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Issue No 23

CHEWIN ‘T’ CUD VOLUNTEERS.

Sept 2002

Cudworth Amateurs Football Club — 1914-15

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Remembering Old Seppy When I was a girl of about 10 years old, I used to go to visit my Auntie Jane and Uncle Matt – their surname was Pickering, they had a daughter, Linda. What sticks in my memory, was the closeness off the people that lived in the rows of houses, my Aunt & Uncle lived on, Woodcock Terrace. I was always used to an outside toilet and bathroom so it was quite a novelty on my visits to get bathed on the hearth in a tin bath. I used to think how cosy it all was, wrapped in a warm towel at the front of a lovely coal fire, burning in a gleaming, black lead fireplace, because Auntie Jane took a lot of pride in keeping her little house, spick & span. Now going to the toilet was another thing, as the little Terrace houses, only had one door, you had to go round the row of houses, to get to the loo, not very nice on a cold dark winters night. But my Auntie or Uncle used to take us, and wait for us with the torch to show us the way. I remember that some men used to come and empty the toilets, and take away the ashes from the fires at the same time. Next door to my Auntie & Uncle, lived

Opencast The opencast mining has started. I did not welcome its forecasted coming, nor did I object to it. I am able to hear the drone of the machinery from my garden, but I am also able to hear the singing of the birds. If as predicted they have fled the opencast area, many appear to have flown only a couple of fields away.

Jack & Glady’s Pickering, Uncle Matts brother, they had two daughters, Pat & Janet. Another family I remember was, Mr & Mrs Goodison, they had a son Peter, and daughter Sandra, all the kids played together. I remember going to the shop half way up Sidcop Road, it was a beer-off shop, you could go and buy a pint of beer in a jug and she always had sweets, etc, on sale, by the way, the lady was called Madge Wright, she could put the fear into you, with just one look. Everybody knew her and she knew everybody too. It seems funny, but I used to say to my Aunty, I wouldn’t live here rent free, and low and behold, my husband Terry & I, bought a house known as, ‘Ervin’ nearly built on the same spot, years later in 1962, as the old Terrace known as Woodcock Terrace. To top it all Auntie Jane helped us to move in so you can imagine what she had to say! Joan Beazant. PS:- If anybody has any stories or photos of Sidcop Estate – please let us have them – photos once scanned will be returned. My garden now has a vast increase in visitors, and in some cases, when nesting, residents. The feeding stations and bird baths require filling more often. The newly painted gate is covered in droppings, and I have witnessed a group of sparrows eating most of the petals from a cluster of snow in summer flowers. But, what a joy to watch and listen. Sheila Bell – July 2002.

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Developments at the Cudworth Hotel Shafton Camera Club, to give them their full official title – Shafton and District Photographic Society, hold meetings every Thursday at the Cudworth Hotel. I’ve spent many a good night there. When you consider the Club has been operating for over 20 years, it still managers with ease to generate waves, no tidal waves of enthusiasm. Once or twice a year I usually give the members a talk on photography. To break the evening up I always take my guitar and sing them a few songs. Believe me when we’ve all had a few drinks the atmosphere is terrific with most of its members joining in. Although the Club can be great fun it is also a wonderful place to go and learn From Sam in Australia. My brother and sister-in-law put me on to your website. My name is Sam Joburns (a born and bred Cudworth Lad.) I used to live in Bloomfontein St after moving from Birkwood Avenuue. At the age of 15½ I joined the army, served 8 years in a variety of places including Northern Ireland twice, then in 1972 emigrated to Australia, where I remain to this day. October this year will be my second visit in 30 years and I'm thoroughly looking forward to it. The last time I visited in 1992, many historical events had or were taking place. I believe my old school had just been de-

about photography. Even though the standard of photography is extremely high, some members have won prestigious national competitions. Beginners are made welcome and encouraged to learn. Derrick Holstead the Club’s President is particularly good at making people feel at ease. Photographic competitions are run on a regular basis, and well organised and are designed to encourage creativity and technical knowledge. The feeling I get about the club is that it is more like a family. They tend to look after each other and often go on weekend breaks to places like the Dales to indulge in their hobbies. So, if you’re ever at a loose end on a Thursday night and fancy taking up photography, why not have a nip down to the Cudworth Hotel and tell them Ronnie sent you.

Ronnie Neville – Jun 2002. molished (Snydale Rd Secondary Modern) and on a sadder note the pits were being closed. The old saying was true of Grimethorpe thought, wasn't it - "THE BAND PLAYED ON." I'll never forget the first time the lads came to Sydney, I saw them in a shopping centre promoting their music. I wore my Barnsley away shirt and they all signed my copy of Brassed Off. Bob Archer even remembered my brother Pee Joburns. I then made a booking to see one of their memorable concerts in Newcastle, NSW, along with many other fellow British people. Brilliant, the hairs stood up on my skin.

