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BURSAR 845-451-1290 bursar@culinary.edu CAREER SERVICES 845-451-1275 707-967-2495 CONTINUING EDUCATION 1-800-888-7850 DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 845-451-1324 GREYSTONE STUDENT AFFAIRS MANAGER 707-967-2420

DVD AND VIDEO SALES 1-800-888-7850

WEBSITES www.ciachef.edu www.ciaprochef.com THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (MAIN CAMPUS) 1946 Campus Drive Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499 THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA AT GREYSTONE 2555 Main Street St. Helena, CA 94574 THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, SAN ANTONIO 312 Pearl Parkway, Building 2, Suite 2102 San Antonio, TX 78215 THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, SINGAPORE Block 31, Temasek Polytechnic 21 Tampines Avenue 1 Singapore 529757

LEARNING STRATEGIES CENTER 707-967-2406 (Greystone) 845-905-4638 (Hyde Park) 845-905-4639 (TTY/TDDY) The CIA at Greystone and the CIA San Antonio are branches of the CIA, Hyde Park, NY. The CIA Singapore is an additional campus.

The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone 2555 Main Street St. Helena, CA 94574

2012–2013 Academic Catalog

FINANCIAL AID 845-451-1243 (Hyde Park) 707-967-2510 (Greystone) financialaid@culinary.edu

RESTAURANT RESERVATIONS 707-967-1010 The Culinary Institute of America

ADMISSIONS 1-800-CULINARY (285-4627) 845-452-9430 707-967-2496 admissions@culinary.edu

CIA Academic Catalog 2012–2013 St. Helena, CA Campus


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Academic Calendar 2012–2013 Our Mission General Information Career Opportunities History Accreditation Awards Student Life and Services Admissions Transfer Credit International Students Tuition and Fees Financial Aid Academic Policies Curricula Associate in Occupational Studies Degree Programs Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program (ACAP) Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program (AWBP) Course Descriptions Faculty and Staff Policies Campus Map Travel Directions and Area Map Index

4 5 6 7 7 11 13 15 25 30 32 34 39 48 60 60 64 66 69 79 90 96 98 100

©May 2012 The Culinary Institute of America

Table of Contents | 3


2012–2013 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2012 JUNE

JULY

S

M

T

W

T

3 10 17 24

4* 11 18 25

5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

SEPTEMBER S

M

T

W

T

F

S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 * 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

AUGUST T W T F S 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31

S

M

T

W T F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

S

S

7 14 21 28

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31

4 11 18 25

M

T

W

T 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 4 11 18 25

S 3 10 17 24

2013 JANUARY

DECEMBER

T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

S

S

M

T

T

W

W

T

S

M

T

3 10 17 24 31

4 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 18 19 20 21 25 26 27 28

F

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

S

M

FEBRUARY

S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

S

7 14 21 28

W T F S 2 3 4 5† 9 10 11 12 16 17 18 19 23 24 25 26 30 31

M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30

S 3 10 17 24

M

F S 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28

M

T

W

T

W T F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

AOS Entry Date

AWBP Entry Date

ACAP Entry Date

AOS Graduation

AWBP and AOS Graduations

ACAP Graduation

No Class (All Programs)

➸ * †

6/4/12 and 9/17/12 are required orientation days for incoming students. All other students do not have class on these days. 1/5/13 is a Saturday class.

4 | Academic Calendar

T

S 4 11 18 25


OUR MISSION The Culinary Institute of America is a private, not-for-profit college dedicated to providing the world’s best professional culinary education. Excellence, leadership, professionalism, ethics, and respect for diversity are the core values that guide our efforts. We teach our students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to live successful lives and to grow into positions of influence and leadership in their chosen profession.

NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer committed to the principle of equal opportunity in education and employment, in compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and other federal, state, and local laws. The CIA does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, age, genetic information, marital status, veteran status, ancestry, national or ethnic origin, or any other protected group or classification under federal or state laws. These principles also apply to admissions, financial aid, academic matters, career services, counseling, housing, employment policies, scholarship programs, medical services, and all other programs and activities available at the CIA. The Culinary Institute of America, pursuant to Title IX, Title VII, and state laws, also prohibits sexual harassment, which includes sexual assault and sexual violence.

The director of HR faculty relations is designated as the Title IX coordinator and age discrimination coordinator for the CIA. Inquiries and/or complaints, including the procedure for filing a complaint regarding this nondiscrimination statement and the CIA’s compliance with applicable laws, statutes, and regulations as outlined above, must be directed to: Joseph Morano, Director— HR Faculty Relations The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Drive Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499 Office: Roth Hall, Room S326 845-451-1314, j_morano@culinary.edu OR U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-1100 1-800-421-3481; ocr@ed.gov; Fax: 202-453-6012; TDD: 1-877-521-2172

Our Mission | 5


GENERAL INFORMATION Purpose The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) provides instruction in the basics of cooking, baking and pastry, and hospitality management to aspiring culinarians. At the CIA at Greystone campus in St. Helena, CA, the following programs are offered:

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS IN CULINARY ARTS AND IN BAKING AND PASTRY ARTS The 21-month associate in occupational studies (AOS) degree programs prepare students for a wide variety of careers in the foodservice and hospitality industry. The programs give students the opportunity to: • Learn and practice the professional skills used in food preparation and service. • Understand the principles of food identification, food and beverage composition, and nutrition.

ACCELERATED CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM Designed exclusively for graduates of bachelor’s degree programs in hospitality management, food science, nutrition, or a closely related field, the CIA’s 30-week Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program (ACAP) offers comprehensive, skill-based learning that gives students a solid foundation in the culinary arts. In this program, students will: • Spend focused time developing foundation skills, from knife skills and product knowledge to plate presentation and professional equipment.

• Acquire management skills to better use human and physical resources in foodservice operations.

• Learn culinary principles, techniques, and flavor strategies.

• Gain experience in the proper use and maintenance of professional knives and hand tools.

• Study topics including flavor dynamics, function of ingredients, baking and pastry, and garde manger.

• Become familiar with the layout and workflow of professional kitchens and bakeshops.

• Discover the influences of flavors, ingredients, and cuisines from around the world.

• Build skills as a member of a team.

ACCELERATED WINE AND BEVERAGE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM The Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program curriculum provides a comprehensive and multi-sensory approach to this important area of the hospitality industry. In 30 weeks, students will:

• Gain appreciation for the history, evolution, and international diversity of the culinary and baking and pastry arts. • Learn to communicate accurately and effectively. • Develop a personal sense of professionalism necessary for working successfully in the foodservice and hospitality industry. • Build academic skills and acquire a global perspective in general education courses.

• Gain foundation knowledge of wines from all wine-producing regions of the globe. • Take part in thorough guided tastings, and develop tasting and sensory evaluation skills. • Study cellar management and inventory control.

6 | General Information


• Learn key culinary terminology and techniques to form the basis for food and wine pairing skills. • Create a service plan for training employees and enhancing sales. • Develop the skills, discipline, and professionalism necessary for working successfully in the foodservice and hospitality industry.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES An education from The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) offers you unparalleled career opportunity in an industry that generates an estimated $632 billion in annual sales in the United States. In 2012, 12.9 million people are projected to be employed in the foodservice business, making it one of the largest private-sector employers, according to the National Restaurant Association. The CIA is represented around the world by more than 44,000 alumni who achieve success across a wide range of careers. They become executive chefs, personal chefs, restaurant and business owners, media personalities, restaurant and hotel chain executives, food writers, research chefs, food and beverage executives, and culinary educators and work in all segments of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Some CIA AOS degree program graduates enter the industry as entry-level cooks and pastry cooks for restaurants, hotels, country clubs, retail bakeries, and institutions; others choose jobs in dining room service, catering, food research, or kitchen supervision. Still others choose to enroll in the college’s bachelor’s degree programs in Hyde Park, NY to expand their employment possibilities to include business management and staff management positions, as well as business ownership, communications, marketing, sales, and more.

Graduates of the Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program gain hands-on culinary skill and knowledge to complement their bachelor’s degree in hospitality management, food science, nutrition, or a closely related field. The program prepares them for a multitude of opportunities such as cook, research assistant, restaurant assistant manager, and other entry-level positions. Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program graduates can pursue such positions as entry-level food and beverage manager, retail wine and beverage buyer, specialty tasting room associate, or wine steward in fine dining and multi-unit restaurants. With experience, they can become a wine and beverage sales representative in wholesale distribution, work as a beverage director in fine dining, or take on other positions within the food, beverage, and winery segments.

HISTORY The college has enjoyed a unique history characterized by rapid expansion in its more than 65 years of service. The Culinary Institute of America opened in 1946 as the New Haven Restaurant Institute, a small cooking school in downtown New Haven, CT, with an enrollment of 50 students and a faculty consisting of a chef, a baker, and a dietitian. The Institute, at that time a vocational school for World War II veterans, offered a 16-week program featuring instruction in 78 popular menus of the day. Members of the New Haven Restaurant Association sponsored the original school, whose founders, Frances Roth and Katharine Angell, served as its first director and chair of the board, respectively. As the foodservice industry grew, so did enrollment, necessitating a move in 1947 to larger quarters: a 40-room mansion adjacent General Information | 7


to Yale University. The school’s name was changed to the Restaurant Institute of Connecticut; in 1951 it became known as The Culinary Institute of America, reflecting the diversity of the student population. The educational program was expanded to two years, and continuing education courses for industry professionals were introduced. By the time of Mrs. Roth’s retirement in 1965, the school had increased its enrollment to 400 students and operated a $2 million facility. In 1969, with more than 1,000 students and with facilities strained to the maximum, the school’s administrators launched a search for a new home. They found it in St. Andrewon-Hudson, a former Jesuit novitiate in Hyde Park, NY. Two years later, the new school opened, with its main building renamed Roth Hall. In 1995, The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone (a branch of the CIA, Hyde Park, NY), opened its doors to food and wine professionals as the college’s continuing education campus in the heart of California’s Napa Valley. The Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program was added in 2002 for students with a bachelor’s degree in hospitality, food science, nutrition, or a closely related field. In fall 2006, the Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) in culinary arts degree program offered in Hyde Park became available at the Greystone campus in St. Helena. This enabled students to obtain the worldfamous CIA culinary degree program education on the West Coast as well as prepare them, if they elected to do so, to enroll in the junior year of the CIA’s bachelor’s degree program at the Hyde Park campus. In 2008, the college opened its second branch campus, The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio. Today, the Texas 8 | General Information

campus offers the Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in culinary arts degree program and a certificate program in Latin cuisines, as well as programs for foodservice industry professionals and food enthusiasts. The CIA at Greystone continued to expand its educational offerings to support the growing industry demand for qualified bakers and pastry chefs by offering the AOS in baking and pastry arts degree program beginning in fall 2009. AOS baking and pastry students at Greystone follow the same proven curriculum offered at the main campus in Hyde Park, NY, while experiencing the diversity of California’s Napa Valley. Introduced in 2010, the Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program gives students the knowledge, foundation skills, and deep understanding of this specialized industry segment they need to advance through the ranks in hospitality and food and beverage management. Also in 2010, in partnership with the Singapore Institute of Technology, the CIA opened its Singapore location on the campus of Temasek Polytechnic. The CIA Singapore offers the college’s bachelor of professional studies degree program in culinary arts management to graduates of polytechnic institutions who have earned their diplomas in hospitality & tourism management, leisure and resort management, or culinary and catering management, as well as to other diploma program graduates. The CIA at Greystone currently enrolls approximately 200 students in its four credit programs, along with approximately 2,300 students in its professional development courses.

THE GREYSTONE CAMPUS Located in California’s lush Napa Valley, the CIA at Greystone features a wide variety of


innovative programs and facilities for culinarians. Collectively, they emphasize the cooking and baking traditions of many cultures; fresh, seasonal ingredients; health and nutrition; and sustainable agriculture. Greystone students benefit from the college’s outstanding educational facilities:

The Teaching Kitchens In Greystone’s kitchens, students have the opportunity to cook on traditional gas burners and electric radiant burners, use induction technology, and work with equipment from some of the world’s finest manufacturers. The 15,000-square-foot open floor plan encourages interaction and valuable sharing of ideas at cooking suites and community dining tables. Viking Range Kitchen Located at the south end of the first floor of the Greystone building, this 3,600-squarefoot kitchen includes suites of professional equipment found in commercial kitchens. Students work and dine together in this open-plan facility, located just steps from the Cannard Herb Garden. Shunsuke Takaki Baking Center Located at the north end of the Teaching Kitchen, the Shunsuke Takaki Baking Center is home to baking and pastry arts education at Greystone. Degree and certificate program students gain hands-on experience with standard industry equipment and practice their skills on spacious suites featuring granite and wood countertops. Chocolate Laboratory Designed specifically for detailed pastry work, this climate-controlled 675-square-foot show kitchen on the first floor of the Greystone main building is the site of degree-program classes on chocolates, confections, and specialty décor.

Rudd Center for Professional Wine Studies The Rudd Center for Professional Wine Studies is home to the Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program, where aspiring food and wine professionals study the core subjects of sensory analysis, world grape varietals, and service management. The Rudd Center also offers a variety of continuing education courses focused on the professional management of wines for members of the hospitality, retail, and distribution sectors of the beverage industry. With our location right in the heart of wine country, the professional wine studies classes provide opportunities for students to taste with winemakers in their cellars, walk the vineyards with viticulturalists, and be instructed by the top wine educators in America. Williams Center for Flavor Discovery A think tank for flavor issues, the Williams Center for Flavor Discovery features sensory analysis technology that allows invited foodservice professionals to interact with chefs, winemakers, and food producers to evaluate a broad range of flavor questions. The findings are then shared with the industry to enhance a collective understanding of flavor. Ventura Foods Center for Menu Research and Development With ideation rooms, a theater-style kitchen, and interactive audience response technologies, the Ventura Foods Center is designed to inspire innovative, menu-driven business solutions for the foodservice industry. De Baun Theatre The De Baun Theatre supports Greystone’s educational mission and provides campus visitors with exposure to what our students do. The 48-seat demonstration theater is the site of cooking presentations—including demos and book signings by guest chefs—for campus visitors. General Information | 9


Cannard Herb Garden Composed of seven sweeping terraces of organically grown culinary herbs, the Cannard Herb Garden acts as a living classroom for the aspiring and professional chefs who work and study at Greystone. PUBLIC OPERATIONS Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant The CIA’s award-winning Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant is staffed by professionals and by students in the final on-campus semester of the AOS in culinary arts degree program. It is open to the public year round, with patio seating during temperate months. The restaurant offers bold and flavorful contemporary fare in a casual setting. The à la carte menu features simple selections emphasizing fresh, seasonal ingredients. The award-winning wine list is comprised entirely of wines from California. Casual dress, including jeans, sneakers, and walking shorts is suitable when dining in the Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant. Seating is available every day from 11:30 a.m.– 9 p.m. for continuous service for lunch and dinner. Preferred pricing is available for current students and alumni. The Bakery Café by illy Located on the main floor of the Greystone building, The Bakery Café by illy offers guests the opportunity to experience coffee and cuisine from two industry leaders— illycaffè and the CIA. Customers can choose from a variety of sumptuous sandwiches, soups, salads, breads, pastries, desserts, and coffee drinks prepared by students in the college’s baking and pastry arts degree program. The bakery café is open Tuesday– Saturday from 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

10 | General Information

Special Events The CIA at Greystone is also a magnificent venue for a wide variety of special events. Its centerpiece building is a historic landmark (the former Christian Brothers Winery) with grand cathedral ceilings, massive hand-cut stone walls, and hand-selected antiques. Greystone’s team of culinary professionals designs a menu unique for the event while maintaining traditions of the regional agriculture. Once the menu is created, wines are selected to perfectly complement the flavors. Guests are greeted in the Atrium just inside Greystone’s original oak front doors. The Atrium rises 90 feet to the third floor, providing a singularly dramatic setting for hors d’oeuvre receptions. Dinner and dancing are held in the historic Vintners Hall of Fame, which features beamed ceilings and stone walls lined with 2,000-gallon wooden casks. Campus Store and Marketplace The Spice Islands Marketplace, Greystone’s campus store, is located on the first floor of the main building. The Marketplace offers a list of over 1,300 titles, many that are difficult to find elsewhere, as well as a selection of professional cooking and baking equipment, school supplies, health and beauty aids, gourmet food and ingredients, and gift items ranging from sweatshirts to glassware to souvenirs. Student discounts are offered on uniforms as well as other merchandise. The campus store features a unique Flavor Bar where guests can experience flavor dynamics firsthand, in tasting exercises created by CIA faculty. At the Flavor Bar, unique ingredients, such as olive oil and artisan chocolates, are featured for comparative tastings. Additional artisan and signature confections created by the AOS in baking and pastry arts degree program students are for sale.


PROFESSIONAL AND PHYSICAL RESOURCES CIA at Greystone students benefit from the experience of our award-winning international faculty of chefs, pastry chefs, bakers, and wine experts. These professionals have extensive experience in the classroom and have served in some of the best-known restaurants, hotels, and resorts in this country and around the world. The 117,000-square-foot main building at Greystone is a historic structure that was built in 1889. The main educational area is on the north end of the third floor, where, in an open-plan format, there are five teaching kitchens, two bakeshops, and an outdoor area for live-fire cooking. The teaching floor occupies 15,000 square feet and is designed to accommodate approximately 170 students through multiple sessions. The third floor also houses the library, student computer lab, Learning Strategies Center, four classrooms, a cooking demonstration stage, and educational administrative offices. The library offers course guides, textbooks, and resources for additional research and study. The second floor of the Greystone building houses three lecture rooms, a 15,000-squarefoot special events space, and the public Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant that provides real-life, hands-on experience for students in the associate degree program in culinary arts. On the first floor, there is a 125-seat facility with a demonstration cooking theater as well as a similar but smaller public demonstration theater, administrative offices, and the campus store. There is also a 3,600-square foot, open-plan teaching kitchen with capacity for 72 students through multiple sessions, and a kitchen specifically equipped to support pastry skill development.

CAMPUS LOCATION The CIA at Greystone is located in the heart of the Napa Valley at 2555 Main Street, St. Helena, CA. The campus is approximately 11⁄2–2 hours north of San Francisco, CA. (See “Travel Directions,” page 98.) CAMPUS MAP To view a map of the Greystone campus, see pages 96–97. CAMPUS VISITS Prospective students are encouraged to come see the CIA firsthand. Admissions Information Sessions are scheduled throughout the year, giving prospective students a chance to talk with admissions representatives, faculty, and current students. Call 707-967-2496 or 1-800-CULINARY, or visit www.ciachef.edu for session dates. ACCREDITATION The Culinary Institute of America is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 267-2845000. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Official recognition of this CIA accreditation may be found under “Institutions” on the Middle States website: www.msche.org. NOT-FOR-PROFIT STATEMENT The Culinary Institute of America is an independent, not-for-profit educational organization [Section 501 (c) (3)] pursuing its mission of providing the highest quality culinary education. This not-for-profit status distinguishes the Institute from others because it enables us to focus on the quality of education rather General Information | 11


than on satisfying the investment expectations of shareholders. Governed by a board of trustees not compensated for its services, the Institute benefits from the guidance of its board members, who represent the hospitality field as well as the professional and educational communities.

Information Criteria to determine financial aid awards Format Financial Aid Brochure, printed material Location Financial Aid Office, website

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DATA (CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS) In accordance with U.S. Department of Education reporting guidelines, information pertaining to potential occupations, job placement rates, program on-time completion rate, and other relevant employment data for the Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program and Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program may be found on the ACAP and AWBP pages of the CIA website at www.ciachef.edu/admissions.

Information Re-establishing eligibility Catalog Format Admissions Office, website Location

LOCATION OF INFORMATION Information pertaining to financial aid, faculty, curriculum, policies, and other subjects important to CIA students is available in campus publications and other printed materials. This information can be found in offices at the Hyde Park and/or Greystone campuses, as well as on our website (www.ciachef.edu). The table that follows, in accordance with the federal Higher Education Act, is designed to help you locate information you may need. Information Description of available financial aid Format Financial Aid Brochure, printed material Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Financial aid application procedure Format Financial Aid Brochure Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Financial aid eligibility requirements Format Financial Aid Brochure, printed material Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Selection criteria for aid recipients Format Financial Aid Brochure, printed material Location Financial Aid Office, website 12 | General Information

Information Criteria for continued eligibility Format Catalog Admissions Office, website Location Information Satisfactory academic progress and financial aid Format Catalog Location Admissions Office, website

Information Method and frequency of financial aid disbursement Format Financial Aid Brochure, printed material Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Loan repayment information Format Entrance Counseling Form, Catalog Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Terms and conditions of federal student loans Format Financial Aid Brochure, Catalog, Handbook Location Financial Aid Office, Admissions Office, Student Affairs Office, website Information General Federal Work-Study conditions Format Financial Aid Brochure Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Federal Perkins and Federal Stafford exit counseling information Format Exit Counseling Forms Location Financial Aid Office Information Cost of attendance Format Printed material Location Financial Aid Office, website Information Specific costs, charges, and fees Format Catalog Location Admissions Office, website Information Refund policy Format Catalog, Handbook, Enrollment Agreement Location Admissions Office, website, Student Affairs Office, Bursar’s Office Information Refund distribution Format Catalog, Handbook Location Admissions Office, website, Student Affairs Office, Bursar’s Office Information Supporting accreditation documentation Format Printed material Location Office of Academic Assessment and Accreditation Information Degree and certificate programs Format Catalog Location Admissions Office, website


Information Transfer of credit policies and articulation agreements Format Catalog Admissions Office, website Location Information Instructional and physical facilities Catalog Format Location Admissions Office, website Information Faculty and instructional personnel Format Catalog Location Admissions Office, website Information Names of accrediting, approving, or licensing bodies Catalog Format Location Office of Academic Assessment and Accreditation, website Information Facilities for students with disabilities Format Catalog Location Admissions Office, website Information Names, titles, and locations of employees available for information dissemination Format Catalog, Handbook Location Admissions Office, website, Student Affairs Office Information Graduation rates Format Report, website Location Office of Institutional Research and Business Intelligence Information AOS and certificate placement data Format Printed report Location Career Services Office Information Institutional security policies and crime statistics* Format Safety & Security Information Report Location Campus Safety, Dean of Student Affairs Office, Human Resources, Residence Life, Admissions Office, Payroll Office Information Peer-to-peer file sharing policies Format Catalog, Handbook Location Admissions Office, website, Information Technology Department Information Campus emergency response information Format Handbook, Safety & Security Information Report Location Campus Safety Information Missing persons procedure Format Handbook, Safety & Security Information Report Location Campus Safety Information Fire safety information Format Handbook Location Campus Safety Information Vaccination Policy Format Handbook Location Student Affairs Office, Admissions Office

COLLEGE AWARDS The CIA is proud of the many awards its faculty, staff, and students have received. The following is just a sample of recent industry accolades the college has earned: Faculty/Administration Lifetime Achievement Award, Foodservice Educators Network International President

Tim Ryan ’77, 2012 Winner, Cochon 555 Cooking Competition

Chef-Instructor Lars Kronmark, 2012 Chef Professionalism Award, American Culinary Federation Dean of Education Russell

Scott, 2011 Third Place, U.S. Finals of the World Chocolate Masters Competition Pastry Instructor

Stephen Durfee, 2010 Who’s Who of Food & Beverage in America, James Beard Foundation President Tim Ryan

’77, 2010; Vice President—Strategic Initiatives and Industry Leadership Greg Drescher, 2005 Silver Plate Award, International Foodservice Manufacturers Association President Tim Ryan ’77, 2009 Chef of the Year, American Culinary Federation Dean of Education Russell Scott, 2008 Award of Excellence—Entrepreneur of the Year, International Association of Culinary Professionals President Tim Ryan ’77, 2007 Chef of the Year, Cordon d’Or—Gold Ribbon Academy of the Culinary Arts Chef-Instructor

Lars Kronmark, 2007 Silver Spoon Award, Food Arts magazine

Vice President—Strategic Initiatives and Industry Leadership Greg Drescher, 2006 Team Grand Prize, La Coupe du Monde de la Boulangerie Team Leader, Baking and Pastry

Arts Robert Jörin, 1999 One of the “10 Best Pastry Chefs in America,”

Pastry Art & Design Pastry Instructor Stephen Durfee, 1999

* The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. Contact Alice-Ann Schuster, associate vice president and dean of student affairs, at 845-451-1262 to request a hard copy of the statistics, or view them at http://ope.ed.gov/security. General Information | 13


Restaurants Great Wine Capitals Best of Tourism Award for Wine Tourism Restaurants Wine Spectator

Greystone Restaurant, 2012 America’s Best Wine Lists Award, National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, Fine Dining Category Wine Spectator

Greystone Restaurant, 2003 Restaurants & Institutions Ivy Award Wine

Spectator Greystone Restaurant, 1999

College/Department Faces of Diversity Inspiration Award, National Restaurant Association CIA, 2011 Best Cooking School, Cordon d’Or—Gold Ribbon Culinary Award Cordon d’Or Cuisine CIA,

2010 Gold Level Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification, U.S. Green Building Council Vineyard Lodge II stu-

dent residence hall, 2010 Award of Excellence, International Association of Culinary Professionals CIA at Grey-

stone, 2002

14 | General Information

CIA CAMPUSES The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Drive Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499 845-452-9600 www.ciachef.edu The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone 2555 Main Street St. Helena, CA 94574 707-967-1100 www.ciachef.edu/california The Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio 312 Pearl Parkway, Building 2, Suite 2102 San Antonio, TX 78215 210-554-6400 www.ciachef.edu/texas The Culinary Institute of America, Singapore Block 31, Temasek Polytechnic 21 Tampines Avenue 1, Singapore 529757 + (65) 6592 1136 www.ciachef.edu.sg


STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES To promote individual well-being, growth, leadership, and participation among its students, the CIA at Greystone offers a variety of services. Our Napa Valley campus provides an ideal setting for living and learning, with the staff and facilities you need to succeed.

RESIDENCE HALLS The college maintains residential facilities that provide housing for approximately 130 students, both on campus in the Guest House, and at the Vineyard Lodge Housing Center. Vineyard Lodge II, one of two residence halls at the Center, holds LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, offering students the chance to live in—and learn from living in—an environmentally conscious facility. Occupancy in all residence halls is either single or double rooms with private or shared bath. Residential housing is a privilege, and students are expected to adhere to college behavioral standards and be cooperative members of the residential community. Once accepted to the CIA, students interested in housing must submit an application, available online at www.ciachef.edu. Oncampus housing is guaranteed for all incoming first-semester students. The pricing of campus housing for each semester varies with the type of accommodation, but includes all utilities (including air conditioning), cable TV access, limited local phone service, and hardwire and wireless Internet connections. Amenities also include coin-operated laundry and a common area. There are no security deposits required. All rooms are furnished with a desk, chair, dresser, wardrobe or closet, television, and bed for each student. Each room will have linen and limited housekeeping service provided on a regular basis. All residence halls

are non-smoking facilities. Additional amenities include a fitness room in Vineyard Lodge II, and a kitchen for student use and an outdoor patio with grilling area at the Vineyard Lodge. Resident assistants reside in all three housing facilities to provide supervision, guidance, and activities for residential students. Fulltime security is provided by the Office of Safety and Security. Students interested in off-campus housing should contact the student affairs manager at 707-967-2420 for a listing of current rentals. The CIA offers this listing only as an information service to incoming students and therefore cannot be responsible for rental conditions and negotiations with landlords.

