and you’re always going to have someone who abuses that [too],” he said. Gabe Lynott, the general manager of the Airliner, 22 S. Clinton St., which

has a breath machine, said he notices that older adults tend to take the machines more seriously than students. “Would the machine steer you clear from driving?” he said. “I’m sure it could if you take what the read out says seriously. [But] will these machines prevent [drunk driving]? No, because they can’t take your keys and tell you to take a cab.”

pared to it.” The university began the pilot for the program in late March, extending invitations to undergraduate freshmen to begin with. A week after the opening date, 43 students had signed up for the program. “It’s really innovative the way Kognito delivered [suicide prevention training] through a web interface,” he said. “Students … can do it on their own time.” The program uses “av-

atar-based learning,” in which users engage in conversations with emotionally responsive student avatars who exhibit signs of psychological distress. In the process, the program hopes to teach users to practice and learn how to use open-ended questions, reflective listening and other techniques. Leah Wentworth, a graduate assistant with the suicide prevention program, said the university would carefully evaluate the program.

“It’s a common program, and we want to be able to make the case that it is effective or not,” she said. “We’re trying to see if behaviors change as a result of this training.” The training takes around 30 minutes to complete, and the students will be contacted again in a month to see if any learned skills have been used. Though the program trains students to look for indicators in a wide range of groups, Cochran said

certain groups at universities were at higher risk for suicide. “Research has identified elevated risk for graduate students, particularly in health and science fields,” he said. “Veterans … and GLBT populations we know for sure are at higher risk.” Though the program’s administrators were confident in its value, some UI students had mixed views on the program. “[In-person training] might be more effective,

but I don’t see how it could hurt,” UI junior Jake Hopes said. UI senior Seth Frederici was open to the idea. “It could be beneficial, but each person is so individualistic,” he said. Wentworth hopes it sparks a discussion on campus. “Eleven thousand college students die by suicide every year,” she said. “That’s 11,000 opportunities for us to have that conversation to point us in the right direction.”

in Iowa City or within a mile of Iowa City,” he said. “… It really should be a bipartisan effort, and the board makes decisions that aren’t necessarily bipartisan.” Supervisors Rod Sullivan, Janelle Rettig, and Terrence Neuzil live in Iowa City, and Pat Harney resides just outside of the northern city limits. All four are Democrats. Republican Supervisor John Etheredge lives outside Kalona. Anderson said roughly 7,600 valid signatures — 10 percent of the turnout in the recent general election — are necessary by early May. He said 10,000 signatures is the goal. A petition would give voters three options: • Uphold elections as is, with elections to at-large

supervisor seats with no district residency requirement. •Establish supervisor elections to at-large seats, with a mandated district residency. •Create supervisor elections by district, with district residency required. Bill Keettel, a former chairman of the Johnson County Republicans, said that because the U.S. Congress and neighboring Linn County utilize a district-based system, the representation makes logical sense. “The question of practicality is certainly going to be argued by both proponents and opponents of change to voters,” Keettel said. “The clue to the legality of this is that Linn County has gone to districts.”

Mike Carberry, the chairman of the Johnson County Democrats, said that although he has yet to examine the petition, geographical competition would result. “We are Johnson County, we are not Shueyville, we are not Swisher, we are not just Iowa City,” he said. “We shouldn’t be artificially putting [supervisors] into zones. You don’t have to live in a particular area to be sensitive of those issues.” Carberry noted a proposed plan would create a “doughnut effect” — one rural district surrounded by four metropolitan ones. He said to ensure each district had equal population numbers roughly 27,400 residents would have to reside within each. Sullivan questioned

the practicality of such a change. “I think that what happens when you go to districts is you lose efficiency and create parochialism, driving up the cost of government,” he said. “… We live in a country where it’s one-person, one-vote. It doesn’t matter what it looks like on a map, land doesn’t vote; people vote.” Because roughly half of Johnson County’s population resides in the city limits of Iowa City, Sullivan said districts would still not be equally represented. “What I think a lot of people don’t understand is there’s going to have to be a district that is half North Liberty, three-quarters Coralville, and three Iowa City districts by law,” he

said. “There will not be a district where even half the people are rural. There is no way to do that under law.” John Deeth, Democratic activist and political blogger, said he believes the plan is a Republican ploy to push Etheredge into the 2014 re-election arena. “As recently as of 2000, all five of the supervisors lived outside of Iowa City,” he said. “It wasn’t until 2009 when Iowa City representation started. Basically, a lot of this is the personal politics of Rod and Janelle [Rettig]. It was after Janelle got on the board that the Republicans got interested in districts. If people want to increase rural representation, the district idea is the complete backwards approach.”


