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BURSAR 845-451-1290 bursar@culinary.edu CAREER SERVICES 845-451-1275 CIA BAKERY CAFÉ 210-554-6464 CONTINUING EDUCATION 1-800-888-7850 DVD AND VIDEO SALES 1-800-888-7850

EDUCATION 210-544-6452 FINANCIAL AID 845-451-1243 financialaid@culinary.edu LEARNING STRATEGIES CENTER 845-905-4638 845-905-4639 (TTY/TDDY) PEARL SECURITY SERVICES 210-889-5287 STUDENT SERVICES 210-544-6451

The Culinary Institute of America

ADMISSIONS 1-800-CULINARY (285-4627) 210-554-6400 ciasanantonio@culinary.edu

CIA Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 2012–2013

WEBSITES www.ciachef.edu www.ciaprochef.com

The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio 312 Pearl Parkway, Building 2, Suite 2102 San Antonio TX 78215

2012–2013 Academic Catalog

The CIA San Antonio and the CIA at Greystone are branches of the CIA, Hyde Park, NY. The CIA Singapore is an additional campus.

San Antonio, TX Campus


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Academic Calendar 2012–2013 Our Mission General Information Student Life and Services Campus Safety Admissions Tuition and Fees Financial Aid Academic Policies Curricula Course Descriptions Faculty and Staff Student Policies Travel Directions and Area Map Index Calendar

4 5 6 12 20 23 28 34 41 56 61 69 75 85 87 91

©June 2012 The Culinary Institute of America

Table of Contents | 3


2012–2013 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2012 JUNE S

M

JULY T

W

T

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

F

S 1 8 15 22 29

SEPTEMBER S

M

T

W

T

2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30

S 1 8 15 22 29

AUGUST

M 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24 31

W T F S 4 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 18 19 20 21 25 26 27 28

S

M

T

W T F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

S

S

7 14 21 28

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31

4 11 18 25

M

T

W

T 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 4 11 18 25

S 3 10 17 24

2013 JANUARY

DECEMBER S

M

T

W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31

S 1 8 15 22 29

MARCH S

M

T

W

T

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

S

M

T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

FEBRUARY W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24 31

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

S 3 10 17 24

M

F S 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28

APRIL

MAY

S

S

7 14 21 28

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30

M

T

W

T

T

W T F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

S 4 11 18 25

AAS Entry Date

LCCP Entry Date

No Class (All Programs)

AAS Graduation

LCCP Graduation

Saturday Class

Please note: The CIA San Antonio will periodically hold Special Project Days to provide students with opportunities to participate in learning activities outside the usual classroom study. The dates will be publicized in a timely manner, and classes will not meet on these days.

4 | Academic Calendar


OUR MISSION The Culinary Institute of America is a private, not-for-profit college dedicated to providing the world’s best professional culinary education. Excellence, leadership, professionalism, ethics, and respect for diversity are the core values that guide our efforts. We teach our students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to live successful lives and to grow into positions of influence and leadership in their chosen profession.

NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT

The director of HR faculty relations is desig-

The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) is

discrimination coordinator for the CIA.

an affirmative action/equal opportunity

Inquiries and/or complaints, including the

employer committed to the principle of

procedure for filing a complaint regarding

equal opportunity in education and employ-

this nondiscrimination statement and the

ment, in compliance with Title IX of the

CIA’s compliance with applicable laws,

Education Amendments of 1972, Section

statutes, and regulations as outlined

504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title

above, must be directed to:

VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of

Joseph Morano, Director—HR Faculty

1964, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975,

Relations

and other federal, state, and local laws.

The Culinary Institute of America

The CIA does not discriminate against indi-

1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY

viduals on the basis of race, color, sex, sex-

12538-1499

ual orientation, gender identity, religion,

Office: Roth Hall, Room S326

disability, age, genetic information, marital

Phone: 845-451-1314

status, veteran status, ancestry, national or

E-mail: j_morano@culinary.edu

ethnic origin, or any other protected group

OR

or classification under federal or state laws. These principles also apply to admissions, financial aid, academic matters, career services, counseling, housing, employment policies, scholarship programs, medical services, and all other programs and activities available at the CIA.

nated as the Title IX coordinator and age

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-1100 Phone: 1-800-421-3481

The Culinary Institute of America, pursuant

Fax: 202-453-6012; TDD: 1-877-521-2172

to Title IX, Title VII, and state laws, also

E-mail: ocr@ed.gov

prohibits sexual harassment, which includes sexual assault and sexual violence.

Our Mission | 5


GENERAL INFORMATION Purpose The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) provides instruction in the basics of cooking, baking and pastry, and hospitality management to aspiring culinarians. At the CIA San Antonio campus, the following programs are offered:

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN CULINARY ARTS The 21-month associate in applied science (AAS) degree program prepares students for a wide variety of careers in the foodservice and hospitality industry. The program gives students the opportunity to: • Learn and practice the professional skills used in food preparation and service. • Understand the principles of food identification, food and beverage composition, and nutrition. • Acquire management skills to better use human and physical resources in foodservice operations. • Gain experience in the proper use and maintenance of professional knives and hand tools. • Become familiar with the layout and work flow of professional kitchens and bakeshops. • Build skills as a member of a team. • Gain appreciation for the history, evolution, and international diversity of the culinary and baking and pastry arts. • Learn to communicate accurately and effectively. • Develop a personal sense of professionalism necessary for working successfully in the foodservice and hospitality industry. • Build academic skills and acquire a global perspective in general education courses.

LATIN CUISINES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM The 30-week Latin Cuisines Certificate Program is designed for graduates of approved 6 | General Information

associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or certificate programs in culinary arts who have a serious interest in deepening their knowledge of Latin cuisines and acquiring a specialization that can help advance their career. In this program, students will: • Become well-versed in the unique ingredients, culinary techniques, and cultural traditions that span the rich Latin American region. • Study the foods of Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Central America, the Caribbean, and more. • Explore of the nuances of flavor development and culinary expression related to Latin American cuisines. • Gain the culinary knowledge and skills to bring creativity to the menu while respecting authentic Latin traditions.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES An education from The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) offers you unparalleled career opportunity in an industry that generates an estimated $632 billion in annual sales in the United States. In 2012, 12.9 million people are projected to be employed in the foodservice business, making it one of the largest private-sector employers, according to the National Restaurant Association. The CIA is represented around the world by more than 44,000 alumni who achieve success across a wide range of careers. They become executive chefs, personal chefs, restaurant and business owners, media personalities, restaurant and hotel chain executives, food writers, research chefs, food and beverage executives, and culinary educators


and work in all segments of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Some CIA associate degree program graduates enter the industry as entry-level cooks and pastry cooks for restaurants, hotels, country clubs, retail bakeries, and institutions; others choose jobs in dining room service, catering, food research, or kitchen supervision. Still others choose to enroll in the college’s bachelor’s degree program in Hyde Park, NY to expand their employment possibilities to include business management and staff management positions, as well as business ownership, communications, marketing, sales, and more. Graduates of the CIA Latin Cuisines Certificate Program gain the specialized education that prepares them to enter or return to the culinary workforce more marketable than ever, with valuable new knowledge and skills in this growing segment of the industry. Students can work as chefs or in other culinary-related positions in diverse settings that include restaurants, cafés, hotels, private clubs, catering companies, and retail operations.

HISTORY The college has enjoyed a unique history characterized by rapid expansion in its more than 65 years of service. The Culinary Institute of America opened in 1946 as the New Haven Restaurant Institute, a small cooking school in downtown New Haven, CT, with an enrollment of 50 students and a faculty consisting of a chef, a baker, and a dietitian. The Institute, at that time a vocational school for World War II veterans, offered a 16-week program featuring instruction in 78 popular menus of the day. Members of the New Haven Restaurant Association sponsored the original school, whose founders,

Frances Roth and Katharine Angell, served as its first director and chair of the board, respectively. As the foodservice industry grew, so did enrollment, necessitating a move in 1947 to larger quarters: a 40-room mansion adjacent to Yale University. The school’s name was changed to the Restaurant Institute of Connecticut; in 1951 it became known as The Culinary Institute of America, reflecting the diversity of the student population. The educational program was expanded to two years, and continuing education courses for industry professionals were introduced. By the time of Mrs. Roth’s retirement in 1965, the school had increased its enrollment to 400 students and operated a $2 million facility. In 1969,with more than 1,000 students and with facilities strained to the maximum, the school’s administrators launched a search for a new home. They found it in St. Andrew-on-Hudson, a former Jesuit novitiate in Hyde Park, NY. Two years later, the new school opened, with its main building renamed Roth Hall. In 1995, The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone opened its doors to food and wine professionals as the college’s continuing education campus in the heart of California’s Napa Valley. The Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program (ACAP) was added in 2002 for students with a bachelor’s degree in hospitality, food science, nutrition, or a closely related field. In fall 2006, the Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) in culinary arts degree program offered in Hyde Park became available at the Greystone campus in St. Helena. This enabled students to obtain the world-famous CIA culinary degree program education on the West Coast as well as preGeneral Information | 7


pare them, if they elected to do so, to enroll in the junior year of the CIA’s bachelor’s degree program at the main campus in Hyde Park, NY. In 2008, the college opened its second branch campus, The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio. The Texas campus offered a culinary arts certificate program, as well as programs for foodservice industry professionals and food enthusiasts. The CIA at Greystone continued to expand its educational offerings to support the growing industry demand for qualified bakers and pastry chefs by offering the AOS in baking and pastry arts degree program beginning in fall 2009. An Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program was added at Greystone in 2010. Students gain the knowledge, foundation skills, and deep understanding of this specialized industry segment they need to advance through the ranks to the top positions in hospitality and food and beverage management. Also in 2010, in partnership with the Singapore Institute of Technology, the CIA opened its Singapore location on the campus of Temasek Polytechnic. The CIA Singapore offers the college’s bachelor of professional studies degree program in culinary arts management to graduates of polytechnic institutions who have earned their diplomas in hospitality and tourism management, leisure and resort management, or culinary and catering management, as well as to other diploma program graduates. The CIA San Antonio launched the Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Culinary Arts degree program in 2011 and the Latin Cuisines Certificate Program in 2012.

8 | General Information

ACCREDITATION The Culinary Institute of America is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 267-284-5000. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Official recognition of this CIA accreditation may be found under “Institutions” on the Middle States website: www.msche.org. PROFESSIONAL AND PHYSICAL RESOURCES Students at The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio benefit from the experience of our award-winning international faculty of chefs, pastry chefs, and bakers. These professionals have extensive experience in the classroom and have served in some of the best-known restaurants, hotels, and resorts in this country and around the world. The campus is housed in a 30,000-squarefoot building on the site of the former Pearl Brewery, near downtown San Antonio, TX. The facility combines the realism of the professional foodservice environment with an ideal educational environment focusing on student learning and outcomes. Five state-ofthe-art teaching kitchens are designed to provide modules and stations at which students can perform their lab exercises and be observed and coached on an individual basis. Equipment used by students at the CIA San Antonio has been selected to replicate the professional foodservice environment. Students will work with commercial ranges, fryers, grills, ovens, refrigeration, and other tools of the trade. Pots, pans, and hand tools are selected to be appropriate for the learning exercises as well as to acclimate


students to the types of tools they will encounter in the professional kitchen.

CAMPUS LOCATION The campus is located in the heart of San Antonio and only a few minutes from the San Antonio International Airport (see “Travel Directions,� page 85).

follows, in accordance with the federal Higher Education Act, is designed to help you locate information you may need. Information Format Location

Description of available financial aid Financial Aid Brochure, Printed material Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Financial aid application procedure Financial Aid Brochure Financial Aid Office, website

CAMPUS VISITS Prospective students are encouraged to come see the CIA San Antonio firsthand. Admissions Information Sessions are scheduled throughout the year, giving prospective students a chance to talk with admissions representatives, faculty, and current students. Call 1-800-CULINARY (285-4627) or visit www.ciachef.edu for session dates.

Information Format Location

Financial aid eligibility requirements Financial Aid Brochure, Printed material Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Selection criteria for aid recipients Financial Aid Brochure, Printed material Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Criteria to determine financial aid awards Financial Aid Brochure, Printed material Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Criteria for continued eligibility Catalog Admissions Office, website

NOT-FOR-PROFIT STATEMENT The Culinary Institute of America is an independent, not-for-profit educational organization [Section 501 (c) (3)] pursuing its mission of providing the highest quality culinary education. This not-for-profit status distinguishes the Institute from others because it enables us to focus on the quality of education rather than on satisfying the investment expectations of shareholders. Governed by a board of trustees not compensated for its services, the Institute benefits from the guidance of its board members, who represent the hospitality field as well as the professional and educational communities.

Information Format Location

Satisfactory academic progress and financial aid Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information Format Location

Re-establishing eligibility Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information Format Location

Method and frequency of financial aid disbursement Financial Aid Brochure, Printed material Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Loan repayment information Entrance Counseling Form, Catalog Financial Aid Office, website

Information

Terms and conditions of federal student loans Financial Aid Brochure, Catalog, Handbook Financial Aid Office, Admissions Office, Student Affairs Office, website

LOCATION OF INFORMATION Information pertaining to financial aid, faculty, curriculum, policies, and other subjects important to CIA students is available in campus publications and other printed materials. This information can be found in the Admissions offices at the Hyde Park and/or San Antonio campuses, as well as on our website (www.ciachef.edu). The table that

Format Location Information Format Location

General Federal Work-Study conditions Financial Aid Brochure Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Federal Perkins and Federal Stafford exit counseling information Exit Counseling Forms Financial Aid Office

Information Format Location

Cost of attendance Printed material Financial Aid Office, website

Information Format Location

Specific costs, charges, and fees Catalog Admissions Office, website General Information | 9


Information Format Location

Refund policy Catalog, Handbook, Enrollment Agreement Admissions Office, website, Student Affairs Office, Bursar’s Office

Information Format Location

Campus emergency response information Handbook, Safety & Security Information Report Campus Safety

Information Format Location

Refund distribution Catalog, Handbook Admissions Office, website, Student Affairs Office, Bursar’s Office

Information Format Location

Missing persons procedure Handbook, Safety & Security Information Report Campus Safety

Information Format Location

Supporting accreditation documentation Printed material Office of Academic Assessment and Accreditation

Information Format Location

Fire safety information Handbook Campus Safety

Information Format Location

Degree and certificate programs Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information Format Location

Transfer of credit policies and articulation agreement Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information Format Location

Instructional and physical facilities Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information Format Location

Faculty and instructional personnel Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information

Names of accrediting, approving, or licensing bodies Catalog Office of Academic Assessment and Accreditation, website

Format Location Information Format Location

Facilities for students with disabilities Catalog Admissions Office, website

Information

Names, titles, and locations of employees available for information dissemination Catalog, Handbook Admissions Office, website, Student Affairs Office

Format Location Information Format Location

Graduation rates Report Office of Planning and Operations Support

Information

Associate degree and certificate placement data Printed report Career Services Office

Format Location Information Format Location

Information Format Location

Institutional security policies and crime statistics* Safety & Security Information Report Campus Safety, Student Affairs Office, Human Resources, Residence Life, Admissions Office, Payroll Office Peer-to-peer file sharing policies Catalog Admissions Office, website, Information Technology Department

10 | General Information

* The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. Contact Alice-Ann Schuster, associate vice president and dean of student affairs, at 845-451-1262 to request a hard copy of the statistics, or view them at http://ope.ed.gov/security.

COLLEGE AWARDS The CIA is proud of the many awards its faculty, staff, and students have received. The following is just a sample: Lifetime Achievement Award, Foodservice Educators Network International President Tim Ryan ’77, 2012 Critics Choice Award for Best Bakery, San Antonio Express-News CIA Bakery Café, 2011 Faces of Diversity Inspiration Award, National Restaurant Association CIA, 2011 Best Cooking School, Cordon d’Or—Gold Ribbon Culinary Award, Cordon d’Or Cuisine CIA, 2010 IACP Cookbook Award, Professional Kitchens Category, International Association of Culinary Professionals Baking and Pastry: Mastering the Art and Craft, 2nd edition, 2010 Who’s Who of Food & Beverage in America, James Beard Foundation President Tim Ryan ’77, 2010; Vice President —Strategic Initiatives and Industry


Silver Plate Award, International Foodservice Manufacturers Association President Tim Ryan ’77, 2009 Sharing Culinary Traditions Award, American Academy of Chefs President Tim Ryan ’77, 2009 Communicator Award, International Academy of the Visual Arts Video Production Department, 2009 Prize of Honor, Société Culinaire Philanthropique Salon of Culinary Art CIA, 2008 National Best Books Award, Cookbooks— General Category, USA Book News The Culinary Institute of America Cookbook, 2008 National Best Book Awards, Cookbooks— Vegetables/Grains/Pasta Category, USA Book News Vegetables, The Culinary Institute of America, 2008 First Place, Cookbook Category, National Indie Excellence Book Awards Vegetables, The Culinary Institute of America, 2008 Award of Excellence—Entrepreneur of the Year, International Association of Culinary Professionals President Tim Ryan ’77, 2007

Hotelympia 2000 Salon Culinaire (London, England) Three gold medals, one silver medal, and the hot foods class winner, CIA Culinary Team 2000

CIA CAMPUSES The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Drive Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499 845-452-9600, www.ciachef.edu The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone 2555 Main Street St. Helena, CA 94574 707-967-1100, www.ciachef.edu/california The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio 312 Pearl Parkway, Building 2, Suite 2102 San Antonio, TX 78215 210-554-6400, www.ciachef.edu/texas The Culinary Institute of America, Singapore Block 31, Temasek Polytechnic 21 Tampines Avenue 1, Singapore 529757 + (65) 6592 1136, www.ciachef.edu.sg

Marc Sarrazin Trophy, Société Culinaire Philanthropique Salon of Culinary Art CIA Team, 2007, 2006, 2003, 2001, 2000, 1997, 1996 America’s 100 Best: Best Cooking School, Reader’s Digest The Culinary Institute of America, 2005 Honoree, America’s Flavor Landmarks, McCormick®, The Culinary Institute of America, 2005

General Information | 11


STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES To promote individual well-being, growth, leadership, and participation among its students, the CIA San Antonio offers a variety of services. Our campus provides an ideal setting for learning, with the staff and facilities you need to succeed.

PERSONAL COUNSELING AND MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES Personal difficulties and emotional stress can affect your quality of life and ability to learn. Speaking with a trained, objective professional can increase self-awareness and help you build better coping strategies. If you are already under the care of a psychiatrist and/or therapist, you may want to transfer your care to local resources in order to have appropriate support during your time at school. Check with your insurance provider for a list of therapists and psychiatrists in Bexar County who accept your insurance. Students without insurance should consider purchasing coverage. One option is to purchase additional coverage through the CIA’s Student Accident and Health Insurance Program, offered through Commercial Travelers Mutual Insurance Company. If you experience a mental health crisis, Bexar County Mental Health can be reached at 210-207-2581, 24 hours a day. INSURANCE The CIA San Antonio offers secondary accident insurance for each student in the amount of $10,000 for each accident. The college also offers medical insurance that you can purchase through Commercial Travelers Mutual Insurance Company. Once you are an accepted student, you will be mailed a brochure outlining coverage for both accident and medical insurance. You can also go to www.studentplanscenter.com to view and download the brochure, enroll12 | Student Life and Services

ment card, and claim form. The CIA does not carry insurance covering loss of, theft of, or damage to your personal property. Consult your family insurance agent for information on obtaining this coverage.

LEARNING STRATEGIES The CIA, through the Learning Strategies Center at the Hyde Park, NY campus and oncampus assistance at the CIA San Antonio, provides degree program students at the CIA San Antonio with opportunities to enhance their skills and develop study strategies for success. The wide array of services includes tutoring, disability services, and mentoring programs and are available at no charge. Tutoring Services Students who are interested in obtaining extra help through tutoring services should contact the director of education, who will make arrangements for a peer tutor. A peer tutor is a student who has successfully completed the course and has demonstrated proficiency in that class. Peer tutors can provide one-on-one tutoring to support and assist students in their classes at no additional charge to the student. In addition, advice on time management, learning styles, note taking, test-taking strategies, and organization is also available through the director of education. Disability Services The college provides support services for students with disabling conditions. The Learning Strategies Center (LSC) at the Hyde Park,


NY campus will assist qualified students in attaining reasonable accommodations and support services. Our disability support specialists are available to discuss students’ specific needs in the classroom and kitchen. Reasonable accommodations may include readers, note takers, priority seating, enlargement of notes, tape recording a lecture, books on CD, interpreters, testing accommodations, assistance with lifting, or priority registration, depending on the student’s documentation and specific functional limitations. After reviewing the documentation and interviewing the student, a disability support specialist will determine and recommend appropriate accommodations for each student’s course of study. The recommended accommodations will be communicated to the student and, with his or her consent, to the proper personnel at the CIA San Antonio in order to best assist the student. Accommodations for students with disabilities are based on individual needs and functional limitations. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate a request for services and remain involved as a committed learner who has taken charge of his/her own needs. Due to confidentiality laws governing institutions of higher education, students must disclose their disability and request accommodations from each instructor and/or other staff members and departments themselves. Students with disabling conditions need to request accommodations for every class, quiz, midterm, or final exam as well as for costing practical exams and externship. Accommodations are not provided retroactively. Students must notify instructors of their disability and need for accommodations during the first week of class. The instructor is responsible for providing academic accommodations in the classroom.

To obtain services, students are required to provide the LSC with recent professional documentation of their disability. The documentation must be provided on the practitioner’s letterhead, not on a prescription form. The practitioner cannot be a family member. All documentation needs to be sent to the Learning Strategies Center at The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499. This information will be kept confidential and must be received at least one month prior to their start date. Should students decide to disclose their disability once on campus, they must submit current professional documentation to the Learning Strategies Center to receive accommodations. Students must be registered with the LSC in order to receive accommodations. Learning disability documentation or ADHD documentation should not be older than three years, except where appropriate documentation is provided by a professional indicating that new testing would not be required, given the individual circumstances. Students with outdated documentation may receive accommodations while actively obtaining new documentation. Provisional accommodations are given for two months while the student is obtaining new documentation. If updated documentation is not submitted within that time frame, the provisional accommodations are discontinued. For additional information, call 845451-1219 to speak with a disability specialist. A qualified student with a disability is one who: • Identifies himself or herself to one of the disability support specialists at the Hyde Park campus in a timely manner. • Provides the college with comprehensive, current, professional documentation of a disability.

Student Life and Services | 13


• Provides documentation that clearly indicates the student’s functional limitations and the need for reasonable academic adjustments, auxiliary aids, or services. • Needs those adjustments, auxiliary aids, or services to participate in and/or benefit from the college’s programs and activities. • Is able to benefit from the adjustments, auxiliary aids, or services. • Can meet the academic and technical standards set out by the CIA.