PERSONAL COUNSELING AND MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES Personal difficulties and emotional stress can affect your quality of life and ability to learn. Speaking with a trained, objective professional can increase self-awareness and help you build better coping strategies. If you are already under the care of a psychiatrist and/or therapist, you may want to transfer your care to local resources in order to have appropriate support during your time at school. Check with your insurance provider for a list of therapists and psychiatrists in Napa County who accept your insurance. Students without insurance should consider purchasing coverage. One option is to purchase additional coverage through the CIA’s Student Life and Services | 15


Student Accident and Health Insurance Program, offered through Commercial Travelers Mutual Insurance Company. On a limited basis, a licensed therapist can arrange to meet with you, on campus, to discuss your counseling needs. Call 707-9672443 and leave a confidential voicemail message with your name and a phone number where you can be reached. Also, the student affairs manager can assist you with local referrals to therapists. If you experience a mental health crisis, Napa County Mental Health can be reached at 707-253-4711, 24 hours a day. You may also be seen for an emergency evaluation at nearby St. Helena Hospital.

portal) for enrolled students. Past examples of Greystone student organizations have included:

INSURANCE The CIA at Greystone carries secondary accident insurance for each student in the amount of $10,000 for each accident. The college offers medical insurance that you can purchase through Commercial Travelers Mutual Insurance Company. Once you are an accepted student, you will be mailed a brochure outlining coverage for both accident and medical insurance. You can also go to www.studentplanscenter.com to view and download the brochure, enrollment card, and claim form. The CIA does not carry insurance covering loss of, theft of, or damage to your personal property. Consult your family insurance agent for information on obtaining this coverage.

My Plate

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS There are several student-run clubs at Greystone, many that feature activities and programs designed by students. Meeting schedules and activities vary; complete information is available on the Greystone page of CIA Main Menu (the student web 16 | Student Life and Services

Bread Club

Gives both baking and pastry and culinary arts students the opportunity to produce artisan breads and develop the skills and leadership necessary to produce highquality bread products. Greystone Green Thumbs

Maintains an organic produce garden near campus. Students also sell their produce at the local farmers’ market in season and provide Greystone with ingredients during the off-season.

Enables interested students to design and execute their own menu to be served to a limited number of fellow students at Greystone, under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Sage Thymes

Greystone’s student newsletter, published periodically. The Sage Thymes covers a wide variety of topics, from food trends and campus happenings to world cuisines and chef profiles. Wine Club

Provides students with the chance to learn about a variety of wine topics and participate in varietal tastings, regional tastings, and vertical tastings, as well as wine and food pairings. (Participants must be at least 21 years of age.)

LEARNING STRATEGIES The CIA, through the Learning Strategies Centers (LSC) at the Hyde Park, NY and St. Helena, CA campuses, provide degree and certificate program students at Grey-


stone with opportunities to enhance their skills and develop study strategies for success. Located in the Margie Schubert Library in Room 306 of the Greystone main building, the LSC offers a wide array of services, including tutoring, disability services, and mentoring programs, and are available at no charge.

Tutoring Services Students who are interested in obtaining extra help through tutoring services should contact the Learning Strategies Center administrator, who will make arrangements for a peer tutor. A peer tutor is a student who has successfully completed the course and has demonstrated proficiency in that class. Peer tutors can provide one-on-one tutoring to support and assist students in their classes at no additional charge to the student. In addition, advice on time management, learning styles, note taking, test-taking strategies, and organization is also available through the Learning Strategies Center administrator. Disability Services The college provides support services for students with disabling conditions. The Learning Strategies Center (LSC) at the Hyde Park, NY campus will assist qualified students in attaining reasonable accommodations and support services. Our disability support specialists are available to discuss students’ specific needs in the classroom, kitchen, and residence hall. Reasonable accommodations may include readers, notetakers, priority seating, enlargement of notes, tape recording a lecture, books on CD, interpreters, testing accommodations, assistance with lifting, priority registration, or residence hall accommodations, depending on the stu-

dent’s documentation and specific functional limitations. After reviewing the documentation and interviewing the student, a disability support specialist will determine and recommend appropriate accommodations for each student’s course of study. The recommended accommodations will be communicated to the student and, with his or her consent, to the Learning Strategies Center administrator and the proper personnel at Greystone in order to best assist the student. Accommodations for students with disabilities are based on individual needs and functional limitations. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate a request for services and remain involved as a committed learner who has taken charge of his/her own needs. Due to confidentiality laws governing institutions of higher education, students must disclose their disability and request accommodations from each instructor and/or other staff members and departments themselves. Students with disabling conditions need to request accommodations for every class, quiz, midterm, or final exam as well as for their costing exam and externship. Accommodations are not provided retroactively. Students should notify instructors of their disability and need for accommodations during the first week of class. The instructor is responsible for providing academic accommodations in the classroom. To obtain services, students are required to provide the LSC with recent professional documentation of their disability. All documentation needs to be sent to the Learning Strategies Center at The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499. The documentation must be provided on the practitioner’s letterhead (not on a prescription form), and Student Life and Services | 17


dated and signed by the physician or psychologist. The practitioner cannot be a family member. This information will be kept confidential and must be received at least one month prior to their start date. Should students decide to disclose their disability once on campus, they must submit current professional documentation to the Learning Strategies Center to receive accommodations. Students must be registered with the LSC in order to receive accommodations. Learning disability documentation or ADHD documentation should not be older than three years, except where appropriate documentation is provided by a professional indicating that new testing would not be required, given the individual circumstances. Students with outdated documentation may receive accommodations while actively obtaining new documentation. Provisional accommodations are given for two months while the student is obtaining new documentation. If updated documentation is not submitted within that time frame, the provisional accommodations are discontinued. For additional information, call 845-451-1219 to speak with a disability specialist. A qualified student with a disability is one who: • Identifies himself or herself to the Learning Strategies Center administrator at Greystone or to one of the disability support specialists at the Hyde Park campus in a timely manner. • Provides the college with comprehensive, current, professional documentation of a disability. • Provides documentation that clearly indicates the student’s functional limitations and the need for reasonable academic adjustments, auxiliary aids, or services. • Needs those adjustments, auxiliary aids, or services to participate in and/or benefit from the college’s programs and activities. 18 | Student Life and Services

• Is able to benefit from the adjustments, auxiliary aids, or services. • Can meet the academic and technical standards set out by the CIA.

Housing Accommodations Policy and Procedures In compliance with Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, students with documented disabilities may request special housing accommodations within the context of current housing policies. For the procedures to request housing accommodations, please contact the disability support specialist at the Hyde Park, NY campus at 845-451-1219 or 845-451-1288. Testing Accommodations Some students with disabilities need alternative testing accommodations. Examples of these include, but are not limited to, test content read to them, tests written in large print, extra time on tests, assistance in filling out Scantron® sheets, and tests taken in a less-distracting environment. If a student needs to take an exam in a location outside the classroom, the student needs to schedule it with the LSC administrator at least 48 hours prior to the day of the test. If the appointment is not made within 48 hours of the test date, the student may not receive accommodations for that test. Appointments for alternative tests are made around the actual time the class is taking the test, or at a time that does not conflict with the student’s class schedule. Once the student makes an appointment to take a test with the LSC administrator, the instructor will receive an e-mail with the date and time of the test. The instructor is then responsible for delivering the


exam to the LSC administrator prior to the scheduled test and picking up the completed test.

Course Substitutions and Waivers There are no course waivers granted on the basis of disability at the CIA. Additionally, the CIA does not modify course content or requirements. A petition requesting a course substitution is an option for students. According to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, colleges have the right to deem which courses are essential to their curricula. Students may submit a petition for a course substitution; however, if the course is deemed to be essential to the program, the request will be denied. Documentation Requirements The following are requirements for submitting documentation requesting disability services at the CIA: • Learning Disabilities or ADD/ADHD—docu-

mentation must be less than three years old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. Additionally, the psychoeducational evaluation must be based on an adult test format such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Woodcock-Johnson Achievement Test. • Psychiatric Disabilities—documentation

must be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. This documentation must be updated annually. • Rehabilitated Drug Addiction/Alcoholism—

documentation must be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. • Hearing Impairments—an audiogram

administered by a licensed audiologist and any additional medical documentation must be less than three years old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. Information regarding the functional limitations should be included.

• Medical and/or Physical Disabilities—docu-

mentation must be provided as to the nature of the disability, diagnosis, resulting functional limitations, physician recommendations for appropriate accommodations, and be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA. • Visual Impairments—documentation must

be less than a year old from the date the student requests services from the CIA and should be provided by an optometrist or ophthalmologist. This documentation must be updated annually. • Temporary Disability Due to Illness or Injury—documentation verifying the nature

of the condition, stating the expected duration of the condition, and describing the accommodation is necessary. The verification of temporary disability must be no older than 60 days.

Should unforeseen functional limitations arise that require an accommodation, an additional evaluation may be required for a medical, emotional, learning, or physical condition, whether preexisting or developing after enrollment. Contact the LSC at Greystone at 707-9672406 or the disability support specialists in the Learning Strategies Center at our Hyde Park campus at 845-451-1219 or 845-4511288 for assistance in determining if your documentation is appropriate and current. For further information about our disability services, please visit www.ciachef.edu.

Technical Standards The mission of The Culinary Institute of America is to teach students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to grow into professional positions of influence and leadership in the food and hospitality industry. Contemporary culinary, baking and pastry, and hospitality education requires that the acquisition and utilization of professional knowledge be Student Life and Services | 19


accompanied by a necessary set of skills and professional attitudes. The CIA requires that all students meet certain functions and technical standards that are essential for successful completion of all phases of our education programs, and that reflect industry requirements and standards. To participate in and successfully complete the CIA’s degree, certificate, and/or non-credit programs, each student, with or without reasonable accommodations, must be able to: 1. Have the ability to sufficiently perform kitchen, externship, dining room, café, and classroom activities and procedures. Examples of relevant activities include, but are not limited to, the ability to: a. Work in a refrigerated classroom. b. Lift and transport food, including hot food, as well as other culinary or baking product, equipment, small wares, and utensils. c. Lift and transport trays with plated foods, small wares, and other items, and serve and clear tables where guests are seated. d. Safely pour and serve liquids and beverages, including hot liquids. e. Safely handle hot foods such as pulled sugar or other items coming out of a heat source. f. Safely use knives for food preparation as well as other commercial cooking, baking, or serving utensils. g. Perform repetitive motion skills required in the kitchen and the food industry, such as whisking, dicing, or piping. h. Follow and maintain the National Restaurant Association’s ServSafe® sanitation standards for safe food handling. i. Safely and effectively operate standard commercial cooking and foodservice equipment. j. Participate and/or work in an environ20 | Student Life and Services

ment where commercial microwaves and convection ovens are being used continuously. k. Test and evaluate food and beverage products. l. Produce food products within the time parameters designated by a course objective within a class or for a hands-on cooking or baking practical. m. Handle and cook different varieties of fish, seafood, beef, pork, chicken, lamb, venison, or other meats, vegetables, and fruit products. n. Handle and bake/cook using different flours—including all grains—as well as chocolate, fruits, and nuts. 2. Attend and actively participate in all class room courses. 3. Attend and actively participate in production kitchen classes; instructional kitchen classes; dining room, café, and/or laboratory classes; and externship, for a minimum of seven consecutive hours per session, noting that those sessions may start at different hours of the day. 4. Communicate effectively and professionally when interacting with peers, faculty, staff, other college personnel, guests, and employers. Examples of relevant communication activity include, but are not limited to: a. Use of effective verbal and/or nonverbal communication skills b. Effective utilization of the English language c. Ability to interpret communication from other people and respond in a professional fashion 5. Have the ability to meet and perform sufficiently all course objectives that are essential in all classroom, laboratory, dining room, café, externship, and kitchen courses. Examples of relevant cognitive ability include, but are not limited to, the ability to: a. Learn and benefit from the college’s curriculum. b. Follow directions.


c. Reason and perform independently. d. Process information accurately and thoroughly and prioritize tasks. e. Demonstrate skills of recall using both long- and short-term memory. f. Apply knowledge. g. Perform mathematical computations. h. Write essays, reports, and research projects as well as complete other collegelevel writing assignments. i. Demonstrate the conceptual, integrative, and analytical skills necessary for problem solving and critical thinking. 6. Have the emotional stability, as well as the behavioral and social attributes, required to work individually and in teams within classrooms, laboratories, dining rooms, cafÊs, kitchen environments, and externship. Examples of relevant activities include, but are not limited to, the ability to: a. Develop professional working relationships with classmates, instructors, guests, employers, and others. b. Function effectively under stress and regulate one’s own emotional reaction. c. Adapt to multiple situations and perform multiple tasks. d. Adhere to the college’s Student Code of Conduct. e. Exercise sound judgment. f. Focus and maintain attention on tasks. g. Self-manage medical or emotional conditions. 7. Have the ability to sufficiently maintain the safety and well-being of fellow students without posing a safety threat to himself/herself or others in all environments on campus, and during externship and other college-sponsored trips.

Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs The Learning Strategies Center (LSC) at our Hyde Park, NY campus coordinates

the Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs. In the Faculty and Alumni Mentor Programs, enrolled students on all of our campuses have an opportunity to be paired with either a faculty member on campus or an experienced CIA graduate. The programs provide students with additional guidance and structure as they pursue their culinary or baking and pastry career. The mentor acts as a role model to demonstrate the positive results of pride, professionalism, and hard work, and can help a student determine which area of the industry he or she is best suited for or most interested in pursuing. Mentors can also help introduce students to the wide network of CIA alumni and other professionals in the field. To provide students with support while they are on their externships, the CIA has an Externship Host Mentor Program. The externship host mentor is a CIA graduate located in the city a student chooses to go to for his or her externship. The role of this mentor is to help the student know where to find appropriate housing; introduce him or her to other restaurateurs as well as area purveyors, manufacturers, and farmers; and share information about offerings such as sports and the arts. The program will give students an opportunity to use their time on externship for continued learning and to begin to establish their own professional network. The Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host Mentor Programs are voluntary programs designed for the benefit of students who want to enhance their educational experience to the fullest. To learn more, please contact the Learning Strategies Center administrator at 707-967-2406.

Student Life and Services | 21


TECHNOLOGY ON CAMPUS FOR STUDENTS The CIA at Greystone currently has a stateof-the-art network infrastructure that supports LAN, WAN, wireless network, high-speed Internet connection, and 14 PC workstations in one computer lab on campus available for student use. The computers run a variety of applications such as MS Office, ESHA Food Processor, Internet, and other applications used to support the curriculum. Residence halls and other locations on campus—such as the teaching kitchen, the Ventura Foods Center for Menu Research and Development, the Williams Center for Flavor Discovery, and the Rudd Center for Professional Wine Studies—are equipped with an 802.11 a/b/g compliant wireless network. Within their first week on campus, students will be provided with access to CIA Main Menu (the student web portal), MyCIA.net e-mail, and the online learning system. Information available through CIA Main Menu includes campus events, announcements, departmental web pages, links to other educational resources, and information personalized to the individual student (i.e., Student Account, Financial Aid, and Registrar information). MyCIA.net email is another avenue for sharing campusrelated information from faculty, staff, and student clubs. It’s also available for students to take with them after graduation, enabling them to maintain contact with their alma mater as they move forward in their careers. Course guides, as well as other supporting materials for classes, are posted via an online course management system. All of these Internet resources are available from both on- and off-campus locations for all currently enrolled students. 22 | Student Life and Services

Information Technology (IT) staff members are available to advise students on a wide variety of technical issues. For questions about account information, students may email ithelp@mycia.net or call IT support in Hyde Park at 845-451-1698 from 9:30 a.m.– 12:30 p.m. or 2–6 p.m. Pacific Time. Students are helped during our support hours on a first-come, first-served basis. When coming to Greystone IT for support, students must stay while we work on their computer. We will only look at a machine if it is the student’s own. We cannot fix hardware issues, but will look over the computer to give advice on getting it repaired. For more information about computer resources offered at the CIA, as well as detailed information about the wireless network, account information, recommended PC configurations, and updated technologies on campus, visit www.ciachef.edu/admissions/life/technology. It is highly recommended that students bring a personal computer when enrolling in classes to take full advantage of the available electronic resources used during their course of study. The computer lab is available to anyone without this equipment and provides printing services.

Student Computer Lab Greystone’s computer laboratory is located on the southwest corner of the third floor of the main building next to the Education Office. The computer lab is equipped with a wide variety of software programs and also provides services such as printing. Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Peer-to-peer file sharing is not allowed and is blocked on the CIA network using bandwidth-shaping technology. Under the Higher Education Opportunity Act (H.R.


4137), illegal distribution of copyrighted materials may be subject to criminal and civil penalties. The CIA is legally obligated to assist authorities in identifying individuals who violate copyright law pertaining to peer-to-peer file sharing. It is also in violation of school policy to use technology designed to circumvent the blocking of this activity.

LIBRARY The Margie Schubert Library is located on the third floor of the main building adjacent to the teaching kitchens. In addition, through a special arrangement, students may borrow books from the St. Helena Public Library, which has an outstanding collection on wines. Resources are also available from The Culinary Institute of America’s Conrad N. Hilton Library at the Hyde Park, NY campus. The library houses an outstanding collection of nearly 86,000 volumes, 4,500 DVDs and videos, and approximately 280 current periodical titles. Although there is a strong specialization in the culinary field, the collection also has a liberal arts listing supporting the college’s ever-expanding educational programs. The library is also home to the Learning Strategies Center (see page 16). CAREER SERVICES A CIA education offers students unparalleled career opportunities. The Career Services Office is located at the main campus in Hyde Park, NY. The director of career services maintains an office at the Greystone campus and schedules regular visits to campus to assist students throughout their career decision-making process. A variety of resources and activities are available to help assess career potential, stay abreast of indus-

try trends and requirements, develop a knowledge of job opportunities, and set employment goals. The externship course in the AOS degree program is an integral part of the curriculum and a significant opportunity for students. This direct industry experience enables them to apply new skills and further clarify career goals. For assistance in acquiring permanent positions, students may access online job listings to learn of employment opportunities, career paths, and organization characteristics. CIA students can use a web-based system, Experience, to research opportunities. The system offers links to the websites of employers, enabling students to more fully research job opportunities with particular organizations. Whether seeking an externship site or fulltime employment after graduation, you are strongly encouraged to have early and ongoing involvement with the activities and resources the Career Services Office provides to make well-informed externship and employment decisions. While the college vigorously pursues job placement for graduates, placement is not guaranteed.

ON-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT Part-time employment may be available at the Greystone campus. Students often work in the Spice Islands Marketplace (campus store), as well as in campus administration and the Education and Special Events departments. There are a variety of jobs available, including tutors, office assistants, tour guides, kitchen assistants, retail clerks, purchasing assistants, prep cooks, and servers for special events on campus. In addition to offsetting your college expenses, on-campus employment can enhance your Student Life and Services | 23


education, provide practical experience, and generate valuable networking opportunities. Please contact the human resources manager at Greystone at 707-967-2340 for current student job openings. Once you are employed, you will need to complete a new hire packet that includes a W-4 form and I-9 document (a form required by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security that establishes your eligibility to work in the United States). The I-9 form requires presentation of original documentation to verify eligibility. Please refer to CIA Main Menu for a copy of these documents. Once you start your job, you should talk with your supervisor about the procedures to follow to ensure proper payment, including payroll deadlines for time sheet submission. Students are advised to work no more than 20 hours per week. As a student employee, you have the option to sign up for direct deposit at a local bank or a bank at home. To begin direct deposit, you’ll need to provide the CIA’s Payroll Office with the name of your bank, its routing number (also referred to as the transit ABA number), and your checking or savings account number. A form will be provided with your employment materials.

ALUMNI RELATIONS Since 1946, The Culinary Institute of America has greatly expanded its programs both within the college and with our alumni constituency. This has happened with a clearly defined purpose: to create and maintain the premier college for culinary education. In the process, our alumni ranks have grown to more than 44,000 professionals working in all areas of foodservice throughout the U.S. and the world. 24 | Student Life and Services

The Alumni Relations Department was established to fully integrate CIA alumni into regional and national programs which will benefit their professional growth and provide support for the college, both academically and financially. CIA alumni are involved in virtually every area of college advancement, including recruitment, admissions, student mentoring, career placement, fund-raising, regional receptions, and other special CIA presentations. In turn, the college offers lifelong access to career placement assistance, résumé referral services, continuing education courses, instructional and training videos and DVDs, and publications to keep alumni updated on colleagues and new programs, activities, and industry advancements. All CIA alumni are welcomed as members of the Alumni Network and its online community (www.ciaalumninetwork.com). Upon graduation, students receive an ID card that qualifies them for discounts in the restaurants, for continuing education courses, for CIA-produced instructional media, and in the Spice Islands Marketplace at the CIA at Greystone. Annual class reunions and regional alumni receptions held throughout the country bring graduates together for social and business networking. The Alumni Relations staff is available to assist students and alumni. For more information, contact the Alumni Relations Department in Hyde Park at 845-451-1401 or alumni@culinary.edu.


ADMISSIONS The Culinary Institute of America seeks candidates who can demonstrate academic competence and who have practical experience in the foodservice industry.

ADMISSIONS PROCESS

• Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Pro-

The CIA has a selective admissions process

gram (ACAP) only—A bachelor’s degree in

whereby each candidate is evaluated indi-

hospitality management, food science, nutri-

vidually. The basic requirements for its

tion/dietetics, or a closely related area

degree and certificate programs are as

• Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate

follows:

Program (AWBP) only—a degree in hospital-

• A high school diploma or GED credential

ity management, culinary arts management,

• Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) programs only—The CIA requires that you do one of the following: 1. Work hands-on with fresh ingredients in a professional kitchen or bakery prior to enrollment, at least 10–15 hours a week for six months. 2. Participate in a high school culinary program that either: a. operates a restaurant, bakery, or café that is open to the public, faculty, or students at least two days a week for six months out of the school year, or b. completes at least two on-site or off-site catering jobs per week for at least six months out of the year. 3. Complete 12 credits of college-level courses, including at least six credits of hands-on culinary courses with a grade of at least “C+” in the hands-on courses. The experience requirement is designed to help you understand the realities of working in the food industry before you enroll. It’s a rewarding and challenging profession, and we want to be sure you are absolutely confident in your career choice. Please note that you do not need this experience to apply for admission—the requirement must be met before you enter the CIA.

or a closely related field OR a bachelor’s degree in another discipline, along with a minimum of 12 months experience in service or management at an establishment where a professional wine and beverage program is in place. In addition, students must be 21 years of age by the program start date.

Students in the AOS programs are required to have a complete medical examination within one year of their entry date. An exam form is supplied by the CIA (and is available from our website) for this purpose and must be completed and returned to the Medical Office for review by the school’s medical staff. There are no exceptions to this requirement. A medical examination is not required for the certificate programs.

AOS DEGREE PROGRAMS— APPLICATION PROCEDURE Your application is seen as a direct reflection of you—your interest, motivation, confidence, and academic ability. Your prior educational record will be evaluated according to the difficulty of the program undertaken, class rank, and grade point average. Applicants who have vocational training in culinary arts and related disciplines are expected to have Admissions | 25


strong marks in these areas. The CIA has an experience requirement for admission to the degree programs. All prior relevant experience should be documented. While you may apply for admission with minimal experience, you’ll be expected to gain at least six months hands-on food preparation experience prior to entering the CIA. The steps to apply for admission are as follows:

1. Complete the application • Read the application form carefully and complete all sections. • If you have significant experience in the foodservice industry or are a career changer, it is also helpful to include a copy of your résumé. • The CIA requires that students take math and writing placement tests prior to enrollment. You may be excused from one or both tests if you have qualifying SAT, ACT, or AP English Language and Composition scores or have successfully completed an English Composition or Culinary Mathematics course with a grade of “C” or better at an accredited college or university within the past 10 years. For more information about assessment test requirements, please contact the manager of recruitment at Greystone.

2. Include your essay Attach your essay of 500 words. 3. Enclose your nonrefundable application fee Include a check or money order for $50 made out to The Culinary Institute of America. 4. Ask for recommendations One recommendation is required. It must be from a foodservice employer describing your foodservice experience and that verifies the duration and quality of your previous employment. In addition, submitting a rec26 | Admissions

ommendation from a professional contact (e.g., employer, business associate, mentor) is advised in order to give the Admissions Committee a greater understanding of your character and abilities.

5. Request official transcripts Ask all high schools and postsecondary schools you’ve attended to mail your official transcripts (not a student copy) directly to the Admissions Department in Hyde Park, NY. If you hold an equivalency diploma, the official test scores must be submitted. If you’re in high school, your transcript must be complete through the 11th grade, and indicate what courses you’ll take in the 12th grade or show your marks for the 12th grade. Please note that you must be a high school graduate or have received an equivalency diploma to enter the CIA. If you have matriculated in a collegelevel degree program and have completed the equivalent of 24 or more college credits, you may not be required to submit a high school transcript. Academic transcripts are required for all colleges you have attended. 6. Submit your SAT and/or ACT scores If you have taken the SAT and/or ACT within the last five years, the college strongly recommends that you include your scores, as they may help you qualify for a scholarship if submitted prior to acceptance. 7. Send the required application materials to the CIA Materials should be addressed to: Admissions Department, The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499. 8. Show proficiency in math and writing Submit your SAT or ACT scores, and/or take the COMPASS™ placement tests at a testing


site near your home. We will contact you to make arrangements once we receive your application.

Please note: • All prospective students must demonstrate their proficiency in the English language at a level adequate for success at the CIA. If your primary spoken language is other than English, the submission of TOEFL scores is required as part of your application. Please see page 32 for details. • Our Admissions Committee reviews all applications, which are valid for one year. Please note that the CIA does not return any materials sent as part of the admission review process. Do not submit original diplomas and certificates, as they will not be returned. • You may also apply for admission online at www.ciachef.edu/admissions/apply.

ACCELERATED CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM— APPLICATION PROCEDURE The Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program (ACAP) is open only to students who will have completed a bachelor’s degree in hospitality management, restaurant management, food science, nutrition, or closely related field by June 1 of the year of their program date. The CIA will make a judgment about your background preparation and readiness to succeed in this program based on your interview, essay, recommendations, and transcripts. You must complete a college-level course or have equivalent work experience in food safety, sanitation, and basic food costing prior to beginning ACAP. An assessment will be made during your admissions interview and appropriate coursework suggested. Graduates in food science and nutrition who are accepted into the program may also complete the CIA’s Introduction to the Pro-

fessional Kitchen online course prior to the start of class at no additional cost. Your application for admission must be submitted to the Admissions Department at the CIA’s main campus in Hyde Park, NY no later than an application deadline of March 1 of the year of your program start date. You will be notified of an admissions decision within a few weeks of the completion of your file, including the interview. The CIA reserves the right to verify any information you provide for review. The steps to apply for admission are as follows:

1. Complete the application • Read the application form carefully and complete all sections. • If you have experience in the foodservice industry, it is also helpful to include a copy of your résumé.