6 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013

Daily Break The Daily Iowan

the ledge This column reflects the opinion of the author and not the DI Editorial Board, the Publisher, Student Publications Inc., or the University of Iowa.

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today’s events • Sports Forum, 9 a.m., Senior Center, 28 S. Linn • Theater Games for Fun and Creativity, 10 a.m., Senior Center • English Language Learners’ Discussion Circle, 3 p.m., S126 Pappajohn Business Building • Physics/Astronomy Colloquim, “Chasing the Largest Shock Waves in the Universe,” Shea Brown, Physics/Astronomy, 3:30 p.m., 301 Van Allen • Hawkeyes Going Global, 6 p.m., W401 Pappajohn Business Building

OK to Hear at a Da Club but not the Senior Center: • “Have you ever seen a skirt that short before?” • “You just made my heart skip a beat.” • “What do I wear to bed? Depends.” • “Save the last dance for me?” • “Drop dead.” • “He looks DTF.” • “Tonight, I’m ridin’ dirty.” • “You have a condom, right?” • “Last call.” • “Does the carpet match the drapes?” • “You wanna use the paddles?” • “Man, what died in here?” • “I don’t even have a gag reflex anymore.” • “Lotta hotties here tonight.” • “My panties are so wet right now.” • “One of our regulars got two of the girls pregnant last month.” • “There’s a couple having sex in the men’s room.” • “I can see myself spending the rest of my life with you.” Andrew R. Juhl thanks Jayne, Erik, David, Kevin, Kit & Aaron for contributing to today’s Ledge.

For more news, visit www. dailyiowan. com

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UITV schedule 12:30 p.m. Define American 2 Book Festival, Ridley Pearson, July 14, 2012 3 Book Wings 2013, China, March 12 4:30 Define American 6 School of Music presents UI Symphony 7 Middle and Late Stone Age in Arid Southern Africa, Excava-

horoscopes

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• Boys and Men Healing Documentary, 6:30 p.m., Iowa City Public Library, 123 S. Linn • Showing of A Friend Indeed — the Bill Sackter Story, 7 p.m., Uptown Bill’s, 730 S. Dubuque and Wild Bill’s Coffee Shop, 321 North Hall • Spring Concert at the Old Capitol, 7 p.m., Old Capitol Senate Chamber • “Live from Prairie Lights,” Vivian Gornick, nonfiction, 8 p.m., Prairie Lights, 15 S. Dubuque • Catacombs of Comedy, 9 p.m., Yacht Club, 13 S. Linn Campus channel 4, cable channel 17

tions at Erb Tanks, Namibia 8 The Horned Giants Who Ate Our Ancestors 9 Iowa Magazine 9:30 Daily Iowan TV News Update 10 Iowa Magazine 10:30 Daily Iowan TV News Update 11 Best of Java Blend

Monday, April 8, 2013 by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Take stock of what’s on your agenda, and make sure you take care of the most important things first. Last-minute changes that are out of your control are likely to develop. Compensating for such delays will keep you on track. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) Check out your alternatives when dealing with peers, legal matters, or anything to do with institutions or government agencies. Make sure you stick to the rules and avoid upsetting anyone who can influence the outcome of something you are trying to accomplish. GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Put more into getting things done instead of talking about what you want to accomplish. It’s important to follow through and to uphold your reputation. Don’t make an impulsive move if it concerns money. Sit tight and work hard. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Avoid making abrupt changes that reflect your expertise and knowledge. Showing your sensitivity and concern is good, but not if it makes you appear unstable or impractical. Don’t mix business with pleasure. Innovative but sound alternatives will work best. LEO (July 23–Aug. 22) Expand your awareness. Self-improvement is a plus that will contribute to the big picture. A change of scenery or connecting with new people will lead to partnerships and lifestyle changes you might want to consider. Love is on the rise. VIRGO (Aug. 23–Sept. 22) Don’t give in to temptation to spend your cash. Anything that threatens your long-term security must be avoided. Go over your personal papers, and do whatever it takes to protect your assets. A headache can be expected due to someone annoying you. LIBRA (Sept. 23–Oct. 22) Put more time and effort into important partnerships. Open up regarding your intentions, feelings, and beliefs. Don’t let anyone pressure you into doing something that doesn’t work well for you. Call the shots, and let your experience guide you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23–Nov. 21) Share your knowledge and creative ideas. Express how you feel about organizations and the people you are dealing with daily. It’s important to be surrounded by people who inspire and motivate you to explore avenues that contribute to your goals. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22–Dec. 21) Ulterior motives are apparent. Take charge, call the shots, and don’t be afraid to intervene if someone tries to push you in a direction that doesn’t suit your needs. Choose change over more of the same, and you will make progress. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22–Jan. 19) Rely on the past in order to make the right choice now. Job prospects look good as long as you offer services that are within your means. Problems while traveling or dealing with people opposing you can be expected. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20–Feb. 18) Revert to the things you enjoy doing most, and you will improve your position and ease your stress. Love is on the rise, and discussing future plans with someone you consider to be special will set you on a positive path. PISCES (Feb. 19–March 20) Ease into whatever it is you want to pursue. Pull from resources you know you can count on, and set a standard, budget, and timeline that will keep you moving forward until you reach your goals. Don’t give in to bullies or peer pressure.