Testing Accommodations Some students with disabilities need alternative testing accommodations. Examples of these include, but are not limited to, test content read to them, tests written in large print, extra time on tests, assistance in filling out Scantron® sheets, and tests taken in a lessdistracting environment. If a student needs to take an exam in a location outside the classroom, the student needs to schedule it with the student affairs manager at least 48 hours prior to the day of the test. If the appointment is not made within 48 hours of the test date, the student may not receive accommodations for that test. Appointments for alternative tests are made around the actual time the class is taking the test, or at a time that does not conflict with the student’s class schedule. Once the student makes an appointment to take a test with the director of education, the instructor will receive an e-mail with the date and time of the test. The instructor is then responsible for delivering the exam to the director of education prior to the scheduled test and picking up the completed test. Course Substitutions and Waivers There are no course waivers granted on the basis of disability at the CIA. Additionally, the CIA does not modify course content or requirements. 14 | Student Life and Services

A petition requesting a course substitution is an option for students. According to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, colleges have the right to deem which courses are essential to their curricula. Students may submit a petition for a course substitution; however, if the course is deemed to be essential to our degree or certificate program, the request will be denied.

Documentation Requirements The following are requirements for submitting documentation requesting disability services at the CIA: • Learning Disabilities or ADD/ADHD—documentation must be less than three years old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. Additionally, the psychoeducational evaluation must be based on an adult test format such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Woodcock-Johnson Achievement Test. • Psychiatric Disabilities—documentation must be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. This documentation must be updated annually. • Rehabilitated Drug Addiction/ Alcoholism—documentation must be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. • Hearing Impairments—an audiogram administered by a licensed audiologist and any additional medical documentation must be less than three years old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. Information regarding the functional limitations should be included. • Medical and/or Physical Disabilities— documentation must be provided as to the nature of the disability, diagnosis, resulting functional limitations, physician recommendations for appropriate accommodations, and be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA.


• Visual Impairments—documentation must be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA and should be provided by an optometrist or ophthalmologist. This documentation must be updated annually.

To participate in and successfully complete the CIA’s degree, certificate, and/or non-credit programs, each student, with or without reasonable accommodations, must be able to:

• Temporary Disability Due to Illness or Injury—documentation verifying the nature of the condition, stating the expected duration of the condition, and describing the accommodation is necessary. The verification of temporary disability must be no older than 60 days.

1. Have the ability to sufficiently perform kitchen, externship, dining room, café, and classroom activities and procedures. Examples of relevant activities include, but are not limited to, the ability to:

Should unforeseen functional limitations arise that require an accommodation, an additional evaluation may be required for a medical, emotional, learning, or physical condition, whether preexisting or developing after enrollment. Disability support specialists in the Learning Strategies Center at our Hyde Park campus are available at either 845-451-1219 or 845-451-1288 and can assist you in determining if your documentation is appropriate and current. For further information about our disability services, visit www.ciachef.edu.

Technical Standards The mission of The Culinary Institute of America is to teach students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to grow into professional positions of influence and leadership in the food and hospitality industry. Contemporary culinary, baking and pastry, and hospitality education requires that the acquisition and utilization of professional knowledge be accompanied by a necessary set of skills and professional attitudes. The CIA requires that all students meet certain functions and technical standards that are essential for successful completion of all phases of our education programs, and that reflect industry requirements and standards.

a. Work in a refrigerated classroom. b. Lift and transport food, including hot food, as well as other culinary or baking product, equipment, small wares, and utensils. c. Lift and transport trays with plated foods, small wares, and other items, and serve and clear tables where guests are seated. d. Safely pour and serve liquids and beverages, including hot liquids. e. Safely handle hot foods such as pulled sugar or other items coming out of a heat source. f. Safely use knives for food preparation as well as other commercial cooking, baking, or serving utensils. g. Perform repetitive motion skills required in the kitchen and the food industry, such as whisking, dicing, or piping. h. Follow and maintain the National Restaurant Association’s ServSafe® sanitation standards for safe food handling. i. Safely and effectively operate standard commercial cooking and foodservice equipment. j. Participate and/or work in an environment where commercial microwaves and convection ovens are being used continuously. k. Test and evaluate food and beverage products. l. Produce food products within the time parameters designated by a course objective within a class or for a handson cooking or baking practical. Student Life and Services | 15


m. Handle and cook different varieties of fish, seafood, beef, pork, chicken, lamb, venison, or other meats, vegetables, and fruit products. n. Handle and bake/cook using different flours—including all grains—as well as chocolate, fruits, and nuts. 2. Attend and actively participate in all class room courses. 3. Attend and actively participate in production kitchen classes; instructional kitchen classes; dining room, café, and/or laboratory classes; and externship, for a minimum of seven consecutive hours per session, noting that those sessions may start at different hours of the day. 4. Communicate effectively and professionally when interacting with peers, faculty, staff, other college personnel, guests, and employers. Examples of relevant communication activity include, but are not limited to: a. Use of effective verbal and/or nonverbal communication skills. b. Effective utilization of the English language. c. Ability to interpret communication from other people and respond in a professional fashion. 5. Have the ability to meet and perform sufficiently all course objectives that are essential in all classroom, laboratory, dining room, café, externship, and kitchen courses. Examples of relevant cognitive ability include, but are not limited to, the ability to: a. Learn and benefit from the college’s curriculum. b. Follow directions. c. Reason and perform independently. d. Process information accurately and thoroughly and prioritize tasks. e. Demonstrate skills of recall using both long- and short-term memory. f. Apply knowledge. g. Perform mathematical computations. h. Write essays, reports, and research proj16 | Student Life and Services

ects as well as complete other collegelevel writing assignments. i. Demonstrate the conceptual, integrative, and analytical skills necessary for problem solving and critical thinking. 6. Have the emotional stability, as well as the behavioral and social attributes, required to work individually and in teams within classrooms, laboratories, dining rooms, cafés, kitchen environments, and externship. Examples of relevant activities include, but are not limited to, the ability to: a. Develop professional working relationships with classmates, instructors, guests, employers, and others. b. Function effectively under stress and regulate one’s own emotional reaction. c. Adapt to multiple situations and perform multiple tasks. d. Adhere to the college’s Student Code of Conduct. e. Exercise sound judgment. f. Focus and maintain attention on tasks. g. Self-manage medical or emotional conditions. 7. Have the ability to sufficiently maintain the safety and well-being of fellow students without posing a safety threat to others in all environments on campus, and during externship and other college-sponsored trips.

Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs The Learning Strategies Center (LSC) at our Hyde Park, NY campus coordinates the Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs. In the Faculty and Alumni Mentor Programs, enrolled students on all of our campuses have an opportunity to be paired with either a faculty member on campus or an experienced CIA graduate. The programs provide students with additional guidance and structure as they pursue their culinary or baking and pastry career. The mentor acts as a role model to demonstrate the positive


results of pride, professionalism, and hard work, and can help a student determine which area of the industry he or she is best suited for or most interested in pursuing. Mentors can also help introduce students to the wide network of CIA alumni and other professionals in the field. To provide students with support while they are on their externships, the CIA has an Externship Host Mentor Program. The host mentor is a CIA graduate located in the city a student chooses to go to for his or her externship. The role of this mentor is to help the student know where to find appropriate housing; introduce him or her to other restaurateurs as well as area purveyors, manufacturers, and farmers; and share information about offerings such as sports and the arts. The program will give students an opportunity to use their time on externship for continued learning and to begin to establish their own professional network. The Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs are voluntary programs designed for the benefit of students who want to enhance their educational experience to the fullest. To learn more, please contact the Learning Strategies Center coordinator in Hyde Park at 845-451-1283.

LIBRARY The CIA San Antonio’s 2,338-square-foot campus library includes computer work stations that allow students access to the online CIA Main Menu (the student web portal) and student e-mail accounts, as well as the college’s web-based course management system. The library also has printers available for student use. Resources are also available from The Culinary Institute of America’s Conrad N. Hilton Library at the Hyde Park, NY cam-

pus. The library houses an outstanding collection of nearly 86,000 volumes, 4,500 DVDs and videos, and approximately 280 current periodical titles. Although there is a strong specialization in the culinary field, the collection also has a liberal arts listing supporting the college’s ever-expanding educational programs.

PUBLIC OPERATIONS CIA Bakery Café Open to the public, the CIA Bakery Café offers fine espresso, coffees, and teas along with a wide array of breakfast pastries, artisan breads, and desserts. The café also offers light lunch selections including soups, salads, hot and cold sandwiches, savory pastries, and flatbreads, as well as chilled agua frescas, soft drinks, beer, and wine. Staffed by a full-time crew that includes a number of CIA graduates, the Café offers both a Manager in Training (MIT) and Supervisor in Training (SIT) program. These 11-month programs give recent CIA San Antonio graduates the opportunity to continue their education in a real restaurant setting. MITs and SITs oversee employees and student workers in the café, and learn about managing techniques and how to operate different areas of the restaurant.  The Café is open Tuesday through Saturday, 7 a.m.–5 p.m., and Sunday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Call 210-554-6464. NAO Restaurant In 2012, the CIA San Antonio is opening a new student-staffed restaurant, NAO, that will present a culinary tapestry of Latin ingredients, traditions, and cultures. CAREER SERVICES A CIA education offers students unparalleled career opportunities. The Career Serv-

Student Life and Services | 17


ices Office, located at the Hyde Park campus, sends a staff member to San Antonio on a regular basis to assist CIA students throughout their career decision-making process. A variety of resources and activities are available to help assess career potential, stay abreast of industry trends and requirements, develop knowledge of job opportunities, and set employment goals. The externship course in the AAS degree program is an integral part of the curriculum and a significant opportunity for students. This direct industry experience enables them to apply new skills and further clarify career goals. For assistance in acquiring permanent positions, students may access computerized job listings to learn of employment opportunities, career paths, and organization characteristics. CIA students can use a web-based system, Experience, to research opportunities. The system offers links to the websites of employers, enabling students to more fully research job opportunities with particular organizations. Whether seeking an externship site or fulltime employment after graduation, students are strongly encouraged to have early and ongoing involvement with the activities and resources the Career Services Office provides to make well-informed externship and employment decisions. While the college vigorously pursues job placement for graduates, placement is not guaranteed.

ON-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT Part-time employment may be available at the San Antonio campus. There are a variety of jobs available, including office assistants, tour guides, and kitchen assistants. In addition to offsetting your college expenses, oncampus employment can enhance your 18 | Student Life and Services

education, provide practical experience, and generate valuable networking opportunities. Once you have obtained a position, you will need to complete new-hire paperwork that includes a W-4 form and I-9 document (a form required by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security that establishes your eligibility to work in the United States.) Once you start your job, you should talk with your supervisor about the payroll deadlines for time sheet submission. Students may work up to 20 hours per week. Occasional weekend catered events are also available. As a student employee, you have the option to sign up for direct deposit at a local bank or a bank at home. To begin direct deposit, you’ll need to provide the CIA’s Payroll Office with the name of your bank, its routing number (also referred to as the transit ABA number), and your checking or savings account number. A form will be provided with your employment materials.

ALUMNI RELATIONS Since 1946,The Culinary Institute of America has greatly expanded its programs both within the college and with our alumni constituency. This has happened with a clearly defined purpose: to create and maintain the premier college for culinary education. In the process, our alumni ranks have grown to more than 44,000 professionals working in all areas of foodservice throughout the U.S. and the world. The Alumni Relations Department was established to fully integrate CIA alumni into regional and national programs which will benefit their professional growth and provide support for the college, both academically and financially. CIA alumni are involved in virtually every area of college


advancement, including recruitment, admissions, student mentoring, career placement, fund-raising, regional receptions, and other special CIA presentations. In turn, the college offers lifelong access to career placement assistance, résumé referral services, continuing education courses, instructional and training videos and DVDs, and publications to keep alumni updated on colleagues and new programs, activities, and industry advancements. All CIA alumni are welcomed as members of the Alumni Network and its online community (www.ciaalumninetwork.com).

Upon graduation, students receive an ID card that qualifies them for discounts in CIA restaurants, for continuing education courses, for CIA-produced instructional media, and in any of college’s campus stores. Annual class reunions and regional alumni receptions held throughout the country bring graduates together for social and business networking. The Alumni Relations staff is available to assist students and alumni. For more information, contact the Alumni Relations Department in Hyde Park at 845-451-1401 or alumni@culinary.edu.

Student Life and Services | 19


CAMPUS SAFETY It’s important to remember campus safety is everyone’s responsibility. If every person who sets foot on the CIA campus observes the policies and procedures described in this section, we’ll continue to enjoy a safe, pleasant educational environment.

STATEMENT OF STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY The Culinary Institute of America provides a practical learning environment for each of its students. You’ll be required to participate in a variety of hands-on experiences on or off campus, consistent with training in the culinary or food and beverage field. As a CIA student, you assume the risks and responsibilities inherent in the educational process. Observation and application experiences may at times involve dangers and hazards to which professionals in the foodservice industry are exposed, along with the normal risks of functioning in American society. Although the CIA can assume no responsibility for any of these risks, we do attempt to provide a safe environment and to instruct you in safe practices and procedures. However, none of us are immune to injury in the course of our daily lives, work, or field of study, so you should conduct yourself with due and reasonable care in your actions. If a particular educational experience is either a course requirement, degree requirement or voluntary extracurricular activity, you must decide whether or not to participate and expose yourself to its possible hazards. If you choose not to participate in a required activity, however, you may fail to satisfy the course or degree requirements. You may wish to discuss the risks noted above with the faculty or staff supervisor of the activity in which you’re participating.

20 | Campus Safety

ACCIDENTS Any accident involving injury, no matter how small, should be reported immediately to the teaching kitchen manager, chefinstructor, or director of education. MISSING PERSON PROCEDURE All faculty are required to notify the director of education if a student is missing from class for three consecutive classes. The director of education will check to see if the student is attending any other classes. If it is determined that the student is not attending other classes, the director of education will begin an earnest search for the missing student by calling the student’s cell phone number and checking with departments and constituents such as friends, family, and local authorities. Please be considerate to those who care for your safety—take the time to communicate any change in your arrival and/or travel intentions to friends, teachers, and parents. More often than not, the missing person is delayed due to unforeseen circumstances or to a simple change in plans. FIRE SAFETY In accordance with Texas State law, all campus buildings are equipped with fire alarms, fire extinguishers, smoke and heat detectors, pull boxes, fire doors, fire sprinklers, carbon monoxide detectors, emergency power and lighting, exit signs, and building floor plans. Tampering with any of these devices will result in automatic disciplinary action and, in some cases, criminal prosecution.


These regulations are subject to revision in order to comply with state and local law. Fire alarms are installed for the protection of all staff and students. Should an alarm sound, everyone must leave the building immediately. If you do not leave immediately when the fire alarm sounds, you will be subject to disciplinary action. False fire alarms can cause inconvenience and waste productive time, create hazards from unnecessary building evacuation, and create traffic hazards for responding emergency personnel. Excessive false fire alarms can cause building occupants to become complacent and noncompliant with emergency evacuation procedures. Vandalism of fire detection or fire suppression equipment may render it inoperative, thus creating a serious fire safety hazard. Maliciously causing a fire alarm by pulling a fire alarm box is considered among the gravest violations of CIA regulations and may result in arrest. Penalty for conviction is a $1,500 fine and/or one year in jail. If you’re found to be responsible for causing a false alarm, you may also be fined up to $1,000 by the CIA. A $250 reward will be paid to the person or persons whose identification leads to the apprehension and conviction of anyone who intentionally sets a fire or causes a fire alarm to sound when there is no fire.

PERSONAL PROPERTY AND VALUABLES The CIA does not carry insurance covering the loss of, theft of, or damage to your personal property. To help prevent losses, follow these guidelines: 1. Carry only a small amount of money with you at all times; never carry large amounts of cash. 2. Be sure your lockers are locked.

3. Inscribe your name on all textbooks, knives, personal equipment, and clothing—and never leave them lying about unattended.

LOST AND FOUND Please turn in any found item of value to the director of education’s office. THEFT You can prevent theft by avoiding carelessness with your valuables. Report any theft immediately to the director of education. Additional notification can be made to Pearl Security, which patrols the exterior areas of campus, and/or the San Antonio Police Department. For police assistance, dial 911. BUILDING MONITORING Interior spaces of the campus buildings are under surveillance monitoring 24 hours a day. Unauthorized or after-hours entry is recorded and automatically alarmed to a remote security service provider. ID-ACCESS KEY CARDS CIA buildings require authorized access key card entry at all times, with the exception of during special events. Student picture IDAccess cards issued on day one of classes provide access to CIA buildings during prescheduled authorized access time periods. If these cards are lost or stolen, the incident should be reported immediately to the office manager on the 3rd floor, suite 2305; phone: 210-554-6401 (ext. 6401 on campus). PARKING The CIA student parking area is located in the spaces under the Highway 281 overpass at Avenue A and Pearl Parkway. These spaces are located on the south side of Pearl Parkway. A diagram is included in your orientation packet.

Campus Safety | 21


All vehicles must be registered with the CIA San Antonio to park on campus. Please fill out the CIA Vehicle Information Form and return to the student services coordinator.

MEDICAL EMERGENCIES In case of injury or a sudden onset of illness while you are in the CIA building or immediate surrounding grounds, your instructor is always your first point of contact. He or she will assist in notifying the appropriate persons or calling 911 as appropriate. Additional coordination and communication assistance is available from the officer manager at 210-554-6401.

22 | Campus Safety

PEARL SECURITY Pearl provides on-site security 24 hours a day, seven days a week through Pearl Security Services. If you need security assistance when not within the CIA buildings or immediate surrounding grounds, call the security cell phone at 210-889-5287.


ADMISSIONS The Culinary Institute of America seeks candidates who can demonstrate academic competence and who have practical experience in the foodservice industry.

ADMISSIONS PROCESS The college has a selective admissions process whereby each candidate is evaluated individually. The basic admissions requirements for the Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Culinary Arts degree are:

• Documentation of all prior relevant work

• A high school diploma or GED credential

website) for this purpose and must be com-

• One of the following, to fulfill the CIA’s experience requirement: a. Work hands-on with fresh ingredients in a

experience. A complete medical examination is required for students in the AAS program within 90 days of the entry date. An exam form is supplied by the CIA (and is available from our pleted and returned to the Medical Office for review by the school’s medical staff. There are no exceptions to this requirement. A medical

professional kitchen or bakery prior to

examination is not required for the certificate

enrollment, at least 10–15 hours a week

program.

for six months. b. Participate in a high school culinary program that either: i. operates a restaurant, bakery, or café that is open to the public, faculty, or students at least two days a week for six months out of the school year, or ii. completes at least two on-site or offsite catering jobs per week for at least six months out of the year. c. Complete 12 credits of college-level courses, including at least six credits of hands-on culinary courses with a grade of at least C+ in the hands-on courses. The experience requirement is designed to help you understand the realities of working in the food industry before you enroll. Foodservice and hospitality is a rewarding and challenging profession, and we want to make sure you are confident in your career choice.

AAS DEGREE PROGRAMS— APPLICATION PROCEDURE Your application is seen as a direct reflection of you—your interest, motivation, confidence, and academic ability. Your prior educational record will be evaluated according to the difficulty of the program undertaken, class rank, and grade point average. Applicants who have vocational training in culinary arts and related disciplines are expected to have strong marks in these areas. The CIA has an experience requirement for admission to the degree program. All prior relevant experience should be documented. While you may apply for admission with minimal experience, you’ll be expected to gain at least six months hands-on food preparation experience prior to entering the CIA. The steps to apply for admission are as follows:

• One letter of recommendation from a foodservice employer describing the applicant’s

1. Complete the application form

foodservice experience.

• You can apply online at www.ciachef.edu/ Admissions | 23


apply or download the application form. • Read the application form carefully and complete all sections. • Attach your essay of between 400 and 500 words. • Pay your $50 nonrefundable application fee.

2. Ask for a recommendation One recommendation is required. It must be from a foodservice employer describing your foodservice experience. 3. Request official transcripts Ask all high schools and postsecondary schools you’ve attended to mail your official transcripts (not a student copy) directly to the Admissions Department in Hyde Park, NY. If you hold an equivalency diploma, the official test scores must be submitted. If you’re in high school, your transcript must be complete through the 11th grade, and indicate what courses you’ll take in the 12th grade or show your marks for the 12th grade. Please note that you must be a high school graduate or have received an equivalency diploma to enter the CIA. If you have matriculated in a collegelevel degree program and have completed the equivalent of 24 or more college credits, you may not be required to submit a high school transcript. Academic transcripts are required for all colleges you have attended. 4. Submit your SAT and/or ACT scores While SAT/ACT scores are not required, if you have taken the SAT and/or ACT within the last 10 years, the college strongly recommends that you include your scores, as they may help you qualify for a scholarship if submitted prior to acceptance. 5. Send the required application materials to the CIA Materials should be addressed to: Admis24 | Admissions

sions Department, The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499.

LATIN CUISINES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM—APPLICATION PROCEDURE The Latin Cuisines Certificate Program (LCCP) is open only to individuals who possess an approved associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or certificate in culinary arts. The CIA will make a judgment about your background preparation and readiness to succeed in this program based on your interview, essay, and transcripts. Your application is seen as a direct reflection of you—your interest, motivation, confidence, and academic ability. Your prior educational record will be evaluated according to the difficulty of the program undertaken, class rank, and grade point average. The steps to apply for admission are as follows: 1. Complete the application • Read the application form carefully and complete all sections. • Attach your essay of 500 words describing your interest and passion for Latin cuisines and what you would like to get from this program. • If you have experience in the foodservice industry, it is also helpful to include a copy of your résumé.

2. Request official transcripts Ask all postsecondary schools you’ve attended to mail your official transcripts (not a student copy) from a qualifying culinary arts program directly to CIA Admissions. Academic transcripts are required for all colleges you have attended, demonstrating your completion of a degree or certificate in culinary arts or comparable study.


3. Enclose your nonrefundable application fee Include a check or money order for $50 made out to The Culinary Institute of America. 4. Send the required application materials to the CIA Materials should be addressed to: The Culinary Institute of America—LCCP Admissions Department 1946 Campus Drive Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499 TECHNICAL STANDARDS In order to reflect the requirements and standards of the foodservice and hospitality industry, The Culinary Institute of America requires all students to meet certain functions/technical standards that are essential for successful completion of all phases of our education programs. To participate in and successfully complete the CIA’s degree, certificate, and/or non-credit programs, each student, with or without reasonable accommodations, must be able to meet these standards, which can be found on page 15. Our disability support specialists at the Hyde Park, NY campus are also available to assist students in determining if their documentation is appropriate and current or to answer any additional questions. For further information about our disability services, visit www.ciachef.edu or call 845-451-1219 or 845-451-1288. WITHDRAWAL OF APPLICATION Applicants who have not visited the school prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three business days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of the facilities and inspection of equipment where training and services are provided.

ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS The CIA has articulation agreements in place with other educational organizations, including high schools and National Student Organizations (NSOs). To obtain a list of participating organizations, please contact the CIA’s director of admissions at the Hyde Park, NY campus. TRANSFER CREDIT Due to the unique nature of the curriculum at The Culinary Institute of America, only selected business management and liberal arts courses will be considered for transfer credit approval. We do not accept transfer credits for culinary arts, baking and pastry arts, or hospitality and service management (restaurant) courses. For questions about transfer-eligible courses, contact the Admissions Office. Approval Criteria 1. Course has an appropriate focus from an accredited college or university. 2. Course was completed with a grade of “C” or better. 3. All applicable course work was completed within the past 10 years. 4. Applicant took the College Board AP exam and received a score of “4” or higher within the past five years.