2. Include your essay Attach your essay of 500 words. 3. Enclose your nonrefundable application fee Include a check or money order for $50 made out to The Culinary Institute of America. 4. Ask for recommendations Two recommendations are required. One should be from a senior administrator or faculty member associated with the program from which you have graduated or will graduate. If you have been out of school for more than five years, please substitute a letter of recommendation from your current employer. The second letter of recommendation must be from a professional contact (e.g., employer, business associate, mentor) in order to give the Admissions Committee a greater understanding of your character and abilities. Admissions | 27


5. Request official transcripts Ask all postsecondary schools you’ve attended to mail your official transcripts (not a student copy) directly to the Admissions Department in Hyde Park, NY. Academic transcripts are required for all colleges you have attended. 6. Send the required application materials to the CIA Certificate program applicants should address their materials to ACAP Admissions, The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499. 7. Schedule an interview Once all materials have been received, you will be interviewed by the CIA at Greystone Admissions staff. Please call 707-967-2496 to schedule your interview. In the event a visit is not possible, a phone interview may be scheduled. Please note: • All prospective students must demonstrate their proficiency in the English language at a level adequate for success at the CIA. If your primary spoken language is other than English, the submission of TOEFL scores is required as part of your application. Please see page 32 for details. • Our Admissions Committee reviews all applications, which are valid for one year. Please note that the CIA does not return any materials sent as part of the admission review process. Do not submit original diplomas and certificates, as they will not be returned. • You may also apply for admission online at www.ciachef.edu/admissions/apply.

ACCELERATED WINE AND BEVERAGE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM— APPLICATION PROCEDURE The Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program (AWBP) is open to those individuals 21 years of age or older who have a serious interest in a professional career in wine, beverage, and service management in the hospitality industry. Prospective students must have completed an associate or bachelor’s degree program in hospitality management, culinary arts management, or a closely related field. Students who have completed a bachelor’s program in another discipline may apply after completing at least 12 months experience in the hospitality industry. The CIA will make a judgment about your level of preparation and readiness to succeed based on your application, essay, interview, and letters of recommendation. Your application is seen as a direct reflection of you—your interest, motivation, confidence, and academic ability. Your prior educational record will be evaluated according to the difficulty of the program undertaken, class rank, and grade point average. Applicants who have coursework in wine and related subjects are expected to have high marks in these areas. The steps to apply for admission are as follows:

1. Complete the application • Read the application form carefully and complete all sections. • If you have significant experience in the food and beverage industry or are a career changer, it is also helpful to include a copy of your résumé.

2. Include your essay Attach your essay of 500 words. 28 | Admissions


3. Enclose your nonrefundable application fee Include a check or money order for $50 made out to The Culinary Institute of America. 4. Ask for recommendations Two recommendations are required. One should be from a senior administrator or faculty member associated with the program from which you have graduated or will graduate. If you have been out of school for more than five years, please substitute a letter of recommendation from your current employer. The second letter of recommendation must be from a professional contact (e.g., employer, business associate, mentor) in order to give the Admissions Committee a greater understanding of your character and abilities. If you have a bachelor’s degree in another discipline, the second letter of recommendation must verify the duration of your service or management employment as a minimum of 12 months. 5. Request official transcripts Ask all postsecondary schools you’ve attended to mail your official transcripts (not a student copy) directly to CIA Admissions. Academic transcripts are required for all colleges you have attended. 6. Send the required application materials to CIA Admissions Materials should be addressed to: AWBP Admissions, The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499. 7. Schedule an interview Once all materials have been received, you will be interviewed by the CIA at Greystone Admissions staff. Please call 707-967-2496 to

schedule your interview. In the event a visit is not possible, a phone interview may be scheduled. Please note: • All prospective students must demonstrate their proficiency in the English language at a level adequate for success at the CIA. If your primary spoken language is other than English, the submission of TOEFL scores is required as part of your application. Please see page 32 for details. • Our Admissions Committee reviews all applications, which are valid for one year. Please note that the CIA does not return any materials sent as part of the admission review process. Do not submit original diplomas and certificates, as they will not be returned. • You may also apply for admission online at www.ciachef.edu/admissions/apply.

TECHNICAL STANDARDS In order to reflect the requirements and standards of the foodservice and hospitality industry, The Culinary Institute of America requires all students to meet certain functions/technical standards that are essential for successful completion of all phases of our education programs. To participate in and successfully complete the CIA’s degree, certificate, and/or non-credit programs, each student, with or without reasonable accommodations, must be able to meet these standards, which can be found on page 19. Contact the LSC at Greystone at 707-9672406 or the disability support specialists at the Hyde Park, NY campus at 845-451-1219 or 845-451-1288 for assistance in determining if your documentation is appropriate and current or to answer any additional questions. For further information about our disability services, visit www.ciachef.edu.

Admissions | 29


WITHDRAWAL OF APPLICATION Applicants who have not visited the school prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three business days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of the facilities and inspection of equipment where training and services are provided. ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS The CIA has articulation agreements in place with other educational organizations, including high schools and National Student Organizations (NSOs). To obtain a list of participating organizations, call the CIA’s director of admissions at the Hyde Park, NY campus at 1-800-CULINARY. CHALLENGE EXAMS A student can be awarded credit for Culinary Math and/or Writing by demonstrating knowledge of the course content acquired prior to enrolling at the CIA. This is achieved by earning a passing score on a challenge exam. The challenge exam for each of these two courses tests the concepts that are taught in that course. A student is eligible to take the Writing challenge exam if he or she has met one or more of the following criteria: • Earned an AP writing score of 3 or higher • Took college-level, writing-intensive classes but did not receive transfer credit • Has professional writing experience

To receive credit for the Writing course, a score of at least 74% on the Writing challenge exam is required. A student is eligible to take the Mathematics challenge exam if he or she has met one or more of the following criteria: • Earned an AP math score of 3 or higher

• Completed a college-level math class but did not receive transfer credit

To receive credit for the Culinary Math course, a score of at least 72% on the Mathematics challenge exam is required.

TRANSFER CREDIT Due to the unique nature of the curriculum at The Culinary Institute of America, only selected business management and liberal arts courses will be considered for transfer credit approval. We do not accept transfer credits for culinary arts, baking and pastry arts, or hospitality and service management (restaurant) courses. For questions about transfer-eligible courses, contact the Admissions Office. Approval Criteria 1. Course has an appropriate focus from an accredited college or university. 2. Course was completed with a grade of “C” or better. 3. All applicable course work was completed within the past 10 years. 4. Applicant took the College Board AP exam and received a score of “4” or higher within the past five years.

How to Apply for Transfer Credit The following steps should be followed when preparing your request for transfer credit (to be submitted with your application for admission): 1. Consult this catalog to find out which courses are required for your program. Feel free to contact the transfer credit coordinator for assistance at 1-800-CULINARY. 2. Obtain a copy of the CIA’s Application for the Transfer of Credit from your registration packet, the CIA website, the Admissions Office, the Registrar’s Office at the main campus, or the registration manager at Greystone. 3. Complete the top two sections of the transfer credit application.

30 | Admissions


4. You may be asked to provide official course descriptions for each course you would like to transfer. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the transfer credit coordinator. If you are requesting transfer credit for College Board AP classes, please provide us with an official College Board report of your scores. If you are requesting transfer credit for the CIA’s Food Safety course, you must attach a copy of your National Restaurant Association (NRA) ServSafe® certificate and include either one of the following with or on your Application for the Transfer of Credit: a) The course description for the food safety college course of at least 1.0 credit or b) A copy of your ProStart National Certificate of Achievement. 5. Include an official copy of your high school and/or college transcripts if they were not previously sent. 6. Submit your completed transfer credit application and supporting documentation along with your application for admission. Degree and certificate program candidates should submit materials to: Admissions Department, Attn: Transfer Credit at The Culinary Institute of America, 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499.

Please note: • Credits accepted for transfer may count toward the completion of degree or certificate program requirements but are not calculated in a student’s grade point average at the college. • Tuition charges are assessed based on fulltime study, with each semester ranging between 12–18 credits. Students who take fewer or more than the full-time course load will be charged according to the schedule on page 35.

POLICY FOR TRANSFERS BETWEEN CAMPUSES (DEGREE PROGRAMS) In some instances, a currently enrolled associate degree student may seek a transfer of studies to a different CIA campus in the U.S. The following policy has been established so that each case may be considered on an individual basis. The student must submit a written request for transfer to the appropriate department at the target campus that includes a full explanation as to why the transfer is necessary. For transfers to the CIA at Greystone, the student should contact the director of education support; for transfers to Hyde Park, the Registrar’s Office; and for transfers to San Antonio, the director of education. As part of this written request, the student will provide a personal plan identifying dates for the transfer request and how he or she intends to maintain academic progress through the process. The written request will be reviewed and given consideration based on the following conditions: • Space is available at the target campus, • The student has completed at least one semester of study, and at least one semester of study remains prior to anticipated graduation, • The student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0, • The student’s learning track will not be interrupted in a way that will interfere with his or her academic progress, • The student will be responsible for any makeup and re-registration fees, • The student does not have any unresolved probationary or disciplinary issues, and • The student is in good financial standing with the Bursar’s Office. Admissions | 31


A student is allowed only one transfer opportunity during his or her degree pursuit. The student may not retake any class in which he or she has previously received a final grade. Attendance records will carry over from one campus to the other and will be considered along with academic progress. A student who has withdrawn or who is on a leave of absence may also be considered for transfer to another campus if the request is made within one year of the original leave. Once all criteria are reviewed, the student will be notified of the transfer decision by either the director of education support at Greystone, the director of education in San Antonio, or the Registrar’s Office in Hyde Park.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Application Application procedures are the same as those for applicants from the United States, with the exception of three additional requirements: 1. If your native language is other than English, you will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the English language as part of your application file through either: • the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), administered by the Educational Testing Service. A minimum paper score of 550, CBT (computer-based test) score of 213, or iBT (Internet-based test) score of 80 (with a minimum of 20 in each section) is required. For information on test dates and locations, write to TOEFL, Box 6151, Princeton, NJ, 08541, USA; e-mail toefl@ets.org; visit www.toefl.org; or call 609-771-7100; or • the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), co-sponsored by the English testing entity of the University of Cambridge, and British and Australian 32 | Admissions

organizations. A minimum overall score of 7.0 is required. For information, write to IELTS, Inc.,100 East Corson Street, Suite 200, Pasadena, CA 91103, USA; e-mail ielts@ceii.org; visit www.ielts.org; or call 626-564-2954. 2. In order for you, as an international student, to obtain your Certificate of Eligibility (Form I-20): • your sponsor(s) must provide the Admissions Department with valid Affidavits of Support (Form I-134) verifying that funds will be available for all educational and living expenses while you are studying in the United States, or • you may choose to provide a bank statement indicating sufficient funds on account and a cover letter from the holder of the account stating his or her intent to provide your tuition and living expenses for the duration of your studies in the United States. 3. You must provide a copy of your passport showing your personal information page (to ensure accurate processing of Form I-20).

Please note: All documentation must be in English. If originals are in another language, they must be translated before they are submitted to the CIA.

Visa Requirements (AOS Degrees) The associate degree programs require an F-1 student visa. International students who hold an F-1 student visa and are enrolled in these programs may: • work on campus for a maximum of 20 hours per week with authorization by the school official. • complete the required externship in the U.S. with authorization by the school official. Employment authorization is job-specific. • accept part-time employment off campus after nine months of full-time study with authorization from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) via the application


process. The time worked will be deducted from post-completion employment. • accept full-time employment—for up to 12 months after completion of studies—with authorization from the DHS via the application process, which takes approximately three months.

All of the above employment opportunities require a Social Security number. This application process takes 10–20 days, with authorization from the school official, and an offer of employment.

you select a health plan that is right for you. Also, most plans require you to pay for a portion of your care, so access to some cash or credit is still important. A group policy, the “Part B: Sickness Medical Expense Benefit,” is offered by the CIA as well. In lieu of personal coverage, the CIA policy will be mandatory.

Note: Canadian citizens do not need a visa to enter the U.S., but must have a passport. A student should present the passport, Form I-20 A-B, and financial documentation at the Canadian/U.S. border.

Visa Requirements (Certificate Programs) The certificate programs require an M-1 student visa. The M-1 visa does not allow students to work in the United States during their education, and is not acceptable for employment in the U.S. following graduation. Students may apply for employment authorization after completion of studies based on one month of employment for every four months of study. Medical Insurance As an F-1 or M-1 student, you are required to have medical insurance while in the U.S. We strongly recommend that you obtain a medical insurance plan before you leave that will cover your health costs in this country. Please note that you may also want to secure coverage for mental health care, prescriptions for any chronic illness, and dental care, as these are not necessarily included in basic medical insurance policies. You should consider your overall needs and well-being as Admissions | 33


TUITION AND FEES The CIA is dedicated to keeping costs to students as low as possible while maintaining the high quality of its programs, services, and facilities. This section documents 2012– 2013 tuition and fees effective July 1, 2012, subject to increase July 1, 2013. The AOS degree programs are four semesters in length, totaling 60 weeks plus a 18–21 week externship between the freshman and sophomore years. The certificate programs are two semesters long, totaling 30 weeks.

TUITION AND FEES—AOS

TUITION PAYMENT SCHEDULE

Tuition, per semester ..................................$12,950 Board, per semester ......................................$1,330 (includes two meals per instructional day)

First Semester, Freshman Year and Certificate

Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100 Culinary tool kit, textbooks, uniforms..............$1,395 Baking tool kit, textbooks, uniforms................$1,255 Fourth semester supplies (culinary)....................$445 Fourth semester supplies (baking and pastry) ....$480 General fee,* per semester................................$545 STRF Fee,** per semester....$2.50 per $1,000 of tuition

TUITION AND FEES—ACAP Tuition, per semester ..................................$12,950 Board, per semester ......................................$1,330 (includes two meals per instructional day) Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100 Culinary tool kit, textbooks, uniforms..............$1,110 General fee,* per semester................................$545 STRF Fee,** per semester....$2.50 per $1,000 of tuition

TUITION AND FEES—AWBP Tuition, per semester ..................................$12,950 Board, per semester ......................................$1,330 (includes two meals per instructional day) Required fees: Application fee (nonrefundable)..........................$50 Class confirmation fee (nonrefundable) ............$100 Supplies, textbooks, uniforms ........................$1,210 General fee,* per semester................................$545 STRF Fee,** per semester....$2.50 per $1,000 of tuition * The general fee includes charges such as student activity and exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance. ** See page 35. 34 | Tuition and Fees

Advance deposit (due upon receipt of Enrollment Agreement) ....................................$300 One-half of tuition (due 60 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,175 Unpaid balance (due 14 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,475 Total, per semester ......................................$12,950 Second Semester, Freshman Year and Certificate; First and Second Semesters, Sophomore Year One-half of tuition (due 60 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,475 Unpaid balance (due 14 days prior to semester start date) ....................................................$6,475 Total, per semester ......................................$12,950 Residence hall fees and all required fees are due 14 days prior to the semester start date. Payment will be considered late after five days, at which time students may be assessed a $50 late fee. Every student is required to pay one half of tuition prior to his or her semester start date. This payment is an indication of your preparedness to pay and your financial commitment to the college. Financial aid, which is not paid until you start your semester, cannot be used to meet the one-half-of-tuition payment requirement. For students with financial aid, half tuition or your balance—whichever is less—must be paid 60 days prior to your start date.

RESIDENCE HALL RATES Rates per semester are as follows: Guest House and Vineyard Lodge I Single-occupancy room..................................$4,340 Double-occupancy room................................$3,450


Vineyard Lodge II Single-occupancy room with bath ..................$4,340 Single-occupancy room (shared bath) ............$3,865 Double-occupancy room................................$3,450

ing. There are two common kitchen facilities available in the Vineyard Lodge Housing Center for students to prepare meals outside of class time.

Quadruple-occupancy room (four sharing bath) ..$2,835

FEES THAT MAY BE ASSESSED Makeup Fees: Re-registration ..................................................$50 Failure (per credit) ............................................$863 Additional room and board fees may apply. Contact the Bursar’s Office for more information.

Sample of Makeup Charges: 1.5 credits (failure) ..................................$1,427.50 * 3 credits (failure) ..........................................$2,855 ** * Includes estimated board fee for seven days. ** Includes estimated board fee for 14 days.

PART-TIME AND OVERLOAD FEES AOS students who take less or more than the full-time course load will be charged according to the following schedule: More than 18 credits ........$863 per additional credit Less than 12 credits ..........................$863 per credit The board fee while taking these courses will be assessed based on the amount of time needed to complete the course load.

MEALS—BOARD Board is a required fee for all long-term students. The cost per semester is $1,330, which includes two meals per instructional day based on class schedules. Morning students receive continental breakfast and hot lunch, and afternoon students receive a light lunch and dinner. During the meal, which is enjoyed with fellow students and faculty, students are encouraged to evaluate the basic techniques involved in both the preparation and the service of food. This is considered a valuable part of culinary education. For students living in the residence halls, a third meal per instructional day will be provided in the teaching kitchens in the main build-

STUDENT TUITION RECOVERY FUND (STRF) FEE You must pay the state-imposed assessment for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) if all of the following applies to you: 1. You are a student who is a California resident and prepays all or part of your tuition either by cash, guaranteed student loans, or personal loans, and 2. Your total charges are not paid by any thirdparty payer such as an employer, government program, or other payer unless you have a separate agreement to repay the third party.

You are not eligible for protection from the STRF, and you are not required to pay the STRF assessment, if either of the following applies: 1. You are not a California resident. 2. Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, government program, or other payer, and you have no separate agreement to repay the third party.

Please see page 94 for more information.

WITHDRAWAL REFUNDS You can cancel your enrollment in writing at any time. Suspension for any reason is considered a withdrawal. In computing refunds, the last date of class attendance will be considered the date of withdrawal or termination. Refunds will be issued as follows: At least 90 days prior to registration or within three days of signing enrollment agreement ....................................Full tuition refund Within the first three days of the first semester, if the student has not toured the campus....................................Full tuition refund Prior to the start of each semester ........................Full tuition refund less $100 Tuition and Fees | 35


Refund for First Semester: Day 1................................100% of tuition less $100 Days 2–7 ............................90% of tuition less $100 Days 8–14 ..........................80% of tuition less $100 Days 15–21 ........................70% of tuition less $100 Days 22–28 ........................60% of tuition less $100 Days 29–35 ........................50% of tuition less $100 Days 36–42 ........................40% of tuition less $100 Days 43–70 ....................................No refund is due

Refund for Subsequent Semesters: Day 1................................100% of tuition less $100 Days 2–7 ............................90% of tuition less $100 Days 8–18 ..........................55% of tuition less $100 Days 19–35 ........................30% of tuition less $100 Days 36–70 ....................................No refund is due

The college will credit to your student account any tuition amount due as indicated on page 35, and will pay any balance due to you from unliquidated tuition deposits within 30 days of your leaving school. New, unused equipment may be returned to the student affairs manager within 20 days of withdrawal for credit to your student account. Uniforms that have been embroidered with your name may not be returned. If you have a prolonged illness, you’ll receive a full, proportional refund from the college.

Treatment of Title IV Aid When a Student Withdraws The law specifies how the college must determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that you earn if you withdraw from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs), Federal Perkins Loans and, in some cases, certain state grant aid (LEAP/SLEAP), GEAR UP grants, and SSS Grants to students. 36 | Tuition and Fees

When you withdraw during your period of enrollment, the amount of Title IV program assistance that you have earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula. If you received (or the college or a parent received on your behalf) less assistance than the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned by the college and/or you. The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a pro rata basis. For example, if you completed 30% of your period of enrollment, you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have completed more than 60% of the period of enrollment, you earn all the assistance that you were scheduled to receive for that period. If you did not receive all of the funds that you earned, you may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement. If the post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, you may choose to decline the loan funds so that you don’t incur additional debt. The college may automatically use all or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursement (including loan funds, if you accept them) for tuition fees and room and board charges (as contracted with the college); for other college charges, the college needs your permission to use the post-withdrawal disbursement. If you do not give permission (which some colleges ask for when you enroll), you will be offered the funds. However, it may be in your best interest to allow the college to keep the funds to reduce your debt at the college. There are some Title IV funds that you were scheduled to receive that you cannot earn once you withdraw because of other eligibility requirements. For example, if you are


a first-time, first-year undergraduate student and you have not completed the first 30 days of your program before you withdraw, you will not earn any Direct loan funds that you would have received had you remained enrolled past the 30th day. If you receive (or the college or a parent receives on your behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, the college must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of 1. your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds, or 2. the entire amount of excess funds.

The college must return this amount even if it didn’t keep this amount of your Title IV program funds. If the college is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent, for a PLUS) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, you make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the unearned amount. You must make arrangements with the college or the Department of Education to return the unearned grant funds. The requirements for Title IV program funds when you withdraw are separate from any refund policy that the college may have. Therefore, you may still owe funds to the college to cover unpaid institutional charges. The college may also charge you for any Title IV program funds that the college was required to return. If you have questions about your Title IV program funds, call the Federal Student Aid

Information Center at 1-800-4-FEDAID (1-800-433-3243). TTY users may call 1-800-730-8913. Information is also available on Student Aid on the web by visiting www.studentaid.ed.gov. The college will make available upon request examples of the application of our refund policy.

CREDIT BALANCES Credit balances will be refunded upon request or automatically refunded within 14 days of the date the credit occurs on the student’s account and are processed at the Bursar’s Office at the Hyde Park campus. Current students can pick up their refund checks in their group mailbox; all other refunds will be mailed to the last known billing address. Note that the law requires that any excess PLUS funds be returned to the parent. If a school determines that PLUS funds created a credit balance, the credit balance would have to be given to the parent. The CIA will refund the parent when the PLUS is the only payment on the account and the PLUS disbursement is more than the student’s institutional charges. See page 41 to learn more. TUITION INSTALLMENT PLAN The Culinary Institute of America, in partnership with Tuition Management Systems (TMS), is pleased to offer payment choices to help you afford your college education expenses. This interest-free monthly payment option allows you to maximize your savings and income by spreading your college education expenses over equal monthly payments. Your only cost is an annual enrollment fee of $75. For more information please call Tuition Management Systems at 1-800-343-0911, or visit www.afford.com. Tuition and Fees | 37


2012–2013 TUITION/FEE SCHEDULE–DEGREE PROGRAMS

Tuition* Application

First Semester Freshman

Second Semester Freshman

First Semester Sophomore

Second Semester Sophomore

$12,950

$12,950

$12,950

$12,950

$50

Confirmation #

$100 $1,395†/$1,255††

Supplies Board** General Fee★ Total

$445‡/$495‡‡

$1,330

$1,330

$1,330

$1,330

$545

$545

$545

$545

$16,370/ $16,230

$14,825

$15,270/ $15,305

$14,825

* Full-time tuition is per semester, with each semester ranging from 12–18 credits. # The non-refundable confirmation fee is due upon signing of the enrollment agreement and payment of the $300 advance deposit on tuition. ** Board includes two meals per day on scheduled class days. † First-semester supplies for culinary arts students include culinary tool kit, textbooks, and uniforms. †† First-semester supplies for baking and pastry arts students include baking and pastry tool kit, textbooks, and uniforms. ‡ Fourth-semester supplies for culinary arts students. ‡‡ Fourth-semester supplies for baking and pastry arts students. ★ The General Fee includes charges such as student activity and exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance. NOTE: In addition to the fees listed above, California residents may be subject to the STRF fee of $2.50 per $1,000 of tuition for each semester. Please see page 35 for more information.

2012–2013 TUITION/FEE SCHEDULE–CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Tuition* Application

First Semester

Second Semester

$12,950

$12,950

$50

Confirmation #

$100 $1,110†/$1,210††

Supplies Board** General Fee

Total

$1,330

$1,330

$545

$545

$16,085/ $16,185

$14,825

* Full-time tuition is per semester, with each semester ranging from 12–18 credits. The non-refundable confirmation fee is due upon signing of the enrollment agreement and payment of the $300 advance deposit on tuition. ** Board includes two meals per day on scheduled class days. † First-semester supplies for ACAP students. †† First-semester supplies for AWBP students. ★ The General Fee includes charges such as student activity and exam fees, graduation exercises, and secondary student accident insurance. NOTE: In addition to the fees listed above, California residents may be subject to the STRF fee of $2.50 per $1,000 of tuition for each semester. Please see page 35 for more information. #

38 | Tuition and Fees


FINANCIAL AID Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Need-based financial aid may be awarded through any combination of scholarships, grants, loans, or Work-Study funds. The awards (except for Work-Study) are credited to your student account each semester, but may be refunded to you if all obligations to the college have been met. Priority for federal grants, loans, and Work-Study is given to students showing the greatest need as demonstrated by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Merit-based scholarships are also available.

APPLYING FOR AID To apply for financial aid, you must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The CIA’s federal code is 007304. Students selected for verification will be asked to provide additional information to the Financial Aid Office such as official IRS transcripts of your or your parents’ federal tax returns. Incoming students will automatically be considered for CIA merit-based aid through the admissions process. HOW NEED IS DETERMINED Financial need is determined by subtracting the family contribution—determined by the FAFSA—from the college cost of attendance. The difference between the college cost of attendance and your family contribution represents your financial need. COST OF ATTENDANCE In addition to the fixed direct cost listed in the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog, the CIA is required to estimate a cost of attendance (COA) that includes indirect costs such as personal expenses and transportation. While COA can be one of the more confusing aspects of the financial aid process, it gives the student and his or her family an idea of what costs might be incurred beyond tuition and fees so they

can plan accordingly. It is important to differentiate between indirect costs, which are simply estimates used by our office during the awarding process to determine a student’s financial need, and direct costs, which are actual amounts that will be charged to the student’s account. Keep in mind that the Financial Aid Office can only award students an amount of aid equal to or less than their associated cost of attendance budget. If you have questions regarding your budget, would like consultation in planning your budget, or would like copies of the cost of attendance, please contact the Financial Aid Office.

STUDENT ELIGIBILITY RESPONSIBILITY To be eligible for federal or state financial aid, you must not owe repayment on a federal or state grant, or be in default on any guaranteed/federally insured student loan. Also, you must be making satisfactory progress in the academic program (see “Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress,” page 52). Aid Suspension Due to Drug Conviction The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, suspends aid eligibility for students who have been convicted under federal or state law of the sale or possession Financial Aid | 39


of drugs, if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid. If you have a conviction for this offense, call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-433-3243 or go to the FAFSA website (www.fafsa.ed.gov), click “Before Beginning a FAFSA” in the left column, and submit the Student Aid Eligibility Worksheet to find out how this law applies to you. If you have lost your federal student aid eligibility because of drug conviction, you can regain eligibility by successfully completing a qualified drug rehabilitation program or passing two unannounced drug tests administered by such a program. You may also regain your eligibility if your conviction is reversed, set aside, or removed from your record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on your record.

CONTINUED FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY Students must reapply for financial aid each school year; the CIA has a FAFSA priority deadline of April 15. Students who file by this date will be processed first and given priority for institutional and federal campus-based funds. Students also need to make satisfactory academic progress, as determined by the director of education support, in order for aid to continue. If makeup course work is required before starting a new semester, financial aid will not be awarded for the new semester until the course work has been completed and the director of education support determines the student’s eligibility to start the new semester. There is no federal, state, or CIA aid offered for the costs of making up courses. 40 | Financial Aid

FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS The CIA participates in the following programs, which are funded wholly or in part by the U.S. government: Federal Pell Grant If you have not yet earned a bachelor’s degree, you may be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. Award amounts are determined by the U.S. Department of Education based upon your expected family contribution (EFC). Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Students who have not yet received a bachelor’s degree and are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant may be considered for a Federal SEOG. Based on the availability of funds, priority is given to the students with the greatest need who submitted the FAFSA by the CIA’s deadline. Amounts vary and are determined each year based on funds allocated to the CIA by the U.S. Department of Education. Federal Work-Study You may apply for a Federal Work-Study position if the Financial Aid Office determines you are eligible. The dollar amount of the award, however, is only an estimate of your expected earnings and is not deducted from your bill by the Bursar’s Office. As a Work-Study-approved student, you find employment by applying for one of the jobs at the CIA, and you receive a paycheck every other week. You may work up to 20 hours per week. Although preference for on-campus employment is given to Work-Studyapproved students, jobs are not guaranteed.