Radio, Music, News & Sports 89.7 FM • www.krui.fm Monday Noon-1 p.m., Dan Riggenberg 1-2 p.m., Sports Squawk 2-4 p.m., The Fuzz Fix 4-5 p.m., Death by X Chromosome

5-6 p.m., HealthBeat 6-8 p.m., The Cathartic Arc 8-10 p.m., Saturn X 10 p.m.-midnight, Into the Void Midnight-4 a.m., Heady Jamz

A bridge not too far

The Center for Student Involvement and Leadership put on the Bridging Fiesta at Old Brick on April 6. The event included a sit-down dinner and casino games. (The Daily Iowan/Juan Carlos Herrera)


The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013 | 7

Sports SOFTBALL Continued from 10 team,” shortstop Megan Blank said. “We have the confidence in ourselves that we can beat these teams.” They proved just that in Sunday afternoon’s rubber match. Despite losing the game 3-2, Iowa showed that it is good enough to play with the best teams in the conference. After four scoreless innings to begin the game, in which pitcher Kayla Massey retired 10-straight Nebraska hitters, the game was broken open by Nebraska’s leadoff hitter Kiki Sparks, who drilled a single to left to score the first 2

basketball Continued from 10 ly pleasing, especially when done successfully. In conference this season, just two of Iowa’s nine losses came by double-digits. Only current championship contender Michigan truly blew out

tennis Continued from 10 receive solid performances from Seaborne, sophomore Shelby Talcott, and freshman Caitlin Hindmarsh — each of them won a singles match. “Shelby has been solid for us all season,” Dougherty said. “She is much more consistent this year than last year in terms of being able string together wins back to back matches.” Talcott won her match impressively Sunday, disposing of her opponent (6-

baseball Continued from 10 lead with a run in the top of the fourth, but the Iowa offense came through with 2 runs

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Iowa

Nebraska

runs of the game. Iowa tied the game back up in the bottom of the sixth. Blank stepped into the batter’s box facing a 2-0 count when she appeared to have been hit on her right elbow. However, the homeplate umpire did not see it that way. Blank was not issued first base and was told to get back in the box. Next pitch, gone. Blank homered over the right-center field wall, her second of the series and seventh on the year, to knot the game at 2. Blank added to her Big Ten leading RBIs, bringing her total to 46 for the season. The homer was all for nothing, however, as the Iowa defense committed two errors in the top half of the

seventh inning, resulting in a 3-2 lead as Nebraska took the game and the series. “We have to just keep fighting; we have to have

faith in ourselves,” second basemen Bradi Wall said, “We are a great team; we are in every single one of these games.”

the Hawkeyes, 95-67, on Jan. 6 in Ann Arbor. One of the two coaches to beat Iowa by more than 10 points in conference play is Indiana’s Tom Crean. Yet the Crimson and Cream coach — who beat Iowa by 13 in Bloomington in early March — is seemingly the first to offer praise.

“I like watching Iowa play,” he said after the Hoosiers beat the Hawkeyes in Iowa City on Dec. 31, 2012. “They play so hard, they’re competitive, [McCaffery] mixes lineups, he’s got a lot of versatility.” The Black and Gold’s head coach is tempered when talking about next year, but he knows his

players realize that no longer will Iowa be the team to earn an upset victory. Instead, they look to become the team hoping to avoid an upset. “[The 2012-13 season] makes us optimistic,” McCaffery said after the NIT loss. “It makes us hungry, it makes us recognize what’s before us.”