How to Apply for Transfer Credit The following steps should be followed when preparing your request for transfer credit (to be submitted with your application for admission): 1. Consult this catalog to find out which courses are required for your program. Feel free to contact the transfer credit coordinator for assistance at 1-800-CULINARY. 2. Obtain a copy of the CIA’s Application for the Transfer of Credit from your registration packet, the CIA website, the Admissions Office, or the Registrar’s Office. Admissions | 25


3. Complete the top two sections of the transfer credit application. 4. You may be asked to provide official course descriptions for each course you would like to transfer. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the transfer credit coordinator. If you are requesting transfer credit for College Board AP classes, please provide us with an official College Board report of your scores. If you are requesting transfer credit for the CIA’s Introduction to Food Science course, you must attach a copy of your National Restaurant Association (NRA) ServSafe® certificate and include either one of the following with or on your Application for the Transfer of Credit: a) The course description for the food safety college course of at least 1.0 credit or b) A copy of your ProStart National Certificate of Achievement. 5. Include an official copy of your high school and/or college transcripts if they were not previously sent. 6. Submit your completed transfer credit application and supporting documentation along with your application for admission. Degree program candidates should submit materials to: Admissions Department, Attn: Transfer Credit at The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499.

Please note: • Credits accepted for transfer may count toward the completion of degree or certificate program requirements but are not calculated in a student’s grade point average at the college. • Full-time students may not receive transfer credits for all courses requested if the number of credits transferred reduces the amount for a semester below the 12 credits required for full-time study. Tuition charges are assessed based on full-time study, with each semester ranging between 12–18 credits. • Students who transfer credits from another institution do not receive credit toward tuition and fees at The Culinary Institute of America. 26 | Admissions

POLICY FOR TRANSFERS BETWEEN CAMPUSES (ASSOCIATE DEGREE) In some instances, a currently enrolled associate degree student may seek a transfer of studies to a different CIA campus in U.S. The following policy has been established so that each case may be considered on an individual basis. The student must submit a written request for transfer to the appropriate department at the target campus that includes a full explanation as to why the transfer is necessary. For transfers to the CIA San Antonio, the student should contact the director of education; for transfers to Hyde Park, the Registrar’s Office; and to the CIA at Greystone, the director of education support. As part of this written request, the student will provide a personal plan identifying dates for the transfer request and how he or she intends to maintain academic progress through the process. The written request will be reviewed and given consideration based on the following conditions: • Space is available at the target campus, • The student has completed at least one semester of study, and at least one semester of study remains prior to anticipated graduation, • The student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0, • The student’s learning track will not be interrupted in a way that will interfere with his or her academic progress, • The student will be responsible for any makeup and re-registration fees, • The student does not have any unresolved probationary or disciplinary issues, and • The student is in good financial standing with the Bursar’s Office.


A student is allowed only one transfer opportunity during his or her degree pursuit. The student may not retake any class in which he or she has previously received a final grade. Attendance records will carry over from one campus to the other and will be considered along with academic progress. A student who has withdrawn or who is on a leave of absence may also be considered for transfer to another campus if the request is made within one year of the original leave. Once all criteria are reviewed, the student will be notified of the transfer decision by either the director of education at the CIA San Antonio, the Registrar’s Office in Hyde Park, or the director of education support at Greystone. The student will sign a new enrollment agreement with the target campus showing new enrollment dates.

VACCINATIONS The Culinary Institute of America and state law requires proof of two MMR vaccines given on or after your first birthday or proof of immunity by an MMR titer lab test, and vaccination against meningitis. If these requirements are not met, you will need to be re-immunized. The CIA also requires vaccination against hepatitis A. Vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended but not required. Please make arrangements with your healthcare provider to administer any required immunizations during your required medical exam appointment. Any follow-up vaccinations can be arranged through a provider local to San Antonio. Please see the director of education for details.

Admissions | 27


TUITION AND FEES The CIA is dedicated to keeping costs to students as low as possible while maintaining the high quality of its programs, services, and facilities. This section documents 2012–2013 tuition and fees effective July 1, 2012, subject to increase July 1, 2013. The associate degree

program is four semesters in length, totaling 60 weeks plus an 18–21 week externship between the freshman and sophomore years. The certificate program is two semesters long, totaling 30 weeks.

TUITION AND FEES August 2012 AAS Entry Date and Certificate Program Tuition, per semester ..................................$12,950 Board, per semester..........................................$665 (includes one meal per instructional day) Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100 Culinary tool kit, textbooks, uniforms (freshman year, degree program)....................$1,395 Culinary tool kit, textbooks, uniforms (sophomore year, degree program)....................$445 Culinary tool kit, uniforms (certificate program) ........................................$720 General fee,* per semester ................................$300 Fees that may be assessed:† Failure (per credit) ............................................$863 Part-time and overload fees‡ (per credit)............$863 Re-registration fee..............................................$50 Late registration fee ........................................$100 * The general fee includes charges such as exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance. † Additional board fees may apply. Contact the Bursar’s Office for more information. ‡ For AAS students who take fewer than 12 credits or more than 18 credits.

November 2012, February 2013, and May 2013 AAS Entry Dates July 1, 2012–June 30, 2013 Tuition, per semester ..................................$12,950 Board, per semester..........................................$665 (includes one meal per instructional day) Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100

28 | Tuition and Fees

Culinary tool kit, textbooks, uniforms (freshman year) ............................................$1,395 General fee,* per semester ................................$300 Fees that may be assessed:† Failure (per credit) ............................................$863 Part-time and overload fees‡ (per credit)............$863 Re-registration fee..............................................$50 Late registration fee ........................................$100

July 1, 2013–June 30, 2014 Tuition, per semester ..................................$13,475 Board, per semester..........................................$690 (includes one meal per instructional day) Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100 Culinary tool kit, textbooks, uniforms (sophomore year) ............................................$460 General fee,* per semester ................................$315 Fees that may be assessed:† Failure (per credit) ............................................$898 Part-time and overload fees‡ (per credit)............$898 Re-registration fee..............................................$50 Late registration fee ........................................$100

July 1, 2014–June 30, 2015 Tuition, per semester ..................................$14,000 Board, per semester..........................................$715 (includes one meal per instructional day) Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100 General fee,* per semester ................................$330 Fees that may be assessed:† Failure (per credit) ............................................$933 Part-time and overload fees‡ (per credit)............$933 Re-registration fee..............................................$50


Late registration fee ........................................$100 * The general fee includes charges such as exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance. † Additional board fees may apply. Contact the Bursar’s Office for more information. ‡ For AAS students who take fewer than 12 credits or more than 18 credits.

SAMPLE TUITION PAYMENT SCHEDULE First Semester, Freshman Year: Advance deposit (due upon receipt of Enrollment Agreement) ....................................$300 One-half of tuition (due 60 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,175 Unpaid balance (due 14 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,475 Total, per semester ......................................$12,950 Second Semester, Freshman Year; First and Second Semesters, Sophomore Year: One-half of tuition (due 60 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,475 Unpaid balance (due 14 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,475 Total, per semester ......................................$12,950 Note: All required fees are due 14 days prior to the semester start date. Payment will be considered late after five days, at which time students may be assessed a $50 late fee. Every student is required to pay one half of tuition prior to his or her semester start date. This payment is an indication of your preparedness to pay and your financial commitment to the college. Financial aid, which is not paid until you start your semester, cannot be used to meet the one-half-of-tuition payment requirement. For students with financial aid, half tuition or your balance—whichever is less—must be paid 60 days prior to your start date.

MEALS—BOARD Board is a required fee for all students and includes one meal per instructional day based on class schedules. During the meal, which is enjoyed with fellow students and faculty, students are encouraged to evaluate the basic techniques involved in both the preparation and the service of food. This is considered a valuable part of culinary education. CANCELLATION POLICY A full refund will be made to any student who cancels the enrollment contract within

72 hours (until midnight of the third day, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays) after the enrollment contract is signed and a tour of the facilities and inspection of the equipment is made by the prospective student.

REFUND POLICY The CIA San Antonio’s refund policy is as follows: 1. Refund computations will be based on scheduled course time of classes through the last documented day of an academically related activity. Leaves of absence, suspensions, and school holidays will not be counted as part of the scheduled classes. 2. The effective date of termination for refund purposes will be the earliest of the following: (a) The date of termination, if the student is terminated by the college, (b) The date of receipt of written notice from the student, or (c) The first of the following dates when the student’s participation in an academically related activity cannot be documented: at the end of the first week of each academic semester, at the end of the first month of each academic semester, at the midpoint of each academic semester, and at the end of each academic semester. 3. If tuition and fees are collected in advance of entrance, and if after expiration of the 72-hour cancellation privilege the student does not enter the college, not more than $100 in nonrefundable administrative fees shall be retained by the college for the entire program. 4. If a student enters a program and withdraws or is otherwise terminated, the college may retain not more than $100 in nonrefundable administrative fees for the entire program. The minimum refund of Tuition and Fees | 29


the remaining tuition and fees will be the pro rata portion of tuition, fees, and other charges that the number of hours remaining in the portion of the course or program for which the student has been charged after the effective date of termination bears to the total number of hours in the portion of the course or program for which the student has been charged. A student may not collect a refund if he or she has completed 75 percent or more of the total number of hours in the portion of the program for which the student has been charged on the effective date of termination. 5. The student will not be required to purchase instructional supplies, books, and tools until such time as these materials are required. Once these materials are purchased, no refund will be made. 6. A student who withdraws for a reason unrelated to his or her academic status after the 75 percent completion mark and requests a grade at the time of withdrawal shall be given a grade of “incomplete” and permitted to re-enroll in the course or program during the 12-month period following the date the student withdrew without payment of additional tuition for that portion of the course or program. 7. A full refund of all tuition and fees is due and refundable in each of the following cases: (a) An enrollee is not accepted by the college; (b) If the course of instruction is discontinued by the college and this prevents the student from completing the course, or (c) If the student’s enrollment was procured as a result of any misrepresentation in advertising, promotional materials of the college, or representations by the owner or representatives of the college. 30 | Tuition and Fees

A full or partial refund may also be due in other circumstances of program deficiencies or violations of requirements for career schools and colleges. 8. Refund policy for students called to active military service—A student of the college who withdraws as a result of being called to active duty in a military service of the United States or the Texas National Guard may elect one of the following options for each program in which he or she is enrolled: (a) If tuition and fees are collected in advance of the withdrawal, a pro rata refund of any tuition, fees, or other charges paid by the student for the program and a cancellation of any unpaid tuition, fees, or other charges owed by the student for the portion of the program the student does not complete following withdrawal; (b) A grade of incomplete with the designation “withdrawn—military” for the courses in the program, other than courses for which the student has previously received a grade on the student’s transcript, and the right to re-enroll in the program, or a substantially equivalent program if that program is no longer available, not later than the first anniversary of the date the student is discharged from active military duty without payment of additional tuition, fees, or other charges for the program other than any previously unpaid balance of the original tuition, fees, and charges for books for the program; or (c) The assignment of an appropriate final grade or credit for the courses in the program, but only if the instructor or instructors of the program determine that the student has: (1) Satisfactorily completed at least 90 percent of the required coursework for the program; and


(2) Demonstrated sufficient mastery of the program material to receive credit for completing the program. 9. The payment of refunds will be completed once the refund instrument has been negotiated or credited into the proper account(s) within 60 days after the effective date of termination. If you obtain equipment as specified in the agreement as a separate charge, and return it in good condition within 30 days following the date of your withdrawal, the college shall refund the charge for the equipment paid by you. If you fail to return the equipment in good condition, allowing for reasonable wear and tear, within this 30-day period, the college may offset against the refund the documented cost to the college for the equipment. The documented cost of the equipment may be less than the amount charged, and the amount the college has charged in the contract. In any event, you will never be charged for more than the equipment charges stated in the contract. The CIA San Antonio will give you written notice of these payments within 30 days of the date we receive your termination notice. The college will make available upon request examples of the application of our refund policy.

Treatment of Title IV Aid When a Student Withdraws The law specifies how the college must determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that you earn if you withdraw from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs), Federal Perkins Loans and, in some cases, certain state grant aid (LEAP/ SLEAP), GEARUP grants, and SSS Grants to students.

When you withdraw during your period of enrollment, the amount of Title IV program assistance that you have earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula. If you received (or the college or a parent received on your behalf) less assistance than the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned by the college and/or you. The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a pro rata basis. For example, if you completed 30% of your period of enrollment, you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have completed more than 60% of the period of enrollment, you earn all the assistance that you were scheduled to receive for that period. If you did not receive all of the funds that you earned, you may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement. If the post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, you may choose to decline the loan funds so that you don’t incur additional debt. The college may automatically use all or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursement (including loan funds, if you accept them) for tuition fees and room and board charges (as contracted with the college); for other college charges, the college needs your permission to use the post-withdrawal disbursement. If you do not give permission (which some colleges ask for when you enroll), you will be offered the funds. However, it may be in your best interest to allow the college to keep the funds to reduce your debt at the college. There are some Title IV funds that you were scheduled to receive that you cannot earn once you withdraw because of other eligibility requirements. For example, if you are a first-time, first-year undergraduate student Tuition and Fees | 31


and you have not completed the first 30 days of your program before you withdraw, you will not earn any Direct loan funds that you would have received had you remained enrolled past the 30th day. If you receive (or the college or a parent receives on your behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, the college must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of 1. your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds, or 2. the entire amount of excess funds.

The college must return this amount even if it didn’t keep this amount of your Title IV program funds. If the college is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent, for a PLUS) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, you make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the unearned amount. You must make arrangements with the college or the Department of Education to return the unearned grant funds. The requirements for Title IV program funds when you withdraw are separate from any refund policy that the college may have. Therefore, you may still owe funds to the college to cover unpaid institutional charges. The college may also charge you for any Title IV program funds that the college was required to return. If you have questions about your Title IV program funds, call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FEDAID 32 | Tuition and Fees

(1-800-433-3243). TTY users may call 1-800-730-8913. Information is also available on Student Aid on the web by visiting www.studentaid.ed.gov. The college will make available upon request examples of the application of our refund policy.

CREDIT BALANCES Credit balances will be refunded upon request or automatically refunded within 14 days of the date the credit occurs on the student’s account and are processed at the Bursar’s Office at the Hyde Park campus. Current students can pick up their refund checks in their group mailbox; all other refunds will be mailed to the last known billing address. Note that the law requires that any excess PLUS funds be returned to the parent. If a school determines that PLUS funds created a credit balance, the credit balance would have to be given to the parent. The CIA will refund the parent when the PLUS is the only payment on the account and the PLUS disbursement is more than the student’s institutional charges. See page 36 to learn more. TUITION INSTALLMENT PLAN The Culinary Institute of America, in partnership with Tuition Management Systems (TMS), is pleased to offer payment choices to help you afford your college education expenses. This interest-free monthly payment option allows you to maximize your savings and income by spreading your college education expenses over equal monthly payments. Your only cost is an annual enrollment fee of $75. For more information please call Tuition Management Systems at 1-800-343-0911, or visit www.afford.com.


2012–2013 TUITION/FEE SCHEDULE—DEGREE PROGRAM

Tuition* Application Confirmation #

First Semester Freshman

Second Semester Freshman

First Semester Sophomore

Second Semester Sophomore

$12,950

$12,950

$12,950

$12,950

$50 $100

Supplies

$1,395†

Board**

$665

$665

$665

$665

General Fee##

$300

$300

$300

$300

$15,460

$13,915

$14,360

$13,915

Total

$445‡

* Full-time tuition is per semester, with each semester ranging from 12–18 credits. # The non-refundable confirmation fee is due upon signing of the enrollment agreement and payment of the $300 advance deposit on tuition. ** Board includes one meal per day on scheduled class days. † First-semester freshman supplies include culinary tool kit, textbooks, and uniforms. ‡ First-semester supplies for sophomores. ## The General Fee includes charges such as exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance.

2012–2013 TUITION/FEE SCHEDULE—CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Tuition* Application

First Semester Freshman

Second Semester Freshman

$12,950

$12,950

$50

Confirmation #

$100

Supplies

$720†

Board** General Total

Fee##

$665

$665

$300

$300

$14,785

$13,915

* Full-time tuition is per semester, with each semester ranging from 12–18 credits. # The non-refundable confirmation fee is due upon signing of the enrollment agreement and payment of the $300 advance deposit on tuition. ** Board includes one meal per day on scheduled class days. † First-semester supplies include culinary tool kit and uniforms. ## The General Fee includes charges such as exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance.

Tuition and Fees | 33


FINANCIAL AID Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Need-based financial aid may be awarded through any combination of scholarships, grants, loans, or Work-Study funds. The awards (except for Work-Study) are credited to your student account each semester, but may be refunded to you if all other obligations to the college have been met. Priority for federal grants, loans, and Work-Study is given to students showing the greatest need as demonstrated by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Merit-based scholarships are also available.

APPLYING FOR AID To apply for financial aid, you must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The CIA’s federal code is 007304. Students selected for verification will be asked to provide additional information to the Financial Aid Office such as official IRS transcripts of federal tax returns. HOW NEED IS DETERMINED Financial need is determined by subtracting the expected family contribution (EFC)—as determined by the FAFSA—from the college cost of attendance. The difference between the college cost of attendance and your expected family contribution represents your financial need. COST OF ATTENDANCE In addition to the fixed direct cost listed in the section on tuition and fees, the CIA is required to estimate a cost of attendance (COA) that includes indirect costs such as personal expenses and transportation. While COA is one of the more confusing aspects of the financial aid process, it gives students and their families an idea of the costs that might be incurred beyond tuition and fees so they can plan accordingly. It is important to differentiate between indirect costs, which are simply estimates used by our office during the awarding process to determine a stu34 | Financial Aid

dent’s financial need, and direct costs, which are actual amounts that will be charged to the student’s account. Keep in mind that the Financial Aid Office can only award students an amount of aid equal to or less than their associated cost of attendance budget. If you have questions regarding your budget, would like consultation in planning your budget, or would like a copies of the cost of attendance, please contact the Financial Aid Office.

STUDENT ELIGIBLITY RESPONSIBILITY To be eligible for federal or state financial aid, you must not owe repayment on a federal or state grant, or be in default on a Federal Perkins Loan or any guaranteed/ federally insured student loan. Also, you must be making satisfactory progress in the academic program (see “Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress,” page 45). Aid Suspension Due to Drug Conviction  The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, suspends financial aid eligibility for students who have been convicted under federal or state law of the sale or possession of drugs, if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid.


If you have a conviction for this offense, call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-433-3243, or go to the FAFSA website (www.fafsa.ed.gov), click “Before Beginning a FAFSA” in the left column, and submit the Student Aid Eligibility Worksheet to find out how this law applies to you.  If you have lost your federal student aid eligibility because of a drug conviction, you can regain eligibility by successfully completing a qualified drug rehabilitation program or passing two unannounced drug tests administered by such a program. You may also regain your eligibility if your conviction is reversed, set aside, or removed from your record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on your record.

Federal Pell Grant If you are enrolled in the AAS or certificate program and have not yet earned a bachelor’s degree, you may be awarded a Federal Pell Grant. Award amounts are determined by the U.S. Department of Education based upon your expected family contribution (EFC).

CONTINUED FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY Students must reapply for financial aid each school year; the CIA has a FAFSA priority deadline of April 15. Students who file by this date will be processed first and given priority for institutional and federal campusbased funds. You also need to make satisfactory academic progress, as determined by the director of education, in order for aid to continue. If make-up course work is required before starting a new semester, financial aid will not be awarded for the new semester until the course work has been completed and the director of education determines the student’s eligibility to start the new semester. There is no federal, state, or CIA aid offered for the costs of making up courses.

Federal Perkins Loan A Federal Perkins Loan is a low-interest loan for both AAS and certificate program students who demonstrate exceptional need. The Financial Aid Office determines eligibility, giving priority to students with the greatest financial need who have completed the FAFSA process by the priority deadline. Award amounts vary based on need and the U.S. Department of Education allocation to the CIA.

FEDERAL PROGRAMS The CIA participates in the following programs, which are funded wholly or in part by the U.S. government.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) If you are enrolled in the AAS or certificate program, have not yet received a bachelor’s degree, and are Federal Pell Grant-eligible, you may be considered for a Federal SEOG. Based on the availability of funds, priority is given to the students with the greatest need who submitted the FAFSA by the CIA’s deadline. Amounts vary and are determined each year based on funds allocated to the CIA by the U.S. Department of Education.

Federal Direct Loans (Subsidized and Unsubsidized) Both Direct Loan programs require borrowers to complete entrance counseling and a Master Promissory Note. To obtain more information about the Federal Direct Loan programs, including current interest and fee rates, visit www.studentloans.gov. The Direct Subsidized Loan is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need. The federal government pays all interest costs for Direct Subsidized borrowers while Financial Aid | 35


the borrowers are in school and during grace and deferment periods. The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is awarded to students who do not meet financial need requirements or who need to supplement their Direct Subsidized Loans. Borrowers remain responsible for all interest that accrues (accumulates) during school, grace, and deferment periods. Dependent students in the certificate program or in the first year of the AAS degree program may borrow, as freshmen, up to $5,500 (including up to $3,500 Subsidized) per year. Students in the second year of the AAS degree program can borrow, as sophomores, up to $6,500 (including $4,500 Subsidized) per year. Important to know: Dependent students whose parents get denied a Federal Direct PLUS (see next column) can receive an additional $4,000 for the freshman and sophomore years. Independent students (typically 24 years old or older) in the certificate program or in the first year of the AAS degree program may borrow, as freshmen, up to $9,500 (including up to $3,500 Subsidized) per year. Students in the second year of the AAS degree program can borrow, as sophomores, up to $10,500 (including up to $4,500 Subsidized). Students start repayment of the loan(s)— plus interest—six months after they complete their program, withdraw, or otherwise stop attending the CIA. The government offers different repayment plans, the most common of which is the standard repayment, which spreads out the principal and interest amounts over the course of 10 years (please see the sample repayment chart on page 38). All loans taken out to finance your education must be paid in full and in a timely manner. Failure to repay loan(s) will affect your credit rating as well as jeopardize loan programs for all students. Upon graduation, student borrowers will be given information on loan repayment. 36 | Financial Aid

Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Parents of dependent students in a certificate or AAS degree program may apply for a PLUS to help cover their child’s educational expenses. The parent must be the student’s biological or adoptive parent, and must not have an adverse credit history (i.e., must be credit worthy). In addition, the parent must complete the PLUS application and sign the Master Promissory Note (MPN). Important to know: Your parent should not apply for a PLUS more than 90 days prior to your entry date. The amount that could be borrowed is up to the cost of attendance, minus financial aid from all other sources. To obtain more information about the Federal Direct PLUS program, including the current interest and fee rates, visit www.studentloans.gov. Parents can request from Direct Lending that repayment start six months after the student completes his or her program, withdraws, or otherwise stops attending the CIA. The government offers different repayment plans, the most common of which is the standard repayment, which spreads out the principal and interest amounts over the course of 10 years (please see the sample repayment chart on page 38). All loans taken out to finance your education must be paid in full and in a timely manner. Failure to repay loan(s) will affect your credit rating as well as jeopardize loan programs for all students. Upon graduation, student borrowers will be given information on loan repayment. Veterans’ Benefits Veterans and surviving family members of veterans whose deaths or disabilities were service-connected may be eligible for educational benefits while attending the CIA. Forms and information are available at all Veterans Administration offices.