Federal Perkins Loan A Federal Perkins Loan is a low-interest loan for both AOS and certificate program students who demonstrate exceptional need. The Financial Aid Office determines eligibility, giving priority to students with the greatest financial need who have completed the FAFSA process by the priority deadline. Award amounts vary based on need and the U.S. Department of Education allocation to the CIA. Federal Direct Loans (Subsidized and Unsubsidized) Both Direct Loan programs require the borrowers to complete entrance counseling and the Master Promissory Note. To obtain more information about the Federal Direct Loan programs, including the current interest and fee rates, visit www.studentloans.gov. The Direct Subsidized Loan is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need. The federal government pays all interest costs for Direct Subsidized borrowers while the borrowers are in school. The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is awarded to students who do not meet financial need or who need to supplement their Direct Subsidized Loans. Borrowers remain responsible for all interest that accrues (accumulates) during school, grace, and deferment periods. Dependent students in their freshman year of the AOS degree program may borrow up to $5,500 (including up to $3,500 Subsidized) per year. AOS sophomores can borrow up to $6,500 (including $4,500 Subsidized) per year. Students in the certificate programs can borrow up to $7,500 (including $5,500 Subsidized) per year. Important to know: Dependent students whose parents get denied a Federal Direct

PLUS can receive an additional $4,000 for the freshman and sophomore years. Independent students (typically 24 years old or older) in their freshman year of the AOS degree program may borrow up to $9,500 (including up to $3,500 Subsidized) per year. AOS sophomores can borrow up to $10,500 (including up to $4,500 Subsidized). Students in the certificate programs can borrow up to $12,500 (including $5,500 Subsidized) per year. Students start repayment of the loan(s)— plus interest—six months after they complete their program, withdraw, or otherwise stop attending the CIA. The government offers different repayment plans and the most common is the standard repayment, which spreads out the principal and interest amounts over the course of 10 years (please see the sample repayment chart on page 42). All loans taken out to finance your education must be paid in full and in a timely manner. Failure to repay loan(s) will affect your credit rating as well as jeopardize loan programs for all students. Upon graduation, student borrowers will be given information on loan repayment.

Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Parents of dependent students in the degree programs may apply for a PLUS to help with their child’s educational expenses. The parent must be the student’s biological or adoptive parent, and must not have an adverse credit history (i.e., must be credit-worthy). In addition, the parent must complete the PLUS application and sign the Master Promissory Note (MPN). Important to know: Your parent should not apply for a PLUS more than 90 days prior to your entry date. Financial Aid | 41


FEDERAL LOAN REPAYMENT CHART FEDERAL DIRECT LOANS (SUBSIDIZED AND UNSUBSIDIZED), FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL, AND FEDERAL PLUS LOANS

4% BALANCE AT REPAYMENT

PAYMT.

MO.

5% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

6% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

INTEREST

$1,000

$50

21

$37

$50

21

$46

$50

22

$50

$2,000

$50

44

$150

$50

44

$192

$50

45

$237

$3,000

$50

68

$353

$50

70

$459

$50

72

$576

$4,000

$50

94

$660

$50

98

$876

$50

103

$1,121

$6,000

$61

120

$1,290

$64

120

$1,637

$67

120

$1,994

$8,000

$81

120

$1,719

$85

120

$2,182

$89

120

$2,658

$10,000

$101

120

$2,149

$106

120

$2,728

$111

120

$3,322

$20,000

$202

120

$4,299

$212

120

$5,456

$222

120

$6,645

$30,000

$304

120

$6,448

$318

120

$8,183

$333

120

$9,967

$40,000

$405

120

$8,598

$424

120

$10,912

$444

120

$13,290

$50,000

$506

120

$10,747

$530

120

$13,639

$555

120

$16,612

$60,000

$607

120

$12,897

$636

120

$16,367

$666

120

$19,935

$100,000

$1,012

120

$21,494

$1,061

120

$27,278

$1,110

120

$33,224

42 | Financial Aid


7% BALANCE AT REPAYMENT

PAYMT.

MO.

8.25% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

9% INTEREST PAYMT.

MO.

INTEREST

$1,000

$50

22

$66

$50

22

$80

$50

22

$88

$2,000

$50

46

$284

$50

47

$347

$50

48

$387

$3,000

$50

75

$703

$50

78

$882

$50

81

$1,001

$4,000

$50

109

$1,404

$50

117

$1,827

$51

120

$2,080

$6,000

$70

120

$2,360

$74

120

$2,831

$76

120

$3,120

$8,000

$93

120

$3,146

$98

120

$3,775

$101

120

$4,161

$10,000

$116

120

$3,933

$123

120

$4,719

$127

120

$5,201

$20,000

$232

120

$7,866

$245

120

$9,436

$253

120

$10,402

$30,000

$348

120

$11,799

$368

120

$14,155

$380

120

$15,603

$40,000

$464

120

$15,732

$491

120

$18,873

$507

120

$20,805

$50,000

$581

120

$19,665

$613

120

$23,592

$663

120

$26,005

$60,000

$697

120

$23,598

$736

120

$28,310

$760

120

$31,207

$100,000

$1,161

120

$39,330

$1,227

120

$47,183

$1,267

120

$52,011

Financial Aid | 43


The amount that could be borrowed is up to the cost of attendance, minus financial aid from all other sources. To obtain more information about the Federal Direct PLUS program, including the current interest and fee rates, visit www.studentloans.gov. During the PLUS application process, parents can request from Direct Lending that repayment start six months after the student completes his or her program, withdraws, or otherwise stops attending the CIA. The government offers different repayment plans, the most common of which is the standard repayment, which spreads out the principal and interest amounts over the course of 10 years (please see the sample repayment chart on page 42). All loans taken out to finance your education must be paid in full and in a timely manner. Failure to repay loan(s) will affect your credit rating as well as jeopardize loan programs for all students. Upon graduation, student borrowers will be given information on loan repayment.

Veterans’ Benefits Veterans and surviving family members of veterans whose deaths or disabilities were service-connected may be eligible for educational benefits while attending the CIA. Forms and information are available at all Veterans’ Administration offices. STATE FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS State Grants for AOS Students Several states, including California, offer need-based and/or merit-based grants to CIA students who are residents of these states. Students should contact their state education departments to determine availability and eligibility. 44 | Financial Aid

Cal Grant Residents of California enrolled at the CIA at Greystone are eligible for this grant. To be considered, you must complete your FAFSA (www.fafsa.ed.gov) by March 2 of the year you will enter the program. To learn more, visit www.calgrants.org. Vocational Rehabilitation If you have a disability, you may be offered assistance by your state’s Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, depending on the state’s criteria. If you are offered financial assistance through this program, please have your rehabilitation counselor contact the CIA’s Financial Aid Office in Hyde Park, NY. CIA FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS FOR AOS STUDENTS CIA Need-based Grant A CIA need-based grant is awarded to degree program students who have completed their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). When awarding need-based grant and/or scholarship aid, the college gives priority to the students with the greatest need who submitted the FAFSA by the CIA’s deadline. CIA Merit-based Scholarship The CIA seeks students who not only have demonstrated academic excellence, but leadership qualities as well. CIA meritbased scholarships are awarded to students identified through the admissions process; a separate scholarship application is not necessary. These scholarships are renewable annually with a GPA of 3.0 or better. SAT/ACT Achievement Scholarship While SAT and ACT test scores are not


required for admission to the CIA, students who submit their test results during the admissions process will be considered for this scholarship. Students with a minimum SAT Math and Reading combined score of 1000 or ACT Math and English combined score of 22 will receive this one-time award for their freshman year.

CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship The college offers this scholarship to prospective students who are encouraged by a CIA graduate to apply for admission. Qualifying students will receive a onetime scholarship for their freshman year in our degree programs. To be eligible for the CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship, you must include a letter of recommendation from a CIA graduate with your application for admission. National Student Organization (NSO) Scholarships—National Level Competitions Students who compete and place first, second, or third in a national culinary arts, baking and pastry arts, or culinary management competition sponsored by SkillsUSA, Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), or ProStart will receive scholarships to attend the CIA. The amounts of these awards vary and are set each year by the college. These scholarships are renewable annually with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Students may receive only one NSO competition scholarship. If you have won multiple competitions, the CIA will honor the award with the highest monetary value. Winners must enroll by June of the year following their senior year of high school. All competition scholarships are for secondary level only, with the excep-

tion of the SkillsUSA first place winner in the national postsecondary culinary arts competition. Please check the CIA website for more details.

NSO Scholarships—State Level Competitions Students who compete and place first, second, or third in select state culinary arts, baking and pastry arts, or culinary management competitions sponsored by SkillsUSA, Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), or ProStart will receive scholarships to attend the CIA. The amounts of these awards vary and are set each year by the college. These scholarships are renewable annually with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Students may receive only one NSO competition scholarship. If you have won multiple competitions, the CIA will honor the award with the highest monetary value. Winners must enroll by June of the year following their senior year of high school. All competition scholarships are for secondary level only. NSO Scholarships—Officer Awards Students who served as officers in SkillsUSA or FCCLA at the school, state, or national levels may qualify for a onetime, nonrenewable scholarship for their freshman year. The amount of this award varies and is set by the CIA each year. A student can receive both an officer award and a competition award for the same organization. NSO Scholarships—Essay Contest Active members of SkillsUSA, FCCLA, and ProStart who have not received a competition scholarship can enter a 500word essay on a topic chosen each year by the Admissions Department to compete Financial Aid | 45


for a scholarship. The selected winners must enroll by June of the following year. This is a one-time, nonrenewable scholarship for their freshman year.

To be eligible for the CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship, you must include a letter of recommendation from a CIA graduate with your application for admission.

CIA FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS FOR ACAP STUDENTS

CIA FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS FOR AWBP STUDENTS

ACAP Dean’s Scholarship for Select Programs Referrals Students from select hospitality baccalaureate programs who are recommended to the ACAP by their program dean, director, or faculty member are eligible for a scholarship. Students will be automatically selected for this award based on their letter of recommendation. For a listing of eligible bachelor’s degree programs, please call 707-967-2496.

AWBP Dean’s Scholarship for Select Programs Referrals Students from select hospitality baccalaureate programs who are recommended to the AWBP by their program dean, director, or faculty member are eligible for a scholarship. Students will be automatically selected for this award based on their letter of recommendation. For a listing of eligible bachelor’s degree programs, please call 707-967-2496.

ACAP Career Advancer Scholarship Students with more than 2.5 years of full-time work experience may be eligible for this scholarship. Students will need to submit a résumé outlining their work experience to be evaluated with their application for admission.

AWBP Career Advancer Scholarship Students with more than 2.5 years of full-time work experience may be eligible for this scholarship. Students will need to submit a résumé outlining their work experience to be evaluated with their application for admission.

Vi Endowed Scholarship The Vi Endowed Scholarship is available to graduates of accredited undergraduate nutrition, dietetics, food science, or hospitality programs. All students accepted by May 1 will be considered for this scholarship based on academic records, extracurricular activities, and the personal essay provided with your application. A separate scholarship application is not necessary. Final selection will be made in consultation with Vi.

Robert M. Parker, Jr. Wine Advocate Endowed Scholarship Merit-based scholarships are made available annually to AWBP students via funds raised at an on-campus tasting led by Mr. Parker. Interested students should contact the Greystone Admissions Office at 707-967-2496.

CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship The college offers this scholarship to prospective students who are encouraged by a CIA graduate to apply for admission. 46 | Financial Aid

CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship The college offers this scholarship to prospective students who are encouraged by a CIA graduate to apply for admission. To be eligible for the CIA Alumni Referral Scholarship, you must include a letter of recommendation from a CIA graduate with your application for admission.


PRIVATE FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Scholarships Throughout the year, many organizations generously offer scholarship assistance to students enrolled at the CIA. Almost two million dollars was awarded in donated scholarships last year. Criteria and application procedures vary, and are listed in the Financial Aid Times, which is sent to all enrolled students at their MyCIA.net e-mail address. CIA students are encouraged to read the Financial Aid Times to learn of possible new scholarship opportunities. A variety of sources outside the CIA offer private grants and scholarships. The Internet, public libraries, and high school guidance offices are good sources for scholarship information. Check the CIA website for additional sources.

loan more than 90 days prior to your entry date. For a list of lenders commonly used by CIA students, please visit www.ciachef.edu/admissions/finaid.

FOR MORE INFORMATION For further information on financial aid opportunities at the CIA, contact the Financial Aid Office at 845-451-1243.

Loans Some lenders offer educational alternative loans as a means to fund your education. These loans are generally based on your credit history and can be used in addition to any federal, state, school, or private funding you receive. Always file a FAFSA before applying for an alternative loan to determine eligibility for federal aid, as it is important to use all other resources before turning to an alternative loan. Please be aware that final approval of the loan must be received by the CIA Financial Aid Office before an alternative loan will be deducted from your bill. Contact your lender when you apply for admission to understand the procedure and time frame required to have a loan in place by your entry date. Please note that you should not apply for an alternative Financial Aid | 47


ACADEMIC POLICIES Students at The Culinary Institute of America, as at any college, are taught a variety of information, skills, and values in their classes. They are evaluated based on their performance in the college’s classrooms, kitchens, bakeshops, and dining rooms as they progress toward their degree. This section outlines the policies that support the curricula and academic life at the CIA.

POLICY ON ATTENDANCE Class Attendance Given the demands of the college’s degree and certificate programs, the amount of material covered in classes, and the nature of the curriculum, all students are required to arrive on time and remain in class for all class sessions. Students who miss more than a specific number of classes within a course will automatically fail that course and must repeat the entire course. Students who miss more than a specific number of classes throughout the program will be put on probation or suspended. Missing Classes If students are absent for a class in which daily participation is graded, they will receive a grade of zero for that class. Students who miss more than a specified number of classes in a course (as follows) shall automatically fail that course and will have to retake it unless they have been administratively withdrawn prior to the end of the course: • Two classes in a 1.5- or three-credit 11-, 12-, 13-, 14-, or 15-day course as well as a 14- or 15-week course • Four classes in a six-credit culinary or baking and pastry course • Four classes in a three-credit course that meets 24 times in a semester

48 | Academic Policies

Absences Prior to Major Vacations Students who miss class(es) on either the day before or the day after the July, November, or December vacations will earn two absences for each class that they miss. Please verify class schedules with the published academic calendar before making any travel plans for these vacations periods. Attendance Probation for Cumulative Absences AOS degree students who miss 10 classes in the freshman and sophomore years will be reminded of the policy, placed on attendance probation, and warned of possible suspension or dismissal by the student affairs manager. In blocks where two or more courses meet in one day, each class that a student misses counts as one absence. Certificate program students can miss no more than five classes for the 30-week duration of the program and still be considered for graduation. In semesters where two or more courses meet in one day, each class that a student misses counts as one absence per class. Students who miss four classes may be placed on attendance probation. Attendance Review AOS students on attendance probation who miss additional classes may be required to attend a meeting of the Standards Committee. Certificate students who miss four classes may be required to attend a meeting of the Standards Committee.


Attendance at Standards Committee Meetings Students who do not attend the scheduled meeting of the Standards Committee will be automatically suspended, and the Committee will determine whether and under what conditions the students will be allowed to continue their studies at the college. Attendance Suspension AOS degree students who accumulate more than 18 absences in their freshman and sophomore years may be suspended from college by the Standards Committee. Medical, legal, and family emergency reasons for missing classes will be taken into account by the Standards Committee so long as students notify the student affairs manager at the time and can provide appropriate documentation. Personal Emergencies and Exceptional Circumstances If a student is forced to miss a class due to sickness, personal emergencies, or unforeseen circumstances, the student must notify the student affairs manager, who will notify the faculty member and the director of education support. Depending on the nature of the situation and the academic circumstances, the student affairs manager, after consultation with the faculty member, may recommend an administrative withdrawal from the course. In exceptional circumstances and if the student has not exceeded the maximum number of absences that would cause one to fail the course or be withdrawn from the program, the faculty member may assign additional work and give partial credit for a missed class. In the event that a student is sick on the day(s) of their practical and/or make-up practical, they should (if possible) go directly to a physician for an evaluation. If warranted, the doctor will issue a sick note for

the student to take to the student affairs manager, who will inform the registration manager of the No Show due to sickness. After a discussion with the student, the registration manager will re-schedule the test date, and the student will not be charged for the new test date. Baking and pastry arts students should refer to their practical criteria for the baking and pastry two-day practical examination for additional grading criteria and information.

Religious Holidays/Military Reservist Duty If you are observing a religious holiday or have required military reservist duty that coincides with regularly scheduled class days, you are excused for that time period. In such cases, you can be excused for no more than two days of that class and you will be held accountable for information you missed. If you need to take more than two days for religious or military service reasons, you will be required to take an Administrative Withdrawal (AW). As a participant in religious or military reservist activities, you will not be academically penalized for missing class. Standards Committee The members of the Standards Committee will include the dean of education, director of education support, student affairs manager, team leader for baking and pastry arts, and team leader for culinary arts. Appeal Since the decision of the Standards Committee is final, there is no appeal.

Academic Policies | 49


LEAVES OF ABSENCE AND WITHDRAWALS Students may request a leave of absence from CIA classes for up to 90 days. A second leave of absence may be requested within a 12-month period for medical reasons. Leaves of absence must be requested in writing to the student affairs manager. Students who do not file their request for a leave of absence in writing, or who are leaving CIA for periods of time greater than 90 days, will be placed on Withdrawal. For further details, please contact the student affairs manager. For tuition refund information, refer to the schedule for withdrawal refunds on page 35. Students who re-enroll following their leave of absence or withdrawal are responsible for completing any new curriculum requirements that may have been added during the period of their absence. In such cases, students may be charged additional tuition or fees according to college policies. For more information, please refer to the Student Handbook. ATTENDING CLASSES WITH A TEMPORARY MEDICAL CONDITION Students who have a medical condition requiring an arm cast, a sling, a leg cast, or crutches, or other temporary condition that significantly impairs mobility will not be permitted in culinary, baking, pastry, or table service classes for safety reasons. When their condition is fully healed, they must present a release note from their doctor to the student affairs manager in order to resume culinary, baking, pastry, or table service classes. Faculty concerned about a student’s participation in class for these reasons should inform the student affairs manager and send the student to that office.

50 | Academic Policies

ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL/ DROPPING A CLASS All students are expected to attend and complete all classes for which they are registered. However, there are times when a medical or personal emergency may prevent a student from completing a class. In such cases, a student may request permission to withdraw from a class by immediately contacting the student affairs manager. All requests for withdrawal from a class are given serious consideration, but not all requests are granted. Please keep in mind that if you had been failing the class at the time you requested withdrawal, you may still receive a failing grade. First-semester freshmen may not qualify for an administrative withdrawal (AW) for a class unless they are able to maintain fulltime status, minus the class they are requesting to drop. Students who are granted an Administrative Withdrawal from a class will be charged $50 to retake the class. Students may drop a course if they follow the guidelines outlined in the Student Handbook. COURSE MAKEUP POLICY Students who have to make up a course for any reason must make arrangements through the registration manager. Doubling up on courses is strongly discouraged, but may be permitted under the following conditions: • The student has a minimum grade point average of 2.0 and is not on academic probation. • The courses being considered are not courses in the second semester of the sophomore year. • The enrollment in the makeup course does not exceed the maximum allowable class size. • The course schedules do not conflict. • There are no prerequisites.


Should doubling be allowed, students will only be able to take one course on a double schedule. Degree program students who fail a course twice must obtain written permission from the associate director of education to take the course at another college and must receive a grade of “C” or higher to transfer the credits back to The Culinary Institute of America. Certificate program students must pass all courses in no more than two attempts.

CULINARY AND BAKING & PASTRY PRACTICAL RETAKE POLICY (AOS DEGREES) Students who remain unsuccessful at passing the culinary or baking and pastry practical examinations after their third attempt will not be allowed to register for a subsequent attempt until they have met with the Standards Committee. The Committee may require the completion of remedial work before allowing the student to register for any subsequent attempts. This may require the student to take a leave of absence in order to complete the work off campus. Students will be notified by the student affairs manager when they are required to meet with the Standards Committee. COSTING PRACTICAL RETAKE POLICY (AOS DEGREES) Students who fail the costing practical examination two or more times are required to make an appointment with the Learning Strategies Center administrator and receive five hours of documented tutoring before the exam can be rescheduled. Once the student has received the necessary tutoring, he or she will be cleared by the Learning Strategies Center administrator to register to retake the exam.

CULINARY AND WINE & SERVICE PRACTICAL RETAKE POLICY (CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS) Students who remain unsuccessful at passing either the culinary or wine and service practical examinations after their third attempt will not be allowed to register for a subsequent attempt until they have met with the Standards Committee. The Committee may require the completion of remedial work before allowing the student to register for any subsequent attempts. This may require the student to take a leave of absence in order to complete the work off campus. Students will be notified by the student affairs manager when they are required to meet with the Standards Committee. PREREQUISITES FOR EXTERNSHIP (AOS DEGREES) Externship takes place during your third semester. You may be registered for Externship with one culinary arts or baking and pastry arts course outstanding and one liberal arts or business management course outstanding. An outstanding course is defined as one you have failed, one for which you have received an Incomplete, or one from which you have withdrawn. However—without exception—to begin externship, you must have received a passing grade for: • Food Safety (ARTS-112), which includes achieving ServSafe® certification • Culinary or Baking and Pastry Practical Examination I • Externship Prep Seminar I and II, and the Externship Registration Seminar

Procedure Students who fail the Culinary or Baking and Pastry Practical Examination I will be notified immediately by the faculty member administering the examination. They must make arrangements with the registration Academic Policies | 51


manager to take the examination by the end of the semester and pass in order to be allowed to begin their externship. Please see the exam retake policy on page 51 for more information. Students will be notified by the registration manager of any outstanding courses and the available schedule for makeups.

PREREQUISITE FOR SOPHOMORE-YEAR REGISTRATION Students with outstanding courses from freshman year due to failure, incomplete grade, or administrative withdrawal are required to successfully complete those courses before beginning the first semester of the sophomore year. PREREQUISITES FOR RESTAURANT COURSES In order to enroll in the CIA’s restaurant service courses (Contemporary Restaurant Service and Formal Restaurant Service), AOS culinary arts students must successfully complete their externship and the practical exam portion of the Introduction to Customer Service class. POLICY ON SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS Academic Standards Committee The Academic Standards Committee is responsible for reviewing and assessing student academic progress and upholding the college’s academic standards and honesty policies. If a student is unable to maintain satisfactory academic progress or has exhibited academic dishonesty, the committee can impose sanctions including, but not limited to: • Academic probation • Suspension from the college • Permanent dismissal from the college

52 | Academic Policies

Satisfactory Academic Performance Students are expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress and move efficiently through the program by passing all courses and assessments, and maintaining a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 1.75 at the end of the first semester and a 2.0 for all subsequent semesters. Student grades may be reviewed at any time. A student will not be considered making satisfactory academic progress if he or she: • Has a cumulative GPA below 1.75 at the end of the first semester, • Has a semester GPA below 2.0 for any subsequent semester, • Has failed externship twice, • Has been unable to complete successfully a semester within eight months, • Is being reviewed for violation of the Policy on Academic Honesty, or • Has extenuating circumstances that need to be reviewed by the committee.

Prior to meeting with the Academic Standards Committee, students will be required to provide a statement to the committee describing the reasons that contributed to poor academic performance. If a student fails to appear before the Academic Standards Committee, the committee has the authority to proceed with the hearing and render a decision.

Veterans Affairs When the grade point average of a Veterans Affairs (VA) student is unsatisfactory after nine weeks, the student will be placed on academic probation for six weeks. If, during the next semester, the student’s cumulative grade point average remains below the graduation requirement, the student will not be certified for VA educational benefits until his/her academic status is restored to good


standing. However, the student can continue enrollment subject to regular CIA academic policies. The CIA maintains a written record of the previous education and training of the veteran or eligible person, and clearly indicates appropriate credit has been given for that education or training. The educational period for that student at the CIA will be shortened proportionately, and the college will notify the student and the Department of Veterans Affairs when this occurs.

Students will be required to submit a request for readmission to the registration manager a minimum of three weeks prior to a reentry date. Reentry dates will be based on availability of space in the class or semester in which the student wants to return.

Academic Probation Academic probation provides students an opportunity to improve their academic standing while still enrolled in the program. Academic probation will be communicated in writing by the registration manager. Students on academic probation must meet with the Learning Strategies Center administrator to address study skill issues. They may also be encouraged to meet with a counselor to help address personal issues.

• Be in good satisfactory academic standing, and

Academic Suspension Academic suspension will be rendered if a student: • Has been on academic probation during the last semester completed and is unable to maintain a GPA of 2.0 by the end of the current semester, • Fails a course three times, or • Does not satisfy other criteria deemed appropriate by the Academic Standards Committee.

While on academic probation, students will have their GPA audited every three weeks prior to the end of the semester. If a student’s cumulative GPA is below 2.0 by the end of the semester of the academic probation, he or she will be suspended from classes for a minimum of 15 weeks.

Financial Aid Probation In accordance with HEA Section 484(c), 34 CFR 668.16(e), 34 CFR 668.32(f) and 34 CFR 668.34, in order to be deemed eligible for financial aid, students must:

• Maintain full-time status.

Students at The Culinary Institute of America are expected to maintain fulltime status in the program, which is a minimum of 12 credits per semester. On occasion, they may fall below full-time due to failures or other circumstances. If students fall below 12 credits, they will be classified as part-time and may lose part or all of their financial aid package. Check with the Financial Aid Office if you are required to drop below full-time. If, at the end of a semester, it has been determined that a student does not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements, that student will not be eligible for financial aid unless granted a one-semester probationary period by the Academic Standards Committee. When retaking a course that is not part of a full semester, students will not be eligible to receive financial aid until they have successfully completed the course and are permitted to start the next semester.

Recording Suspensions or dismissal will be recorded on the student’s transcript. Academic Policies | 53


Appeal The decision of the Academic Standards Committee is final and therefore cannot be appealed. POLICY ON ACADEMIC HONESTY At The Culinary Institute of America, students are expected to develop their own ideas and to consult research materials for their studies. Borrowing original ideas, recipes, research, or wording from another source without giving credit is plagiarism; using prepared materials from an organization whose primary business is selling research papers is dishonest; submitting a paper prepared for one course to a faculty member teaching another course or section of that same course, without prior permission, is cheating; copying from another source is stealing; and cheating in any form is dishonest. This behavior, or assisting anyone else in this behavior, represents a serious violation of professional and academic standards at the CIA and will not be tolerated. Since such behavior is demeaning to the academic integrity of the programs, students who do not record the sources of their information will fail that assignment and may be required to complete another equivalent assignment. Students who copy materials that are not their own and present that material as their own work will fail the assignment and possibly the course. Students found cheating will automatically fail the test or assignment involved and may also fail the course. Serious violations of these standards will require that student to see the Standards Committee. Initial Consequences A faculty member who identifies academically dishonest behavior will tell the student 54 | Academic Policies

about it, explain what is wrong, ask for an explanation, and inform the student of the consequences for the dishonesty. In each case, the faculty member will inform the student in person and by letter, a copy of which will be sent to the registrar and the associate director of education.