2, 6-1) at the No. 2 singles position. Talcott said she remains confident with the way she has played this season and looks forward to the remainder of the schedule. “I was happy with the way I played,” she said. “I came out and was able to stay consistent from start to finish and really play my own game.” Seaborne played a competitive match at the No. 1 singles position, splitting the first two sets with Purdue’s Mara Schmidt before winning in a third-set tiebreaker. Seaborne looked sharp in the opening set, but then Schmidt regained

her composure to take the second frame. “I started off the match really positive, I looked for my shots and being able to dictate points,” Seaborne said. “I started off the second set well but then started missing a few and let that go to my head, instead of just erasing it from my mind. It was unfortunate to lose the tiebreaker. I regrouped for the third set tiebreaker and was able to get back to what I was doing in the first set.” The team will take to the road next weekend as it gets ready to take on more challenging Big Ten opponents in Michigan

State and No. 10 Michigan. Dougherty said that securing a doubles point might be a key for her squad when it travels to Michigan, because singles points are elusive in the conference. “You don’t have easy matches at 1 and 2 in the Big Ten,” Dougherty said. And those two [Talcott and Seaborne] were able to come up big for us today. It’s disappointing we couldn’t start out with the doubles point. We then were digging ourselves out of a hole, and when you’re doing that against good teams, you’re in trouble.”

in the fifth and sixth to take a 3-run lead. A bit of nervousness set in during the top of the ninth when Nebraska loaded the bases with no outs. A sacrifice fly and a dropped routine fly ball

by right fielder Kris Goodman cut the lead to 1. With runners on the corners and one out, relief pitcher Ricky Sandquist got the final Nebraska batter to roll into a double play and save the win for the Hawks.

“We hit the ball really well this weekend,” senior starting pitcher Andrew Hanse said. “Our pitching wasn’t the strongest, but we were able to get this victory and put everything together today.”

PLAYERS

AB

R

H

DOWLING, CF WALL, 2B BLANK, SS MASSEY, P ZOELLER, 3B GYERMAN, RF HOFFMAN, C LUNA, 1B AKER, LF

4 2 3 1 2 3 3 2 3

0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1

TOTALS

AB

R

H

23

2

5

2

IP

H

R

ER

PITCHERS

MASSEY (L, 12-8) 7.0

NEBRASKA IOWA

3

RBI BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0

RBI BB

3

1

SO PLAYERS 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0

STOKES, CF BREAULT, PH BANDA, 3B EDWARDS, TAT, P THOMASON, RF TYSON, DP FOWLER, 1B EDWARDS, TAY, C DECKER, 2B ARMSTRONG, SS BETTIOL, LF

SO TOTALS

4

3

BB SO PITCHERS 5

AB

R

H

3 1 3 3 2 4 3 2 2 3 3

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1

0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

AB

R

H

26

3

3

3

IP

H

R

ER

4 EDWARDS, TAT 5.0 LOCKMAN (W, 11-2)2.0

4 1

RBI BB 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 0

SO

0 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0

RBI BB

SO

5

2 0

4

BB SO 2 2

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R

H

E

0 5

1 0

0 0

0 5

1 0

0 0

4 0

0 0

0 X

6 10

8 12

1 2

2 1

Errors add up for Iowa baseball By Jalyn Souchek jalyn-souchek@uiowa.edu

The Iowa baseball team sank further toward the cellar of the Big Ten standings after falling to Nebraska in two of three games this past weekend. The Hawkeyes (11-15, 2-7 Big Ten) haven’t had much success lately, and the reason may lie in the number of errors they’ve committed. Iowa committed seven errors during the three-game set against the Cornhuskers (13-17, 7-2). The Black and Gold currently hold the No. 2 spot in the Big Ten with 48 errors this season — Penn State leads with 50. “[Errors] hurt us without a doubt,” Iowa head coach Jack Dahm said. “… We’ve got to clean up our defense, without a doubt. We have a chance to be a good defense, but we still have a long ways to go.” The Hawks have struggled defensively against Big Ten foes primarily, accounting for 21 errors in those matchups. These mistakes have not gone unnoticed. Nebraska drove in a run off nearly every defensive error the Hawkeyes committed. In the second game against the Huskers — a game in which the lead went back and forth — the defense looked abysmal. Iowa relinquished its first lead of the game in the sec-