STATE PROGRAMS State Grants Several states offer need-based and/or merit grants to CIA students who are residents of these states. You should contact your state education department to determine availability and eligibility. Vocational Rehabilitation If you have a disability, you may be offered assistance by your state’s Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, depending on the state’s criteria. If you are offered financial assistance through this program, please have your rehabilitation counselor contact the CIA’s Financial Aid Office in Hyde Park, NY. CIA FINANCIAL AID El Sueño Scholarship The CIA offers El Sueño Scholarships to aspiring culinarians in both the Latin Cuisines Certificate Program and AAS degree programs. This unprecedented fund awards a significant portion of program tuition for students who qualify. To qualify, you must complete your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), have a completed CIA San Antonio application for admission on file, complete the El Sueño Scholarship application (available online or from the Hyde Park or San Antonio admissions offices), and submit an essay of 400–500 words describing how the El Sueño Scholarship will assist in making your dream of pursuing a culinary arts degree a reality (AAS) or help in advancing your career (LCCP). Alumni Referral Scholarship The college offers this scholarship to prospective students who are encouraged by a CIA graduate to apply for admission. Qualifying students will receive a one-time $1,000 scholarship for their first year in our degree

programs. To be eligible for the CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship, you must include a letter of recommendation from a CIA graduate with your application for admission.

La Vista Grant Students entering the Latin Cuisines Certificate Program may be eligible for this grant. Eligibility is determined during the admission process; students should also complete the FAFSA and El Sueño Scholarship application. Student Employment You may apply for a student employment position on campus. The dollar amount of your earnings is not deducted from your bill by the Bursar’s Office; instead, you will receive a paycheck on a bi-weekly basis. You may work up to 20 hours per week. Jobs are based on availability and are not guaranteed. PRIVATE FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Scholarships Throughout the year, many organizations generously offer scholarship assistance to students enrolled at the CIA. Almost $2 million was awarded in donated scholarships last year. Criteria and application procedures vary, and are listed in the Financial Aid Times, which is sent to all enrolled students at their MyCIA.net e-mail address. CIA students are encouraged to read the Financial Aid Times to learn of possible new scholarship opportunities. A variety of sources outside the CIA offer private grants and scholarships. The Internet, public libraries, and high school guidance offices are good sources for scholarship information. Check the financial aid section of our website at www.ciachef.edu for additional sources. Loans Some lenders offer alternative loans as a means to fund your education. These loans Financial Aid | 37


FEDERAL LOAN REPAYMENT CHART FEDERAL DIRECT LOANS (SUBSIDIZED AND UNSUBSIDIZED), FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL, AND FEDERAL PLUS LOANS

4% BALANCE AT REPAYMENT

PAYMT.

MO.

5% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

6% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

INTEREST

$1,000

$50

21

$37

$50

21

$46

$50

22

$50

$2,000

$50

44

$150

$50

44

$192

$50

45

$237

$3,000

$50

68

$353

$50

70

$459

$50

72

$576

$4,000

$50

94

$660

$50

98

$876

$50

103

$1,121

$6,000

$61

120

$1,290

$64

120

$1,637

$67

120

$1,994

$8,000

$81

120

$1,719

$85

120

$2,182

$89

120

$2,658

$10,000

$101

120

$2,149

$106

120

$2,728

$111

120

$3,322

$20,000

$202

120

$4,299

$212

120

$5,456

$222

120

$6,645

$30,000

$304

120

$6,448

$318

120

$8,183

$333

120

$9,967

$40,000

$405

120

$8,598

$424

120

$10,912

$444

120

$13,290

$50,000

$506

120

$10,747

$530

120

$13,639

$555

120

$16,612

$60,000

$607

120

$12,897

$636

120

$16,367

$666

120

$19,935

$100,000

$1,012

120

$21,494

$1,061

120

$27,278

$1,110

120

$33,224

38 | Financial Aid


7% BALANCE AT REPAYMENT

PAYMT.

MO.

8.25% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

9% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

INTEREST

$1,000

$50

22

$66

$50

22

$80

$50

22

$88

$2,000

$50

46

$284

$50

47

$347

$50

48

$387

$3,000

$50

75

$703

$50

78

$882

$50

81

$1,001

$4,000

$50

109

$1,404

$50

117

$1,827

$51

120

$2,080

$6,000

$70

120

$2,360

$74

120

$2,831

$76

120

$3,120

$8,000

$93

120

$3,146

$98

120

$3,775

$101

120

$4,161

$10,000

$116

120

$3,933

$123

120

$4,719

$127

120

$5,201

$20,000

$232

120

$7,866

$245

120

$9,436

$253

120

$10,402

$30,000

$348

120

$11,799

$368

120

$14,155

$380

120

$15,603

$40,000

$464

120

$15,732

$491

120

$18,873

$507

120

$20,805

$50,000

$581

120

$19,665

$613

120

$23,592

$663

120

$26,005

$60,000

$697

120

$23,598

$736

120

$28,310

$760

120

$31,207

$100,000

$1,161

120

$39,330

$1,227

120

$47,183

$1,267

120

$52,011

Financial Aid | 39


are generally based on your credit history and can be used in addition to any federal, state, school, or private funding you receive. Always file a FAFSA before applying for an alternative loan to determine eligibility for federal aid, as it is important to use all other resources before turning to an alternative loan. Please be aware that final approval of the loan must be received by the CIA Financial Aid Office before an alternative loan will be deducted from your bill.

40 | Financial Aid

Contact your lender when you apply for admission to understand the procedure and time frame required to have a loan in place by your entry date. You should not apply for an alternative loan more than 90 days prior to your entry date. For a list of lenders commonly used by CIA students, visit www.ciachef.edu/admissions/finaid.

FOR MORE INFORMATION For further information on financial aid opportunities at the CIA, contact the college’s Financial Aid Office in Hyde Park at 845-451-1243.


ACADEMIC POLICIES Students at The Culinary Institute of America, as at any college, are taught a variety of information, skills, and values in their classes. They are evaluated based on their performance in the college’s classrooms, kitchens, bakeshops, and dining rooms as they progress toward their degree. This section outlines the policies that support the curricula and academic life at the CIA.

POLICY ON ATTENDANCE Class Attendance Given the demands of the college’s degree and certificate programs, the amount of material covered in classes, and the nature of the curriculum, all students are required to arrive on time and remain in class for all class sessions. Students who miss more than a specific number of classes within a course will automatically fail that course and must repeat the entire course. Students who miss more than a specific number of classes throughout the program will be put on probation or suspended. Missing Classes If students are absent for a class in which daily participation is graded, they will receive a grade of zero for that class. Students who miss more than two classes in a 1.5- or threecredit, 11-, 12-, 13-, 14-, or 15-day course as well as a 14- or 15-week course shall automatically fail that course and will have to retake the course unless they have been administratively withdrawn from the course prior to the course end. Students who miss more than four classes in a six-credit course shall automatically fail that course and will have to retake it unless they have been administratively withdrawn prior to the end of the course. See page 43 for the policy on administrative withdrawals.

Tardy Policy Students are expected to arrive on time for class and to remain in class for the entire session as scheduled. Missing any portion of a class period may result in having points deducted from your grade. 1. More than one hour late or leaving early will be treated as a full-day absence. 2. Three late arrivals equal a full-day absence. 3. Five points deduction for every 10 minutes late (from your daily points for production and motivation). Absences Prior to Major Vacations Students who miss class(es) on either the day before or the day after the July, November, or December vacations will earn two absences for each class that they miss. Please verify class schedules with the published academic calendar before making any travel plans for these vacations periods. Attendance Probation for Cumulative Absences AAS degree students who miss 10 classes in the freshman and sophomore years will be reminded of the policy, placed on attendance probation, and warned of possible suspension or dismissal by the director of education. In semesters where two or more courses meet in one day, each class that a student misses counts as one absence per class.

Academic Policies | 41


Certificate program students can miss no more than five classes for the 30-week duration of the program and still be considered for graduation. In semesters where two courses meet in one day, each class that a student misses counts as one absence per class. Students who miss four classes will be placed on attendance probation.

Attendance Review AAS students on attendance probation who miss additional classes may be required to attend a meeting of the Standards Committee. Certificate students who miss four classes will be required to attend a meeting of the Standards Committee. Attendance at Standards Committee Meetings Students who do not attend the scheduled meeting of the Standards Committee will be automatically suspended, and the Committee will determine whether and under what conditions the students will be allowed to continue their studies at the college. Attendance Suspension AAS degree students who accumulate more than 18 absences in their freshman and sophomore years may be suspended from college by the Standards Committee. Medical, legal, and family emergency reasons for missing classes will be taken into account by the Standards Committee so long as students notify the director of education at the time and can provide appropriate documentation. Personal Emergencies and Exceptional Circumstances If a student is forced to miss a class due to sickness, personal emergencies, or unforeseen circumstances, the student must notify the director of education, who will notify the faculty member. Depending on the nature of 42 | Academic Policies

the situation and the academic circumstances, the director of education, after consultation with the faculty member, may recommend an administrative withdrawal from the course. In exceptional circumstances and if the student has not exceeded the maximum number of absences that would cause one to fail the course or be withdrawn from the program, the faculty member may assign additional work and give partial credit for a missed class. In the event that a student is sick on the day(s) of their practical and/or make-up practical, they should (if possible) go directly to a physician for an evaluation. If warranted, the doctor will issue a sick note for the student to take to the director of education, who will inform the student affairs coordinator of the No Show due to sickness. After a discussion with the student, the student affairs coordinator will re-schedule the test date, and the student will not be charged for the new test date.

Religious Holidays A student who misses a class to observe religious holidays on regularly scheduled class days must notify the faculty member(s) ahead of time and be excused from class. The student must also obtain a signed form from the student affairs manager excusing him or her from class due to the observance, and will be held accountable for the information missed. The student can request extra assignments or other ways to make up the information missed, but missing classes for this reason does not count as an absence. Standards Committee The members of the Standards Committee will include the managing director, director of education, and a faculty member.


Appeal Since the decision of the Standards Committee is final, there is no appeal. LEAVES OF ABSENCE AND WITHDRAWALS Students may request a leave of absence from CIA classes for up to 90 days. A second leave of absence may be requested within a 12month period for medical reasons. Leaves of absence must be requested in writing to the director of education. Students who do not file their request for a leave of absence in writing, or who are leaving CIA for periods of time greater than 90 days, will be placed on Withdrawal. For further details, please contact the director of education. For tuition refund information, refer to the schedule for withdrawal refunds on page 26. Students who re-enroll following their leave of absence or withdrawal are responsible for completing any new curriculum requirements that may have been added during the period of their absence. In such cases, students may be charged additional tuition or fees according to college policies. ATTENDING CLASSES WITH A TEMPORARY MEDICAL CONDITION Students who have a medical condition requiring an arm cast, sling, leg cast, crutches, or other temporary condition that significantly impairs mobility will not be permitted in culinary, baking, pastry, or table service classes for safety reasons. When their condition is fully healed, they must present a note from their doctor to the student affairs manager in order to resume culinary, baking, pastry, or table service classes. Faculty concerned about a student’s participation in class for these reasons should inform the director of education and send the student to that office.

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL FROM A CLASS All students are expected to attend and complete all classes for which they are registered. However, there are times when a medical or personal emergency may prevent a student from completing a class. In such cases, a student may request permission to withdraw from a class by immediately contacting the director of education. All requests for withdrawal from a class are given serious consideration, but not all requests are granted. Please keep in mind that if you had been failing the class at the time you requested withdrawal, you may still receive a failing grade. Students who are granted an Administrative Withdrawal from a class will be charged $50 to retake the class. COURSE MAKEUP POLICY Students who have to make up a course for any reason must make arrangements through the director of education. Doubling up on courses is strongly discouraged, but may be permitted under the following conditions: • The student has a minimum grade point average of 2.0 and is not on academic probation. • The courses being considered are not courses in the second semester of the sophomore year. • The enrollment in the makeup course does not exceed the maximum allowable class size. • The course schedules do not conflict. • There are no prerequisites.

Degree program students who fail a course twice must obtain written permission from the director of education to take the course at another college and must receive a grade of “C” or higher to transfer the credits back to The Culinary Institute of America.

Academic Policies | 43


CULINARY PRACTICAL RETAKE POLICY Students who remain unsuccessful at passing the culinary practical examination after their third attempt will not be allowed to register for a subsequent attempt until they have met with the Standards Committee. The Committee may require the completion of remedial work before allowing the student to register for any subsequent attempts. Students will be notified by the director of education when they are required to meet with the Standards Committee. COSTING PRACTICAL RETAKE POLICY Students who fail the costing practical examination two or more times are required to make a telephone appointment with the learning specialist in Hyde Park and receive five hours of documented tutoring arranged by the director of education before the exam can be rescheduled. Peer tutoring is available by appointment through the director of education. Once the student has received the necessary tutoring, he or she will be cleared by the director of education to register to retake the exam. SKILLS REMEDIATION CIA faculty will assign a student to attend Skills Remediation for a specific competency for the following reasons only: 1. The student has failed to demonstrate proficiency in the competency during his or her class. 2. The student has missed the competency in his or her class due to absence.

Scheduling The director of education, upon receiving the Skills Remediation Kitchen Assignment form from the faculty member, will schedule

the student to take part in Skills Remediation on day 13 or 14 of the semester or sooner—whenever there are fewer than three students taking their practical exam.

Grades If a student is scheduled to attend Skills Remediation, he or she will carry a grade of Incomplete (I). Once the student has demonstrated proficiency in the competency in question during Skills Remediation, the assigning faculty member will change the grade (which is based on the student’s actual attendance and performance in the class, and will not include his or her Skills Remediation performance) and submit the grade change through EGAS. Skills Remediation Attempts Students will be allowed up to three attempts to achieve proficiency at a single competency. If a student fails to show proficiency after three attempts, or has carried an Incomplete for more than three blocks, he or she will be required to meet with the director of education. Fee The fee levied by the Bursar’s Office for attending a Skills Remediation session is $50, which will be billed to the student’s account. PREREQUISITES FOR EXTERNSHIP Externship takes place during your third semester. You may be registered for Externship with one culinary arts or baking and pastry arts course outstanding. An outstanding course is defined as one you have failed, have received an Incomplete, or from which you have withdrawn. However—without exception—to begin externship, you must have received a passing grade for: • Mathematics (MGMT-110)

44 | Academic Policies


• Introduction to Food Science (ARTS-150), which includes achieving ServSafe® certification • Culinary Practical Examination I

Procedure Students who fail the Culinary Practical Examination I will be notified immediately by the faculty member administering the examination. They must make arrangements with the director of education to take the examination that block and pass it in order to be allowed to begin their externship. Please see the exam retake policy on page 44 for more information. Students will be notified by the director of education of any outstanding courses and the available schedule for makeups. PREREQUISITES FOR SOPHOMORE-YEAR REGISTRATION Students with outstanding courses from freshman year due to failure, incomplete grade, or administrative withdrawal are required to successfully complete those courses before beginning the first semester of the sophomore year. PREREQUISITES FOR RESTAURANT COURSES To enroll in the CIA’s restaurant service courses (Contemporary Restaurant Service and Formal Restaurant Service), AAS culinary arts students must successfully complete their externship and the practical exam portion of the Introduction to Customer Service class. POLICY ON SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS Standards Committee The Standards Committee is responsible for reviewing and assessing student academic progress and upholding the college’s academic standards and honesty policies. If a

student is unable to maintain satisfactory academic progress or has exhibited academic dishonesty, the committee can impose sanctions including, but not limited to: • Academic probation • Suspension from the college • Permanent dismissal from the college

Satisfactory Academic Performance Students are expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress and move efficiently through the program by passing all courses and assessments, and maintaining a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 1.75 at the end of the first semester and a 2.0 for all subsequent semesters. Student grades may be reviewed at any time. A student will not be considered making satisfactory academic progress if he or she: • Has a cumulative GPA below 1.75 at the end of the first semester of the associate degree program or the first nine weeks of a certificate program, • Has a semester GPA below 2.0 for any subsequent semester, • Has failed externship twice, • Has been unable to complete successfully a semester within eight months, • Is being reviewed for violation of the Policy on Academic Honesty, or • Has extenuating circumstances that need to be reviewed by the committee.

Prior to meeting with the Standards Committee, students will be required to provide a statement to the committee describing the reasons that contributed to poor academic performance. If a student fails to appear before the Standards Committee, the committee has the authority to proceed with the hearing and render a decision.

Academic Policies | 45


Veterans Affairs When the grade point average of a Veterans Affairs (VA) student is unsatisfactory after nine weeks, the student will be placed on academic probation for six weeks. If, during the next semester, the student’s cumulative grade point average remains below the graduation requirement, the student will not be certified for VA educational benefits until his/her academic status is restored to good standing. However, the student can continue enrollment subject to regular CIA academic policies. Military educational benefits have limitations as to the length of time you are eligible to receive those benefits. The CIA maintains a written record of the previous education and training of the veteran or eligible person, and clearly indicates appropriate credit has been given for that education or training. The educational period for that student at the CIA will be shortened proportionately, and the college will notify the student and the Department of Veterans Affairs when this occurs.

last semester completed and is unable to maintain a GPA of 2.0 by the end of the current semester, • Fails a course three times, or • Does not satisfy other criteria deemed appropriate by the Standards Committee.

While on academic probation, students will have their GPA audited every three weeks prior to the end of the semester. If a student’s cumulative GPA is below 2.0 by the end of the semester of the academic probation, he or she will be suspended from classes for a minimum of 15 weeks. Students will be required to submit a request for readmission to the director of education a minimum of six weeks prior to returning to the college. Because of the nature of the class schedule at the CIA San Antonio, reinstatement may not be possible until the next class entry date (up to one year).

Academic Suspension (Certificate) The individual records of students who are on academic probation will be reviewed. The following conditions will result in academic suspension:

Academic Probation Academic probation provides students an opportunity to improve their academic standing while still enrolled in the program. Academic probation will be communicated in writing by the director of education. Students on academic probation must meet with the student affairs manager to address study skill issues. They may also be encouraged to meet with a counselor to help address personal issues.

• The student has been on academic probation during the last semester completed and is unable to maintain a GPA of 2.0 in the current semester.

Academic Suspension (Associate Degree) Academic suspension will be rendered if a student:

• Maintain full-time status.

• Has been on academic probation during the 46 | Academic Policies

Financial Aid Probation In accordance with HEA Section 484(c), 34 CFR 668.16(e), 34 CFR 668.32(f) and 34 CFR 668.34, in order to be deemed eligible for financial aid, students must: • Be in good satisfactory academic standing, and

Students at The Culinary Institute of America are expected to maintain full-time status in the program, which is a minimum of 12 credits per semester. On occasion, they may


fall below full-time due to failures or other circumstances. If students fall below 12 credits, they will be classified as part-time and may lose part or all of their financial aid package. Check with the Financial Aid Office if you are required to drop below full-time. If, at the end of a semester, it has been determined that a student does not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements, that student will not be eligible for financial aid unless granted a one-semester probationary period by the Standards Committee. When retaking a course that is not part of a full semester, students will not be eligible to receive financial aid until they have successfully completed the course and are permitted to start the next semester.

stealing; and cheating in any form is dishonest. This behavior, or assisting anyone else in this behavior, represents a serious violation of professional and academic standards at the CIA and will not be tolerated. Since such behavior is demeaning to the academic integrity of the programs, students who do not record the sources of their information will fail that assignment and may be required to complete another equivalent assignment. Students who copy materials that are not their own and present that material as their own work will fail the assignment and possibly the course. Students found cheating will automatically fail the test or assignment involved and may also fail the course. Serious violations of these standards will require that student to see the Standards Committee.

Recording Suspensions or dismissal will be recorded on the student’s transcript.

Initial Consequences A faculty member who identifies academically dishonest behavior will tell the student about it, explain what is wrong, ask for an explanation, and inform the student of the consequences for the dishonesty. In each case, the faculty member will inform the student in person and by letter, a copy of which will be sent to the registrar and the director of education.

Appeal The decision of the Standards Committee is final and therefore cannot be appealed. POLICY ON ACADEMIC HONESTY At The Culinary Institute of America, students are expected to develop their own ideas and to consult research materials for their studies. Borrowing original ideas, recipes, research, or wording from another source without giving credit is plagiarism; using prepared materials from an organization whose primary business is selling research papers is dishonest; submitting a paper prepared for one course to a faculty member teaching another course or section of that same course, without prior permission, is cheating; copying from another source is

Suspension or Dismissal In cases of academic dishonesty where the faculty member wants to recommend suspension or dismissal, the faculty member shall consult with the appropriate education staff member and shall recommend suspension or dismissal in writing to the appropriate college official within five working days (Monday through Friday, exclusive of holidays). The faculty member shall also inform the student in writing.

Academic Policies | 47


Academic Review The individual records of students who are recommended by a faculty member for suspension or dismissal due to academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Standards Committee. Students will be required to provide a statement or explanation of their situation as well as attend a meeting to review the circumstances surrounding the dishonest behavior. At that meeting, a decision will be made regarding whether the student will be suspended, be dismissed, or can continue at the college under specific conditions. If students fail to live up to these conditions, they will be suspended for a minimum of one semester or dismissed from the college. Recording Students suspended or dismissed for academic reasons will have that fact recorded on their transcripts. Appeal Since the decision of the Standards Committee is final, there is no appeal. GRADING The college operates on a quality-point alpha grading system as follows: Grade

Numeric Range

Grade Points

A

95–100

4.00

A-

90–94

3.66

B+

87–89

3.33

B

84–86

3.00

B-

80–83

2.66

C+

77–79

2.33

C

74–76

2.00

C-

70–73

1.66

D

65–69

1.00

F

<65

0.00

I

0.00

W

0.00

48 | Academic Policies

AW

0.00

P

0.00

HP

0.00

TC

0.00

NS

0.00

NG

0.00

AU

0.00

In order to calculate the GPA, multiply the credits earned by the grade points for each course separately to calculate the quality points. Then add all the quality points together and divide total quality points by credits earned, including credits for “F” grades that have not been repeated. For courses with “C” level competency, grades of “C-” or “D” are equivalent to failing grades.

GRADING SYMBOLS I Incomplete: This grade indicates a student hasn’t completed all the course requirements. It may also indicate failure to master specific course competencies. Freshmen or sophomores must make up all course requirements before they can begin the next semester. If students do not complete the course by the specified date, they will automatically fail the course and be required to make up the entire course at the cost of full tuition. W Withdrawal from the CIA: This grade doesn’t include absences and isn’t computed into the grade point average. AW Administrative Withdrawal: This symbol indicates that a student was granted an administrative withdrawal from the class by the director of education. Absences are not shown, and there is no effect on the cumulative grade point average.


P

HP TC

NS

NG

AU

Pass: Given for costing and culinary practical examinations and some passfail courses. High Pass: Given for costing and culinary practical examinations. Transfer Credit: Denotes that credit for a course was transferred from another college. No Show: Given only for costing and culinary practical examinations and externship prep seminars if a student never showed up to take them. Note: if a practical exam or externship prep seminar is missed for this reason, it is recorded as an absence. No Grade: This grade is automatically given if a student is on a roster and the instructor fails to give a grade or if the student hasn’t officially withdrawn from a course. Audit: This symbol indicates that a student did not take the course for credit and the instructor of this course did not make an evaluation to issue a grade.