Suspension or Dismissal In cases of academic dishonesty where the faculty member wants to recommend suspension or dismissal, the faculty member shall consult with the appropriate education staff member and shall recommend suspension or dismissal in writing to the appropriate college official within five working days (Monday through Friday, exclusive of holidays). The faculty member shall also inform the student in writing. Academic Review The individual records of students who are recommended by a faculty member for suspension or dismissal due to academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Standards Committee. Students will be required to provide a statement or explanation of their situation as well as attend a meeting to review the circumstances surrounding the dishonest behavior. At that meeting, a decision will be made regarding whether the student will be suspended, be dismissed, or can continue at the college under specific conditions. If students fail to live up to these conditions, they will be suspended for a minimum of one semester or dismissed from the college. Recording Students suspended or dismissed for academic reasons will have that fact recorded on their transcripts.


Appeal Since the decision of the Standards Committee is final, there is no appeal. GRADING The college operates on a quality-point alpha grading system as follows: Grade

Numeric Range

Grade Points

A

95–100

4.00

A-

90–94

3.66

B+

87–89

3.33

B

84–86

3.00

B-

80–83

2.66

C+

77–79

2.33

C

74–76

2.00

C-

70–73

1.66

D

65–69

1.00

F

<65

0.00

I

0.00

W

0.00

AW

0.00

P

0.00

HP

0.00

TC

0.00

NS

0.00

NG

0.00

AU

0.00

In order to calculate the GPA, multiply the credits earned by the grade points for each course separately to calculate the quality points. Then add all the quality points together and divide total quality points by credits earned, including credits for “F” grades that have not been repeated. For courses with “C” level competency, grades of “C-” or “D” are equivalent to failing grades.

GRADING SYMBOLS I Incomplete: This grade indicates a student hasn’t completed all the course requirements. It may also indicate failure to master specific course competencies. Freshmen or sophomores must make up all course requirements before they can begin the next semester. If students do not complete the course by the specified date, they will automatically fail the course and be required to make up the entire course at the cost of full tuition. W Withdrawal from the CIA: This grade doesn’t include absences and isn’t computed into the grade point average. AW Administrative Withdrawal: This symbol indicates that a student was granted an administrative withdrawal from the class by the associate director of continuing education. Absences are not shown, and there is no effect on the cumulative grade point average. P Pass: Given for costing, cooking, and baking practical exams and some passfail courses. HP High Pass: Given for costing, cooking, writing, and baking practical examinations. TC Transfer Credit: Denotes that credit for a course was transferred from another college. NS No Show: Given only for costing, cooking, and baking practical exams and externship prep seminars if a student never showed up to take them. Note: if a practical exam or externship prep seminar is missed for this reason, it is recorded as an absence.

Academic Policies | 55


NG No Grade: This grade is automatically given if a student is on a roster and the instructor fails to give a grade or if the student hasn’t officially withdrawn from a course. AU Audit: This symbol indicates that a student did not take the course for credit and the instructor of this course did not make an evaluation to issue a grade. Students are only allowed to repeat classes that they have previously failed or from which they have received an administrative withdrawal. When the course is repeated and a passing grade is issued, the previous failure remains on the student’s transcript but is not included in the calculation of his or her grade point average. If a repeated course is failed more than once, all failures are noted on the transcript, but only the first failure is omitted from the calculation. At the end of each course, the instructor will issue a grade. Clarification about the grade can be obtained by contacting the instructor immediately. For details on the grade review process, please see the Student Handbook.

POLICY ON INCOMPLETE GRADES Incomplete grades shall be assigned by faculty members when a student has not yet completed the work for a course and the faculty member agrees to provide a student more time to finish the course. Students shall have no more than nine weeks from the end of the date of the course to submit any incomplete work to the faculty member. Students who do not finish their incomplete work in the period required will receive an “F” grade. An incomplete grade will be automatically converted to a failing grade nine weeks after the date of the end of the course. 56 | Academic Policies

In order to be eligible for an incomplete grade, a student must: • have already completed at least three quarters of the work in a course, • have a passing grade on the work already submitted in the course, and • sign an Incomplete Grade Agreement that indicates the remaining work to be done, the time frame to accomplish that work, and the consequences of not completing the work on time or in a quality manner.

The Incomplete Grade Agreement shall be signed by the student and faculty member and a copy shall be kept in the student’s file along with the class roster on which the grades are recorded. Incomplete grades are not a substitute for an administrative withdrawal, which is granted by the student affairs manager for a student’s personal or medical circumstance. In addition, incomplete grades: • shall not be given for students who will fail the course due to absences, • cannot be used for a student retaking a final exam (with the exception of a score less than 75 on the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® certification exam), and • will not be included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average (GPA).

POLICY ON AUDITING COURSES The CIA allows auditing of courses to enable students to pursue topics of their interest. Students may audit a course only under the following circumstances: • The student must be currently enrolled in a degree or certificate program, • There is room in the course, • The course is not a required course in the student’s degree or certificate program, • There are no scheduling conflicts, • The course is offered by the college for credit,


• The faculty member has approved the request to audit the course, • The student has paid the audit fee before the class begins, and • The student is in good academic and financial standing.

Externship is not eligible for audit. The auditing fee is $400 per credit. Students who audit courses are expected to attend all classes, but their work will not be evaluated and no record of their participation will be kept. Their transcripts will show that they have audited the course. Students who want to audit courses must make payment to the Bursar’s Office and make scheduling arrangements with the registion manager.

POLICY ON GRADUATION PARTICIPATION Students must complete all of their academic requirements—courses, including externship (for degree students); comprehensive examinations; and other requirements—and maintain a 2.0 cumulative average to graduate and receive their CIA diploma or certificate. In order to participate in graduation ceremonies, students must satisfactorily complete all of their course work and comprehensive exams. Students with any outstanding course work may petition the director of education support to participate in their graduation ceremony. Procedure The director of education support, in conjunction with the registration manager, conducts graduation audits and is responsible for certifying that every student is eligible to participate in graduation. For the AOS degrees, this audit will be conducted during the second semester of the sophomore year. For the certificate programs, the audit will be conducted during the second semester.

The registration manager will contact students who need to complete courses and examinations and notify the Bursar’s Office and Financial Aid Office.

COMMENCEMENT AWARDS (AOS DEGREES) Special awards for deserving students in the associate degree program are presented at commencement. These include: CIA at Greystone Standards of Excellence Award Given to the student who best embodies the core values of excellence, leadership, professionalism, ethics, and respect for diversity Culinary Award Recognizes the student with excellent skills in culinary arts Frances Roth Leadership Award For outstanding leadership, professionalism, and service to the college Katharine Angell Academic Achievement Award Given to both culinary and baking and pastry arts students with the highest GPA through the Contemporary Restaurant Service or Beverages and Customer Service class Management Award For excellence in management classes St. Honoré Baking & Pastry Award Recognizes the student with excellent skills in baking and pastry courses COMMENCEMENT AWARDS (ACAP) Special awards for deserving students in the ACAP are presented at graduation: Academic Achievement Award Given to the student with the highest GPA Academic Policies | 57


through the 27th week of classes

Culinary Award Recognizes the student with excellent skills in culinary arts Student Achievement Award Recognizes one ACAP student who has achieved a high standard of performance as determined by the faculty COMMENCEMENT AWARDS (AWBP) Special awards for deserving students in the AWBP are presented at graduation: Academic Achievement Award Given to the student with the highest GPA through the 27th week of classes Service Award Recognizes the student with excellent skills in wine and beverage service Student Achievement Award Recognizes one student in the Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program who has achieved a high standard of performance as determined by the faculty and administration ATTENDANCE SEAL If perfect attendance is maintained for all on-campus semesters, a seal accompanies the diploma. WEB-BASED LEARNING The college employs a web-based course management system that can be accessed by students and faculty both on and off campus. The tool provides online access to all course guides, recipe manuals, syllabi, and support materials for The Culinary Institute of America’s degree and certificate programs. Students can read and study the course material directly online and have the option of downloading and printing all or selected 58 | Academic Policies

portions of these materials. The system also gives students the ability to hyperlink to other pertinent educational resources on the Internet, including links to the CIA’s Digital Video Library. The course management system is just one of many online applications available via CIA Student Web Services that enrich our students’ educational experience. Degree program students may use an online learning environment for selected liberal arts classes.

STATEMENT OF ACADEMIC FREEDOM Faculty members shall be free to teach course information without regard to censorship or any other artificial restraints on free inquiry and learning. Faculty members shall be restricted to dealing with course materials in the classroom environment and shall not use the classroom as a basis for the transmission of information outside of their assigned courses. They shall, however, be free to discuss any controversial issues dealing with their courses without the fear of reprisal, provided that the discussions are related to subjects taught. The CIA has developed standard course materials that faculty members are expected to teach. Faculty members are encouraged to present individual views and alternative materials as a means of supplementing, but not replacing, that standard course material. Academic freedom in the CIA shall not be deemed to permit or condone denigration or demeaning criticisms of other faculty members, staff members, students, the CIA, its programs, or the foodservice and hospitality industry. Freedom of individual conscience, association, and expression shall be encour-


aged and fairness of procedure shall be observed both to safeguard legitimate interests of the CIA and to exhibit by appropriate example the basic objectives of a democratic society.

COLLABORATIVE DEGREE PROGRAM The Culinary Institute of America, the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier culinary college, and the Cornell School of Hotel Administration, the recognized leader in service and hospitality management, have formed an alliance to offer a collaborative degree program for students with a passion for food and hospitality operations. After earning their AOS at the CIA, students can transfer to Cornell and complete their Bachelor of Science (BS) from the Cornell Hotel School in four to five semesters. This unique educational opportunity allows CIA students to explore topics such as advanced restaurant management, revenue management, design and development, and restaurant entrepreneurship, as well as foodservice in hotels, resorts, spas, stadiums, institutions, and other hospitality settings. Students may be accepted into the program after completing their associate degree program at the CIA. They must complete the Cornell application requirements and interview with the Cornell School of Hotel Administration. In a predetermined program, AOS in Culinary Arts students may be awarded up to 49 transfer credits, and AOS in Baking and Pastry Arts students up to 43 credits. To learn more, visit www.shacia.org or www.hotelschool.cornell.edu, or e-mail CIA_Alliance@sha.cornell.edu.

Academic Policies | 59


CURRICULA Degrees and Certificates Offered Degree Programs Associate in Occupational Studies in Culinary Arts Associate in Occupational Studies in Baking and Pastry Arts

Certificate Programs Accelerated Culinary Arts Accelerated Wine and Beverage

HEGIS* Code 5404 * Higher Education General Information Survey

DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS The degree and certificate program curricula at The Culinary Institute of America are composed of courses offering comprehensive instruction in cooking, baking, beverage studies, and general education. The CIA does not provide English as a Second Language instruction. After graduating from these programs, students will have acquired a top-notch education, enabling them to meet the needs of the foodservice and hospitality industry for well-educated, highly qualified professionals. While it is to students’ advantage to complete the degree or certificate programs in the prescribed period, they may take a maximum of 11⁄2 times the normal completion time to complete their program if circumstances warrant. ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS The Culinary Institute of America awards the degree Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) upon completion of the required curriculum in culinary arts or baking and pastry arts. The degree programs expose stu60 | Curricula

dents to the different styles and experiences of the college’s faculty members, acquaint them with a wide variety of foodservice equipment, and prepare them for whatever area of the foodservice and hospitality industry they choose to enter. The AOS degree program in culinary arts teaches students what works in the front and the back of the house and why it works to prepare them for such entry-level positions as chef, caterer, dining services administrator, food researcher, kitchen supervisor, food writer, and more, as well as similar mid-level positions that come with more experience. The AOS degree in baking and pastry arts provides a broad foundation and understanding of baking and pastry making, preparing students for such entry-level positions as baker and pastry chef, as well as more advanced levels such as baking and pastry arts researcher, bakeshop supervisor, and owner/operator. To qualify for the degree, students must successfully complete the entire course of study: four on-campus semesters of about 15 weeks each, plus one 18- to 21-week semester at an approved externship site. Students


need to earn a total of 69 credits and maintain a grade point average of at least 2.0 to complete the associate degree program. In addition, to be considered for an AOS degree, CIA students must (a) receive National Restaurant Association ServSafe® certification upon completion of the Food Safety course and (b) adhere to food safety certification standards throughout the curriculum. Degrees will be inscribed “With High Honors,” “With Honors,” and/or display a “Perfect Attendance” seal if performance merits citation.

AOS Educational Objectives— Culinary Arts • Attain proficiency in traditional and contemporary culinary techniques, basic baking and pastry skills, service, and beverage management. • Acquire general skills including independent and critical thinking, analytical and technological skills, applied problem solving, effective communication, quantitative analysis, and an appreciation for lifelong learning. • Learn the interpersonal skills necessary for working effectively in the foodservice industry. • Examine basic management principles in the foodservice industry.

AOS Educational Objectives— Baking and Pastry Arts • Attain proficiency in traditional and contemporary baking and pastry techniques, basic culinary skills, service, and beverage management. • Develop general skills including independent and critical thinking, analytical and technological skills, applied problem solving, effective communication, and quantitative analysis, as well as an appreciation for lifelong learning. • Learn the interpersonal skills necessary for working effectively in the foodservice industry. • Examine basic management principles in the foodservice industry.

Class Sessions and Credit Hours A clock hour is defined as 50 minutes of instructional time in class. At least 15 hours of class lecture or 30 hours of laboratory time—and the study and homework associated with those class hours—constitute one semester credit hour. Instructional Programs and Schedule While enrolled in either of the CIA’s twoyear programs, students will be assigned to small instructional groups. These groups, with a maximum of 20 students, are scheduled for all laboratory courses, which integrate culinary theory and practice. Within each group, students will actively participate in learning assignments related to the cleaning and sanitizing of laboratory areas and equipment. Personal hygiene and proper food handling procedures are emphasized to minimize potential food contamination. Strict sanitation and safety regulations are practiced and enforced. This reflects the college’s concern that such practices be an integral part of all foodservice and hospitality operations, for the health and safety of personnel and guests alike. Curricula | 61


Graduation Requirements (NC=Non-credit) AOS in Culinary Arts Freshman Year, First Semester

Credits

Culinary Math Externship Prep Seminar I Externship Prep Seminar II Food Safety* First-Year Seminar: Recipes for Success Introduction to Gastronomy Nutrition Product Knowledge Culinary Fundamentals* Total credits

1.5 NC NC 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 6.0 15.0

Freshman Year, Second Semester Credits Introduction to Management Meat Identification, Fabrication, and Utilization Seafood Identification and Fabrication Modern Banquet Cookery Introduction to Ă&#x20AC; La Carte Cookery High-Volume Production Cookery Culinary Practical Exam I Externship Registration Seminar College Writing Total credits

Externship

1.5 1.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 NC NC 3.0 16.5

3.0 Sophomore Year, Second Semester

Sophomore Year, First Semester Baking and Pastry Skill Development Garde Manger Cuisines of the Americas Controlling Costs and Purchasing Food Cuisines of the Mediterranean Cuisines of Asia Menu Development Total credits

1.5

3.0 3.0 3.0 1.5 3.0 3.0 1.5 18.0

Introduction to Customer Service Wine Studies Culinary Practical Exam II Contemporary Restaurant Cooking Contemporary Restaurant Service Formal Restaurant Cooking Formal Restaurant Service Costing Examination Total credits

TOTAL CREDITS FOR AOS DEGREE

1.5 3.0 NC 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 NC 16.5

69.0

* Students must receive a passing grade for both Culinary Fundamentals and the NRA ServSafeÂŽ examination (part of the Food Safety course) and meet GPA requirements in order to progress to the second semester of the freshman year. Please note: For current students, curricular requirements for degree completion are those described in the catalog of the year they first matriculated in the program. For students returning to the CIA to complete their degree, individual course requirements will be determined upon readmission. Questions about the curriculum should be directed to the dean of education.

62 | Curricula


Graduation Requirements (NC=Non-credit) AOS in Baking and Pastry Arts Freshman Year, First Semester

Credits

Baking and Pastry Techniques* Baking Ingredients and Equipment Technology Culinary Math Externship Prep Seminar I Externship Prep Seminar II Food Safety* First-Year Seminar: Recipes for Success Introduction to Gastronomy Nutrition Total credits

6.0 1.5 1.5 NC NC 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 15.0

Externship

Freshman Year, Second Semester Credits Principles of Design Café Savory Foods Production Introduction to Management Basic and Classical Cakes Individual and Production Pastries Baking and Pastry Practical Examination I Hearth Breads and Rolls Externship Registration Seminar College Writing Total credits

1.5 1.5 1.5 3.0 3.0 NC 3.0 NC 3.0 16.5

3.0 Sophomore Year, Second Semester

Sophomore Year, First Semester Controlling Costs and Purchasing Food Confectionery Art and Special Occasion Cakes Chocolate and Confectionery Technology and Techniques Contemporary Cakes and Desserts Specialty Breads Advanced Baking Principles Baking and Pastry Practical Examination II Menu Development Total credits

1.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 NC 1.5 18

Introduction to Customer Service Wine Studies Café Operations Beverages and Customer Service Restaurant and Production Desserts Restaurant Operations: Baking and Pastry Costing Examination

Total credits

TOTAL CREDITS FOR AOS DEGREE

1.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 NC

16.5

69.0

* Students must receive a passing grade for both Baking and Pastry Techniques and the NRA ServSafe® examination (part of the Food Safety course) and meet GPA requirements in order to progress to the second semester of the freshman year. Please note: For current students, curricular requirements for degree completion are those described in the catalog of the year they first matriculated in the program. For students returning to the CIA to complete their degree, individual course requirements will be determined upon readmission. Questions about the curriculum should be directed to the dean of education.

Curricula | 63


The college’s academic schedule ensures that students will progress from basic to intermediate to advanced subject matter in proper sequence. Registration for each semester depends on the successful completion of the courses in the previous semesters. The CIA reserves the right to modify course sequence, content, and offerings. Students may begin the AOS degree programs on one of several entry dates each year, and complete basic on-campus coursework in four 15-week semesters. An additional 18- to 21-week off-campus externship is taken between the freshman and sophomore years. During externship, students will be employed in the foodservice industry at a CIA-approved site. In advance of this course, students must successfully complete two externship preparatory seminars and an externship registration seminar conducted by CIA Career Services (see page 73 for more information). Externship is a valuable part of the learning experience and provides students with the opportunity to apply the skills they have learned in the program. Following this course, students must submit an acceptable required externship manual within two weeks and receive a passing grade to be awarded their degree. The final semester includes course work in the on-campus Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant or bakery café.

ACCELERATED CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM The Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program (ACAP) is designed for graduates of baccalaureate programs in hospitality management, food science, nutrition, and other closely related fields who want to understand the inner workings of a professional kitchen 64 | Curricula

and gain skills that will enhance their degree and provide expanded career opportunities. These skills are developed through hands-on exercises designed to teach culinary techniques and enhance an understanding of flavors and the dynamic interaction of ingredients. Graduates of the program will have the skills and knowledge for positions such as cook, research assistant, restaurant assistant manager, and other entry-level positions. To qualify for the certificate, students must successfully compete the entire course of study: two on-campus semesters of about 15 weeks each. The program consists of 30 credits of lecture and hands-on participation in a culinary laboratory. The ACAP is approximately 30 weeks in length, and depending on the calendar, students may have an occasional weekday off during the program. Once students have successfully completed the required 30 credit hours while maintaining at least a 2.0 grade point average and no more than five absences, they will be awarded the “Accelerated Culinary Arts Program” certificate upon graduation.

ACAP EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES • Attain proficiency in traditional and contemporary culinary techniques through handson exercises in a professional kitchen environment. • Acquire background knowledge of world cuisines in order to identify characteristic flavor profiles. • Learn the tools and function of a professional kitchen in order to apply them towards prior knowledge of hospitality management, food science, and dietetics/nutrition.


Graduation Requirements (NC=Non-credit) Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program First Semester

Credits

Ingredients and Techniques of Fabrication Skill Development I Skill Development II Skill Development III Contemporary Topics in Culinary Arts Total credits

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 15.0

Second Semester

Credits

Baking and Pastry Skill Development Cuisines of the Americas Cuisines of Asia Culinary Practical Examination I Cuisines of Europe and the Mediterranean Garde Manger Total credits

TOTAL CREDITS FOR CERTIFICATE

3.0 3.0 3.0 NC 3.0 3.0 15.0

30.0

Please note: For current students, curricular requirements for certificate completion are those described in the catalog of the year they first matriculated in the program. For students returning to the CIA to complete their degree, individual course requirements will be determined upon readmission. Questions about the curriculum should be directed to the dean of education.

Curricula | 65


Class Sessions and Credit Hours A clock hour is defined as 50 minutes of instructional time in class. At least 15 hours of class lecture or 30 hours of laboratory time—and the study and homework associated with those class hours—constitute one semester credit hour. Instructional Program and Schedule While enrolled in the CIA’s courses, students will be assigned to small instructional groups. These groups, with a maximum of 20 students, are scheduled for all practical or laboratory courses, which integrate culinary theory and practice. Within each group, students will actively participate in learning assignments related to the cleaning and sanitizing of laboratory areas and equipment. Personal hygiene and proper food handling procedures are emphasized to minimize potential food contamination. Strict sanitation and safety regulations are practiced and enforced. This reflects the college’s concern that such practices be an integral part of all foodservice and hospitality operations, for the health and safety of personnel and guests alike. The college’s academic schedule ensures that students will progress from basic to intermediate to advanced subject matter in the proper sequence. Each class serves as the prerequisite for the next and registration for each semester depends on the successful completion of the courses in the previous semester. The CIA reserves the right to modify course sequence, content, and offerings. ACCELERATED WINE AND BEVERAGE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM The core of the Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program (AWBP) involves 66 | Curricula

instruction in those topics critical to professionals working in this area of the industry and will enhance prior education in areas of hospitality management, culinary arts, or other related fields. The objective is to teach a comprehensive overview of wines of the worlds, from varietals and winemaking practices to wine laws and distribution, that will be of immediate value to employers looking to bring a wine professional into their organization. Intertwined into each class in the curriculum are food and wine pairing and service topics and exercises, subjects of critical importance to beverage professionals. Graduates of the program will have the skills and knowledge for entry-level positions in food and beverage management, service, wine hospitality, winery sales, distribution, catering, and wine and food event management. To qualify for the certificate, students must successfully complete the entire course of study: two on-campus semesters of about 15 weeks each. The program consists of 30 credits of lecture and hands-on participation in classroom activities developed to increase knowledge about this important discipline in the foodservice industry. The AWBP is approximately 30 weeks in length, and depending on the calendar, students may have an occasional weekday off during the program. Once students have successfully completed the required 30 credit hours while maintaining at least a 2.0 grade point average and no more than five absences, they will be awarded the “Accelerated Wine and Beverage Program” certificate upon graduation.


AWBP EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES • Attain proficiency in sensory analysis of wines, distilled spirits, and fermented and non-fermented beverages. • Acquire knowledge of major wine-producing regions of the world. • Explain basic management responsibilities in the food and beverage industry, specifically as related to beverage management.

Graduation Requirements (NC=Non-credit) Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program First Semester

Credits

Fundamentals of Wine and Professional Service New World Wines I New World Wines II Culinary Skills for Wine Professionals Wine Regions of Europe I Total credits

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 15.0

Second Semester Wine Regions of Europe II Global Wine Business and Wine Operations Wine and Service Practical Exam Fermented and Specialty Non-Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits Applied Theories in Flavor Dynamics and Mixology Total credits

TOTAL CREDITS FOR CERTIFICATE

Credits 3.0 3.0 NC 3.0 3.0 3.0 15.0

30.0

Please note: For current students, curricular requirements for certificate completion are those described in the catalog of the year they first matriculated in the program. For students returning to the CIA to complete their degree, individual course requirements will be determined upon readmission. Questions about the curriculum should be directed to the dean of education.

Curricula | 67


Class Sessions and Credit Hours A clock hour is defined as 50 minutes of instructional time in class. At least 15 hours of class lecture or 30 hours of laboratory timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the study and homework associated with those class hoursâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;constitute one semester credit hour. Instructional Program and Schedule While enrolled in this program, students will be assigned to instructional groups of up to 24 students. These groups are scheduled for all lecture and lab classes together as a team to integrate theory and practice while stressing human relations and communication skills. Within this group, students will actively participate in learning assignments, beginning with a sensory analysis of wines and spirits in a systematic, professionally recognized process that gives each student a common language with which to discuss and describe beverages. From this foundation, the program will build essential knowledge of regional grape growing and winemaking techniques, geography and terroir, wine laws and regulations appropriate to each region of the world, gastronomy, and contemporary service topics. Culinary skills will be taught as a means to expand sensory analysis capabilities and as a way to develop a vocabulary to evaluate food in preparation for food and wine pairing exercises throughout the program. Service topics are woven into each class to comprise a modern lesson in hospitality management that can be immediately applicable upon graduation.

68 | Curricula

The collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic schedule ensures that students will progress from basic to intermediate to advanced subject matter in the proper sequence. Each class serves as the prerequisite for the next and registration for each semester depends on the successful completion of the courses in the previous semester. The CIA reserves the right to modify course sequence, content, and offerings.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Courses in the CIA’s Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) degree programs in culinary arts or baking and pastry arts give students comprehensive, hands-on experience in the theory and techniques of foodservice and hospitality management while systematically incorporating general education. All credits can transfer to the corresponding bachelor’s degree program in culinary arts management or baking and pastry arts management in Hyde Park, NY. Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program (ACAP) courses provide a skills-based foundation in the culinary arts to graduates of bachelor’s degree programs in hospitality management, food science, nutrition, or a closely related field. Courses in the Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program (AWBP) curriculum give graduates of bachelor’s or associate degree programs in hospitality management, culinary arts management, or a closely related field—or of other bachelor’s degree programs with commensurate experience—comprehensive, hands-on instruction in wines, beverages, and service management.

ADVANCED BAKING PRINCIPLES BAKE-251

beverage management. 3 credits

An examination of baking methods and principles from a nutritional and chemical/physical point of view. Students will conduct experiments (using controlled formulas) and nutritional analyses on various baking ingredients and products in order to develop a better understanding of baking principles. Topics include: preparation of common products with a variety of ingredients; diets such as vegan, diabetic, and gluten-free; nutritional labels; and preparation of desserts, breads, and cakes for persons with special dietary needs.

APPLIED THEORIES IN FLAVOR DYNAMICS AND MIXOLOGY WINS-251

3 credits

Students examine wines and beverages as ingredients in the larger arena of food and beverage pairing. Classic and contemporary affinities are studied and compatibilities among global flavors and cuisines are explored. The mixology topic delves deeper into flavor pairings found only in beverages. Program capstone projects are presented in a case study forum to more thoroughly explore challenges and opportunities in professional food and

BAKING AND PASTRY SKILL DEVELOPMENT BAKE-241

3 credits

An introduction to the principles and techniques used in the preparation of high-quality baked goods and pastries, with an emphasis on fundamental production techniques and evaluation of quality characteristics. Topics include bread fermentation and production, ingredient functions, and custard ratios and preparations.