ond inning after committing two errors. The Hawkeyes entered the seventh inning tied, but Iowa lost the knot after an error by right fielder Taylor Zeutenhorst. The Black and Gold dropped the second contest, 12-8, a game marred by four errors. “We gave them some runs. We go out and work hard for runs and then we go make an error,” Dahm said. “It seemed like they scored very easy and that we had to work a lot harder for runs than they did because of our defense.” Adjusting to the field hasn’t been all that easy for the defense, the head coach said, which may be the reason Iowa has struggled at home. The field was frozen just a week prior to this weekend’s series. The Black and Gold do have a beacon of hope in its center field with sophomore Eric Toole, who is one of the few Hawkeyes to have yet to commit an error in his 22 appearances. “He covers so much ground, too,” Dahm said. “He’s developed into an outstanding center fielder, runs a lot of balls down, and gets good reaches on balls, and he’s one of the better center fielders in our conference. His speed is very, very good. He doesn’t have a super strong arm, but he hits the cutoff man every time and understands how to play the position.”

Self-confidence has helped the sophomore defensively. “Just keep in mind that, ‘Oh, I’m not going to make an error,’ ” Toole said. “I tell myself that I’m just going to get every ball I can and get the ball to the infielders and try not to make an error.” The last time Iowa finished a contest error-free

was Feb. 23, when they defeated New Mexico, 6-2. “It goes back to the fundamentals,” infielder Jake Yacinich said. “Every rep, it’s quality over quantity. We’re all good enough, and a lot of them are mental mistakes, too. It’s between the ears, and it’s getting better every day.”


8 | The Daily Iowan • Iowa City, Iowa • Monday, April 8, 2013

Sports

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Blank, Iowa softball lose in heartbreaker

Megan Blank’s seventh home run of the season wasn’t enough to lift Iowa over Nebraska on Sunday. By Cody Goodwin cody-goodwin@uiowa.edu

Nebraska’s Tatum Edwards lined up and tossed her 77th pitch a little too far to her left on Sunday afternoon. The ball appeared to nick Megan Blank right on her elbow. Blank backed out of the box, looked at the home-plate umpire, and pointed to where she was hit. But the umpire didn’t award Blank a free pass to first. Iowa softball coach Marla Looper loosely argued. “I needed to argue it because it was true,” she said. But the call stood. Blank smiled and stepped back into the batters box. Blank sent the next pitch sailing over the right-field wall. The 2-run shot in the bottom of the sixth-inning tied Sunday’s softball game between Iowa and Nebraska at 2. “She pretty much piped it,” Blank said. “I was just looking for a good pitch to drive. I remembered my previous at-bat, when she came pretty well over the plate. I had a feeling she’d do the same.” The Culver City, Calif., native has been the offensive light for the Hawkeyes this season with a scorching .420 average. Blank also paces the conference with 46 RBIs through 37 games

Men’s tennis falls twice The Iowa’s men’s tennis team lost a pair of Big Ten meets against ranked opponents this past weekend. The Hawkeyes were in Bloomington on April 6 to compete in the weekend’s first match, against Indiana. The Hoosiers handled the Black and Gold. Indiana jumped out to an early lead by winning two out of three doubles matches and went on to beat the Hawkeyes, 7-0. Andres

‘Would’ve, could’ve, should’ve. I like to think that if we had fielded the ball in the seventh inning and didn’t give up a run, we still would’ve won in the bottom of the seventh.’ — Marla Looper, Iowa softball head coach this season. The Black and Gold shortstop’s seventh home run of the season was the only piece of offense that resulted in runs for the Hawkeyes on Sunday at Pearl Field. Of Iowa’s five hits, Blank had two. But even that home run — which was seemingly done with a near-flawless swing — didn’t come easily. “It wasn’t an easy pitch to get out of the park,” Looper said. “It should’ve been ball four, but Megan did a nice job of staying with it and just carried it out.” Iowa and Nebraska combined for 8 hits over the seven innings, and there was a time when no player from either team reached base for 17 straight at-bats. The game, by most standards, was a pitching duel. But Iowa, down 3-2 in the bottom of the seventh inning, had a chance to seize a victory. Second basemen Bradi Wall stepped up to the plate with two on and two out. With two strikes, Wall made contact and lined