Students are only allowed to repeat classes that they have previously failed or from which they have received an administrative withdrawal. When the course is repeated and a passing grade is issued, the previous failure remains on the student’s transcript but is not included in the calculation of his or her grade point average. If a repeated course is failed more than once, all failures are noted on the transcript, but only the first failure is omitted from the GPA calculation. At the end of each course, the instructor will issue a grade. Clarification about the grade can be obtained by contacting the instructor immediately.

PROBLEMS WITH A GRADE If you have a concern about a grade received in any class:

1. Speak with the instructor of that particular class. 2. If the instructor is unable to satisfy your concern or to answer your questions fully, submit your concerns in writing to the director of education, located in the Admissions building. Your written statement must be received within three weeks of the completion of the course. 3. You will be invited to address the Standards Committee to express your concerns. The committee will also review information provided by the instructor and will then decide what action to recommend to the instructor. 4. The decision of the instructor is final.

PROBLEMS WITH A CLASS If you have other concerns about a class: 1. Speak with the instructor of that particular class. 2. If the instructor is unable to resolve the problem or fully answer your questions, make an appointment to see the director of education. 3. If the problem is not resolved to your satisfaction, make an appointment to see the Standards Committee. 4. The decision of the Standards Committee is final.

POLICY ON INCOMPLETE GRADES Incomplete grades shall be assigned by faculty members when a student has not yet completed the work for a course and the faculty member agrees to provide a student more time to finish the course. Students shall have no more than six weeks from the end of the date of the course to submit any incomplete work to the faculty member. Students who do not finish their incomplete work in the period required will receive an “F” grade. An incomplete grade will be automatically converted to a failing grade nine weeks after the date of the end of the course. Academic Policies | 49


In order to be eligible for an incomplete grade, a student must:

• The faculty member has approved the request to audit the course.

• have already completed at least three quarters of the work in a course,

• The student has paid the audit fee before the class begins.

• have a passing grade on the work already submitted in the course, and

• The student is in good academic and financial standing.

• sign an Incomplete Grade Agreement that indicates the remaining work to be done, the time frame to accomplish that work, and the consequences of not completing the work on time or in a quality manner.

• The course is not part of the student’s degree or certificate program.

The Incomplete Grade Agreement shall be signed by the student and faculty member and a copy shall be kept in the student’s file along with the class roster on which the grades are recorded. Incomplete grades are not a substitute for an administrative withdrawal, which is granted by the director of education for a student’s personal or medical circumstance. In addition, incomplete grades:

The auditing fee is $400 per credit. Students who audit courses are expected to attend all classes, but their work will not be evaluated and no record of their participation will be kept. Their transcripts will show that they have audited the course. Students who want to audit courses must make payment to the Bursar’s Office and scheduling arrangements with the director of education.

PROFESSIONALISM, UNIFORM, AND HYGIENE POLICY

• The student must be currently enrolled in a degree or certificate program.

Professionalism As professionals at The Culinary Institute of America, we are constantly working to enhance the status of the hospitality industry. Students, faculty, staff, and alumni all share a common pride in their work, workplace, and appearance. We have all chosen the hospitality industry as our vocation. It is an ancient and respected profession. It takes many years of hard work, training, dedication, and tenacity to become a leader in this industry, and it takes only a few moments to dress, act, and think like a professional. The following standards of conduct are expected of anyone who aspires to be regarded as a professional in the hospitality industry. Professionals:

• There is room in the course.

• refrain from abusive and foul language;

• The course is not a required course in the student’s degree or certificate program.

• speak and act without prejudice to race, color, creed, religion, age, gender, disability, ethnicity, veteran status, marital status, or sexual orientation;

• shall not be given for students who will fail the course due to absences, • cannot be used for a student retaking a final examination (with the exception of a score less than 75 on the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® certification exam), and • will not be included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average (GPA).

POLICY ON AUDITING COURSES The CIA allows auditing of courses in order to enable students to pursue topics of their interest. Students may audit a course only under the following circumstances:

• There are no scheduling conflicts. • The course is offered by the college for credit.

• demonstrate and adhere to ethical business 50 | Academic Policies


practices, with due respect for customers and colleagues; • promote understanding and respect for those alcoholic beverages used in the hospitality industry; • refrain from the abuse of drugs and alcohol; • treat all equipment and property with respect as if personal property; • are polite and courteous to all visitors, peers, and colleagues; • work with a positive attitude; • dedicate themselves to learning; • stay open-minded to the opinions of others; • share knowledge with others; • act reliably and dependably; and • act with honesty and integrity in their interactions with all people.

General All codes must be observed on your way to class, in class, leaving class, or in the student dining room. All students at The Culinary Institute of America are expected to dress professionally. The uniform code set forth for each particular learning atmosphere takes into consideration hygiene, sanitation, and professionalism. The following are standards that are required when attending any class: • You must be clean-shaven, with sideburns not exceeding the middle of the ear for men. Beards are not permitted. • Mustaches must be neatly trimmed and may not extend below the corner of the lips. • Facial jewelry, including jewelry in eyebrows, eyelids, lips, tongue, upper ear, or nose, is not permitted. • Plain white undergarments are required for both men and women. Colored or logo T-shirts are not permitted. • Leather clothing is not permitted. • Wallet chains and visible key rings are not permitted. • Hats, other than the chef’s toques, are not to be worn.

• In all instances, hair must be a natural color, groomed and clean, and restrained above the collar. No hair colors such as green, blue, or pink, and no outlandish hairstyles such as Mohawk cuts will be permitted. Hair nets and white or black kerchiefs/scrunchies are required to restrain hair that is unruly or hangs below the collar.

Personal Hygiene Every professional in the culinary field should be acutely aware of the necessity to maintain the highest standards of personal hygiene and to present a businesslike appearance at all times. In the early stages of your program, you are issued a Food Sanitation Manual, which discusses personal hygiene in detail. It is the responsibility of all foodservice professionals to bathe or shower, practice oral hygiene, and use deodorant daily. Food Safety and Kitchen Sanitation The CIA has developed comprehensive food safety and sanitation programs. You are responsible for food safety and food preparation area sanitation as an integral part of your learning experience and are expected to abide by the guidelines set forth in each food production area. You are expected to taste food in kitchens and bakeshops using tasting spoons. Eating is allowed only in designated dining areas. Drinking liquid from a closed container and away from the work station is the only acceptable way to consume liquids in kitchens and classrooms. Uniform Care The professional chef’s uniform represents a long and proud tradition. You are expected to wear your uniform with pride and make sure it is neat and clean at the start of each class. Students will be issued five chef’s jackets every 30 weeks (or two semesters), five pairs of pants, two neckerchiefs, and three aprons. Academic Policies | 51


The maintenance of your appearance is a professional matter; therefore, you are responsible for laundering and ironing your own uniform. Alterations to your uniform are your responsibility. The only acceptable alterations are to adjust coat sleeve length and pant hem length. In the event your uniforms do not fit properly, return them within five days of receiving. New uniforms will be issued as soon as possible, and you will be given a lab coat to wear in the interim. This is the only exception to the requirement that you dress in proper uniform. Students will also be issued two monogrammed chef’s coats appropriate for table service classes, and two pairs of black trousers. These uniforms will be issued in the fourth semester.

permitted. • The breast or arm pocket of chef’s jacket may only contain one clip-on pen and one clip-on thermometer. • Fingernails should be short, trimmed, clean, neat, and free of polish. • For sanitation reasons, gloves, aprons, side towels, and hats are not worn when: going to the restroom, taking out the garbage, entering or leaving academic buildings, or eating meals in the student dining room.

Hospitality and Service Management Uniforms • CIA-issued clean and pressed service chef’s jacket. • CIA-approved clean white neckerchief. • Undergarments must be white. Colors and logos are not permitted. • Clean and pressed black trousers for women and men.

Chef’s Uniform The chef’s uniform must be worn in all kitchen, liberal arts, and business management classes.

• Black socks/hosiery with trousers for men and women.

• CIA-issued cleaned and pressed chef’s checkered pants of proper fit, neither pegged nor cuffed.

• One plain ring and one watch are the only jewelry permitted.

• CIA-issued cleaned and pressed white chef’s jacket with embroidered name. • CIA-approved clean white neckerchief. • CIA-issued clean white paper hat. • CIA-issued cleaned and pressed white apron. • Black or white socks only. • Clean and polished black leather work shoes—closed back, non-slip soles, and black laces (when applicable). Shoes should be sturdy and provide support to stand and work for long hours.

• Clean and polished black low-heeled dress shoes.

• Fingernails must be short, trimmed, clean, neat, and free of polish. • Hair must be professionally restrained off the face with solid white or black hair restraints, barrettes, scrunchies, etc. • No cologne, aftershave, or detectable sprays and lotions.

Anything not specified in this section may not be worn with the uniform. Uniforms must be complete and worn as designed.

Student Maître d’Hôtel Uniform

• One plain ring and one watch are the only jewelry permitted. A CIA-issued group leader pin will be permitted on the right front collar of the uniform.

• Traditional business suit or jacket, tie, and trousers for men.

• White undergarments are required for both men and women—colors or logos are not

• Clean and pressed dress-style shirts appropriate to the suit worn.

52 | Academic Policies

• Traditional business suit, dress, or skirt/blouse combination for women.


• Flesh-colored or dark hosiery/dark socks only. • Clean and polished dress shoes. • Jewelry accessories permitted—one post or stud earring per earlobe, one necklace, one watch, one brooch/pin, one ring, and one bracelet. Leather and cloth jewelry is not permitted.

Guidelines for Graduation Dress In recognition of the commitment to professionalism and hospitality, students are expected to wear the following at graduation: • Black socks for men or flesh-colored or black hosiery for women.

room or self-service meal lines. The penalties for non-compliance with the dress code are consistent for all classes at the CIA: • Of your final grade, 10% will be for Professionalism, Uniform, and Hygiene. The professor will assess each violation of the policy while you are in the class. • If you are non-compliant, you will be dismissed from class to make the needed corrections. • You risk the possibility of having demerits issued. You can avoid these penalties by demonstrating professionalism in all that you do.

• Clean and polished black dress shoes. • Black trousers. • CIA-issued, cleaned and pressed white graduation chef jacket buttoned to the top. • CIA-issued neckerchief. • CIA-issued clean, white paper hat. • Hair must be a natural color, groomed, and clean. Hair colors such as green, blue, or pink, as well as outlandish hairstyles such as Mohawk cuts, are unacceptable.

If you have a physical impairment as defined by section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or because of religious beliefs/customs included in title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972) and are unable to shave facial hair as described above, please submit appropriate documentation in writing for a variance to the director of education. Exceptions to this code must be verified by a letter from the director of education and must be carried on your person at all times.

Penalties for Non-Compliance While you are going to class, in class, leaving class, or in the student dining room, the uniform and dress code must be adhered to, and will be enforced. You need to be in proper attire to be admitted to the dining

POLICY ON GRADUATION PARTICIPATION Students must complete all of their academic requirements—courses, including externship; comprehensive examinations; and other requirements—and maintain a 2.0 cumulative average to graduate and receive their CIA diploma or certificate. In order to participate in graduation ceremonies, students must satisfactorily complete all of their course work and comprehensive exams. Students with any outstanding course work may petition the director of education to participate in their graduation ceremony. Procedure The director of education conducts graduation audits and is responsible for certifying that every student is eligible to participate in graduation. This audit will be conducted during the second semester of the sophomore year. The director of education will contact students who need to complete courses and examinations and notify the Bursar’s Office and Financial Aid Office. COMMENCEMENT AWARDS (ASSOCIATE DEGREE) Special awards for deserving students in the Academic Policies | 53


associate degree program are presented at commencement. These include:

Culinary Award Recognizes the student with excellent skills in culinary arts Frances Roth Leadership Award For outstanding leadership, professionalism, and service to the college Katharine Angell Academic Achievement Award Given to the culinary arts student with the highest GPA through the Contemporary Restaurant Service course. Management Award For excellence in management classes COMMENCEMENT AWARDS (CERTIFICATE) Special awards for deserving students in the LCCP are presented at graduation: Academic Achievement Award Given to the student with the highest GPA through the 27th week of classes Culinary Award Recognizes the student with excellent skills in culinary arts Student Achievement Award Recognizes one LCCP student who has achieved a high standard of performance as determined by the faculty ATTENDANCE SEAL If perfect attendance is maintained for all on-campus semesters, a seal accompanies the diploma. WEB-BASED LEARNING The college employs a web-based course management system that can be accessed by 54 | Academic Policies

students and faculty both on and off campus. The tool provides online access to all course guides, recipe manuals, syllabi, and support materials for The Culinary Institute of America’s degree and certificate programs. Students can read and study the course material directly online and have the option of downloading and printing all or selected portions of these materials. The system also gives students the ability to hyperlink to other pertinent educational resources on the Internet, including links to the CIA’s Digital Video Library. The course management system is just one of many online applications available via CIA Student Web Services that enrich our students’ educational experience. Degree program students may use an online learning environment for selected liberal arts classes.

STATEMENT OF ACADEMIC FREEDOM Faculty members shall be free to teach course information without regard to censorship or any other artificial restraints on free inquiry and learning. Faculty members shall be restricted to dealing with course materials in the classroom environment and shall not use the classroom as a basis for the transmission of information outside of their assigned courses. They shall, however, be free to discuss any controversial issues dealing with their courses without the fear of reprisal, provided that the discussions are related to subjects taught. The CIA has developed standard course materials that faculty members are expected to teach. Faculty members are encouraged to present individual views and alternative materials as a means of supplementing, but not replacing, that standard course material. Academic freedom in the CIA shall not be deemed to permit or condone denigra-


tion or demeaning criticisms of other faculty members, staff members, students, the CIA, its programs, or the foodservice and hospitality industry. Freedom of individual conscience, association, and expression shall be encouraged and fairness of procedure shall be observed both to safeguard legitimate interests of the CIA and to exhibit by appropriate example the basic objectives of a democratic society.

COLLABORATIVE DEGREE PROGRAM The Culinary Institute of America, the world’s premier culinary college, and the Cornell School of Hotel Administration, the recognized leader in service and hospitality management, have formed an alliance to offer a collaborative degree program for students with a passion for food and hospitality operations. After earning their AAS at the CIA, students can transfer to Cornell and complete their Bachelor of Science (BS) from the Cornell Hotel School in four to five semesters. This unique educational opportunity allows CIA students to explore topics such as advanced restaurant management, revenue management, design and development, and restaurant entrepreneurship, as well as foodservice in hotels, resorts, spas, stadiums, institutions, and other hospitality settings. Students may be accepted into the program after completing their associate degree program at the CIA. They must complete the Cornell application requirements and interview with the Cornell School of Hotel Administration. In a predetermined program, AAS in Culinary Arts students may be awarded up to 49 transfer credits. To learn more, visit www.shacia.org or www.hotelschool.cornell.edu, or e-mail CIA_Alliance@sha.cornell.edu.

CONTINUING EDUCATION The CIA is here to support you throughout your career, with educational programs and materials designed to further your professional development. Through the college’s Continuing Education Division, you can: • Take individual courses or multi-week immersions in areas such as culinary arts, world cuisines, baking and pastry, culinary technology, menu R&D, foodservice management, and professional wine studies at foundation, intermediate, and advanced skill levels. • Put your skills to the test by earning CIA ProChef® Certification at one of three levels of industry-recognized achievement. • Demonstrate your wine knowledge to the world with a prestigious Certified Wine ProfessionalTM credential from the CIA, offered at foundation and advanced levels. • Participate in conferences for industry professionals. • Reinforce your skills or train your team with a wide range of educational materials from the CIA. Available in a variety of media—from DVD and online to print publications and apps—these training materials cover knowledge areas as diverse as cooking methods, confections, front-of-the-house management, and more. • Enlist the expertise of our CIA Consulting team to develop custom products and solutions for your foodservice and hospitality business.

Programs are offered at our New York, California, and Texas campuses. CIA students and alumni receive a 10% discount on CIA continuing education courses and training materials. For more information, you can visit www.ciaprochef.com or call 1-800-888-7850.

Academic Policies | 55


CURRICULA Degree Offered Associate in Applied Science in Culinary Arts

Certificate Offered Latin Cuisines Certificate

HEGIS* Code 5404 * Higher Education General Information Survey

DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS The degree and certificate program curricula at The Culinary Institute of America are composed of courses offering comprehensive instruction in cooking, baking, beverage studies, and general education. The CIA does not provide English as a Second Language instruction. After graduating from these programs, students will have acquired a top-notch education, enabling them to meet the needs of the foodservice and hospitality industry for well-educated, highly qualified professionals. While it is to students’ advantage to complete the degree or certificate programs in the prescribed period, they may take a maximum of 1½ times the normal completion time to complete their program if circumstances warrant. Please note: Students should follow the course curricula as described in the catalog covering the academic year of their entry date to the CIA. Any curriculum changes listed in subsequent catalogs may not apply to their matriculation. Questions about the course curriculum should be addressed to the director of education.

56 | Curricula

AAS DEGREE CURRICULUM The Culinary Institute of America awards the Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in culinary arts upon completion of the required curriculum. The CIA’s degree program provides students with the broadest culinary arts education possible. It exposes them to the different styles and experiences of the college’s faculty members, acquaints them with a wide variety of foodservice equipment, and prepares them for whatever area of the foodservice and hospitality industry they choose to enter. The Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree program in culinary arts teaches students what works in the front and the back of the house and why it works to prepare them for such entry-level positions as chef, caterer, dining services administrator, food researcher, kitchen supervisor, food writer, and more, as well as similar mid-level positions that come with more experience. To qualify for the degree, students must successfully complete the entire course of study: four on-campus semesters of about 15 weeks each, plus one 18- to 21-week semester at an approved externship site. Students need to earn a total of 69 credits and also need to maintain a grade point average of at


least 2.0 to complete the associate degree program. In addition, to be considered for a degree, CIA students must (a) receive National Restaurant Association ServSafe® certification upon completion of the Introduction to Foodservice course and (b) adhere to food safety certification standards throughout the curriculum. Degrees will be inscribed “With High Honors,” “With Honors,” and/or display a “Perfect Attendance” seal if performance merits citation.

AAS Educational Objectives • Attain proficiency in traditional and contemporary culinary techniques, basic baking and pastry skills, service, and beverage management. • Acquire general skills including independent and critical thinking, analytical and technological aptitude, applied problem solving, effective communication, quantitative analysis, and an appreciation for lifelong learning. • Learn the interpersonal skills necessary for working effectively in the foodservice industry. • Explain basic management responsibilities in the foodservice industry

Class Sessions and Credit Hours A clock hour is defined as 50 minutes of instructional time in class. At least 15 hours of class lecture or 30 hours of laboratory time—and the study and homework associated with those class hours—constitute one semester credit hour.

students in lecture classes. Within each group, students will actively participate in learning assignments related to the cleaning and sanitizing of laboratory areas and equipment. Personal hygiene and proper food handling procedures are emphasized to minimize potential food contamination. Strict sanitation and safety regulations are practiced and enforced. This reflects the college’s concern that such practices be an integral part of all foodservice and hospitality operations, for the health and safety of personnel and guests alike. The number of credit units for the Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Culinary Arts degree program is 69 credit units. The length of time normally required for completion of the program is 21 months. The AAS degree program’s five semesters include a required approved externship, during which students are employed in the foodservice industry. Externship is taken between the second and fourth semesters at CIA-approved sites. The college’s academic schedule ensures that students will progress from basic to intermediate to advanced subject matter in proper sequence. Registration for each semester depends on the successful completion of the courses in the previous semesters. The CIA reserves the right to modify course sequence and content.

Instructional Programs and Schedule While enrolled in the CIA San Antonio AAS degree program, students will be assigned to small instructional groups. These groups will have a maximum of 20 students in laboratory courses, which integrate culinary theory and practice and a maximum number of 40 Curricula | 57


Graduation Requirements (NC = Non-credit)

Freshman Year, First Semester

Credits

Culinary Fundamentals* Externship Prep Seminar I Externship Prep Seminar II First-Year Seminar: Recipes for Success Gastronomy Introduction to Food Science* Mathematics Product Knowledge

Total Credits

6.0 NC NC 1.5 3.0 3.0 1.5 1.5

Freshman Year, Second Semester

Introduction to Management Writing Meat Identification, Fabrication, and Utilization Seafood Identification and Fabrication Modern Banquet Cookery Introduction to Ă&#x20AC; La Carte Cooking High-Volume Production Cookery Culinary Practical Examination I Externship Registration Seminar

Externship

1.5 1.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 NC NC 16.5

3.0

Credits

Baking and Pastry Skill Development Garde Manger Cuisines of the Americas Cuisines of the Mediterranean Cuisines of Asia World Cultures and Cuisines Controlling Costs and Purchasing Food Menu Development Total Credits

1.5 3.0

16.5 Total Credits

Sophomore Year, First Semester

Credits

3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 1.5 1.5 18.0

Sophomore Year, Second Semester Introduction to Customer Service Wine Studies Culinary Practical Examination II Contemporary Restaurant Service Formal Restaurant Service Contemporary Restaurant Cooking Formal Restaurant Cooking Costing Examination Total Credits

TOTAL CREDITS FOR AAS DEGREE

Credits 1.5 1.5 NC 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 NC 15.0

69.0

* Students must receive a passing grade for both the Culinary Fundamentals and the NRA ServSafeÂŽ examination (part of the Introduction to Food Science course) and meet GPA requirements in order to progress to the second semester of the freshman year. Please note: For current students, curricular requirements for degree completion are those described in the catalog of the year they first matriculated in the program. For students returning to the CIA to complete their degree, individual course requirements will be determined upon readmission. Questions about the curriculum should be directed to the director of education. 58 | Curricula


LATIN CUISINES CERTIFICATE CURRICULUM Designed for graduates of approved associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or certificate programs in culinary arts, the 30-week Latin Cuisines Certificate Program provides comprehensive instruction to students who have a serious interest in deepening their knowledge of Latin cuisines and acquiring a specialization that can help advance their career. Skills are developed through handson exercises designed to teach culinary techniques and enhance an understanding of flavors and the dynamic interaction of ingredients. Graduates of the program will have the skills and knowledge to serve as chefs and in other culinary-related positions in the industry. To qualify for the certificate, students must successfully complete the entire course of study: two on-campus semesters of about 15 weeks each. The program consists of 37 credits of lecture and hands-on participation in a culinary laboratory. The LCCP is approximately 30 weeks in length, and depending on the calendar, students may have an occasional weekday off during the program. Once students have successfully completed the required 37 credit hours while maintaining at least a 2.0 grade point average and no more than five absences, they will be awarded the “Latin Cuisines Certificate Program” certificate upon graduation. LCCP Educational Objectives • Attain proficiency in traditional and contemporary Latin American culinary techniques through hands-on exercises in a professional kitchen environment. • Acquire background knowledge of Latin American cuisines in order to identify characteristic flavor profiles.

• Learn the tools and function of a professional kitchen as directly related to Latin American cooking in order to apply them towards prior knowledge of the culinary arts.