BAKING INGREDIENTS AND EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY BAKE-110

1.5 credits

This course will focus on the range of baking ingredients in original, modified, and prepared forms as well as the theory and operation of large equipment and hand tools used in bakeries and pastry shops. Through tasting and testing, students learn to identify and select quality grains, fruits, vegetables, gelling agents, nuts and seeds, dairy products, baking spices, eggs and egg products, flours, chocolates, fats, and oils used in the baking field. The advantages, disadvantages, and operational requirements of various types of equipment will also be covered. Course Descriptions | 69


BAKING AND PASTRY TECHNIQUES BAKE-105

6 credits

This introductory-level course covers the basic theory and skill sets used throughout the field of baking and pastry. Topics covered include the use of hand tools and equipment found in a bakeshop, as well as the exploration of baking and pastry ingredients and their functions. Students will gain a working knowledge of the major methods such as creaming, blending, foaming, meringues, pre-cooked, cut-in, lamination, straight dough, custards, frozen desserts, chocolates, and sauces. Students will also taste and evaluate products they create in class to enhance their understanding of the course material.

BAKING AND PASTRY PRACTICAL EXAMINATION I BAKE-151

In the baking practical exam, students will be tested on the fundamentals of baking: doughs, batters, cakes, Danish, and puff pastry. They will also draw an assignment and prepare three items. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

BAKING AND PASTRY PRACTICAL EXAMINATION II BAKE-230

In the baking practical examination, students are required to produce plated desserts from a mystery basket, demonstrate an understanding of baking and pastry production, and perform at an advanced level. (HighPass/Pass/ Fail grading)

BASIC AND CLASSICAL CAKES BAKE-123

BAKE-255

3 credits

The goal of this course is to give students a realistic working environment where they will be exposed to guest interactions and be able to identify customer needs and concerns in the industry. The student will learn the proper definition and feel of hospitality and what it is to provide accurate guest service. The course will provide an introduction to a wide variety of beverages and models of service, as well as the processes of receiving, storing, and preparing beverages. Instruction will emphasize hot beverages such as teas, coffees, coffee-based drinks, and cocoas; cold drinks such as beer, wine, spirits, juices, sodas, and fruit drinks; and the range of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks available to patrons of retail food and pastry establishments. In addition, students will learn to pair beverages with food items.

CAFÉ OPERATIONS BAKE-254

3 credits

Students experience the reality of producing and marketing products in the setting of an actual bakery café. Students prepare, display, and present savory items, pastry products, and signature baked goods. In an on-campus bakery café environment, students practice the skills of controlling inventory, analyzing sales, and operating a complete shop. Specialty items for customers are developed under the direction of a faculty member.

CAFÉ SAVORY FOODS PRODUCTION BAKE-115

3 credits

A review of creaming, foaming, and blending techniques with an emphasis on preparing simple to complex unfilled cakes, filled cakes, and tortes. Topics to be covered include comparison of classical and modern preparations, classical cakes (such as gâteaux, St. Honoré, Dobosh Torte, Linzer Torte, and Sacher Torte); glazed, iced, molded, and cream filled cakes; tortes; and bombes.

70 | Course Descriptions

BEVERAGES AND CUSTOMER SERVICE

1.5 credits

This production experience concentrates on previously learned knife skills, fundamental cooking techniques, and quantity food production principles. Students will further develop their ability to organize an assigned station based on preparation methods, while focusing on production, plate presentation, and cooking techniques as applied to specific menu items. They will also learn the importance of getting the café foods to the ready stage to be assembled, finished, and served at


a later time. Emphasis will be placed on speed, storage, uses, and nutritional aspects of key ingredients.

CHOCOLATE AND CONFECTIONERY TECHNOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES BAKE-242

3 credits

This course will focus on chocolate and confectionery technology, ingredient function, and the production of chocolates and confections in an artisan setting. Vital concepts in both theory and practice will include controlling the crystallization of fats and sugars, manipulating water and free water in centers, and understanding the mechanics of emulsions. Students will apply their knowledge of these concepts in daily production of a wide range of chocolates and confections. Types of centers to be discussed and produced include varieties of ganache, crystalline and non-crystalline sugar confections, nut-based centers, jellies, and aerated confections. Ingredient function will focus on fats, nutritive sweeteners, dairy products, binding agents, and chocolate. Techniques include chocolate tempering methods, sugar cooking technique, hand dipping centers, and shell molding. Students entering this class should have a working knowledge of chocolate-handling techniques and chocolate tempering.

COLLEGE WRITING ENGL-120

3 credits

Students will write and revise essays that demonstrate their ability to read and think critically, to incorporate evidence into the development of their ideas, and to articulate their responses persuasively. Readings may include essays, articles, literature, or literary criticism. Basic concepts of information literacy will be introduced. Grammar, usage, and mechanics will be reviewed as necessary.

CONFECTIONERY ART AND SPECIAL OCCASION CAKES BAKE-240

3 credits

This course introduces the basics of decorative work as applied to showpieces and spe-

cial occasion cakes. Sugar work such as pulled, blown, and poured will be covered as well as the use of tempered and modeling chocolate. During the second half of the course, students will have the opportunity to design and execute their own three-tier wedding cake as well as work on a special occasion cake and team wedding cake using gumpaste, pastillage, chocolate, or marzipan. Students will be required to complete piping homework.

CONTEMPORARY CAKES AND DESSERTS BAKE-245

3 credits

An examination of cakes and desserts that are assembled and decorated with a modern approach using the latest technology and equipment. Topics will include: small cakes decorated as a whole; cakes finished in molds or rings; and items that can be used for cakes, desserts, or individual pastries. Students will use specialized equipment, practice new presentation methods, and focus on fresh products, simplicity of style, and ease of production.

CONTEMPORARY RESTAURANT COOKING CULA-252

3 credits

This restaurant experience concentrates on previously learned cooking fundamentals and techniques and applies them to the cuisine of a terroir, utilizing Ă  la carte menu preparation in a contemporary restaurant setting. Students will further develop their ability to organize an assigned station based on preparation methods while focusing on the production of menu items, plate presentations, and cooking techniques as applied to the topic of sustainability. Emphasis will be placed on sourcing, storage, uses, and nutritional aspects of key ingredients. This course will be taught in the Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant.

CONTEMPORARY RESTAURANT SERVICE ROPS-250

3 credits

An exploration of table service principles and skills with an emphasis on customer service in a restaurant. The focus will be placed on wine, Course Descriptions | 71


beer, coffee, tea, and non-alcoholic beverage service. Topics include guest relations, professional communications, order taking in an à la carte environment, service sequence, point-ofsale systems, cash handling, beginning merchandising, table skills, and dining room preparation—all in the college’s Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant.

CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN CULINARY ARTS CULS-125

3 credits

An exploration of contemporary issues to complement a professional chef’s skill set. Students will complete hands-on cooking exercises to better understand the dynamics of seasoning, flavor balance, salts and sugars, fats and oils, and umami. Special emphasis is placed on building flavor in a healthy kitchen through appropriate cooking techniques and ingredients such as grains and legumes. Northern California gastronomy is discovered through field trips and a select research topic.

1.5 credits

COSTING EXAMINATION CULS-250 (CULINARY ARTS) BAKE-225 (BAKING & PASTRY ARTS)

This written examination tests knowledge of controlling costs in foodservice organizations and solving problems using quantitative reasoning. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

CUISINES OF ASIA 3 credits

Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional and regional dishes of Asia. Emphasis will be 72 | Course Descriptions

CULP-121

3 credits

Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional regional dishes of the Americas. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques for cuisines representative of the United States, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.

CUISINES OF THE MEDITERRANEAN CULA-242

3 credits

Prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional regional dishes of Europe and the Mediterranean. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines from Spain, France, Germany, Morocco, Tunisia, Greece, and Egypt. CULS-100

Examine the information and skills necessary to analyze and improve the profitability of a foodservice establishment. Topics include the flow of goods, income statements, forecasting sales, and controlling labor and food costs. Students will also analyze the complete purchasing cycle of a restaurant, beginning with product and vendor selection and ending with actual orders.

CULP-122

CUISINES OF THE AMERICAS

CULINARY FUNDAMENTALS

CONTROLLING COSTS AND PURCHASING FOOD MGMT-245

placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparations, and techniques representative of the cuisines from China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and India.

6 credits

An introduction to the application and development of fundamental cooking theories and techniques. Topics of study include tasting, kitchen equipment, knife skills, classical vegetable cuts, stock production, thickening agents, soup preparation, grand sauces, timing and multi-tasking, station organization, palate development, culinary French terms, and food costing. The course also introduces students to fundamental concepts and techniques of basic protein, starch, and vegetable cookery. Emphasis is placed on the study of ingredients, and an introduction to small sauces will be given.

CULINARY MATH MGMT-110

1.5 credits

An exploration of standard units of measure and unit conversion, estimation, percents, ratios, yield tests, recipe scaling, and recipe costing as they relate to the food industry. Students will develop projections and analyze costs in yield tests and recipe pre-costing.


CULINARY PRACTICAL EXAMINATION I CULS-151 (COOKING PRACTICAL) CULS-152 (WRITTEN EXAM)

This culinary examination tests knowledge and proficiency in the principles of cooking and certain fundamental cooking methods—roasting, sautéing, frying, stewing, poaching, and braising. Students will be given an assignment (which includes a soup, protein, vegetable, and starch) to prepare, present, taste, and explain. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

CULINARY PRACTICAL EXAMINATION II CULS-251

This culinary examination tests students’ understanding of fundamental and more advanced proficiency in the principles of cooking. Students will prepare a menu for two that will include a fish starter and a main course. They are also tested on station setup, preparation skills, product presentation and flavor, and ability to answer a range of questions posed by the faculty member. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

CULINARY SKILLS FOR WINE PROFESSIONALS WINS-141

3 credits

A survey of foundation culinary techniques in dry-heat cooking, moist-heat cooking, and combination cooking methods for proteins, starches, and vegetables. Soups, stocks, and sauce-making exercises review classic and contemporary applications. Through hands-on cooking activities, students participate in a professional kitchen environment and develop a vocabulary to evaluate food in preparation for food and wine pairing exercises in subsequent courses.

DISTILLED SPIRITS WINS-241

3 credits

A survey of the global distilled spirits industry focusing on the commercially dominant categories of white and brown spirits, as well as grape-based brandies, fruit-based spirits, and liqueurs. A study is made of the history, cultural traditions, production methods, and regional styles of distilled spirit beverages in

major producing areas. Through guided sensory evaluations, students learn to assess and identify flavor profiles in preparation for applied pairing exercises in upcoming classes.

EXTERNSHIP EXTN-100 (CULINARY ARTS) EXTN-101 (BAKING & PASTRY ARTS)

3 credits

A supervised work experience designed to expand career knowledge while increasing speed, timing, organization, and ability to handle cooking or baking and pastry creation in an approved commercial foodservice and hospitality establishment. Students on externship will receive feedback from their supervisor and keep an externship manual to record and reflect on their work experience. (Prerequisites: see page 51.)

EXTERNSHIP PREP SEMINAR I EXTN-097

non-credit

An introduction to the requirements of the Externship course. Students will explore the steps for planning and conducting a full-time job search. Topics of review include the course requirements, policies and procedures, the process to secure the position, résumé and cover letter writing, interviewing skills, and career planning. Researching approved externship locations as well as travel and housing accommodations are all discussed. (Pass/No Show grading)

EXTERNSHIP PREP SEMINAR II EXTN-098

non-credit

Continued instruction in the process of securing one’s externship position, including review and critique of a strong résumé and cover letter. Interviewing techniques are discussed. Securing the position is reviewed, along with the training agreement, the follow-up process, and continued discussion of career networking and career planning. (Pass/No Show grading)

EXTERNSHIP REGISTRATION SEMINAR EXTN-099

non-credit

Students will register for their externship durCourse Descriptions | 73


ing this session. A completed training agreement is required. The seminar includes a discussion of the college’s expectations and a full overview of the externship manual assignment. In addition, the CIA’s values and the importance of maintaining professionalism are reviewed. (Pass/No Show grading)

FERMENTED AND SPECIALTY NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WINS-231

3 credits

Departing from the world of wine, this course covers other fermented beverages, including beer, ciders, and sake. Historically and culturally significant non-alcoholic beverages such as coffees, teas, and mineral waters are also examined. Attention is given to cultural traditions, production methods, regional styles, sensory evaluation, and service tools and protocols relative to each of these beverage categories.

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR: RECIPES FOR SUCCESS FRSH-100

1.5 credits

The focus of this course is to promote student success as learners and citizens of the world. Thoughout this course, students will recognize the qualities of, and develop as, informed, responsible, and empowered learners. Course objectives will cover topics related to personal, intellectual, and social development. The academic and life skill sets emphasized throughout this course are transferable to the workplace.

FOOD SAFETY ARTS-112

1.5 credits

An introduction to food production practices governed by changing federal and state regulations. Topics to be covered include prevention of food-borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, HACCP procedures, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, and guidelines for safe food preparation, storing, and reheating. Students will also take the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® examination for certification. 74 | Course Descriptions

FORMAL RESTAURANT COOKING CULA-255

3 credits

Learn to prepare modern and seasonal dishes in a restaurant setting and put previously learned skills into practice in the college’s Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant. This course will emphasize cooking techniques and ingredients used in contemporary and classical cuisines and cover planning and ordering, station organization, preparation and plating, timing, palate development, and other production realities of a restaurant.

FORMAL RESTAURANT SERVICE ROPS-255

3 credits

This AOS capstone course will expand upon information students learned in previous hospitality and service management classes. The class will concentrate on the application of service principles of fine dining and hospitality in an à la carte restaurant open to the public. Held in the Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant, the course will emphasize customer service, restaurant operations, sales, and beer, wine, and spirits. Students will study and engage in critical-thinking topics that are relevant to providing high-quality formal table service and customer service.

FUNDAMENTALS OF WINE AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE WINS-101

3 credits

An overview of foundation-level wine topics, including history, culture, viticulture, wine making, and regional gastronomy, as appropriate. Through guided exercises, students are introduced to systematic sensory evaluation techniques and vocabulary. Professional wine service techniques are introduced for subsequent reinforcement throughout upcoming classes.

GARDE MANGER CULP-125

3 credits

An introduction to three main areas of the cold kitchen: reception foods, plated appetizers, and buffet arrangements. Learn to prepare canapés, hot and cold hors d’oeu-


vre, appetizers, forcemeats, pâtés, galantines, terrines, salads, and sausages. Curing and smoking techniques for meat, seafood, and poultry items will be practiced, along with contemporary styles of presenting food and preparing buffets.

GLOBAL WINE BUSINESS AND WINE PROGRAM OPERATIONS WINS-211

3 credits

An overview of international trade laws, import/export regulations, global distribution channels, and marketing. Wine program operations focus on wine list development and management strategies, inventory systems, and pricing. Service education culminates in the development of employee training programs and TIPS (Training for Intervention Procedures) alcohol certification.

HEARTH BREADS AND ROLLS BAKE-111

3 credits

Building on previous knowledge, students learn to mix, shape, bake, store, and distribute breads and rolls. Students will build speed and increase their proficiency in meeting production deadlines with quality products. Emphasis is placed on the use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment, and methods that emphasize flavor, texture, and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf life.

HIGH-VOLUME PRODUCTION COOKERY CULP-130

3 credits

An overview of the food preparation and serving techniques used by the casual dining, onsite catering, non-commercial, and retail segments. This course emphasizes high-volume food production, station setup, timing, service, and menu concept development and execution. Basic cooking and serving competencies will be reinforced and new skills specific to high-production preparation and serving will be taught. Menu items consistent with the retail and non-commercial segments and also common to the casual dining segment of foodservice will be covered. Cooking competencies include egg cookery, grain

cookery, sandwich preparation, pasta cookery, and preparation of simple and composed salads, moderate-cost entrées, and cooking with consideration for dietary needs and restrictions.

INDIVIDUAL AND PRODUCTION PASTRIES BAKE-124

3 credits

Explore the steps for planning and conducting quantity production for banquets and large functions. In this course, students learn how to scale recipes for large-volume production for pastry buffet tables and retail settings. They also will create sheet cakes, French pastries, and buffet desserts.

INGREDIENTS AND TECHNIQUES OF FABRICATION CULS-105

3 credits

An introduction to the identification, use, and storage of animal proteins, vegetables, fruits, herbs, dairy, and other foundation ingredients of the professional kitchen. Additional topics include receiving, identifying, fabricating, and storing beef, pork, poultry, flat and round fish, and shellfish. Hands-on exercises emphasize techniques specific to each variety.

INTRODUCTION TO À LA CARTE COOKING CULP-115

3 credits

The foundation of cooking techniques and theories from Culinary Fundamentals will be applied in a production setting. Emphasis is placed on individual as well as team production. The focus is on cooking fundamentals, ratios, and formulas in a professional kitchen. Multi-course menus will be prepared, with a focus on batch cooking as executed in an à la carte-style service. (Prerequisite: Culinary Fundamentals/CULS-100)

INTRODUCTION TO CUSTOMER SERVICE ROPS-200

3 credits

An exploration of table service principles and skills with an emphasis on customer service in a restaurant. The focus will be placed on wine, beer, coffee, tea, and non-alcoholic beverage service. Topics include guest relations, professional communications, order taking in an à la Course Descriptions | 75


carte environment, service sequence, point-ofsale systems, cash handling, beginning merchandising, table skills, and dining room preparationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all in the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant.

INTRODUCTION TO GASTRONOMY ARTS-111

1.5 credits

An introduction to the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected or will affect the culinary as well as the baking and pastry professions. Topics include the contemporary challenges facing food professionals in the twenty-first century and etiquette as a social and professional discipline. Students will be expected to complete several written assignments and present a group research project.

INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT MGMT-240

1.5 credits

An investigation of various management topics including leadership, training, motivation, delegation, problem solving, decision making, and conflict resolution as they relate to foodservice establishments.

MEAT IDENTIFICATION, FABRICATION, AND UTILIZATION CULA-115

1.5 credits

This course will introduce the student to the subject of meats and their application in foodservice operations, building a strong foundation that supports the principles to be learned in the cooking courses to follow. Through lectures, demonstrations, hands-on activities, and reviews, students will learn about the muscle and bone structure of beef, veal, pork, lamb, and poultry; fabrication methods for sub-primal and foodservice cuts; and proper tying and trussing methods. Lectures will introduce meat inspection, quality and yield grading, costing and yield testing, purchasing specifications, and basic information concerning the farm-to-table trail. Discussions will include preferred cooking methods for all meats, proper knife selection, and butchery equipment. Sanitation and safety standards will be stressed throughout. (Prerequisite: Culinary Fundamentals/CULS-100) 76 | Course Descriptions

MENU DEVELOPMENT MGMT-242

1.5 credits

An analysis of menu development for foodservice establishments. Topics to be covered include: menu development, descriptions, layout, design, and pricing; sales mix; and station balance. Students will be involved in critiquing and creating menus from the perspective of concept, clarity, cost, price, and efficiency.

MODERN BANQUET COOKERY CULA-110

3 credits

This course examines the varied ways in which banquets and catering events may be executed. Terms relating to equipment, food preparation, service, and presentation will be discussed. Students will prepare a menu following the principles and techniques associated with preparing and serving food to large groups, as well as concentrating on principles of modern batch cookery. An emphasis will be placed on maintaining quality and foundational cooking methodology. Students will also learn how to organize, plan, and operate a banquet kitchen. Cooking applications are at a beginning level in preparation for increased understanding of food production. (Prerequisite: Culinary Fundamentals/CULS-100)

NEW WORLD WINES I WINS-121

3 credits

A study of the major grape-growing and wineproducing regions of California, Oregon, and Washington State. Students learn how various climatic influences and geological features affect the wines of each region and make them unique. This class also includes an exploration of classic grape varietals, an introduction to U.S. wine law, labeling, and trade. Service topics and typical regional cuisines are discussed.

NEW WORLD WINES II WINS-131

3 credits

This class continues to explore New World wines as produced in other U.S. states, North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Students will learn how vari-


ous climatic influences and geological features affect the wines of each region and make them unique. This class also includes study of wine laws and regulations appropriate to each region as well as gastronomy and contemporary service topics.

NUTRITION ARTS-243

1.5 credits

Examine the basic concepts and principles of nutrition. In this course, students learn about basic nutrients, food labeling, nutritional principles, current issues in nutrition, and the application of nutritional principles to menu development. Students will also be involved in nutritional analysis of recipes.

PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN BAKE-113

1.5 credits

Study the basic concepts of figure, ground, line, contrast, pattern, proportion, color, symmetry, movement, unity, and balance. Students learn the principles of two- and threedimensional design and develop language to analyze product design, plate presentations, decoration, and packaging on visual, tactile, and conceptual levels.

PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE CULS-114

1.5 credits

An introduction to the identification and use of vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, and spices in various forms. Explore both fresh and prepared foods and learn to identify, receive, store, and hold products. Students will also learn to evaluate products for taste, texture, smell, appearance, and other quality attributes.

RESTAURANT AND PRODUCTION DESSERTS BAKE-252

3 credits

This course covers the preparation and service of hot and cold desserts with a focus on individual desserts, à la minute preparations, and numerous components within one preparation. Students will learn station organization, timing, and service coordination for restaurant dessert production. Products made will include frozen desserts, ice cream, sorbet, glacés, individual

plated desserts, and desserts for functions and banquets. During the course, students will develop a dessert menu from the perspective of variety, costs, practicality, and how well it matches the rest of the menu.

RESTAURANT OPERATIONS: BAKING AND PASTRY ROPS-201

3 credits

This course is an examination of restaurant plated desserts, mignardises, and petits fours that are assembled with a modern approach using the latest technology and equipment. Classroom production will include items appropriate for a variety of uses, such as an à la carte menu, a banquet operation, and coffee service. Topics will include flavor pairing, menu planning, matching items to style of operation, and an introduction to à la carte and banquet production. Students will perform moderate quantity production, be exposed to several styles of service, and be guided through the cross-utilization of products, cost, and labor efficiency. They will also practice new presentation methods, focusing on fresh ingredients, simplicity of style with elegance, and efficiency of production.

SEAFOOD IDENTIFICATION AND FABRICATION CULS-116

1.5 credits

An overview of the principles of receiving, identifying, fabricating, and storing seafood. Identification will involve round fish, flat fish, crustaceans, and shellfish. Topics include knife skills, yield results, quality checks, product tasting, storage of various types of fish, techniques for fabricating cuts for professional kitchens, special storage equipment, commonly used and underutilized species of fish, fishing and aquaculture techniques, and how to choose sustainable species.

SKILL DEVELOPMENT I CULS-118

3 credits

An introduction to and application of fundamental cooking theories and techniques. Topics of study include tasting, kitchen equipment, Course Descriptions | 77


knife skills, classical vegetable cuts, stock production, thickening agents, soup preparation, grand sauces, timing, station organization, palate development, culinary French terms, and food costing.

SKILL DEVELOPMENT II CULS-119

3 credits

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of basic protein, starch, and vegetable cookery. Higher development of fundamental cooking theories and techniques from Skill Development I will be continued. Emphasis is placed on the study of ingredients and an introduction to small sauces will be given. Expanded concepts of time lines and multi-tasking, station organization, culinary French terms, and food costing will continue.

SKILL DEVELOPMENT III CULS-120

3 credits

The foundation of cooking techniques and theories from Skill Development I and II will be applied in a production setting. Emphasis is placed on individual as well as team production. Three-course menus consisting of soup, salad, and an entrée with a vegetable and a starch will be rotated throughout the class. Vegetarian and vegan menus will be introduced as well.

SPECIALTY BREADS BAKE-202

3 credits

This course gives students the chance to learn the principles and techniques of preparing multi-grain breads, sourdoughs, bagels, pretzels, holiday or seasonal breads, and flat breads. Special emphasis will be placed on regional breads and breads of the world; handling grains (such as soakers) for specialty breads; mixing, shaping, and finishing specialty breads; and learning innovative baking methods.

78 | Course Descriptions

WINE AND SERVICE PRACTICAL EXAM WINS-200

This exam tests and recognizes wine knowledge and proficiency on foundation topics in grape varietals, world wine regions, sensory analysis and communication, winemaking techniques, wine business essentials, and basic food and wine pairing principles. (High Pass/Pass/Fail grading)

WINE REGIONS OF EUROPE I WINS-151

3 credits

Study France’s classic grape-growing and wineproducing regions including, among others, Bordeaux, Burgundy, and Champagne. This class also addresses wine regions of Spain such as Rioja, Penedès, and Jerez. Class activities include guided sensory evaluations as well as a review of French and Spanish wine and food heritage, culture, wine laws, and labeling. Service education continues with discussion on contemporary service issues.

WINE REGIONS OF EUROPE II WINS-201

3 credits

A continuation of European wine studies focusing on the history, culture, wine laws, and labeling of wines from Germany, Austria, Italy, and other Eastern European regions. Regional gastronomy and culinary flavor profiles are reviewed, along with beverage service issues.

WINE STUDIES ROPS-240

3 credits

An examination of the roles that wines play as quality beverages in professional foodservice operations. The course will emphasize styles of wine from around the world, the theory and practice of matching wine with food, tasting wines, and organizing wine service. Subjects to be explored include wines of the New World (Northern and Southern Hemispheres) and the Old World (Europe) as well as purchasing, storing, marketing, and serving wines in a restaurant environment. Students will also participate in a restaurant-based wine and food tasting, which will be used as the basis for a wine and food pairing essay.