the ball towards Nebraska’s shortstop, Alicia Armstrong, who snatched it effortlessly. “It felt great. It was good contact,” Wall said. “Unfortunately, I just hit it straight at her. I’ve been hitting it to that side all game, so they knew where to play me.” The catch ended Iowa’s chances of winning Sunday’s rubber match. But even more, Wall’s out left Blank waiting in the batter’s circle. Perhaps the game might’ve ended differently had Wall been able to reach base successfully because Iowa’s most dangerous hitter would have came to the plate. “Oh, hands down,” Wall said. Added Looper: “Would’ve, could’ve, should’ve. I like to think that if we had fielded the ball in the seventh inning and didn’t give up a run, we still would’ve won in the bottom of the seventh. “With Blank coming up, I think we could’ve ended the game on a hit. We had good speed on the bases.”

Estenssoro was the only Hawkeye player to take his match into a third set, but he ended up falling short in a 10-point tiebreaker (7-5-7, 4-6, 1-0). The team then traveled to West Lafayette the following day to take on the Purdue Boilermakers at the Schwartz Tennis Center. The Hawkeyes’ improved performance however, didn’t produce the results they were looking for — the Boilermakers downed Iowa, 6-1. Purdue took the meet’s opening doubles point, even though

Hawkeyes Michael Swank and Joey White managed to win their doubles match (8-3). Purdue won five of six singles matches over the Black and Gold. Hawkeye sophomore Matt Hagan overcame a nagging knee injury to win a three-set tiebreaker (3-6, 7-5, 1-0 [10-8]). Jonas Dierckx gave Purdue’s Mark Kovacs all he could handle in their dual at the No. 1 singles position but came up short in two tiebreakers (7-6, 7-6). — by Dominick White


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CALL THE DAILY IOWAN CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AN AD (319)335-5784, (319)335-5785 e-mail: daily-iowanclassified@uiowa.edu DOGS and CATS welcome at SYCAMORE APARTMENTS Two bedrooms $810-$845. 1/2 off deposit. Call (319)354-1961 for details. www.ammanagement.net KEOKUK STREET APARTMENTS Available now- Large two bedroom, two bath units with dishwasher, microwave, A/C, on-site laundry, on Iowa City busline. $710. Equal Housing Opportunity. SouthGate (319)339-9320 www.SouthGateCo.com

SCOTSDALE APARTMENTS in Coralville has two bedroom sublets available March 30th and April 10th. $665 and $715 includes water and garbage. 1-1/2 baths, on busline, laundry in building and 24 hour maintenance. Call (319)351-1777. ALWAYS ONLINE www.dailyiowan.com WOODLANDS APARTMENTS Available now- Two bedroom, one bath, W/D in unit, A/C, on Iowa City busline. $660. Equal Housing Opportunity. SouthGate (319)339-9320 www.SouthGateCo.com

HOUSE FOR SALE

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THREE / FOUR BEDROOM

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TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT

GRADUATE STUDENTS, PROFESSIONALS AND SMALL FAMILIES Townhouse. Two bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, finished basement, W/D hookups. Westside near BRAND NEW LUXURY LIVING UIHC/ Dental/ Law. Professional/ family atmosphere AT WASHINGTON PLAZAwith courtyards. No pets. No Three bedroom, two bath with smoking. Available 6/1, 7/1, 8/1. all amenities. $1785-$2000. www.northbayproperties.com Call HPM at (319)351-8404 (319)338-5900. with any questions. DAILY IOWAN CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY IOWAN CLASSIFIEDS MAKE CENTS!! (319)335-5784, (319)335-5785 e-mail: 335-5784 335-5785 Rm. E131 Adler Journalism daily-iowan-classified@uiowa.edu

CONDO FOR RENT

HOUSE FOR RENT

MEADOWLARK CONDOSEastside- two bedroom, one bath, secure building, carport, storage, W/D hookup plus on-site laundry. Small pet negotiable. $650/ $675 plus utilities. RCPM (319)887-2187.

2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses for rent. Westside. Go to www.abpropmgmt.com for details or call (319)339-4783.

Classifieds 319-335-5784 319-335-5785

STONE COTTAGE Furnished two bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, fireplace, laundry, wood floors, A/C, off-street parking, buslines, no pets, Muscatine Ave. $1100/ month plus utilities. (319)338-3071. ALWAYS ONLINE www.dailyiowan.com


Sports

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head to dailyiowan.com for coverage of weekend iowa gymnastics and track action.