Class Sessions and Credit Hours A clock hour is defined as 50 minutes of instructional time in class. At least 15 hours of class lecture or 30 hours of laboratory time—and the study and homework associated with those class hours—constitute one semester credit hour. Instructional Program and Schedule While enrolled in this program, students will be assigned to an instructional group of up to 20 students. This group is scheduled as a team for all lecture and lab classes to integrate theory and practice while stressing human relations, communication skills, and teamwork. Within each group, students will actively participate in learning assignments related to the cleaning and sanitizing of laboratory areas and equipment. Exemplary personal hygiene and proper food handling procedures are emphasized to minimize potential food contamination and to develop the professional conduct, demeanor, and image of the student. Strict sanitation and safety regulations are emphatically followed and enforced, reflecting the college’s commitment that such practices are an integral part of all foodservice and hospitality operations. The college’s academic schedule ensures that students will progress from basic to intermediate to advanced subject matter in the proper sequence. Each class serves as the prerequisite for the next and registration for each semester depends on the successful completion of the courses in the previous semester. The CIA reserves the right to modify course sequence and content. Curricula | 59


Graduation Requirements

First Semester

Credits

Second Semester

Credits

Cuisines of Mexico I

3.5

Cuisines of Peru

3.5

Cuisines of Mexico II

3.5

Cuisines of Brazil

3.5

Cuisines of Central America

1.5

Cuisines of the Caribbean

1.5

Cuisines of Ecuador and Bolivia

1.5

Cuisines of Venezuela and Colombia

Cuisines of Chile and Argentina

1.5

1.5

Cuisines of Uruguay and Paraguay

1.5

Latin American Studies I

3.0

Latin American Studies II

3.0

Spanish Language

3.0

Portuguese Language

3.0

Thesis Development I

1.0

Thesis Development II

1.0

Exam Week

Exam Week Total Credits

Total Credits

18.5

18.5

TOTAL CREDITS FOR LCCP CERTIFICATE

37.0

Please note: For current students, curricular requirements for certificate completion are those described in the catalog of the year they first matriculated in the program. For students returning to the CIA to complete their certificate, individual course requirements will be determined upon readmission. Questions about the curriculum should be directed to the director of education.

60 | Curricula


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Courses in the CIA Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree program in culinary arts give students comprehensive, hands-on experience in the theory and techniques of foodservice and hospitality management while systematically incorporating general education. All credits can transfer to the corresponding bachelor’s degree program in culinary arts management in Hyde Park, NY. Latin Cuisines Certificate Program (LCCP) courses gives graduates of culinary arts degree or certificate programs comprehensive, hands-on, specialized instruction in the cuisines and cultures of Latin America.

Technical/Occupational Courses BAKING AND PASTRY SKILL DEVELOPMENT BAKE-241

3 credits

An introduction to the principles and techniques used in the preparation of high-quality baked goods and pastries, with an emphasis on fundamental production techniques and evaluation of quality characteristics. Topics include bread fermentation and production, ingredient functions, and custard ratios and preparations.

CONTEMPORARY RESTAURANT COOKING CULA-252

3 credits

This restaurant experience concentrates on previously learned cooking fundamentals and techniques and applies them to the cuisine of a terroir, utilizing à la carte menu preparation in a contemporary restaurant setting. Students will further develop their ability to organize an assigned station based on preparation methods while focusing on the production of menu items, plate presentations, and cooking techniques as applied to specific cuisines. Emphasis will be placed on sourcing, storage, uses, and nutritional aspects of key ingredients.

CONTEMPORARY RESTAURANT SERVICE ROPS-250

3 credits

An exploration of table service principles and skills with an emphasis on customer service in a restaurant. The focus will be placed on wine, beer, coffee, tea, and non-alcoholic beverage

service. Topics include guest relations, professional communications, order taking in an à la carte environment, service sequence, point-ofsale systems, cash handling, beginning merchandising, table skills, and dining room preparation.

CONTROLLING COSTS AND PURCHASING FOOD MGMT-245

1.5 credits

Examine the information and skills necessary to analyze and improve the profitability of a foodservice establishment. Topics include the flow of goods, income statements, forecasting sales, and controlling labor and food costs. Students will also analyze the complete purchasing cycle of a restaurant, beginning with product and vendor selection and ending with actual orders.

COSTING EXAMINATION CULS-250

This written examination tests knowledge of controlling costs in foodservice organizations and solving problems using quantitative reasoning. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

CUISINES OF ASIA CULP-132

2 credits

Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional and regional dishes of Asia. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines from China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and India. Course Descriptions | 61


CUISINES OF BRAZIL CULS-136

3.5 credits

An introduction to the regional cuisines of Brazil, this course will emphasize ingredients, cooking tools and techniques, and the historical and cultural forces that have shaped the country’s diverse culinary traditions. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate the cuisines from Brazil’s five major geo-culinary regions: North, Northeast, Central-West, South, and the Southeast, including an analysis of Mineira, Bahian, Afro-Brazilian, Nordeste, Gaucho, Caipira, and Carioca flavor profiles.

CUISINES OF CENTRAL AMERICA CULS-132

1.5 credits

This introduction to the cuisines of the seven countries that comprise Central America— Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panamá—will explore ingredients, cooking tools, and culinary techniques, as well as historical and cultural forces that have shaped the region’s culinary traditions. This study is presented in both country-specific and region-specific context. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate dishes specific to each Central American country and develop authentic flavor profiles and culinary techniques relevant both to the specific countries and the region as a whole.

CUISINES OF CHILE AND ARGENTINA CULS-138

1.5 credits

An introduction to the cuisines of Chile and Argentina, this course will dedicate one week each to the native and representative ingredients, cooking techniques, utensils, regional and iconic dishes, geography, climate, and ethnicities that have shaped each country’s cuisine and culinary cultures. The course will first establish an understanding and vocabulary of Chilean cuisine. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate regional Chilean dishes based on authentic flavor profiles and proper cooking techniques. Next, it will establish an understanding and vocabulary of Argentinean cuisine with an emphasis on the culinary tradi62 | Course Descriptions

tions of Buenos Aires, Mendoza, Córdoba, Salta, and Patagonia, including the cultural and historical factors that have shaped these cuisines. The class will prepare, serve, and evaluate regional dishes and analyze flavor profiles of Argentina.

CUISINES OF ECUADOR AND BOLIVIA CULS-137

1.5 credits

An introduction to the cuisines of Ecuador and Bolivia, this course will highlight the regional, Pan-Andean, and Pan-Amazonian cuisines of Ecuador and Bolivia with an emphasis on ingredients, cooking tools, and cooking techniques. Students will prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate foods from Ecuador’s Pacific coast (Cocina Criolla), the Andean region of Ecuador and Bolivia (Comida Serrana, Comida de Altura, and Arequipeño), as well as western and southwestern Amazonian cuisines, in order to analyze flavor profiles for these regional cuisines.

CUISINES OF MEXICO I CULS-130

3.5 credits

Cuisines of Mexico I is an introduction to three of Mexico’s six major regional cuisines—Cocina Norteña (Northern cuisine), La Cocina del Occidente (Western Mexican cuisine), and Las Cocinas del Bajío y Sus Alrededores (the cuisine of Mexico’s lowland and surrounding areas). The course examines native ingredients common throughout Mexico as well as those ingredients typical only to these specific regions. In addition, the course will establish how the geography and climate have determined the choice of ingredients, techniques, cooking methods, and flavor profiles of these regional cuisines. Students will prepare iconic regional dishes with emphasis on authenticity in flavor profile and classic Mexican technique. Conventions of modern and traditional Mexican cuisine found in these regions will be compared and contrasted to cuisines found throughout Latin America.

CUISINES OF MEXICO II CULS-131

3.5 credits

Cuisines of Mexico II is an introduction to the remaining three major Mexican regional


cuisines—La Cocina del Altiplano (Mexican Plateau cuisine), La Cocina del Golfo (Gulf of Mexico cuisine), and Las Cocinas del Sureste (Southeast Mexican cuisine). This course continues to examine national, regional, and local ingredients. It will also explore how geography, climate, international ethnic influences, and religious practices have shaped the evolution of ingredient choice, techniques, cooking methods, and flavor profiles. Students will prepare more iconic regional dishes with emphasis on authenticity in flavor profile and classic Mexican technique. They will also analyze, compare, and contrast the representative preparations of Mexican regional cuisines. The course will identify and study traditional sweets and confections, traditional and festive breads, and traditional and modern dessert preparations.

dients, cooking techniques, respective heritages, and ethnic influences. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate dishes representative of each Caribbean country and develop authentic flavor profiles and culinary techniques relevant both to the specific countries and the region as a whole.

CUISINES OF PERU

An introduction to the cuisines of Uruguay and Paraguay, this course will emphasize Southern Cone grilling methods, as well as Guaraniinspired dishes from the Missiones region. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate regional foods from Uruguay and Paraguay, while comparing and contrasting the grilling traditions of neighboring countries as part of the overall curriculum.

CULS-135

3.5 credits

An introduction to Peruvian cuisine, this course will emphasize ingredients, cooking tools and techniques, and the historical and cultural forces that have shaped the country’s culinary traditions. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate regional Peruvian dishes; develop flavor profiles for Cocina Criolla, Nikkei, and Chifa cuisines; and study Peru’s Andean and Amazonian culinary traditions.

CUISINES OF THE AMERICAS CULP-131

2 credits

Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional regional dishes of the Americas. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques for cuisines representative of the United States, Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean.

CUISINES OF THE CARIBBEAN CULS-133

1.5 credits

The Caribbean as a region is as diverse as the many nationalities of the original settlers. This course will identify, analyze, and compare the commonalities and differences among the Caribbean countries with regard to their ingre-

CUISINES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN CULA-262

2 credits

Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional, regional dishes of Europe and the Mediterranean. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines from Spain, France, Italy, Morocco, Tunisia, Greece, and Egypt.

CUISINES OF URUGUAY AND PARAGUAY CULS-139

1.5 credits

CUISINES OF VENEZUELA AND COLOMBIA CULS-134

1.5 credits

An introduction to the cuisines of Venezuela and Colombia, this course will focus on the representative ingredients, cooking techniques, utensils, regional and iconic dishes, geography, climate, and ethnicities that have shaped each country’s cuisine and culinary cultures. Students will prepare, serve, and evaluate dishes, and develop and analyze authentic flavor profiles and culinary techniques characteristic of each country. Regions studied will include the Caribbean and Pacific Coasts, Tierra Caliente (Valle del Cuaca and Cali), Medellín (Comida Paisana), Tierra Fría (Bogotá and the Andes), and Los Llanos (Orinoco River Basin and the Amazon). Course Descriptions | 63


CULINARY FUNDAMENTALS CULS-100

6 credits

An introduction to the application and development of fundamental cooking theories and techniques. Topics of study include tasting, kitchen equipment, knife skills, classical vegetable cuts, stock production, thickening agents, soup preparation, grand sauces, timing and multi-tasking, station organization, palate development, culinary French terms, and food costing. The course also introduces the student to fundamental concepts and techniques of basic protein, starch, and vegetable cookery. Emphasis is placed upon the study of ingredients and an introduction to small sauces will be given.

on externship will receive feedback from their supervisor and keep an externship manual to record and reflect on their work experience. (Prerequisites: see page 44.)

EXTERNSHIP PREP SEMINAR I EXTN-097

non-credit

CULINARY PRACTICAL EXAMINATION I

An introduction to the requirements of the Externship course. Students will explore the steps for planning and conducting a full-time job search. Topics include the course requirements, policies and procedures, the process to secure the position, résumé and cover letter writing, interviewing skills, and career planning. Researching approved externship locations as well as travel and housing accommodations are all discussed. (Pass/No Show grading)

CULS-151 (Cooking Practical) CULS-152 (Written Exam)

EXTERNSHIP PREP SEMINAR II

This culinary examination tests knowledge and proficiency in the principles of cooking and certain fundamental cooking methods—roasting, sautéing, frying, stewing, poaching, and braising. Students will be given an assignment (which includes a soup, protein, vegetable, and starch) to prepare, present, taste, and explain. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

CULINARY PRACTICAL EXAMINATION II CULS-251

This culinary examination tests students’ understanding of fundamental and more advanced proficiency in the principles of cooking. Students will prepare a menu for two that will include a fish starter and a main course. They are also tested on station setup, preparation skills, product presentation and flavor, and ability to answer a range of questions posed by the faculty member. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading) 3 credits

A supervised work experience designed to expand career knowledge while increasing speed, timing, organization, and ability to handle cooking in an approved commercial foodservice and hospitality establishment. Students 64 | Course Descriptions

non-credit

EXTERNSHIP REGISTRATION SEMINAR EXTN-099

non-credit

Students will register for their externship during this session. A completed training agreement is required. The seminar includes a discussion of the college’s expectations and a full overview of the externship manual assignment. In addition, the CIA’s values and the importance of maintaining professionalism are reviewed. (Pass/No Show grading)

FORMAL RESTAURANT COOKING

EXTERNSHIP EXTN-100

EXTN-098

Continued instruction in the process of securing one’s externship position, including review and critique of a strong résumé and cover letter. Interviewing techniques are discussed. Securing the position is reviewed, along with the training agreement, the follow-up process, and continued discussion of career networking and career planning. (Pass/No Show grading)

CULA-255

3 credits

Learn to prepare modern and seasonal dishes in a restaurant setting and put previously earned skills into practice. This course will emphasize cooking techniques and ingredients used in contemporary and classical cuisines and cover planning and ordering, station


organization, preparation and plating, timing, palate development and other production realities of a restaurant.

FORMAL RESTAURANT SERVICE ROPS-255

3 credits

A review and applications of the principles of fine service and hospitality in an à la carte restaurant serving the public. The course will emphasize customer service, wine and spirits, restaurant trends and sales, merchandising, and sales. Students study and participate in the fundamentals of reservation and point-of-sale systems, controlling inventory, merchandising products and services, managing costs, assuring high-quality service to all customers, and managing service.

GARDE MANGER CULP-125

3 credits

An introduction to three main areas of the cold kitchen: reception foods, plated appetizers, and buffet arrangements. Learn to prepare canapés, hot and cold hors d’oeuvre, appetizers, forcemeats, pâtés, galantines, terrines, salads, and sausages. Curing and smoking techniques for meat, seafood, and poultry items will be practiced, along with contemporary styles of presenting food and preparing buffets.

HIGH-VOLUME PRODUCTION COOKERY CULP-130

3 credits

An overview of the food preparation and serving techniques used by the casual dining, onsite catering, non-commercial, and retail segments. This course emphasizes high-volume food production, station setup, timing, service, and menu concept development and execution. Basic cooking and serving competencies will be reinforced and new skills specific to high-production preparation and serving will be taught. Lecture topics include the organization and structure of contract foodservice providers, production layouts and facility design, and menu concept development and execution. Menu items consistent with the retail and non-commercial segments and also

common to the casual dining segment of foodservice will be covered. Cooking competencies include egg cookery, grain cookery, sandwich preparation, pasta cookery, and preparation of simple and composed salads, moderate-cost entrées, and cooking with consideration for dietary needs and restrictions. Students will prepare and serve items in a semi à la carte style environment.

INDEPENDENT STUDY 1, 2, or 3 credits

Individual research on a topic of a student’s interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Students registering for this course will need to develop a Study Contract with an individual faculty member and obtain permission from the director of education. Independent Study can be taken during the freshman or sophomore year.

INTRODUCTION TO À LA CARTE COOKING CULP-115

3 credits

The foundation of cooking techniques and theories from Culinary Fundamentals will be applied in a production setting. Emphasis is placed on individual as well as team production. The focus is on cooking fundamentals, ratios, and formulas in a professional kitchen. Multi-course menus will be prepared, with a focus on batch cooking as executed in an à la carte-style service. (Prerequisite: Culinary Fundamentals/CULS-100)

INTRODUCTION TO CUSTOMER SERVICE ROPS-200

1.5 credits

This course introduces the various styles of table service and their histories, applications, advantages, and disadvantages. Topics covered include the psychology of service, professional standards of performance for dining room personnel, the fundamental skills required for service ware handling, the service sequence, order taking, and guest relations. Sanitation and safety in the dining room are discussed, as is the identification and correct use of all related equipment. Students will also practice Course Descriptions | 65


fundamental table service and participate in catering seminars.

INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT MGMT-240

1.5 credits

An investigation of various management topics including leadership, training, motivation, delegation, problem solving, decision making, and conflict resolution as they relate to foodservice establishments.

following the principles and techniques associated with preparing food in volume and serving it to large groups. Students will learn how to organize, plan, and operate a professional kitchen. Students will prepare and serve items in a banquet-style environment. Cooking applications are at a beginning level in preparation for increased understanding of food production.

MEAT IDENTIFICATION, FABRICATION, AND UTILIZATION

PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

CULA-115

An introduction to the identification and use of vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, and spices in various forms. Explore both fresh and prepared foods and learn to identify, receive, store, and hold products. Students will also learn to evaluate products for taste, texture, smell, appearance, and other quality attributes.

1.5 credits

This course will introduce the student to the subject of meats and their application in foodservice operations, building a strong foundation that supports the principles to be learned in the cooking courses to follow. Through lectures, demonstrations, hands-on activities, and reviews, students will learn about the muscle and bone structure of beef, veal, pork, lamb, and poultry; fabrication methods for sub-primal and foodservice cuts; and proper tying and trussing methods. Lectures will introduce meat inspection, quality and yield grading, costing and yield testing, purchasing specifications, and basic information concerning the farm-to-table trail. Discussions will include preferred cooking methods for all meats, proper knife selection, and butchery equipment. Sanitation and safety standards will be stressed throughout. (Prerequisite: Culinary Fundamentals/CULS-100)

MENU DEVELOPMENT MGMT-242

MODERN BANQUET COOKERY 3 credits

In this course, students will learn to apply fundamental skills to a production environment 66 | Course Descriptions

1.5 credits

SEAFOOD IDENTIFICATION AND FABRICATION CULS-116

1.5 credits

An overview of the principles of receiving, identifying, fabricating, and storing seafood. Identification will involve round fish, flat fish, crustaceans, and shellfish. Topics include knife skills, yield results, quality checking, product tasting, storage of various types of fish, techniques for fabricating cuts for professional kitchens, special storage equipment, and commonly used and underutilized species of fish.

WINE STUDIES 1.5 credits

An analysis of menu development for foodservice establishments. Topics to be covered include: menu development, descriptions, layout, design, and pricing; sales mix; and station balance. Students will critique and create menus from the perspective of concept, clarity, cost, price, and efficiency. CULA-110

CULS-114

ROPS-220

1.5 credits

An exploration of the roles that wines play as quality beverages in professional foodservice operations. The course will review styles of wine from around the world, the theory and practice of matching wine with food, tasting wines, and organizing wine service. Subjects to be explored include wines of the New World (Northern and Southern Hemispheres) and the Old World (Europe) as well as purchasing, storing, marketing, and serving wines in a restaurant environment.


General Education FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR: RECIPES FOR SUCCESS FRSH-100

1.5 credits

The focus of this course is to promote student success as learners and citizens of the world. Throughout this course, students will recognize the qualities of, and develop as, informed, responsible, and empowered learners. Course objectives will cover topics related to personal, intellectual, and social development. The academic and life skill sets emphasized throughout this course are transferable to the workplace.

GASTRONOMY ARTS-155

3 credits

This course is a study of the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected or will affect the way in which society interacts with food. Topics include the development of the culture around food in society; preference, aversion, and identity in food; taste; terroir; and food politics. Students will complete several written assignments and a research project.

INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SCIENCE ARTS-150

3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the physical and biological sciences that serve as the foundations of food safety and nutrition. Topics include prevention of foodborne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, HACCP procedures, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, and guidelines for safe food preparation, storing, and reheating. Students will take the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® examination in this course. Students also learn about basic nutrients, food labeling, nutritional principles, current issues in nutrition, and the application of nutritional principles to menu development, and will practice nutritional analysis of recipes.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES I ARTS-135

3 credits

In this course, students will first examine Latin America as a whole, then explore the countries individually. The interdisciplinary course studies

the historical and cultural background of the societies that constitute Latin America. Students analyze the geography and climate conditions that established the fundamentals of Latin American cuisines, consider the different ethnic influences that shaped them, and identify commonalities and differences. They then proceed to study each Latin American country or region with the same criteria, from North to South.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES II ARTS-136

3 credits

By 2050, people of Hispanic descent will form the majority in the U.S. Given this rapidly changing demographic, it is important to understand the historical and cultural developments of other nations and regions to better understand one’s own nation. The purpose of this course is to examine the historical and cultural underpinnings of the societies and geopolitical borders that define South America. The class examines the collision between the indigenous people of South America and the Europeans who colonized the continent, as well as the African slaves and indentured servants from Asia who fueled the continent’s vast plantation economies. The result of this collision can be used as a blueprint to understand culture, race, ethnicity, and nationality.

MATHEMATICS MGMT-110

1.5 credits

Students will learn basic mathematical concepts and methods that will assist them in using mathematics in their personal and professional lives. Topics include problem solving, sets, probability, statistics, consumer mathematics, and college algebra.

PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE PORT-310

3 credits

This Portuguese course requires no previous knowledge of the language. Students will learn how to speak, read, write, and understand basic Portuguese through the study of different subjects. They will be able to start a conversation with people they meet, ask about Course Descriptions | 67


their interests and activities, and tell them about themselves. They will also learn to talk in the past tense about activities that have already occurred, and will learn to express their opinion about current events. During this interactive class, participants practice skills learned in class by working in small groups and in real situations such as traveling, ordering food at a restaurant, and getting directions. Through readings, the Internet, films, documentaries, and audio-visual presentations, the course will introduce students to different cultural aspects of the Portuguese-speaking world. Students will write about themselves, their family, and their personal interests, and will be required to give short oral presentations.

SPANISH LANGUAGE SPAN-310

3 credits

This Spanish course requires no previous knowledge of the language. Students will learn how to speak, read, write, and understand basic Spanish through the study of different subjects. They will be able to start a conversation with people they meet, ask about their interests and activities, and tell them about themselves. They will also learn to talk in the past tense about activities that have already occurred, and will learn to express their opinion about current events. During this interactive class, participants practice skills learned in class by working in small groups and in real situations such as traveling, ordering food at a restaurant, and getting directions. Through readings, the Internet, films, and videos, the course will introduce students to various cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will write about themselves, their family, and their personal interests, and will be required to give short oral presentations.

THESIS DEVELOPMENT I ARTS-130

THESIS DEVELOPMENT II ARTS-131

1 credit

Thesis Development II is designed to help students hone and refine the final thesis produced from Thesis Development I. This course will guide students through the process of receiving peer-reviewed commentary, requiring them to critically evaluate and defend their work to experts in their topic area, as well as to the CIA’s Latin Cuisines Advisory Council. At the culmination of defending and revising their research thesis, students will develop it into self-directed projects.

WORLD CULTURES AND CUISINES ARTS-215

3 credits

Food is a critical component of culture within any society. This course investigates its impact on lifestyle, commerce, and politics in key global regions. Students learn why and how agriculture, religion, history, and environmental sustainability influence the characteristics of a culture and its food. The course develops an expanded understanding and appreciation of why and how people from diverse world cultures with varying backgrounds approach food and beverages differently.

WRITING ENGL-120

1 credit

Thesis Development I gives students the autonomy and power to pursue, explore, and expand upon topics relating to Latin America. The course will help to illuminate students’ interests, focus them into academic inquiries, and develop significant research projects 68 | Course Descriptions

around their resolutions. The curriculum will guide students from their initial problem development through independently conducted research—including learning how to locate and determine the validity of source information–and into the drafting of a sophisticated written argument. At the culmination of the course, each student will present a research paper of at least 18 pages, as well as present their inquiries, research, and conclusions orally at a symposium of academics, peers, and invited guests.