FACULTY AND STAFF At the CIA, students learn from—and work side by side with—talented chefs and instructors from many countries. CIA faculty and staff members were a vital part of the American teams which won three consecutive world championships at the Culinary Olympics, the World Cup of Baking, and the Culinary World Cup. In addition to their teaching responsibilites in the kitchen and classroom, CIA at Greystone faculty are actively involved in cutting-edge retreats and conferences held on campus, food and wine pairing programs, solutions-based consulting services, continuing education for foodservice industry professionals, new media projects for web-based training, menu research and development, and much more. For a legend of professional certifications, please see page 89.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Bradley Chairman of the Board Charlie Palmer ’79 Vice Chairman Mindy R. Rich Secretary Jon Luther Treasurer Patricia Anton Robert Berenson Elizabeth Blau Ralph Brennan Fred Carl, Jr. Patricia Dailey Lori Daniel ’79 Lorna Donatone Frank J. Fahrenkopf, Jr. Michael Kaufman Thomas A. Keller Takeshi Kohjima Arthur Maxwell Richard Mazer Charles Merinoff II Robert A. Muh Harold Rosser Martin Sutter Roy Yamaguchi ’76

TRUSTEES EMERITI William C. Anton Chairman Emeritus Donald Axleroad Frank Arthur Banks ’57 Jeffrey P. Berlind August J. Ceradini, Jr. Chairman Emeritus Lee A. Cockerell Barry E. Colman ’83 Dr. John J. Connolly Chairman Emeritus Walter Conti Chairman Emeritus John N. Daly Marcel Desaulniers ’65 Sebastian J. DiMeglio James Doherty John R. Farquharson Daniel A. Gescheidle Burton Hobson Karl Kilburg Abigail Kirsch Peter Kleiser Ted J. Kleisner Charles La Forge Richard Lavin Dr. Barbara Lawrence Herman Leavitt Ronald N. Magruder Faculty and Staff | 79


Tony May M. Cameron Mitchell ’86 Chairman Emeritis John L. Patten Margaret E. Happel Perry Alan R. Plassche Chairman Emeritus Richard J. Ripp ’55 Harris H. Rusitzky Chairman Emeritus Arno B. Schmidt John L. Sharpe Richard Smucker Arnym Solomon ’69 Rodney Stoner ’65 Donald G. Tober Nick Valenti Chairman Emeritus Joseph W. Vannucci Kevin Zraly

Dr. Victor A. L. Gielisse Vice President— Advancement and Business Development, DBA, MBA, BS, CMC, AAC, CFBE, CHE Bruce D. Hillenbrand Vice President— Admissions and Marketing, MBA, BA Richard Mignault Vice President— Administration and Shared Services, BA Charles A. O’Mara Senior Vice President—Finance and Administration, MBA, BS, CPA Alice-Ann Schuster Associate Vice President and Dean— Student Affairs, MS, BS Rick Tietjen Associate Vice President— Planning and Operations Support MBA, BS

HONORARY TRUSTEES Paul Bocuse Christopher (Kit) Goldsbury Barron Hilton William N. Hulett I. Pano Karatassos ’60 J. Willard Marriott, Jr. John Profaci, Sr. James D. Robinson III Allan Schuman Charles E. Williams

Greystone Administration Michael Blanchard Human Resource Manager, BS Maria Coggiola Learning Strategies Center Administrator, MEd, BA Diana Delonis ’97 Director—Education Support, BA, AOS Paul Dray Associate Director—Rudd Center for Professional Wine Studies, BS Jannelle Frey Admissions Officer, MS, BS, NCC Wendy Higgins Director—Career Services, BS, AAS Pat Malloy Greystone Registration Manager Anthony Martin Financial Aid Assistant, BA Emily Massimi Manager—Recruitment, Greystone, BS Lisa Pond Credit-based Programs Coordinator

STAFF President and Cabinet Dr. L. Timothy Ryan ’77 President, EdD, MBA, BS, AOS, CMC, AAC Greg Drescher Vice President—Strategic Intiatives and Industry Leadership Mark Erickson ’77 Provost, MBA, BS, AOS, CMC

80 | Faculty and Staff


Catherine Eucker Réblé Student Affairs Manager, BPh Russell H. Scott III Dean of Education, AOS, CMC

Hyde Park Administration Rachel C. Birchwood Director—Admissions, MEd, BS Susan Cussen Associate Vice President— Branch Campuses, MBA, BS Kathleen Gailor Director—Financial Aid, MS, BS Chet Koulik Registrar, MA, BS Linda Terwilliger Bursar Jennifer Wrage Director—Learning Strategies, MS, BS INSTRUCTORS ROBERT BATH, MS, WINE AND BEVERAGE INSTRUCTOR Education: BS, California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, CA. Professional Experience: Co-Owner, Robert Bath Imports, St. Helena, CA. Co-Owner and Consultant, The RLB Wine Group, St. Helena. Writer and Editorial Advisory

THOMAS D. BLIX, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR — HOSPITALITY AND SERVICE Professional Experience: Owner/Executive Chef, The Little Gourmet, Napa, CA. General Manager, FARM at The Carneros Inn, Napa; The Lark Creek Inn, Larkspur, CA; Pinot Blanc, St. Helena, CA. Food and Beverage Director, L’Auberge Carmel, Carmel, CA. Maître d’Hotel, Auberge du Soleil, Rutherford, CA. Server, Domaine Chandon, Yountville, CA. Server, River Horse Café, Park City, UT.

ALI BOUZARI, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR— CULINARY SCIENCE Education: BS, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Professional Experience: Food Biochemist, University of California, Davis. Line Cook, Seasons Restaurant and Bar, Davis. Pastry Chef, Sauté Cook, Opus Restaurant, Denver, CO. Biochemical Consultant/Sous Chef, The Inventing Room, Denver. Biochemical Consultant/Cheesemonger, Antonelli’s Cheese Shop, Austin. Research Assistant, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain; University of Colorado, Denver. Tutor, University of Texas Learning Center, Austin.

WILLIAM M. BRIWA ’80, CEC, CHE, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

Board member, Sommelier Journal, Boulder,

Education: BA, Bard College, Annandale on

CO. Writer, Santé magazine, Burlington, VT.

Hudson, NY. AOS, CIA. Apprenticeship:

National Sales Manager, Shafer Vineyards,

Ketterers Bakery, NYC. Professional Experi-

Yountville, CA. Regional Sales Manager,

ence: Executive Chef, Wine Spectator Grey-

Seagram Classics Wine Company, Mission

stone Restaurant, St. Helena, CA. Chef de

Viejo, CA. General Manager, Sardine Fac-

Partie, The French Laundry, Yountville, CA.

tory Restaurant, Monterey, CA. Assistant

Resident Chef, The Hess Collection Winery,

General Manager, Starker’s Restaurant,

Napa, CA. Chef-Instructor, Napa Valley

Kansas City, MO. Member: Past Vice Chair-

Community College, Napa. Baker, Pastry

man, Past Board Member, Member, Court

Chef, Cook, Knickerbockers, St. Helena.

of Master Sommeliers.

Puppeteer, Magical Moonshine Theater, Yountville. Owner/Operator, Palmers Café, St. Helena. First Cook, Domaine Chandon, Yountville. Personal Chef, Christian Brothers Winery, St. Helena. Baker, Great Chefs

Faculty and Staff | 81


of France at Robert Mondavi Winery,

PATRICK CLARK, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

Oakville, CA; Sugar House Bakery, St.

Professional Experience: Chef, Sutro’s at The

Helena. Roundsman, Royal Sonesta Hotel,

Cliff House, San Francisco, CA. Executive

New Orleans, LA. Awards: Best Webcast,

Chef, California Café, Palo Alto, CA. Food

Savoring the Best of World Flavors DVDs,

and Beverage Consultant, Interim Executive

James Beard Foundation, 2009, 2007. Mem-

Chef, Xebec Bar/Dining, Brisbane, CA.

ber: ACF. Past Board Member, Napa Valley

Executive Chef, Santa Barbara Grill, Cuper-

Farmers’ Market.

tino, CA. Executive Chef/ Director of Food

AARON BROWN, CB, CHE, BAKING INSTRUCTOR

W. Ranch, Carson City, NV. Executive

Education: AA, Western Culinary Institute, Portland, OR. Apprenticeship: Grand Central Baking Company, Seattle, WA. Professional Experience: Bakery Manager, Big River Breads, Corvallis, OR. Head Baker, Il Fornaio America Corporation, Denver, CO, Las Vegas, NV, and Portland. Owner/Head Baker, Spent Grain Baking Company, Seattle. Awards: Baker of the Year, Il Fornaio America Corp., 1997. Member: Retail Bakers of America. Bread Bakers Guild of America.

TUCKER BUNCH, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

and Beverage, The Gold Club at Lightning Chef, Silver Creek Valley Country Club, San Jose, CA. Executive Sous Chef, Burlingame Country Club, Hillsborough, CA. Assistant Banquet Chef, The Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. Instructor, consumer and professional education programs, California Culinary Academy, San Francisco. Awards: ACF Gold Medal, One-Pot Cookery Competition, Chefs Association of the Pacific Coast Culinary Arts Salon, 1998. Twenty-six team medals (8 Gold, 7 Silver, and 11 Bronze) as a member of the Chaîne des Rôtisseurs Culinary Team USA, International Culinary Olympics, Frankfurt, Germany, 1992. Two

Education: AOS, cum laude, Johnson &

ACF Bronze Medals, Chefs Association of

Wales University, Providence, RI. Profes-

the Pacific Coast Culinary Arts Salon, 1992.

sional Experience: Research and Develop-

Gold Medal—First Place, Chefs in America

ment Chef, Joe’s Crab Shack—Landry’s

National Mystery Box Hot Food Competi-

Restaurants, Inc., Houston, TX. Chief Oper-

tion, 1992. ACF Silver Medal, Chefs Associ-

ations Officer, Executive Chef, Crescent

ation of the Pacific Coast Culinary Arts

City Beignets, Houston. Vice President, Dis-

Salon, 1991. Second Place, Chaîne des

trict Manager, Tobaccomart, Houston. Sous

Rôtisseurs “Young Commis Rôtisseur”

Chef/Kitchen Manager, The Quilted Toque,

National Mystery Box Hot Food Competi-

Houston. Cook/Server, A Fare Extraordi-

tion, 1991. Gold Medal, Best of Show, Chefs

naire Catering, Houston. Kitchen Manager,

Association of the Pacific Coast Culinary

Whole Foods Market, Houston. Awards:

Arts Salon, 1990. Member: ACF. Past Board

Nation’s Restaurant News “Hot Concepts!”

President and Culinary Arts Chairman,

Award, 2004.

Chefs Association of the Pacific Coast, ACF San Francisco Chapter.

82 | Faculty and Staff


ALMIR DA FONSECA, CEC, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

SANNA DELMONICO, RD, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR —NUTRITION

Education: Senace Culinary School/Le Cor-

Education: MS, Louisiana State University,

don Bleu, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Apprentice-

Baton Rouge, LA. BS, San Francisco State

ship: Chef Jacques Arpi, Charron, France.

University, San Francisco, CA. Professional

Professional Experience: Executive

Experience: Adjunct Instructor, Dietetic

Chef/Chef Consultant, San Francisco Tow-

Technician Program Co-Coordinator, Santa

ers, San Francisco, CA, Chef/Owner, Flavor

Rosa Junior College, Santa Rosa, CA.

Source Sauces and Catering Services,

Founder and Editor, Tiny Tummies: Good

Sebastopol, CA. Chef-Instructor, Profes-

Food for Growing Families, Napa, CA. Private

sional Culinary Institute, Campbell, CA;

Practice Dietitian, Mill Valley, CA and San

California Culinary Academy, San Fran-

Rafael, CA. Neonatal, Outpatient, and Radi-

cisco. Chef/Department Manager, CA1

ation Oncology Nutritionist, California

Services, Delaware North Companies, Oak-

Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco. Clin-

land International Airport, Oakland, CA.

ical Nutritionist, Baton Rouge General

Chef/Manager, Eurest Dining Services/

Medical Center, Baton Rouge. Graduate

Compass Group USA, G.S.A./Café 450,

Assistant, Pennington Biomedical Research

San Francisco. Corporate Executive Chef,

Center, Baton Rouge. Member: American

Marconi Conference Center, Marshall, CA.

Dietetic Association. Liaison, ADA/ADAF

Executive Chef/Owner, Jack London’s

Kids Eat Right Campaign. Past Educational

Creekside Restaurant, Glen Ellen, CA.

Programs Chair, Past Book Club Chair,

Executive Chef, Sous Chef, Lucas Wharf

Food and Culinary Professionals DPG.

Restaurant, Bodega Bay, CA. Sous Chef,

Napa Children and Weight Coalition. Napa

Elaine Bell Catering Company, Sonoma,

County Breastfeeding Coalition.

CA. Head Chef, Bodega Harbor Country Club, Bodega Bay. Catering Chef/Sauté Chef, Chez Peyo French Restaurant, Sebastopol. Awards: Culinary Educator of the Year, California Culinary Academy, 2003. Delaware North/CA1 Services Chef/ Department Manager Unit of the Year, 2003. Gold Medal, Compass Group USA, Be a Star Chef Competition, 1999. Inductee, International Food Safety Council, 1999. Gold Medal, Compass Group USA, California Food Show, 1998. Two Silver Medals and one Bronze Medal, ACF Food Competi-

JOHN DIFILIPPO, PASTRY INSTRUCTOR Professional Experience: Executive Pastry Chef, Auberge du Soleil, Rutherford, CA. Pastry Chef, Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Phoenix, AZ. Pastry Cook I, Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Laguna Niguel, CA. Pastry Chef, Pascal’s, Newport Beach, CA; LaBarritz Catering, Newport Beach; Kurt’s Gourmet Catering, San Diego, CA. Pastry Chef/Manager, Brownie Baker, Laguna Beach, CA and Santa Ana, CA. Pastry Cook, Piret’s French Bistro, San Diego.

tion, California Chapter, 1991. One of the Top 8 on the West Coast, National Seafood Challenge Competition, 1990–1993. Member: ACF. Chefs Association of the Pacific Coast. World Cooks Association. World Association of Cooks Society. Founding Member, Sonoma County Culinary Guild. Faculty and Staff | 83


CHRISTIE DUFAULT, ACWP, CHE, WINE AND BEVERAGE INSTRUCTOR

fied for HACCP Training, Plan Develop-

Education: BA, Simmons College, Boston,

Food Safety Ltd. and the International

ment, and Implementation, Professional

MA. Professional Experience: Sommelier,

HACCP Alliance. Registered Instructor,

RN74, San Francisco, CA; Restaurant Vin-

National Environmental Health Association

cent Guerithault, Phoenix, AZ; The Marker,

and Prometric Testing and Assessment Serv-

Adam’s Mark Hotel, Philadelphia, PA. Head

ices. Professional Experience: Chef/Food

Sommelier, Quince, San Francisco. Wine

Service “FS” Instructor, United States Coast

Director, Restaurant Gary Danko, San Fran-

Guard, Petaluma, CA. Food Safety Instruc-

cisco. Guide, Butterfield & Robinson,

tor/Owner, Sonoma Food Safety, Petaluma.

Beaune, France. Awards: Best Wine Direc-

Manager, Mom’s Apple Pie, Sebastopol,

tor, San Francisco magazine, 2007. America’s

CA. Chef/Director of Food and Beverage,

Best Young Sommeliers, Wine & Spirits mag-

Chancellor Café, San Francisco, CA.

azine, 2003. Phoenix’s 14 Most Interesting

Chef/Partner, Cuisine Adventures Catering,

Women, City AZ magazine, 1999.

STEPHEN L. DURFEE, CEPC, CHE, PASTRY INSTRUCTOR

San Francisco. Sous Chef/ Butcher, Oritalia Restaurant, San Francisco. Sergeant, United States Army, Army Reserve, and Army

Education: AB, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY. Certificate, Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School, NYC. Professional Experience: Pastry Chef, Charles Nob Hill, San Francisco, CA; Wheatleigh Hotel, Lenox, MA; Alison on Dominick Street, NYC. Pastry Chef, Sous Chef, Chef de Partie, The French Laundry, Yountville, CA. Pastry Instructor, Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School, NYC. Awards: Third Place, U.S. Finals, 2010 World Chocolate Masters Competition. Two Second Place Awards and Overall Fifth Place Award, U.S. Pastry Competition, 2009. Team Third Place, National Pastry Team Championship, 2007. One of the “10 Best Pastry Chefs,” Pastry Art & Design and Chocolatier, 1999. Pastry Chef of the Year, James Beard Foundation, 1998.

National Guard. Member: California Envi-

JEFF FELDMAN, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR— FOOD SAFETY

Clinical Nutrition Managers’ Practice

Education: ServSafe® Instructor Certificate, ServSafe® Food Safety Manager Certificate,

ronmental Health Association, Redwood Chapter. National Environmental Health Association.

JOANNE HATCH, RD, CNSD, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR —NUTRITION Education: MS, Rush University, Chicago, IL. BS, University of California, Davis. Professional Experience: Chief Clinical Dietitian, St. Helena Hospital, St. Helena, CA. Senior Nutrition Systems Specialist, HealthCare Network, San Leandro, CA. Nutritional Care Manager, Desert Regional Hospital, Palm Springs, CA. Member: American Dietetic Association. American Society of Parenteral Nutrition. California Dietetic Association. Dietitians in Nutrition Support. Group.

EDDIE HEINTZ, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR— HOSPITALITY AND SERVICE

National Restaurant Association Educa-

Education: BS, University of Northern Iowa,

tional Foundation. Administrator/Trainer/

Cedar Falls, IA. Professional Experience:

Certified Food Safety Manager, National

Strategist, Restaurant Consultant. Director

Registry of Food Safety Professionals. Certi-

of Hospitality & Restaurant Operations,

84 | Faculty and Staff


Francis Ford Coppola Presents, Napa, CA

of Education, Richmond, CA; Sacred Heart

and Geyserville, CA. General Manager,

Elementary School, San Francisco, CA;

Bounty Hunter, Napa; Bistro Don Giovanni,

Oakland Military Institute, Oakland, CA;

Napa; Bacar, San Francisco, CA; Brew Pub,

Learning for Life, Fremont, CA; East Bay

Kona Brewing Co., Kailua-Kona, HI; Florio

Agency for Children, Oakland; St. Her-

Restaurant, San Francisco; Starlight Room,

man’s Elementary School, Sunnyvale, CA.

Sir Francis Drake Hotel, San Francisco. Assistant Food & Beverage Manager, Four

PAUL IRVING, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

Seasons Hualalai, Kailua-Kona. Manager,

Education: BA with honors, University of

Scala’s, Sir Francis Drake Hotel, San Fran-

California, Santa Cruz. AA, City College of

cisco; Postrio, San Francisco; Bistro Roti,

San Francisco, CA. Professional Experience:

San Francisco. Operations Manager, Boule-

Executive Chef, Chef de Cuisine, Insalata’s,

vard, San Francisco. Opening Team/Travel-

San Anselmo, CA. Executive Chef, Gilt

ing Trainer, TGI Fridays.

Club, Portland, OR; Forbes Island, San

WILLIAM P. HEUBEL, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

Petaluma, CA; Coconut Grove Supper

Education: AOS, California Culinary Acad-

Club, San Francisco. Awards: Award

Francisco, CA; River House Restaurant,

emy, San Francisco, CA. Professional Experi-

of Achievement, City College of San

ence: Executive Chef, Old Edwards Inn and

Francisco.

Spa, Highlands, NC; Keauhou Bay Resort and Spa, Kona, HI. Chef de Cuisine, Canoe House Restaurant, Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Bungalows, Kohala, HI. Sous Chef, Four Seasons at Manele Bay, Lanai, HI; Highlands Inn, Carmel, CA; L’Auberge de Sedona, Sedona, AZ; Ventana Inn, Big Sur, CA.

STEVEN E. ISAAC ’97, CMB, CEPC, PASTRY INSTRUCTOR Education: AOS, CIA. Professional Experience: Executive Pastry Chef, La Baguette, Palo Alto, CA; MotorCity Casino, Detroit, MI; The Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA; Four Seasons Hotel, Chicago, IL. Baking and Pastry Instructor, The San Francisco

JOYCE HODGKINSON, CHE, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR —WRITING

Baking Institute, South San Francisco, CA.

Education: MA, University of San Francisco.

tute of America at Greystone, St. Helena,

BA, San Francisco State University. Profes-

CA. Pastry Chef, The Standard Club,

sional Experience: Adjunct Professor, Clini-

Chicago. Corporate Pastry Chef, Wolfgang

cal Supervisor, Evaluator, University of San

Puck Special Events, Chicago. Assistant Pas-

Francisco. Adjunct Professor, Concordia

try Chef, The Four Seasons Resort and Club

University, Portland, OR. Clinical Supervi-

at Las Colinas, Irving, TX.

sor, Western Governors University, Salt Lake City, UT. Evaluator, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA. Superintendent of Schools, Fort Ross School

Pastry Chef-Instructor, The Culinary Insti-

PAT JEFFRIES, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR— HOSPITALITY AND SERVICE AND GENERAL MANAGER—WINE SPECTATOR GREYSTONE RESTAURANT

District, Cazadero, CA. Principal, Sea

Professional Experience: General Manager,

Breeze School, Foster City, CA; Tam Creek

Norman Rose Tavern, Napa, CA; Cole’s

School, Corte Madera, CA. Consultant, No

Chop House, Napa. Key Account Specialist,

Child Left Behind, California Department

Young’s Market Company, Napa Valley,

Faculty and Staff | 85


CA. Operations Consultant, Luna Vine-

Los Angeles. Line Cook, Domaine Chan-

yards, Napa; Gundlach Budschu, Sonoma,

don, Yountville, CA. Awards: Bay Area’s Top

CA; BarBersQ, Napa.

ROBERT JÖRIN, CMB, CEPC, CCE, CHE, TEAM LEADER—BAKING AND PASTRY ARTS

Ten Up and Coming Chefs, San Francisco Examiner Magazine, 1998.

LARS KRONMARK, CWP, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

Education: Wirtefachschule, Bern, Switzer-

Education: Restaurationsindustriens Laer-

land. Apprenticeship: Konditorei-Restaurant

lingeskole, Copenhagen, Denmark. Appren-

Bräm, Baden, Switzerland. Professional

ticeship: Grande Café, Copenhagen. Sorte

Experience: Pastry Chef/Owner, The

Ravn, Copenhagen. Professional Experience:

Upscale Downtown Bakery, Petaluma, CA.

Coordinator of Culinary Staff, Auction

Baking Instructor, Santa Rosa Junior Col-

Napa Valley, Napa Valley Vintners, St.

lege, Santa Rosa, CA. Baking and Pastry

Helena, CA. Food and Wine Pairing Judge,

Instructor, Lead Chef, California Culinary

North Lake Tahoe Autumn Food and Wine

Academy, San Francisco, CA. Pastry Chef,

Festival, Lake Tahoe, CA. Chef-Instructor,

Gerhard’s Pastries, Sausalito, CA. Head Pas-

China Educational Project, Shanghai and

try Chef, Fabrique Delices, San Mateo, CA;

Beijing, China. Chef-Instructor and Depart-

Beacon Island Hotel, Plettenberg Bay,

ment Head for Hot Foods, California Culi-

Republic of South Africa. Head Bread

nary Academy, San Francisco, CA. Awards:

Baker, Backerei-Konditorei Blaser, Bern.

Winner, Cochon 555 Napa cooking compe-

Head of Baking Department, Confiserie

tition, St. Helena, CA, 2012. Chef of the

Feller, Bern. Assistant Baker, Backerei-

Year, Cordon d’Or-Gold Ribbon Academy

Restaurant Jörin, Davos, Switzerland.

of the Culinary Arts, 2007. Celebrity Guest

Awards: World Champion (U.S. Team),

Chef, Napa Valley Wine Auction, 2010.

Coupe du Monde de la Boulangerie, Paris, France, 1999. Winner, James Beard Founda-

KELLY M. MILLS, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

tion Pastry Competition, West Coast

Education: Culinary arts degree, British

Region, 1993. Member: ACF. Bread Bakers

Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby,

Guild of America. Chefs Association of the

Canada. Apprenticeships: Four Seasons

Pacific Coast.

Hotel, Vancouver, WA. Canadian Chefs

TOD M. KAWACHI, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

Association. Professional Experience: Chef/Owner, Kelly’s on Trinity, San Fran-

Education: Certificate, Seattle Community

cisco, CA. Executive Chef, Four Seasons

College, Seattle, WA. Professional Experi-

Clift Hotel, San Francisco. Executive Sous

ence: Winery Chef, Franciscan Estates-Con-

Chef, Four Seasons Olympic Hotel, Seattle,

stellation Wines U.S., Napa, CA. Executive

WA. Assistant Banquet Chef/Sous Chef,

Chef, River City Bar & Grill, Napa; Eagle

Ritz-Carlton Hotel, A Four Seasons Hotel,

Vines Golf Club, Napa; Saketini Asian

Chicago, IL. Stagier, Le Moulin de Moug-

Diner & Lounge, Napa; Brix Restaurant &

ins, Mougins, France. Awards: Lieutenant

Market, Napa; Roy’s Kahana Bar & Grill-

Governor’s Medal for top vocation student,

Kahana, Maui, HI. Executive Sous Chef,

British Columbia, 1980. Top Apprentice of

Peninsula Beverly Hills Hotel, Los Angeles,

Canada Award, Canadian Chefs Associa-

CA. Tournant Sous Chef, The Hotel Bel Air,

tion, 1980.

Los Angeles. Sous Chef, Checkers Hotel,

86 | Faculty and Staff


REBECCA B. PEIZER ’00, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: BA, State University of New York,

TONI HENDRICKSON SAKAGUCHI ’84, CEC, CHE, TEAM LEADER—CULINARY ARTS

Geneseo. AOS, CIA. Level 2 Fundamentals

Education: BA, Michigan State University,

Diploma, International Sommelier Guild,

East Lansing, MI. AOS with honors, CIA.

Las Vegas, NV. Professional Experience:

Professional Experience: Restaurant Chef,

Executive Chef, Elk Creek Ranch, Meeker,

The Grille, Sonoma Mission Inn & Spa,

CO. Chef/Owner, All Things Culinary LLC,

Sonoma, CA. Sous Chef/ Acting Executive

New York, California, and Colorado. Chef-

Chef, Ojai Valley Inn and Country Club,

Instructor, Culinary School of the Rockies,

Ojai, CA. Lead Baker, Café Puccino Coffee

Boulder, CO. Chef-Instructor, Le Cordon

Bar and Bakery, Universal CityWalk, Los

Bleu College of Culinary Arts, Las Vegas.

Angeles, CA. Executive Chef, City Restau-

Private Chef and Caterer, NYC, Fire Island,

rant and Border Grill, Los Angeles; Border

NY, and Napa Valley, CA. Chef, Cakebread

Grill 2, Santa Monica, CA. Floor Man-

Cellars and Niebaum-Coppola Rubicon

ager/Chef, Border Grill Melrose, Los Ange-

Estate, Napa Valley. Line Cook, Evan’s

les. Kitchen Manager, City Restaurant,

American Gourmet, South Lake Tahoe, CA.

Los Angeles. Awards: Manager of the

Wine Educator, Duckhorn Wine Company,

Quarter, The Grille, Sonoma Mission Inn

St. Helena, CA. Sous Chef and Kitchen

& Spa, 1996.

Manager, Roux, St. Helena. Kitchen Chef,

SCOTT SAMUEL, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR— STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Jacques Pépin Celebrates, San Francisco, CA. Manager, Sarabeth’s Kitchen, NYC. Awards:

Education: BA, Washington State University,

First Place, Taste of Elegance National Pork

Pullman, WA. Apprenticeship: The French

Board Culinary Competition, Las Vegas,

Laundry, Yountville, CA. Professional Expe-

2008. First Place, Italian Culinary Institute

rience: Owner, Simply Brilliant, Seattle, WA.

for Foreigners “Sintonie” Culinary Competi-

Chef-Instructor, Seattle Culinary Academy,

tion, NYC, 2008. Employee of the Quarter,

Seattle; The Art Institute of Seattle Culinary

Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts,

Arts, Seattle. Private Chef, Seattle. Sous

Las Vegas, 2007. Top 10 Sous Chefs in

Chef, The Herbfarm Restaurant, Wood-

America, Bertolli Company and Food &

inville, WA; Gerard’s Restaurant, Lahaina,

Wine, 2002.

HI; Café Juanita, Kirkland, WA. Executive

DUSTIN ROGGE ’00, HOSPITALITY AND SERVICE INSTRUCTOR

Sous Chef, Waterfront Seafood Grill, Seattle. Executive Chef, Brie & Bourdeaux,

Education: BPS, AOS, CIA. Higher Wine

Seattle.

Certificate, Wine & Spirit Education Trust,

ROGER J. STUDEBAKER, CCIM, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR—MANAGEMENT

Boston, MA. Professional Experience: General Manager, Waterbar, San Francisco, CA.

Education: BS, Florida State University, Tal-

Manager, Farallon, San Francisco. General

lahassee, FL. AA, California State Univer-

Manager, Manager, The Girl and the Fig,

sity at Fullerton. Professional Experience:

Sonoma, CA. Member: Eta Sigma Delta

Instructor, Diablo Valley College, Pleasant

Honor Society.

Hills, CA. President, Studebaker Family Corporation, Fairfield, CA. Owner/Branch Manager, CR Funding, Fairfield. Vice Presi-

Faculty and Staff | 87


dent—Restaurant Services, Round Table

lege, 2008. MFA Fellowship, San Francisco

Pizza, Concord, CA. Franchise Owner,

Art Institute, 2001–2005. Local Arts Educa-

Mary’s Pizza Shack, Sonoma, CA. Turn-

tion Partnership (LAEP) Artist in Residence,

around Specialist, Tony Roma’s, Dallas, TX.