Monday, April 8, 2013

iowa 6, nebraska 5

Hawkeye bats not enough

Hoopsters gaining respect The 2012-13 Iowa basketball season made opponents notice the Black and Gold don’t make it easy. By Ian Martin Ian-martin@uiowa.edu

the plate and scored 2 runs but didn’t record a single hit. Three Cornhusker errors, two walks, and a hit batter allowed Iowa to tie the game. Nebraska reclaimed the

Fran McCaffery’s rebuilding process began with 10 wins the season before the coach came to campus. It was a 25-victory campaign in 2012-13. Also measureable is attendance, which went from record lows for Carver-Hawkeye Arena during Todd Lickliter’s tenure to numeous sellouts this past season. Beyond the quantifiable, the Iowa basketball team has also worked to regain respect. The Hawkeyes weren’t exactly a feared opponent in recent Big Ten seasons, with an empty arena and an average of five conference wins per year under Lickliter. The 2013-14 edition of the team, though, won’t sneak up on anyone. “Iowa is going to be a great team in the next couple years,” Baylor head coach Scott Drew said in the wake of Iowa’s 7454 loss to his squad in the NIT championship game on April 4. “Everyone is going to know how good they are.” Drew’s team dominated Iowa in the NIT Finals, but the rest of the NIT was positive national exposure for the Hawkeyes — all of their victories aired on some ESPN channel. Additionally, Iowa defeated two ACC teams in away and neutral environments, even though it has lost seven-consecutive games in the ACCBig Ten Challenge. Pre-selection Sunday, virtually all bracketologists placed Maryland as closer to making the NCAA Tournament than Iowa. Yet, the Terrapins weren’t within more than 4 points for the final 30-plus minutes of the two squads’ NIT semifinal matchup on April 2. The Hawkeyes outshot Maryland on offense from both the field and free-throw line, in addition to turning the ball over 10 fewer times. Iowa’s strong play in Madison Square Garden, the NBA’s most famous arena, even made another major conference head coach take notice. “Iowa was great tonight,” Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon said after the game. “They made plays, they made free throws, they made big shots when they had to make it. They were ready to play.” The Hawkeyes have gained notice not just for their improvement in the win column, but their style of play. Fran McCaffery implemented a transition-heavy style since changing zip codes, resulting in more alley-oops and tired opposing defenses. It’s both crowd and aesthetical-

See baseball, 7

See basketball, 7

Iowa’s Taylor Kaufman makes contact against Nebraska at Banks Field on Sunday. The Hawkeyes won the game, 6-5. (The Daily Iowan/Tork Mason)

The Iowa offense had plenty of strong moments, but the pitching staff couldn’t keep Nebraska off the board. By Tommy Reinking thomas-reinking@uiowa.edu

In a back-and-forth series that saw seemingly comfortable leads evaporate game after game, Nebraska came away with two victories over the Iowa baseball team in three games at Banks Field this past weekend. Both teams swung the bats extremely well throughout the contests, collecting 81 hits and plating 48 runs. The pitching and defense struggled on both sides, however. The two squads had 11 errors in the series. “We didn’t play very well this weekend,” Iowa head coach Jack Dahm said. “We just didn’t play free and easy. I was really happy offensively with how we started swinging the bats in every game. We found ways to manufacture runs and get some key hits with two outs.” The Hawkeyes set the tone early on offense in the first game of the series on April 5, a 12-5 loss. After allowing 4 Nebraska runs in the first inning, the offense couldn’t find a way

to bring runners to the plate. Aside from scoring 2 runs in the third inning, the Black and Gold left ten runners on base in the first four frames. As Nebraska slowly pulled away with runs in the fourth, fifth, seventh, and ninth, Iowa failed to deliver big hits when needed and could only record five hits in the final five innings. The Hawkeyes found their stroke in the second game of the series on April 6 after again falling behind in the top of the third inning, 5-1. Iowa put together their biggest inning of the season in the bottom of the frame when they sent 11 batters to the plate and brought 5 runs home. But once again, the Cornhuskers kept the offense rolling with 7 runs the rest of the way compared to Iowa’s 2 down the stretch. Iowa left 13 runners stranded in the loss. “The first two games we came out, and the pitchers weren’t all there,” Hawkeye first baseman/ catcher Trevor Kenyon said. “We need to be more consistent.