3 credits

This course will introduce students to the principles of expository writing, including content, organization, audience, point of view, clarity, and use of evidence. Students will write, edit and revise papers throughout the semester, and will learn how to incorporate information from outside sources. A grade of 65 or higher is required to pass this course.


FACULTY AND STAFF At the CIA, students learn from—and work side by side with—talented chefs and instructors from many countries. CIA faculty and staff members were a vital part of the American teams which won three consecutive world championships at the Culinary Olympics, the World Cup of Baking, and the Culinary World Cup. The college’s faculty and administrators have won numerous honors and awards, and have written many highly acclaimed culinary texts, including The Professional Chef®, The Professional Chef’s® Techniques of Healthy Cooking, and Baking and Pastry: Mastering the Art and Craft. For a legend of professional certifications, please see page 74.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Bradley Chairman of the Board Charlie Palmer ’79 Vice Chairman Mindy R. Rich Secretary Jon Luther Treasurer Patricia Anton Robert Berenson Elizabeth Blau Ralph Brennan Fred Carl, Jr. Carla R. Cooper Patricia Dailey Lori Daniel ’79 Lorna Donatone Frank J. Fahrenkopf, Jr. Michael Kaufman Thomas A. Keller Takeshi Kohjima Arthur Maxwell Richard Mazer Charles Merinoff II Robert A. Muh Harold Rosser Martin Sutter Roy Yamaguchi ’76 TRUSTEES EMERITI William C. Anton Chairman Emeritus

Donald Axleroad Frank Arthur Banks ’57 Jeffrey P. Berlind August J. Ceradini, Jr. Chairman Emeritus Lee A. Cockerell Barry E. Colman ’83 Dr. John J. Connolly Chairman Emeritus Walter Conti Chairman Emeritus John N. Daly Marcel Desaulniers ’65 Sebastian J. DiMeglio James Doherty John R. Farquharson Daniel A. Gescheidle Burton Hobson Karl Kilburg Abigail Kirsch Peter Kleiser Ted J. Kleisner Charles La Forge Richard Lavin Dr. Barbara Lawrence Herman Leavitt Ronald N. Magruder Tony May M. Cameron Mitchell ’86 Chairman Emeritus John L. Patten Faculty and Staff | 69


Margaret E. Happel Perry Alan R. Plassche Chairman Emeritus Richard J. Ripp ’55 Harris H. Rusitzky Chairman Emeritus Arno B. Schmidt John L. Sharpe Richard Smucker Arnym Solomon ’69 Rodney Stoner ’65 Donald G. Tober Nick Valenti Chairman Emeritus Joseph W. Vannucci Kevin Zraly

HONORARY TRUSTEES Paul Bocuse Christopher (Kit) Goldsbury Barron Hilton William N. Hulett I. Pano Karatassos ’60 J. Willard Marriott, Jr. John Profaci, Sr. James D. Robinson III Allan Schuman Charles E. Williams STAFF President and Cabinet Dr. L. Timothy Ryan ’77 President, EdD, MBA, BS, AOS, CMC, AAC Greg Drescher Vice President—Strategic Initiatives and Industry Leadership Mark Erickson ’77 Provost, MBA, BS, AOS, CMC Dr. Victor A. L. Gielisse Vice President—Advancement and Business Development, DBA, MBA, BS, CMC, AAC, CFBE, CHE 70 | Faculty and Staff

Bruce D. Hillenbrand Vice President—Admissions and Marketing, MBA, BA Richard Mignault Vice President—Administration and Shared Services, BA Charles A. O’Mara Senior Vice President—Finance and Administration, MBA, BS, CPA Alice-Ann Schuster Associate Vice President and Dean— Student Affairs, MS, BS Rick Tietjen Associate Vice President—Planning and Operations Support, MBA, BS

San Antonio Administration Susan Cussen Associate Vice President—Branch Campuses, MBA, BS David P. Kellaway Managing Director, CMC, CCE April Goess ’03 Director—Education, BPS, AOS Alain Dubernard Department Chair—Baking and Pastry Arts, CMB, CHE Hyde Park Administration Rachel C. Birchwood Director—Admissions, MEd, BS Kathleen Gailor Director—Financial Aid, MS, BS Lily Ropes Director—Degree Programs Marketing, BA Mary Ann Stearns Director—Human Resources, BS Linda Terwilliger Bursar Jennifer Wrage Director—Learning Strategies, MS, BS Sharon A. Zraly Director—Academic Assessment and Accreditation


SUSAN CUSSEN, ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT—BRANCH CAMPUSES Education: MBA, State University of New York at Albany. BS, State University of New York at Oneonta. Professional Experience: Senior Director of Educational Enterprises, Director of Marketing, CIA, Hyde Park, NY. Director of Marketing, Sales, and Communications, Container Machinery Corporation, Kinderhook, NY. Project Manager, Elrick & Lavidge, Clifton Park, NY. Regional Sales Representative, Pitney Bowes, Inc., Albany. Marketing Manager, Certified Reports, Kinderhook.

DAVID P. KELLAWAY, CMC, CCE, MANAGING DIRECTOR Professional Experience: Corporate Director of Culinary Operations, Station Casinos, Inc., Las Vegas, NV. Executive Chef, Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino and THEhotel, Las Vegas. Culinary Director, The Mirage Resort & Casino, Las Vegas. Executive Chef, Salish Lodge & Spa, Snoqualmie, WA. Chairman, Education Department, CIA, Hyde Park, NY. Executive Sous Chef, Chef de Cuisine, Sous Chef, Saucier, Garde Manger, The Plaza Hotel, NYC. Sous Chef, The Herbfarm, Fall City, WA. Sous Chef, Aspen Meadows Resort, Aspen, CO. Awards: Gold Medal, Grand Prize, Culinary Olympic Team, 1988. Gold Medal and Medal of the French Government, Société Culinaire Philanthropique. Crystal Chef Award, American Culinary Federation, 1987. CIA Faculty Member of the Year, 1987. Member: ACF. ACF National Culinary Competition Committee. ACF Master Chef Committee. ACF National Apprenticeship Committee. Washington State Chefs Association.

APRIL GOESS ’03, DIRECTOR— EDUCATION Education: BPS, AOS, CIA. Professional Experience: Assistant Director of Admissions, Culinary Demonstrator, CIA, Hyde Park, NY. General Manager, Crew Restau-

rant and Bar, Poughkeepsie, NY. Executive Chef, Eureka Inn, Eureka, CA. Sous Chef, Benbow Inn, Gaberville, CA. Member: Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA). SkillsUSA. ProStart. Eta Sigma Delta Culinary Honor Society. International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education (CHRIE). La Chaîne des Rôtisseurs.

ALAIN DUBERNARD, CMB, CHE, DEPARTMENT CHAIR—BAKING AND PASTRY ARTS Education: Diploma, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), Mexico City, Mexico. Escuela Panamericana de Hoteleria (Hotel Management School), Mexico City. Professional Experience: Production Consultant, Pastelería Alcazar, Mexico City. General Director Assistant and Consultant, Snob, Café Gourmet, Mexico City. Product Development and Good Manufacturing Practices Consultant, Café Miro and Aeropan, Culiacán, Mexico. Consultant, Pastelería Francesa S.A. de C.V. (El Globo), Mexico City. Chef-Owner and General Manager, La Balance Pâtisserie, Mexico City. Assistant Chef, A la Petite Chocolatière, Paris, France. Chef de Partie, Hôtel Bristol, Paris. Commis Pâtissier/Chef de Tour, Roux Restaurants Ltd., London, England. Awards: Marc Sarrazin Cup (CIA team), Salon of Culinary Art, NYC, 2006. Author: Tortas y Tartas en la Cocina. Member: Société Culinaire Philanthropique. Académie Culinaire de France.

DR. MELISSA S. BIGGS COUPAL, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—AMERICAN STUDIES AND THESIS DEVELOPMENT Education: PhD, MA, BA, University of Texas at Austin. Professional Experience: Program Coordinator for Humanities Institute, Visual Archivist, Teaching Assistant, University of Texas at Austin. Consultant, Blackland Community Development Corporation, Austin, TX. Part-time Instructor, Texas Faculty and Staff | 71


State University, San Marcos, TX; Southwestern University, Georgetown, TX. Ethnographer, Center for Social Work Research, University of Texas at Austin; City University of New York, Brooklyn. Graduate Editorial Assistant, Latin American Research Review. Field Researcher, Mendez Middle School, Austin, TX. Teacher Educator, For Kids’ Sake, Austin. Director, Assistant Director and Lead Teacher, First English Lutheran Child Development Center, Austin. Freelance Curriculum Writer, Austin.

VERÓNICA M. DE HERNÁNDEZ, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—SPANISH Education: BA, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza, Mexico. Professional Experience: Spanish Instructor, U.S. Army South, Command Language Program, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX. Director, South Texas Region, Futura Language Professionals, San Antonio. Public Relations Director, Bilingual Educator, Translator, Herma, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. Program Coordinator, Alcadia Municipal Programa “Monterrey Joven,” Monterrey, Mexico. Behavioral and Speech Therapist, Centro Audiofoniátrico, Monterrey. Research Assistant, Behaviorial Analysis and Psychology Departments, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolás de los Garza. CoHost, Co-Writer, La Psicología y su salud radio show, Monterrey.

ILIANA DE LA VEGA, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Professional Experience: Chef/Owner, El Naranjo Mobile, Austin, TX. Chef/Owner, El Naranjo, Oaxaca, Mexico. Member: Latin American Advisory Council.

DR. HOMER C. EMERY, RS, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—FOOD SCIENCE Education: PhD, MES, MPA, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK. BS, Northeastern State College, Tahlequah, OK. Professional Experience: Public Health Officer, San Antonio, TX. Adjunct Assistant Professor, 72 | Faculty and Staff

School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA. Contributing Editor, Meat Business Magazine. Food Sanitation Consultant, U.S. Army Surgeon General. Instructor, California Community Colleges. Awards: Best Food Safety Article, Association of Milk, Food, and Environmental Sanitarians. Member: Texas Department of Health Professional Sanitarian Advisory Committee. Health Advisory Council, Automatic Merchandising Association. National Conference for Food Protection. National Sanitation Foundation Joint Committee on Food Equipment, 1989–90. Bexar County Local Emergency Planning Committee.

IDALINA FRANCA, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—PORTUGUESE Education: BA, AS, The University of North Texas, Denton, TX. Professional Experience: Substitute Instructor, San Antonio Independent School District, San Antonio, TX. Course Instructor, Limitless Youth Development, San Antonio.

DONALD E. GOESS, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR Education: MEd, University of Texas at San Antonio. BA, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, NY. Professional Experience: Graduate Assistant, University of Texas at San Antonio. Sales Account Executive, UPS, San Antonio. Scholarship Coordinator/Financial Aid Counselor, State University of New York at Purchase. Technical Lead/Duty Manager, IBM, East Fishkill, NY. Senior Admissions Counselor, The Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, NY. Senior Sales Representative, Radio Shack, Poughkeepsie. Assistant Manager, Loan Servicing, Poughkeepsie Savings Bank, Poughkeepsie. Supervisor, Membership Department, AAA, Garden City, NY.


SHELLEY GRIESHABER ’94, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—MANAGEMENT Education: BA, Wheaton College, Norton, MA. AOS, CIA. Professional Experience: Food and Beverage Consultant. Director of Culinary Operations, Pearl Brewery, San Antonio, TX. Managing Director, The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio. Cooking School Coordinator, Cooking School Manager, Central Market by HEB, San Antonio. Chef/Owner, Seaport Soup Company, NYC. Sous Chef, Union Square Café, NYC. Line Cook, River Café, NYC. Legal Assistant, Finnegan & Stanzler, Boston, MA; Fordham & Stratton, Boston.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON-KOSSICK, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: BA, cum laude, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS. Certificate, Florida International University School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, North Miami, FL. Diploma, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico. Le Grand Diplôme, Le Cordon Bleu, Mexico City. Professional Experience: Director of Cuisine and Procurement, Orgánica Latina, LLC, New Braunfels, TX. Food Consultant, The Brickworks, Toronto, Canada; Saguaro, Toronto; Voodoo Barbeque and Grill, New Orleans, LA; Naturally Canadian, Mexico City. Executive Chef and Culinary Director, Culinaria, New Orleans. Chef/Proprietor, Passion Fruit, New Orleans. Garde Manger Chef, Herbsaint, New Orleans. Apprentice, China Grill, Mexico City. Content Contributor, Mexpat.Com, Mexico City.

MICHAEL S. KATZ ’93, CEC, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: AOS, CIA. Professional Experience: Executive Chef, Pink Elephant, Gasparilla Inn & Club, Boca Grande, FL. Executive Chef, Lely Resort Golf and Country Club, Naples, FL. Proprietor, Executive Chef, Instructor, Rosemary Lane Café & Cooking School, Naples. General Manager, Dry Dock

Restaurant, Weehawken, NJ. Executive Sous Chef, Hilton Hotel, Tarrytown, NY. Member: ACF. Slow Food International.

GERONIMO P. LOPEZ-MONASCAL, EXECUTIVE CHEF/RESTAURANT INSTRUCTOR Education: CAP in Culinary Arts, Hotel School of Beaune, France. Professional Experience: Executive Chef, Hotel MonsDesign Hotel and Congress Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Grand Villa Argentina, Dubrovnik, Croatia; Marriott Resort Playa Grande, La Guaira, Venezuela; Nestlé Foodservices, Mexico; In the Mood, Caracas, Venezuela. Sous Chef, Four Seasons at Punta Mita, Mexico; Four Seasons at Hualalai, HI; Four Seasons Caracas. Chef Manager, La Creperie, Caracas. Chef-Instructor, La Casserole Du Chef, Caracas. Chef and Co-Owner, Kairos Café, Caracas. Working chef, Cayoclaudio Restaurant, Caracas. Chef for the Director’s Board, Pequiven, Jose, Venezuela. Line Cook, Novotel Chamonix, Chamonix, France; Hostelerie du Vieux Moulin, Bouilland, France; Hotel Central de Beaune, Beaune, France; La Vinoteca, Caracas; Seasons Club, Caracas.

ROBERT R. RODRIGUEZ ’97, RESTAURANT MANAGER/INSTRUCTOR Education: BBA, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX. AOS, CIA. Professional Experience: General Manager, Luke San Antonio, A Chef John Besh Restaurant, San Antonio, TX. Director of Outlets, Event Services Manager, Food and Beverage Manager, Sheraton Hotels of New York, NYC. Conference Services Manager, Millennium Broadway Hotel, NYC. Banquet Certification Instructor, New York Hotel & Motel Trades Council, NYC. JW Steakhouse Director, View Restaurant Manager, New York Marriott Marquis, NYC. Member: New York Hotel & Motel Trades Council, Hotel Association of New York City. Food and Beverage Association of America. Les Amis d’Escoffier Society of New York. Faculty and Staff | 73


PAUL R. SARTORY ’78, CHE, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: AOS with high honors, CIA. Professional Experience: Executive Chef, Belle Meade Country Club, Nashville, TN; Myers Park Country Club, Charlotte, NC; Cherokee Town & Country Club, Atlanta, GA; Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant, St. Helena, CA. Chef, Cedars Inn, Beaufort, NC; Café Azure, Pittsburgh, PA; Pink Elephant, Boca Grande, FL. Sous Chef, La Normande, Pittsburgh. Awards: First Place, USA Bocuse d’Or Competition, 1994. CIA Faculty Member of the Year, 1992.

ROLAND TREVIÑO, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—MATHEMATICS Education: MS, University of Texas at San Antonio. BS, University of Texas at Dallas. Professional Experience: Professor, San Antonio College, San Antonio, TX. Educational Consultant, Educational Testing Service, Texas. Instructor, UTSA PreFreshman Engineering Program, San Antonio; Communities in Schools, San Antonio.

HINNERK VON BARGEN, CHE, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: Master chef diploma, Hotelschool, Hamburg, Germany. Apprenticeship: Hotel Tietjens Hütte, OsterholzScharmbek, Germany; Parkhotel Grüner Jäger, Verden Aller, Germany. Professional Experience: Chef, Hotel zum Schwarzen Ochsen, Rotenburg, Germany. Sous Chef, Restaurant Seasons in the Kempinski Hotel Beijing Lufthansa Center, Beijing, People’s Republic of China. Chef de Partie, Hotel Four Seasons, Hamburg. Chef Saucier, Sun City Cascades Hotel, Bophuthatswana, South Africa. Commis de Cuisine, Demi Chef de Cuisine, SAS Plaza Hotel, Hamburg.

74 | Faculty and Staff

BRIAN D. WEST, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: AAS, The Art Institute of Houston, TX. Professional Experience: Executive Chef, Hotel Contessa, San Antonio, TX; Fresh Horizon Catering, San Antonio. Owner/Executive Chef, Cafe Paladar, San Antonio. Banquet Chef, Biga on the Banks, San Antonio. Sous Chef, Westin La Canterra, San Antonio. Awards: Manager of the Quarter, Hotel Contessa, 2010. Top 100 Chefs in Texas, Texas Monthly, 2008. People’s Choice Award, Blue Star Competition, 2003. Gold Medal, Star Chef Competition, 2002.

LEGEND OF CERTIFICATIONS: AAC CCE CEC CFBE CHE CMB CMC CPA RN RS

American Academy of Chefs Certified Culinary Educator Certified Executive Chef Certified Food and Beverage Executive Certified Hospitality Educator Certified Master Baker Certified Master Chef Certified Public Accountant Registered Nurse Registered Sanitarian


STUDENT POLICIES This section will help you become familiar with CIA San Antonio policies and regulations governing student life. You have the right to an enjoyable and productive experience at the college, and these policies and regulations help protect that right.

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT The Student Code of Conduct promotes the necessary order, safety, and security of the CIA San Antonio community and safeguards the individual and collective rights of everyone on campus. Actions by individuals or groups that interfere with the orderly functions of the college or actions that endanger any member of the community will not be tolerated. You have the right to dictate your personal life and behavior as long as you don’t interfere with the rights of others or with the educational process. Article I: Judicial Authority A. Any member of the college community may report violations of the code directly to the director of education or to any appropriate faculty or staff member. This does not preclude action under the code where information initially came from one who is not a member of the college community. B. The director of education or the appointed designee has the judicial authority to assess penalties and sanctions in accordance with Article III (B). C. Appeal: See Article III (A), Section 3. Article II: Jurisdiction and Proscribed Conduct A. Jurisdiction of the CIA San Antonio

Unless otherwise specified in the college’s written regulations, jurisdiction and discipline is limited to conduct on the college’s

premises, and conduct during college-sponsored field trips or off-campus educational activities. B. Conduct: Rules and Regulations

Violations of the code include, but are not limited to, the behavior outlined below. The administration may, at its discretion, bring charges against any student who conducts himself or herself in violation of the college’s rules or regulations. Any student found to have committed the following misconduct is subject to the disciplinary sanctions outlined in Article III (B): Section 1. Behavior that threatens or endangers the health or safety of oneself or others, whether actual or implied, or which results in personal injury to oneself or others. This behavior includes, but is not limited to, physical conduct, verbal conduct, racial or sexual slurs, threats, intimidation, harassment, hazing, other forms of sexual misconduct, and coercion. Section 2. Illegal or unauthorized possession or use of any type of firearms, or other injurious objects, including but not limited to BB or other pellet guns, paint guns, explosive fireworks, martial arts weapons, combustibles, open flames, or knives (except knives specifically required by the CIA for laboratory classes) or the possession of any other weapon or instrument that could be used to inflict injury, or that might cause a person to believe he or she may be in danger of being harmed. Student Policies | 75


Section 3.The possession, solicitation, sale, distribution, or use of any illegal drugs or substances on the CIA campus, even in cases where a student may have a medical prescription for the use of such drugs or substances; the possession of drug-related paraphernalia (e.g., bongs, pipes, syringes) or the use of hookahs; the use of legal substances in an illegal manner; being in the presence of anyone using illegal drugs or legal substances in an illegal manner. Section 4. Behavior, on or off campus, which would tend to damage the reputation of the college or its students, or which would tend to cause any injury or hardship to anyone. This includes, but is not limited to, non-payment of bills, writing checks with insufficient funds, or misrepresentation of student status. Section 5. Attempted or actual theft of CIA San Antonio property or property of a member of the college community or the local community. This includes theft of services or unauthorized use of college premises, facilities, or services. Section 6. Vandalism, defacement, damage to, or careless use of any part of the college premises or the personal property of any member of the college community. Section 7. Violations of any federal, state, or local law or regulation. These may result in prosecution and sanctions by civil authorities. However, violations which adversely affect the interests and reputation of the CIA San Antonio may result in disciplinary action being taken against any student by the college itself, independently of civil authorities. Section 8. Violation of the campus alcohol policy as set forth in the CIA Academic Catalog and Student Handbook, including, but not lim-

76 | Student Policies

ited to, the following: a. Consuming alcohol in a public or communal area (e.g., parking lots, kitchens, lounges, alcohol-free CIA-sponsored events, etc.). b. Providing minors with alcohol. c. Consumption of alcohol by a minor. d. Possession of alcohol by a minor (includes possession of empty containers of alcohol) and brands of â&#x20AC;&#x153;low/noâ&#x20AC;? alcohol malt or wine beverages. e. Engaging in inappropriate behavior involving alcohol. f. Possession, or being in the presence, of a beer keg/tap system, or beer games (e.g., beer pong, flip cup, funneling). g. Consuming or possessing an excessive amount of alcohol. Section 9. Tampering with any mechanism that is part of the fire alarm system, a fire extinguisher, smoke detector, or any other piece of firefighting equipment, including willfully causing a fire alarm to sound and failing to evacuate when required. Section 10. Furnishing false information to the college; engaging in forgery, alteration, or improper use of any college record, key(s), identification card, or other document; withholding information a student knew or reasonably should have known to disclose to the CIA San Antonio; or withholding information which has been requested by a member of the college community who is authorized to request such information. Section 11. Failure to comply with directions of, or interference with, any college official, faculty, or staff member, including the failure to properly identify oneself or to produce an identification card when requested to do so.