2002.

Area Manager, Vice President of Purchasing, Vice President of Marketing, Vice President of Operations, Emil Villa’s, Hayward, CA. General Manager, Area Manager, Service America, Fort Lauderdale, FL. Division Training Manager, Marriott’s Great America, Santa Clara, CA. Manager, Food Service Operations, Walt Disney Productions, Disneyland, Anaheim, CA. Colonel, United States Marine Corps Reserve, Retired. Member: Vice President, Board of Directors, Kiwanis Club of Fairfield. Fairfield Chamber of Commerce. National Association of Mortgage Brokers. California Association of Mortgage Brokers. California Association of Realtors. National Association of Multi-Unit Owners, Architects, and Construction Engi-

MICHAEL K. WOLF, HOSPITALITY AND SERVICE INSTRUCTOR Education: BA, California State University, Sacramento, CA. Professional Experience: General Manager, Spruce Park City, Park City, UT; Pinot Blanc, St. Helena, CA; Betelnut, San Francisco, CA. CoOwner/Managing Partner, 38 Central, Medford, OR. Director of Operations, Market, St. Helena. Visitors Center Manager, Domaine Carneros Winery, Napa, CA. Managing Partner, Manager, Mustards Grill, Miramonte, Napa. Manager, Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen, Napa.

THOMAS B. H. WONG ’86, CEC, CHE, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR

neers. United States Marine Corps Reserve

Education: AOS, CIA. Certificate, Kapiolani

Officers Association.

Commmunity College, Honolulu, HI.

NANCY WILLIS, ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR— DESIGN

White Sulphur Springs, WV. Professional

Education: MFA, San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. BFA, University of Cincinnati, OH. Professional Experience: Founder/Producer, Path of an Artist Painting Tours to France. Instructor, Path of an Artist Painting Workshop, Sundance, UT. Instructor/Producer, Below the Painted Surface, Napa Valley College, Napa, CA; Nimbus Art Center, St. Helena, CA. Instructor, Napa Valley College, Napa and St. Helena; Nimbus Arts Center, St. Helena. Curator, Harley Bruce Gallery, St. Helena. Producer, Sennelier Artist Materials Workshops; Arts and Culture Lecture Series. Stage Design, Auction Napa Valley, Napa Valley Vintners Association, St. Helena. Awards: Featured Artist, Sundance Food and Wine Festival, 2009. Foundation Grant, Napa Valley Col88 | Faculty and Staff

Apprenticeship: The Greenbrier Hotel, Experience: Featured chef, Great Chefs of Hawaii television series and cookbook. Executive Chef, Mauna Lani Bay Hotel and Bungalows, Kohala Coast, HI; Hotel Hana, Maui, Hana, HI; Waialae Country Club, Honolulu; Royal Hawaiian Hotel, Honolulu; United Airlines, JFK International Airport, Queens, NY. Chef-Instructor, Kapiolani Community College, Honolulu. Restaurant Chef, Ice House Café, Herndon, VA. Chef Tournant, La Chaumiere, Los Angeles, CA; Towers Restaurant, Surf & Sand Hotel, Laguna Beach, CA. Crew Chief C-141 B Aircraft, United States Air Force, Norton AFB, CA. Member: ACF. National Ice Carving Association. Phi Theta Kappa National Honor Society. Le Chaîne des Rôtisseurs.


KEN WOYTISEK, CEC, CCE, CHE, CHEF-INSTRUCTOR Education: BA summa cum laude, Tusculum College, Greenville, TN. Professional Experience: Chef-Instructor, Temasek Polytechnic University, Singapore. Chef de Cuisine/Consultant, Insalata’s Restaurant, San Anselmo, CA. Production Chef, Smith Ranch Homes, San Rafael, CA. Sous Chef, South Park Café, San Francisco, CA. Roundsperson, Campton Place Kempinski, San Francisco; Silks Restaurant, The Mandarin Oriental Hotel, San Francisco; Square One, San Francisco. Assistant Chef, The Sherman House, San Francisco. Lead Cook, China Moon Café, San Francisco; Fourth Street Grill, Berkeley, CA. Prep/Line Cook, Zuni Café, San Francisco. Member: ACF. Approved Certification Evaluator, ACF. LEGEND OF CERTIFICATIONS: AAC ACWP CB CCE CCIM CEC CEPC CFBE CHA CHE CMB CMC CNSD CWP MS NCC NP OCS RD

American Academy of Chefs Advanced Certified Wine Professional Certified Baker Certified Culinary Educator Certified Commercial Investment Member Certified Executive Chef Certified Executive Pastry Chef Certified Food and Beverage Executive Certified Hotel Administrator Certified Hospitality Educator Certified Master Baker Certified Master Chef Certified Nutritional Support Dietitian Certified Wine Professional Master Sommelier National Certified Counselor Notary Public Opthalmic Coding Specialist Registered Dietitian

Faculty and Staff | 89


POLICIES Notice The policies described here and outlined in the Student Handbook have been established to enhance students’ overall educational and social experience at the CIA. This catalog does not constitute a contract between the college and its students on either a collective or individual basis. An enrollment agreement, always signed on campus by a student, constitutes a contract between the CIA and that student. Course and curricula alterations, modifications to tuition and residence hall fees, and other unforeseen changes sometimes occur after publication of the current catalog and before they can be incorporated into later editions. The CIA reserves the right to alter its curricula, tuition, fees, and policies as needed. These changes will not result in retroactive disqualification for the degree or certificate programs.

EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT The CIA does not release confidential academic and personal information, except under conditions permitted by law, without your written permission. The CIA, upon written request, will grant current or former students access to their educational records, except those excluded by policy, and will provide an opportunity for a hearing to challenge those records. If you are an applicant not yet enrolled and in attendance, you may not waive the confidentiality of your records. This means you may not inspect, review, or photocopy any material submitted to the college for consideration, including letters of reference, official transcripts, employment evaluations, and interview and test results, until after you are accepted and enrolled by the CIA. At that time you will have access to the material in the permanent file in accordance with stated policy, copies of which are available in the Registrar’s Office in Hyde Park and with the student affairs manager at Greystone.

90 | Policies

The CIA does not return any materials sent as part of the admission review process. Do not submit original diplomas and certificates, as they will not be returned.

PUBLIC NOTICE OF RIGHTS UNDER THE FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 affords you certain rights with respect to your education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review your education records within 45 days of the day the college receives a request for access. You should submit to the Registrar’s Office—or other appropriate official—written requests that identify the record(s) you wish to inspect. The appropriate official will make arrangements for access and notify you of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the appropriate official to whom the request was submitted does not maintain the records, that official shall advise you of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.


2. The right to request the amendment of your education records that you believe are inaccurate or misleading. You may ask the college to amend a record that you believe is inaccurate or misleading. You should write the appropriate official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record you want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If The Culinary Institute decides not to amend the record as you requested, the college will notify you of the decision and advise you of your right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will be provided to you when you are notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in your education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The Culinary Institute of America does not release information from your record to outside individuals unless you grant permission. However, the release of certain types of information—“directory information” which is not generally considered harmful or an invasion of privacy—may be released. The information includes name, address, program of study, dates of attendance, and degrees or certificates obtained with dates. Addresses are only released for awards and/or scholarship purposes. The Culinary Institute of America is permitted to release such information unless you specifically request that it not be released within two weeks after you commence each semester. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school offi-

cials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the college has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by The Culinary Institute of America to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 Copies of The Culinary Institute of America’s policy governing the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act are available in the Registrar’s Office. Questions concerning FERPA should be referred to the registrar at the CIA in Hyde Park and with the student affairs manager at Greystone.

STATEMENT ON CAMPUS CLIMATE The Culinary Institute of America, with its international faculty and emphasis on cuisines from around the world, values the diversity of its students and is committed to providing an encouraging campus and classroom atmosphere that inspires the Policies | 91


participation of all students. The CIA celebrates the differences students, faculty, and staff bring to the campus. Only with this diversity of knowledge and people can we effectively address the challenges of an increasingly multicultural society and the ever-growing foodservice and hospitality industry. It is the responsibility of faculty and staff members to review their classroom and campus behaviors, and those of any staff they supervise, to ensure students are encouraged, valued, and receive equitable treatment and evaluation regardless of individual differences.

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT You are responsible for becoming familiar with the CIA’s policies and regulations governing student life. The Student Code of Conduct promotes the necessary order, safety, and security of the CIA community and safeguards the individual and collective rights of everyone on campus. Actions by individuals or groups that interfere with the orderly functions of the college or actions that endanger any member of the community will not be tolerated. Individual expression, rights, and privacy are respected and valued; however, students are expected to conduct themselves in adherence to the policies described in the Student Handbook. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY The Culinary Institute of America provides a realistic learning environment for each of its students. As a CIA student, you’ll be required to participate in a variety of “hands-on” experiences on and off campus, consistent with training in the culinary and baking and pastry arts, and to assume the risks and responsibilities inherent in the educational process. 92 | Policies

Observation and application experiences may at times involve dangers and hazards to which professionals in the foodservice field are exposed, along with the normal risks of functioning in American society. Although the CIA can assume no responsibility for any of these risks, we do attempt to provide a safe environment and to instruct you in safe practices and procedures. However, none of us are immune to injury in the course of our daily lives, work, or field of study, so you should conduct yourself with due and reasonable care in your actions. If a particular educational experience is either a course, degree, or certificate requirement or a voluntary extracurricular activity, you must decide whether or not to participate and expose yourself to its possible hazards. If you choose not to participate in a required activity, however, you may fail to satisfy the course, degree, or certificate requirements. You may wish to discuss the risks noted above with the faculty or staff supervisor of the activity in which you’re participating.

STUDENT CONCERNS Many times when you have a concern, you can resolve it on your own by speaking with the party involved. If, however, after speaking with the student or employee about your concern, you do not feel the matter is addressed, or if you are concerned about an administrative process or procedure, you may see the following college officials: Civil Rights Concerns Refer to the Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy in the Student Handbook. • Human Resources Manager


Curriculum and Faculty Concerns • Dean of Education

Financial Concerns • Bursar’s Office in Hyde Park , NY • Director—Financial Aid in Hyde Park, NY

Registration and Course Scheduling Concerns • Registration Manager • Registrar’s Office in Hyde Park ,NY

Residence Life Concerns • Director—Residence Life

HARASSMENT, SEXUAL MISCONDUCT, AND DISCRIMINATION POLICY Members of The Culinary Institute of America community, guests, and visitors have the right to be free from harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination. All members of the campus community are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that does not infringe upon the rights of others. The full version of this policy can be found at www.ciachef.edu on the Consumer Information page.

• Residence Directors

General Student Concerns • Dean of Education • Director—Education Support • Associate Vice President and Dean— Student Affairs in Hyde Park, NY; Hot Line number 845-905-4255

In the event that you are unable to resolve your concern by working with the above individuals, you may need to take further action by following the Complaint and Grievance Procedure. This procedure is part of the Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy, which can be found in the Student Handbook and the Consumer Information page at www.ciachef.edu.

HARASSMENT-FREE CAMPUS STATEMENT The CIA is committed to providing a campus environment free of harassment. The Harassment-Free Campus Statement can be found on the Consumer Information page of the CIA website (www.ciachef.edu).

COMPLAINT AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE This procedure is applied to all civil rights grievances and discrimination complaints, especially those governed by Title IX and other state and federal laws. The Complaint and Grievance Procedure is outlined in the Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy, and can be read in its entirety at www.ciachef.edu on the Consumer Information page. ALCOHOL AND DRUGS The Culinary Institute of America is committed to the prevention of alcohol and drug abuse. Our policy supports the Institute’s philosophy to promote healthy lifestyles for its students and to inhibit the abuse of alcohol and other substances. No one may use, possess, sell, or distribute drugs or other illegal substances, nor may anyone use or possess drug paraphernalia on Institute property or at any CIAsponsored events, except drugs as prescribed by a physician. Throughout this policy, the term “other substances” refers to illegal substances including, but not limited to, marijuana, cocaine, LSD, PCP, amphetamines, heroin, look-alikes, and any of those Policies | 93


substances commonly referred to as “designer drugs.” The inappropriate use of prescription and over-the-counter drugs is also prohibited. With three exceptions, public consumption of alcoholic beverages in CIA-owned and operated facilities and properties is strictly prohibited. The exceptions are as follows: when consumption is part of the course within the classroom, during specifically approved college functions, and in the CIA’s public restaurant. At no time may a student under the age of 21 consume alcohol. The Institute supports and is subject to the laws of Napa County and the State of California. All Institute policies and procedures must conform to local and state laws governing the service and consumption of alcohol. The possession, solicitation, sale, and/or use of illegal drugs is unconditionally prohibited. Violations will result in suspension and possible dismissal from the college.

STUDENT TUITION RECOVERY FUND The State of California created the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) to relieve or mitigate economic losses suffered by California residents who were students attending certain schools regulated by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education. You may be eligible for STRF if you are a California resident and have prepaid tuition, paid the STRF assessment, and suffered an economic loss as a result of any of the following: 1. The school closed before the course of instruction was completed. 2. The school’s failure to pay refunds or charges on behalf of a student to a third party for license fees or any other purpose, or to provide equipment or materials for 94 | Policies

which a charge was collected within 180 days before the closure of the school. 3. The school’s failure to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a federally guaranteed student loan program as required by law or to pay or reimburse proceeds received by the school prior to closure in excess of tuition and other cost. 4. There was a decline in the quality of the course of instruction within 30 days before the school closed or, if the decline began earlier than 30 days prior to closure, the period of decline determined by the Bureau. 5. An inability to collect on a judgment against the institution for a violation of the Act.

STUDENT HANDBOOK You’ll receive the Student Handbook, a guide to campus life, when you arrive on campus. This handy guide explains CIA rules and lists services and activities. The handbook is available through the student affairs manager. CIA-OWNED HOUSING Students have the option of living on campus in one of three residence halls on a space-available basis, provided the college has received their housing application at least 30 days prior to their entry date. The housing application is included in the registration packet sent to students following their admission to the college. Students may either mail in the completed housing application to the CIA at Greystone or fax it to 707-967-2410. Please note that there are no on-campus accommodations for married couples. The college requires students to vacate the halls during major school vacation periods.


DRESS CODE There is a required dress code for all CIA classes. Please refer to the Professionalism, Uniform, and Hygiene Policy section in the Student Handbook for detailed information on the dress code at the CIA. CAMPUS ENVIRONMENT The CIA at Greystone welcomes hundreds of visitors every day—parents, guests, tourists, recruiters, prospective students, and others. Their first impression of the college can be positively or negatively affected by the cleanliness of the buildings and campus grounds. Make it your personal responsibility to see that our campus and residence halls always look their best. It’s easy to say, “I didn’t do it” when approaching spills or litter, but it’s your duty to clean it or pick it up and keep our campus beautiful.

Policies | 95


CIA CAMPUS MAP

1 Historic Greystone Cellars Main Building: 1st floor north: Ecolab Theatre, Administration offices, Safety/Security, Berns Hospitality Area 1st floor south: Spice Islands Marketplace, Viking Range Kitchen, De Baun Theatre, Chocolate Laboratory, The Bakery CafĂŠ by illy 2nd floor north: Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant 2nd floor south: Vintners Hall of Fame 3rd floor north: Teaching Kitchens, Shunsuke Takaki Baking Center 3rd floor south: Ventura Foods Center for Menu R&D, Education offices

96 | Campus Map


2 Guest House Residence Hall

V Visitor/Guest Parking

3 Rudd Center for Professional Wine Studies

R Resident/Student Parking

4 Recycling and Biodiesel Plant

C Commuter/Student Parking

5 Williams Center for Flavor Discovery

All parking lots are handicap-accessible

6 Cannard Herb Garden 7 Vineyard Lodge I Residence Hall 8 Vineyard Lodge II Residence Hall

Campus Map | 97


TRAVEL DIRECTIONS The CIA at Greystone is located 11⁄2–2 hours north of San Francisco in the heart of the Napa Valley. The college is 1⁄4 mile north of the town of St. Helena, at 2555 Main Street.

BY PLANE San Francisco, Oakland, and Sacramento International Airports are all within two hours of the CIA. St. Helena (and the Napa Valley region) is rather rural. We recommend that you make arrangements to rent a car if you are flying into the area. Directions from San Francisco International Airport Follow 101 North towards San Francisco, the Bay Bridge, and I-80 East (towards Sacramento). Cross the Bay Bridge and go approximately 30 miles to the Carquinez Bridge (toll required). After the bridge, get in the right lane for about 2 miles. Take the Highway 37/Columbus Parkway exit and bear left up the ramp. Go west approximately 2 miles and turn right onto Highway 29 to Napa. Head northwest on Highway 29 for approximately 30 miles. Highway 29 and Main Street are the same within the city limits of St. Helena. The CIA at Greystone is approximately 1⁄4 mile north of the town of St. Helena on the left. Directions from Oakland International Airport Follow Hegenberger Road to I-880 towards downtown Oakland. Go approximately 6 miles and bear right onto ramp for I-980 (California Highway 24, Walnut Creek). Turn right onto ramp for I-580 towards San Francisco. Bear to the left as I-580 turns into I-80 East (Sacramento). Travel towards and cross the Carquinez Bridge (toll required). After the bridge, get in the right lane for about 2 miles. Take the Highway 37/Columbus Park98 | Travel Directions

way exit and bear left up the ramp. Go west approximately 2 miles and turn right onto Highway 29 to Napa. Head northwest on Highway 29 for approximately 30 miles. Highway 29 and Main Street are the same within the city limits of St. Helena. The CIA at Greystone is approximately 1⁄4 mile north of the town of St. Helena on the left.

Directions from Sacramento International Airport Upon leaving the airport, take I-5 South towards Sacramento to Exit I-80 West towards SFO. Take I-80 through Fairfield, and bear right to exit at Highway 12 West (Napa and Sonoma). Drive Highway 12 West to Highway 29 and turn right. Travel north on Highway 29 for approximately 25 miles. Highway 29 and Main Street are the same within the city limits of St. Helena. The CIA at Greystone is approximately 1⁄4 mile north of the town of St. Helena on the left. BY CAR From San Francisco: Take 101 North through San Francisco to Highway 37. Take Highway 37 East for 7 miles to Highway 121. Take Highway 121 North, and then follow it to the east for 15 miles to Highway 29. Take Highway 29 North 19 miles to the CIA. The CIA is just 1⁄4 mile north of downtown St. Helena on the left side of the road. From East Bay Area: Take Highway 80 East to Highway 37. Take Highway 37 West for 2 miles to Highway 29. Take Highway 29 North 29 miles to the CIA. The CIA is just 1⁄4 mile north of downtown St. Helena on the left side of the road.


From Sacramento: Take Highway 80 West to Highway 12 (Napa exit) West (Highway 12 is 5 miles past Fairfield). Take Highway 12 West towards Napa for 15 miles to Highway 29. Take Highway 29 North 22 miles to the CIA. The CIA is just 1â &#x201E;4 mile north of downtown St. Helena on the left side of the road.

From Santa Rosa: Take 101 North to River Road/Guerneville (Calistoga exit). Turn right off freeway onto Mark West Springs Road and follow for 10 miles. Turn left onto Petrified Forest Road for 5 miles. Turn right onto Foothill Blvd, which will become Highway 29. Drive south on Highway 29 for 8 miles. After you pass Deer Park Road, the CIA will be on your right.

Area Map | 99


INDEX Academic Calendar, 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 ..........................4

Campus Climate, Statement on ........................91

Academic Freedom, Statement of....................58

Campus Environment ........................................95

Academic Honesty, Policy on ............................54

Campus, Greystone ..............................................8

Academic Policies ..............................................48

Campus Location................................................11

Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program ......................................................6, 64

Campus Map ......................................................96

Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program ......................................................6, 66

Campus Visits......................................................11

Accreditation ......................................................11 Administrative Withdrawal from a Class ........50 Admissions ..........................................................25 Admissions Process ............................................25 Aid Suspension Due to Drug Conviction..........39 Alcohol and Drugs ............................................93 Alumni Relations................................................24 Application Procedure, Accelerated Culinary Arts Certificate Program ................................27 Application Procedure, Accelerated Wine and Beverage Certificate Program ......................28

Campus Store and Marketplace........................10

Campuses, CIA ....................................................14 Career Opportunities ..........................................7 Career Services....................................................23 Certifications, Legend of ..................................89 Challenge Exams ................................................30 CIA Financial Aid Programs (ACAP)..................46 CIA Financial Aid Programs (AOS) ....................44 CIA Financial Aid Programs (AWBP) ................46 CIA-owned Housing ..........................................94 Clubs (Student Organizations)..........................16 Code of Conduct, Student ................................92

Application Procedure, AOS Degree Programs....................................25

Collaborative Degree Program ........................59

Application, Withdrawal of ..............................30

Commencement Awards ..................................57

Applying for Aid ................................................39

Complaint and Grievance Procedure ..............93

College Awards ..................................................13

Area Map ............................................................99

(Cornell) Collaborative Degree Program ........59

Articulation Agreements ..................................30

Continued Financial Aid Eligibility ..................40

Associate Degree Programs ..........................6, 60

Cost of Attendance ............................................39

Attendance, Policy on........................................48

Costing Practical Retake Policy ........................51

Attendance Seal ................................................58

Counseling, Personal..........................................15

Attending Classes with a Temporary Medical Condition ..........................50

Course Descriptions............................................69

Auditing Courses, Policy on ..............................56 Awards, College ................................................13 Awards, Commencement ..................................57

Course Makeup Policy ......................................50 Course Substitutions and Waivers ....................19 Credit Balances ..................................................37 Culinary and Baking Practical Retake Policy....51

Bakery CafĂŠ by illy, The......................................10

Culinary and Wine & Service Practical Retake Policy ..................................................51

Board, Meals ......................................................35

Curricula..............................................................60

Board of Trustees ..............................................79 Degree and Certificate Programs ....................60 Disability Services ..............................................17 100 | Index


Documentation Requirements..........................19

Learning Strategies ............................................16

Dress Code ..........................................................95

Leaves of Absence and Withdrawals................50

Dropping a Class ................................................50

Legend of Certifications ....................................89 Library ................................................................23

Educational Rights and Privacy Act ..................90

Location, Campus ..............................................11

Employment, On-campus ..................................23

Location of Information ....................................12

Externship, Prerequisites for ............................51 Makeup Policy, Course ......................................50 Faculty and Staff ................................................79

Map, Area ..........................................................99

Faculty, Alumni, and Host Mentor Programs ..21

Mealsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Board ....................................................35

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ......90

Mental Health Resources, Personal Counseling and................................15

Federal Loan Repayment Chart ........................42 Federal Financial Aid Programs ........................40 Fees That May Be Assessed................................35 Financial Aid ......................................................39

Gainful Employment Data ................................12 General Information ............................................6

Mentor Programs, Faculty, Alumni, and Externship Host ........................................21 Mission Statement ..............................................5

Nondiscrimination Statement ............................5 Not-for-Profit Statement ..................................11

Grading ..............................................................55 Grading Symbols ................................................55 Graduation Participation, Policy on ................57 Graduation Requirements (ACAP)....................65 Graduation Requirements (AOS)......................62 Graduation Requirements (AWBP) ..................67 Greystone Campus ..............................................8

On-campus Employment ..................................23

Part-Time and Overload Fees ............................35 Peer-to-Peer File Sharing ..................................22 Personal Counseling and Mental Health Resources ........................................................15 Policies ................................................................90 Prerequisites for Externship ..............................51

Harassment-Free Campus Statement ..............93 Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination Policy ..............................93 HEGIS Code ........................................................60 History ..................................................................7 Housing Accommodations ................................18

Prerequisites for Restaurant Courses................52 Prerequisite for Sophomore-Year Registration ....................................................52 Private Financial Aid Programs ........................47 Professional and Physical Resources ................11

Housing, CIA-owned..........................................94

Public Notice of Rights Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ..............90

How Need is Determined, Financial Aid ..........39

Public Operations ..............................................10

Incomplete Grades, Policy on............................56

Residence Hall Rates ..........................................34

Instructors ..........................................................81

Residence Halls ..................................................15

Insurance ............................................................16

Restaurant Courses, Prerequisites for ..............52

International Students ......................................32

Restaurant, Wine Spectator Greystone............10

Index | 101


Satisfactory Academic Progress, Policy on ......52 Sophomore-Year Registration, Prerequisite for................................................52 Special Events ....................................................10 Spice Islands Marketplace ................................10 Staff ....................................................................80 State Financial Aid Programs ............................44 Student Code of Conduct..................................92 Student Computer Lab ......................................22 Student Concerns ..............................................92 Student Eligibility Responsibility, Financial Aid ....................................................39 Student Handbook ............................................94 Student Life and Services ..................................15 Student Organizations ......................................16 Student Responsibility ......................................92 Student Tuition Recovery Fund ........................94 Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) Fee ......35 Substitutions and Waivers, Course ..................19

Technical Standards ....................................19, 29 Technology on Campus for Students ..............22 Testing Accommodations ..................................18 Transfer Credit....................................................30 Transfers Between Campuses, Policy for..........31 Travel Directions ................................................98 Trustees, Board of ..............................................79 Tuition and Fees ................................................34 Tuition and Fee Schedules ................................38 Tuition Installment Plan ....................................37 Tuition Payment Schedule ................................34 Tutoring Services ................................................17

Visa Requirements (AOS Degrees)....................32 Visa Requirements (Certificate Programs) ......33

Web-based Learning..........................................58 Wine Spectator Greystone Restaurant ............10 Withdrawal of Application ..............................30 Withdrawal Refunds..........................................35 102 | Index


NOTES


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NOTES


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FOR YOUR INFORMATION

BURSAR 845-451-1290 bursar@culinary.edu CAREER SERVICES 845-451-1275 707-967-2495 CONTINUING EDUCATION 1-800-888-7850 DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 845-451-1324 GREYSTONE STUDENT AFFAIRS MANAGER 707-967-2420

DVD AND VIDEO SALES 1-800-888-7850

WEBSITES www.ciachef.edu www.ciaprochef.com THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (MAIN CAMPUS) 1946 Campus Drive Hyde Park, NY 12538-1499 THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA AT GREYSTONE 2555 Main Street St. Helena, CA 94574 THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, SAN ANTONIO 312 Pearl Parkway, Building 2, Suite 2102 San Antonio, TX 78215 THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, SINGAPORE Block 31, Temasek Polytechnic 21 Tampines Avenue 1 Singapore 529757

LEARNING STRATEGIES CENTER 707-967-2406 (Greystone) 845-905-4638 (Hyde Park) 845-905-4639 (TTY/TDDY) The CIA at Greystone and the CIA San Antonio are branches of the CIA, Hyde Park, NY. The CIA Singapore is an additional campus.

The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone 2555 Main Street St. Helena, CA 94574

2012–2013 Academic Catalog

FINANCIAL AID 845-451-1243 (Hyde Park) 707-967-2510 (Greystone) financialaid@culinary.edu

RESTAURANT RESERVATIONS 707-967-1010 The Culinary Institute of America

ADMISSIONS 1-800-CULINARY (285-4627) 845-452-9430 707-967-2496 admissions@culinary.edu

CIA Academic Catalog 2012–2013 St. Helena, CA Campus


Greystone Academic Catalog 2012-2013