Iowa

Nebraska

PLAYERS

AB

R

H

TOOLE, CF GOODMAN, LF YACINICH, SS KENYON, 1B KAUFMAN, DH BRAND, DH MANGLER, 2B HICKMAN, C ROSCETTI, 3B HANSE, P SANDQUIST, P

4 1 4 5 4 5 2 4 4 0 0

1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

2 1 0 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 0

TOTALS

AB

R

H

RBI BB

IP

H

R

ER

PITCHERS

HANSE (W, 2-1) SANDQUIST

NEBRASKA IOWA

33

6.2 2.1

6

8 5

RBI BB 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0

1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

5

11 3 2

5

2 2

SO PLAYERS 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

SANGUINETTI, CF KELLY, 2B PRITCHARD, DH CHRISTENS, LF DARBY, RF KALKOWSKI, 1B HEADLEY, 3B LUBACH, C PETERS, SS NIEDERKINS, P HAWKINS, PH KING, PH BUMMER, PH RODER, PH

SO TOTALS 5

BB SO PITCHERS 2 0

1 1

NIEDERKLEIN HAWKINS KING (L,1-2) BUMMER ROEDER

AB

R

H

4 4 3 5 5 4 4 3 3 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

2 1 2 3 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

AB

R

H

35

5

13

5

IP

H

R

SO

1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

RBI BB

SO

ER

0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 2 2 0

0 5 2 2 2

2.2 1.0 1.0 0.2 0.2

RBI BB

2

0 0 2 2 0

BB SO 3 1 0 2 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

R

H

E

0 0

0 0

2 2

1 0

0 2

0 2

0 0

0 0

2 X

5 6

13 11

3 2

That’s a big part. We need to get our confidence up a little more.” Iowa finally put it all together in the third game of the series, a 6-5 victory that featured its fair share of craziness. Trailing 2-0 in the bottom of the third, Iowa sent seven men to

2 3 0 1 1 0

nebraska 10, iowa 6

Women’ s Hawkeye softball team drops 2 of 3 tennis falls twice By Nick Delaquila

Nicholas-delaquila@uiowa.edu

The Iowa softball team continued its struggles, losing two of three to No. 19 Nebraska at Pearl Field this past weekend. With the defeats, Iowa fell to 22-15 on the season, 2-7 in Big Ten play. Iowa’s offense continued to sputter against conference opponents — it managed to tally only 9 runs over the three games. In last weekend’s three games against the Wisconsin Badgers, Iowa scored only 2 runs. After dominating Drake 18-0 on April 3, Iowa came back into conference play with a little bit of confidence. However, that didn’t bring along the wanted results. “Nebraska is a very good ball club; our conference is tough, that’s all there is to it,” Iowa head coach Marla Looper said. “It doesn’t make coming out on the bottom end of the scoreboard any easier.” On April 5, Iowa jumped on the Cornhuskers early by getting out to a 5-0 lead by the end of fifth inning. Iowa held off a

Iowa heads on the road next weekend to face Michigan and Michigan State.

By Mike Maienza Michael-maienza@uiowa.edu

players said they continue to remain confident. “We’re definitely in these games; we know we are a good

The Iowa women’s tennis team lost both of its conference matches this past weekend, falling against Indiana, 6-1, then losing its Sunday match, 5-2, against Purdue. The team is struggling to get things started early on — it has been difficult to win the doubles point recently. The squad has struggled there, even though its No.1 team of junior Ruth Seaborne and sophomore Morven McCulloch improved their record to 12-3 over the weekend. “We know we have to get everyone on the same page on the same day,” Iowa head coach Katie Dougherty said. “We have to get the doubles point going so we can get a little padding for the rest of the match.” Even though the team came up short both times this weekend, the Hawks did

See softball, 7

See tennis, 7

Iowa third baseman Michelle Zoeller goes for the ball at Pearl Field on Sunday. Iowa lost to Nebraska, 3-2. (The Daily Iowan/Tessa Hursh) late Nebraska threat, ultimately winning the game 6-2. The victory marked the Hawkeyes’ sixth win over a ranked opponent this season. April 6, however, was an

entirely different story. After nearly a two-hour rain delay, the Hawkeyes never regained their focus and ended up losing the game, 11-1, in five innings. Despite the struggles, Iowa


The Daily Iowan - 04/08/13  

The Daily Iowan's print edition for Monday, April 08, 2013.

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