Section 12. Violation of the Residence Hall License Agreement. The CIA San Antonio does not have residence halls, so this section is not applicable to this campus. Section 13. Violations of the Professional Hygiene/Uniform Code (see page 50). Section 14. Unprofessional conduct, including, but not limited to, the use of foul language, insulting behavior, or other personal conduct which would tend to demean the reputation of the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students, staff, faculty, visitors, or guests. Section 15. Participation in a campus demonstration that disrupts the normal operations of the CIA San Antonio and infringes upon the rights of other members of the college community; leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/or normal activities within any campus building or areas; intentional obstruction which unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement, either pedestrian or vehicular, on campus. An attempt to make a change to a campus policy or practice via petition is not permitted. Section 16. Theft or other abuse of computer time or phone service including, but not limited to, the following: a. Unauthorized entry into a file for any purpose, including to use, read, or change its contents. b. Unauthorized transfer of a file. c. Unauthorized use of another individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity and/or password. d. Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member, or college official. e. Use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive messages. f. Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the college computing system.

g. Use of a phone to make obscene phone calls. h. Fraudulent use of phone service. i. Improper use of personal access code number. Section 17. Compromising the security of the card access system for the residence halls. The CIA San Antonio does not have residence halls, so this section is not applicable to this campus. Section 18. Abuse of the judicial system including, but not limited to, the following: a. Failure to obey the summons of the director of education or other college official. b. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before the director of education. c. Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a judicial proceeding. d. Initiating a judicial proceeding when you know there is no cause to do so. e. Attempting to discourage an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proper participation in, or use of, the judicial system. f. Attempting to influence the impartiality of the director of education prior to, and/or during, the course of the judiciary proceeding. g. Harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of the director of education prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding. h. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under this code. i. Actually influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the judicial system. C. Violations of Law and Institute Discipline

Section 1. If a student is charged with an off-campus violation of a federal, state, or Student Policies | 77


local law or regulation, but not with any other violation of the Student Code of Conduct, disciplinary action may be taken and sanctions imposed for grave misconduct which demonstrates flagrant disregard for the CIA San Antonio community. Section 2. Disciplinary proceedings may be initiated against a student charged with violation of a law or regulation that is also a violation of this code, for example, if both violations result from the same occurrence without regard to the pendency of civil litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Proceedings under this code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following any civil or criminal proceedings off campus. Section 3. When a student is charged by federal, state, or local authorities with a violation of law, the college will not request or agree to special consideration for that individual because of his or her status as a student. If the alleged offense is also the subject of a proceeding before a judicial board under this code, however, the college may advise off-campus authorities of the existence of this code and of how such matters will be handled within the college community. The CIA San Antonio will cooperate fully with law enforcement and other agencies in the enforcement of criminal law on campus and in the conditions imposed by criminal courts for the rehabilitation of student violators. Individual students and faculty members, acting in their personal capacities, remain free to interact with government representatives as they deem appropriate. The CIA reserves the right to defer or otherwise place in abeyance any disciplinary proceeding during the pendency of a related criminal or administrative proceeding, and the exercise of such a right does not waive the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights 78 | Student Policies

with respect to pursuing the disciplinary action in question. The CIA will comply with the requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), as well as the Americans with Disabilities Act, where applicable, with respect to student disciplinary matters.

Article III: Judicial Policies A. Charges and Hearings

Section 1. Any member of the college community may file charges against any student for misconduct. Charges will be prepared in writing and directed to the director of education. Any charge should be submitted within 30 days of the realization and/or discovery of the alleged violation, exclusive of holidays. This time limit does not include charges as a result of criminal acts that involve off-campus law enforcement authorities. Section 2. The director of education will conduct an investigation to determine whether the charges are meritorious and/or if they can be disposed of administratively by mutual consent of the parties involved. The director will issue a judgment and a penalty. All decisions will be presented to the accused student in written form. Section 3. A decision reached by the director of education may be appealed to the director by adjudged student(s) or complainant(s) within three weekdays, exclusive of holidays, of the issuance of the decision. Such appeals will be in writing and will be delivered to the managing director or his or her designee. B. Sanctions

Section 1. For students found to have violated this code, disciplinary action can range from written warnings to suspension or dismissal from the college.


NOTE: Other than suspension or dismissal from the CIA, disciplinary sanctions will not be made part of the student’s permanent academic record. All disciplinary sanctions, however, are a part of the student’s confidential record maintained by the college. After a period of five years from the student’s date of last enrollment in any degree or certificate program, all sanctions—except suspension or dismissal from the college—are removed from the confidential record. C. Immediate Suspension or Dismissal

Section 1. Immediate suspension or dismissal may be imposed on a student only: a. To ensure the safety and well-being of members of the college community or preservation of property. b. To ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being. c. If the student poses a definite threat of disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the CIA. Section 2. During a suspension, students will be denied access to the campus (including classes and/or all other college activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, as the director of education may determine to be appropriate).

Article IV: Interpretation and Revision A. Any questions of interpretation regarding this code will be referred to the director of education or his or her designee for final determination. B. This code of conduct will be reviewed from time to time under the direction of the director of education or his or her designee.

ALCOHOL POLICY The CIA San Antonio takes seriously the problems that commonly arise from alcohol

misuse and has implemented an alcohol consumption policy. It is our goal to continually reinforce responsible alcohol consumption through educational, counseling, and rehabilitative programs. Alcohol addiction, disruptive and destructive behavior, and the destruction of individual health and talents are dangers that require recognition and prevention. The CIA, San Antonio alcohol consumption policy is based on the following underlying beliefs: 1. Whether you use alcoholic beverages is entirely your decision. The college’s alcohol consumption policy encourages responsible consumption if you choose to use alcohol and respects your decision if you choose to abstain. 2. The college’s mission is twofold: to provide the highest quality culinary education in the world and to create an environment conducive to professional growth. Drinking patterns that interfere with these goals are unacceptable and will result in disciplinary action. The CIA San Antonio supports and is subject to the laws of the State of Texas. All policies and procedures must conform to local and state laws governing the service and consumption of alcohol.

General Rules Governing Campus Alcohol Use Texas state policy, as well as the campus alcohol policy, limit possession and consumption to those students 21 years of age or older. 1. You may not give alcoholic beverages to anyone under the legal drinking age. This includes purchasing alcoholic beverages for underage students, or in any way allowing them to possess or ingest alcoholic Student Policies | 79


beverages. If you’re found to be providing alcoholic beverages to anyone under the legal age, for whatever reason, you will be subject to suspension. 2. You cannot engage in any public consumption of alcoholic beverages in or on college-owned facilities or properties. The exceptions to this regulation are when consumption is part of the legal, accepted course work within the college’s classrooms and laboratories and during approved college functions. 3. You are prohibited from having open containers of alcoholic beverages in any public area of the CIA San Antonio, including parking lots. 4. Beer kegs (including beer balls) are not permitted anywhere on campus. 5. If you are in possession of any alcohol in violation of the campus Alcohol Policy, it can be confiscated and disposed of by a designated college staff member. 6. Confiscation of alcohol may take place under the following conditions: a. If you’re under the Texas state legal drinking age of 21 years. b. If you’re endangering yourself by continuing to possess or consume alcohol, whether or not you’re of legal drinking age. c. If you possess an open container of, or consume, alcohol in public areas such as a corridor, lounge, stairwell, bathroom, or any other public areas on campus.

DRUG POLICY The CIA, in accordance with state and federal legislation, has developed policies and guidelines to deal with the possession, use, solicitation, sale, or distribution of illegal drugs and substances. Any such activity is absolutely prohibited on the CIA San Antonio campus or at any college-controlled 80 | Student Policies

events.

Standards of Conduct for All Students 1. You’ll be subject to severe disciplinary sanctions if you’re found to be in violation of Article III, Section B (3) of the Student Code of Conduct. 2. College sanctions may be imposed in addition to sanctions applicable under local, state, or federal law. The college will cooperate fully with all civil authorities and enforcement agencies. Specific Sanctions: Penalties may range from formal, written warnings (copied into your file) to permanent expulsion from the CIA San Antonio. These include, but are not limited to, fines, community service work, required attendance at professional counseling, and/or completion of specified drug/alcohol rehabilitation programs. The severity of penalties will increase as you repeatedly violate college policy. You may receive one type of sanction for a policy violation and then face a far more serious sanction, including expulsion, for a second violation.

Drug-Free Policy 1. Commitment to an Alcohol- and DrugFree Campus:

The CIA San Antonio is committed to the prevention of alcohol and drug abuse. Our policy supports the college’s philosophy to promote healthy lifestyles for its students and to inhibit the abuse of alcohol and other substances. No one may use, possess, sell, or distribute drugs or other illegal substances, nor may anyone use or possess drug paraphernalia on college property or at any college-sponsored events, except drugs as prescribed by a physician. Throughout this policy, the term “other substances” refers to illegal substances including, but not limited to, marijuana, cocaine, LSD, PCP, amphetamines, heroin,


look-alikes, and any of those substances commonly referred to as “designer drugs.” The inappropriate use of prescription and overthe-counter drugs is also prohibited. No one under 21 years old may use, sell, or distribute alcohol (except in approved classroom situations under the supervision of an instructor). No one may abuse alcohol or distribute/sell alcoholic beverages to anyone under the legal drinking age of 21 years old. 2. CIA Sanctions:

Alcohol: Depending on the type of infraction, disciplinary action can range from written warnings to suspension from the college. The severity of the discipline increases with each infraction. Drugs or Other Illegal Substances: For possession or use, sanctions range from disciplinary probation to suspension. For solicitation or sale, you’ll receive immediate suspension. The CIA San Antonio supports, and is subject to, the laws of Texas and the federal government. All college policies are consistent with these laws. 3. Health Risks:

Alcohol alters judgment, vision, speech, and coordination, and can cause long-term damage to the liver. It severely impairs your ability to function and is a primary cause of vehicular accidents. Marijuana contains THC, a psychoactive chemical that alters the sensory activities of the brain, including longterm damage to memory capabilities. Inhaling marijuana smoke can cause lung cancer, and chronic use can adversely affect reproductive ability in women. Cocaine and crack cause a temporary feeling of energy and a sense of exhilaration. They also increase your heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. Cocaine and crack are highly addictive and can lead to heart attacks, strokes, and

long-term brain damage. 4. Alcohol Counseling and Assistance:

Any student who would like assistance with an alcohol or substance abuse problem should contact the director of education for referral to an appropriate facility.

EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT The CIA does not release confidential academic and personal information, except under conditions permitted by law, without your written permission. The CIA, upon written request, will grant current or former students access to their educational records, except those excluded by policy, and will provide an opportunity for a hearing to challenge those records. If you are an applicant not yet enrolled and in attendance, you may not waive the confidentiality of your records. This means you may not inspect, review, or photocopy any material submitted to the college for consideration, including letters of reference, official transcripts, employment evaluations, and interview and test results, until after you are accepted and enrolled at the CIA. At that time you will have access to the material in the permanent file in accordance with stated policy, copies of which are available in the Registrar’s Office at the Hyde Park, NY campus. The CIA does not return any materials sent as part of the admission review process. Do not submit original diplomas and certificates, as they will not be returned. PUBLIC NOTICE OF RIGHTS UNDER THE FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 affords you certain Student Policies | 81


rights with respect to your education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review your education records within 45 days of the day the college receives a request for access. You should submit to the Registrar’s Office—or other appropriate official— written requests that identify the record(s) you wish to inspect. The appropriate official will make arrangements for access and notify you of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the appropriate official to whom the request was submitted does not maintain the records, that official shall advise you of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of your education records that you believe are inaccurate or misleading. You may ask the college to amend a record that you believe is inaccurate or misleading. You should write the appropriate official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record you want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the CIA decides not to amend the record as you requested, the college will notify you of the decision and advise you of your right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will be provided to you when you are notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in your education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The Culinary Institute of America does not release information from your record to outside individuals unless you grant permission. However, the release of certain types of 82 | Student Policies

information—“directory information” which is not generally considered harmful or an invasion of privacy—may be released. The information includes name, address, campus box number, program of study, dates of attendance, and degrees or certificates obtained with dates. Addresses are only released for awards and/or scholarship purposes. The Culinary Institute of America is permitted to release such information unless you specifically request that it not be released within two weeks after you commence each semester. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the college has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by The Culinary Institute of America to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605. Copies of The Culinary Institute of America’s policy gov-


erning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act are available in the Registrar’s Office. Questions concerning FERPA should be referred to the registrar at the CIA.

• Director of Education

CAMPUS CLIMATE The Culinary Institute of America, with its emphasis on cuisines and culinary traditions from around the world, values the diversity of its students and is committed to providing an encouraging campus and classroom atmosphere that inspires the participation of all students. We encourage positive interaction among faculty, staff, and students that embraces all individuals. Our posture is to celebrate the differences students bring to campus. Only with this diversity of knowledge and people can we effectively address the challenges of an increasingly multi-cultural society and the ever-growing foodservice and hospitality industry. It is the responsibility of faculty and staff members to review their classroom and campus behaviors, and those of any staff they supervise, to ensure that students are treated equitably, encouraged, and valued regardless of individual differences.

• Director of Education

• Director—Human Resources/Title IX Coordinator in Hyde Park, NY

Curriculum and Faculty Concerns

Financial Concerns • Bursar in Hyde Park, NY • Director—Financial Aid in Hyde Park, NY

Registration and Course Scheduling Concerns • Student Affairs Coordinator • Registrar in Hyde Park, NY

General Student Concerns • Director of Education • Associate Vice President and Dean—Student Affairs in Hyde Park, NY

In the event that you are unable to resolve your concern by working with the above individuals, you may need to take further action by following the Complaint and Grievance Procedure. This procedure is part of the Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy, which can be found on the Consumer Information Page at www.ciachef.edu.

STUDENT CONCERNS Many times when you have a concern, you can resolve it on your own by speaking with the party involved. If, however, after speaking with the student or employee about your concern, you do not feel the matter is addressed, or if you are concerned about an administrative process or procedure, you may see the following college officials:

HARASSMENT-FREE CAMPUS STATEMENT The CIA is committed to providing a campus environment free of harassment. The Harassment-Free Campus Statement can be found on the Consumer Information page of the CIA website (www.ciachef.edu).

Civil Rights Concerns Refer to the Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy at www.ciachef.edu on the Consumer Information page.

HARASSMENT, SEXUAL MISCONDUCT, AND DISCRIMINATION POLICY Members of The Culinary Institute of America community, guests, and visitors have the right to be free from harassment, sexual misStudent Policies | 83


conduct, and discrimination. All members of the campus community are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that does not infringe upon the rights of others. The full version of this policy can be found at www.ciachef.edu on the Consumer Information page.

COMPLAINT AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE This procedure is applied to all civil rights grievances and discrimination complaints,

84 | Student Policies

especially those governed by Title IX and other state and federal laws. The Complaint and Grievance Procedure is outlined in the Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy, and can be read in its entirety at www.ciachef.edu on the Consumer Information page.


TRAVEL DIRECTIONS The CIA is located on the 22-acre Pearl site, bordered by the Museum Reach of the San Antonio River and the beautiful River Walk, just north of downtown.

410 

SAN ANTONIO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

410 

281 

87 

THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, SAN ANTONIO

35  281  90 

Traveling from North Take US-281/McAllister Freeway South. Take the Josephine/Grayson St. exit and proceed through Josephine and Grayson St., staying straight on Avenue A. The CIA San Antonio campus is on the Historic Pearl Brewery site, on the right after crossing Grayson.

90 

Traveling from South Take the US-281/McAllister Freeway North towards the San Antonio Airport. Exit Mulberry and circle back under US-281 heading South on US-281. Take the Josephine/Grayson St. exit and proceed through Josephine and Grayson St., staying straight on Avenue A. The CIA San Antonio campus is on the Historic Pearl Brewery site, on the right after crossing Grayson.

Travel Directions | 85


GRAYSON Full Goods Building

Aveda Institute San Antonio

7

8

Can Recycling Building

9

Pearl Stable AVENUE A

V

281 

Historic Brewhouse and Cellars

KARNES

PEARL PARKWAY

To Downtown San Antonio

CIA SAN ANTONIO CAMPUS MAP AND PEARL BREWERY SITE 1. CIA San Antonio Main Building: NAO restaurant CIA Bakery Café Koehler Parking Garage 2. Outdoor Kitchen, CIA San Antonio 3. San Antonio River and River Walk 4. Pearl Farmers Market 5. La Gloria–Restaurant owned by CIA alumnus Johnny Hernandez ’89 6. Sandbar Fish House & Market– Restaurant owned by CIA alumnus Andrew Weissman ’96

86 | Travel Directions

7. il Sogno–Restaurant owned by CIA alumnus Andrew Weissman ’96 8. The Twig Book Shop–Offers CIA cookbooks and texts 9. Melissa Guerra store– Offers CIA Masters Collection® cookware and CIA merchandise V Visitor/Guest Parking

For more information about the Pearl site, including additional shops and attractions, visit www.atpearl.com.


INDEX AAS Degree Curriculum ....................................56

Campus Visits........................................................9

Academic Calendar, 2012–2013 ..........................4

Campuses, CIA....................................................11

Academic Freedom, Statement of....................54

Cancellation Policy ............................................29

Academic Honesty, Policy on ............................47

Career Opportunities ..........................................6

Academic Policies ..............................................41

Career Services ..................................................17

Accidents ............................................................20

Certifications, Legend of ..................................74

Accreditation........................................................8

CIA Bakery Café..................................................17

Administrative Withdrawal from a Class ........43

CIA Financial Aid................................................37

Admissions..........................................................23

Code of Conduct, Student ................................75

Admissions Process ............................................23

Collaborative Degree Program ........................55

Aid Suspension Due to Drug Conviction..........34

College Awards ..................................................10

Alcohol Policy ....................................................79

Commencement Awards ..................................53

Alumni Relations................................................18

Complaint and Grievance Procedure ..............84

Application Procedure, AAS Degree Programs....................................23

Continued Financial Aid Eligibilty ....................35

Application Procedure, Latin Cuisines Certificate Program ................24

(Cornell) Collaborative Degree Program ........55

Application, Withdrawal of ..............................25 Applying for Aid ................................................34 Articulation Agreements ..................................25 Associate Degree Program in Culinary Arts ................................................6 Attendance, Policy on........................................41 Attendance Seal ................................................54 Attending Classes with a Temporary Medical Condition ......................43

Continuing Education........................................55

Costing Practical Retake Policy ........................44 Cost of Attendance, Financial Aid....................34 Counseling, Personal ........................................12 Course Descriptions ..........................................61 Course Makeup Policy ......................................43 Course Substitutions and Waivers ....................14 Credit Balances ..................................................32 Culinary Practical Retake Policy ........................44 Curricula..............................................................56

Auditing Courses, Policy on ..............................50 Awards, College ................................................10

Degree and Certificate Programs, Curricula....56

Awards, Commencement ..................................53

Disability Services ..............................................12 Documentation Requirements ........................14

Bakery Café, CIA ................................................17

Drug Conviction, Aid Suspension Due to ........34

Board, Meals ......................................................29

Drug Policy ........................................................80

Board of Trustees ..............................................69 Building Monitoring ..........................................21

Educational Rights and Privacy Act ..................81 Emergencies, Medical........................................22

Campus Climate ................................................83 Campus Location..................................................9

Employment, On-campus..................................18 Externship, Prerequsites for ..............................44

Campus Map ......................................................86 Campus Safety....................................................20

Faculty and Staff ................................................69 Index | 87


Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs............................................16

Makeup Policy, Course ......................................43

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ............................................................81

Mealsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Board ....................................................29

Federal Loan Repayment Chart ........................38 Federal Programs, Financial Aid ......................35 Fees That May Be Assessed ..............................28

Map, Campus......................................................86

Medical Emergencies ........................................22 Mental Health Resources, Personal Counseling and................................12

Financial Aid ......................................................34

Mentor Programs, Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host ..........................................16

Financial Aid Programs, Private........................37

Missing Person Procedure ......................................20

Fire Safety ..........................................................20

Mission ..................................................................5

General Information............................................6 Grading ..............................................................48 Grading Symbols ................................................48

NAO Restaurant ................................................17 Nondiscrimination Statement ............................5 Not-for-Profit Statement ....................................9

Graduation Participation, Policy on ................53 Graduation Requirements (Associate Degree)..........................................58

On-campus Employment ..................................18

Graduation Requirements (Certificate) ..........60

Parking................................................................21

Grievance Procedure, Complaint and ..............84

Pearl Security......................................................22

Harassment-free Campus Statement ..............83

Personal Counseling and Mental Health Resources ........................................................12

Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy ........................................83

Personal Property and Valuables......................21

HEGIS Code ........................................................56 History ..................................................................7 Honorary Trustees..............................................70 How Need is Determined, Financial Aid ..........34 ID-Access Key Cards ..........................................21 Incomplete Grades, Policy on............................49 Insurance ............................................................12 Latin Cuisines Certificate Curriculum ..............59 Latin Cuisines Certificate Program ....................6

Prerequisites for Externship ..............................44 Prerequisites for Restaurant Courses ..............45 Prerequisites for SophomoreYear Registration ............................................45 Private Financial Aid Programs ........................37 Problems with a Class ........................................49 Problems with a Grade......................................49 Professional and Physical Resources ..................8 Professionalism, Uniform, and Hygiene Policy ................................................50

Learning Strategies............................................12

Public Notice of Rights Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ..............81

Leaves of Absence and Withdrawals ..............43

Public Operations ..............................................17

Legend of Certifications....................................74 Library ................................................................17

Refund Policy......................................................29

Location, Campus ................................................9

Restaurant Courses, Prerequisites for ..............45

Location of Information......................................9 Lost and Found ..................................................21

Satisfactory Academic Progress, Policy on ......45 Security, Pearl ....................................................22

88 | Index


Skills Remediation..............................................44

Theft....................................................................21

Sophomore-Year Registration, Prerequisites for ..............................................45

Transfer Credit....................................................25

Staff ....................................................................70

Travel Directions ................................................85

State Programs, Financial Aid ..........................37

Trustees, Board of ..............................................69

Student Code of Conduct..................................75

Trustees Emeriti..................................................69

Student Concerns ..............................................83

Trustees, Honorary ............................................70

Student Eligibilty Responsibility, Financial Aid....................................................34

Tuition and Fees ................................................28

Student Life and Services ..................................12 Student Policies ..................................................75 Student Responsibility, Statement of ..............20

Transfers Between Campuses, Policy for..........26

Tuition and Fee Schedule ..................................33 Tuition Installment Plan ....................................32 Tuition Payment Schedule, Sample ..................29 Tutoring Services ................................................12

Substitutions and Waivers, Course ..................14 Vaccinations........................................................27 Technical Standards ....................................15, 25 Temporary Medical Condition, Attending Classes with a ..................................................43

Web-based Learning..........................................54 Withdrawal of Application ..............................25

Testing Accommodations ..................................14

Index | 89


NOTES:

90 | Nores


June

Calendar | 91


July 92 | Calendar


August

Calendar | 93


September 94 | Calendar


October

Calendar | 95


November 96 | Calendar


December

Calendar | 97


January 98 | Calendar


February

Calendar | 99


March 100 | Calendar


April

Calendar | 101


May 102 | Calendar


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

BURSAR 845-451-1290 bursar@culinary.edu CAREER SERVICES 845-451-1275 CIA BAKERY CAFÉ 210-554-6464 CONTINUING EDUCATION 1-800-888-7850 DVD AND VIDEO SALES 1-800-888-7850

EDUCATION 210-544-6452 FINANCIAL AID 845-451-1243 financialaid@culinary.edu LEARNING STRATEGIES CENTER 845-905-4638 845-905-4639 (TTY/TDDY) PEARL SECURITY SERVICES 210-889-5287 STUDENT SERVICES 210-544-6451

The Culinary Institute of America

ADMISSIONS 1-800-CULINARY (285-4627) 210-554-6400 ciasanantonio@culinary.edu

CIA Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 2012–2013

WEBSITES www.ciachef.edu www.ciaprochef.com

The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio 312 Pearl Parkway, Building 2, Suite 2102 San Antonio TX 78215

2012–2013 Academic Catalog

The CIA San Antonio and the CIA at Greystone are branches of the CIA, Hyde Park, NY. The CIA Singapore is an additional campus.

San Antonio, TX Campus


San Antonio Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 2012-2013