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Pressgang in Barnsley Road? At a cold dark discreet hour, the winter of 1947 did its best and managed to be traditional, much as the month of January is supposed to be, cold and frosty. The easterly wind, making no secret of its intention had given to pavements and roads a treachery we all know as “black ice” an added threat to process of even heavier frost was small comfort when daylight filled promise. Walking held a fear for rash or unsure placing of feet giving nothing to ensure progress if you needed to be out of doors at unforgiving hours. It was reasonable, even sensible, to be abed! The Milk train from Leeds had arrived at Cudworth station a minute or two after four o’clock on such a morning, on time, in spite of climate. No-one had appeared to show interest in taking my ticket, I walked through the gateway onto the long dark lane which joined the main road at Cudworth railway bridge, near to where Mrs Emma Pimm’s old stone dwelling, to me as a schoolboy a sinister place, has stood then in a fork of the road, Lundwood to the left Monk Bretton to the right of her home. A tedious trek toward the old brickyard with it’s cranked and cracked brick chimney stack not a good proof of products made there, smoked and smouldered to join the pollution out of Cudworth Council gas works, thankfully both stood as did the railway station, at the boundary of the village. Street lighting was a soft glow from gas mantled lamps, little more than candlelight, created eerie shadows that evoked imagination of those cold stone blocks set more than a hundred years

before and remain part of the railway embankment to this day. Youth and physical fitness radiated from me, some months previously having been inducted into the Royal Air Force, I had benefited from vigorous active life the Services had accorded, made me capable of meeting any climate challenge though this icy night was poised to mar my weekend leave of absence. Travelling light proved an advantage for quite soon I was passing John Smith Memorial Church, close to this spot I was to meet a new challenge, from destiny. Not for my plot; to someone who needed my assistance at a strange encounter and was never to be seen, wittingly known even as “He or She”. At the old Council offices almost sliding into a frantic hurrier coming toward me carrying a torch and a heavy black case; this dashing sprinter drew nearer and close to me, grabbed my arm as a voice added “just the block I want”. It came from no less a figure than the much loved and respected, overworked district nurse cum-obstetric-miracle worker, Nurse Hughes. Literally, a lady with a lamp at once pressed me into her service to the as yet, “unborn”. Loaded with the black case, it became threat of a broken leg if one slipped under its load. Then came an executive order, “follow me”, daring to do no other than obey, I followed! At a long street we both readily knew, modern stars of electric wonder showed exactly where the lady of the black bag Continue story on page-5

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and her skill was needed to fulfil someone’s impending nativity. A very real situation I never thought of being concerned with, left me bewildered somewhat embarrassed, but unable to explain or think why. Waiting in that cold hallway thinking was I to be a shepherd or wise young man and see this event through, not daring to ask for dismissal and by now so curious to know the outcome of so unusual an occurrence but never to know, who or what had determined who should be in a certain place at a certain time, seemed so very mysterious. At so youthful a stage in my life, no thought had I given to a need to be happy about these natural events, there were too many diversions from complicated matters as these. Staying quite naïve until a new, healthy and intriguing interest in girls, took place some two years later at the point began my further education! My release from an extraordinary form of “active” service to life, brought thoughts of how magical this lady’s influence had been on that cold starry night, the myths we had eagerly heard about these

“curious new beginnings” brought out imaginative questions from small nosey children who would begin new lines as to how the new addition to the family had arrived. Stand-by answers, deliberate and quite misleading, varied from “under Gooseberry bush”, “Stork”, “under Rhubarb leaves” and purchased with Co-op checks from the milkman invariably, an urgent reply was Nurse Hughes had brought “it” in that Black Bag, innocent, easy responses to avoid what could not just then, be told to youngsters as simple truth. With this as hindsight can I give kind recall of a wonderful lady? To this day I never learned, never sought to know, if boy or girl had tilted the Earth that night and had made destinies collide so gently, then helped begin a new existence. A normal destined arrival at Cudworth Railway station, remarkably, began a day to remember!

Ron Gibson – July 02

CONTACTS.

BACK ISSUES

Should any reader wish to contact a contributor to the magazine, please write to the Chewin ‘T’ Cud Volunteers at Cudworth Employment Resource Centre, 2 Carlton Street, Cudworth, Barnsley S72 8ST and your request will be sent on to the person concerned. Any donations will be much appreciated to cover the cost of postage.

The demand for back issues of the ma ga zi n e, wh i l st bei n g ver y complimentary, is proving to be beyond our means both financially and time-wise. It is with regret therefore, that we must now say that we cannot supply any more than one back issue of the magazine to any one person.

J.Higgs — Treasurer.

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World War II – By Ben Siddons—2001—aged 15 In my history project on World War 2, I will be telling you about Eric's Job as my main category, and I will also be following up on the following: Evacuation, Family Effects, Bombing, and Environment. I have chosen to do my history project on my great grandad Eric Fineron. I chose my grandad because he was situated in the fire service and he can talk for hours on end so here I go. My first topic I am going to talk about is my grandad's job during the war: What service were you in, where were you stationed etc? At the start of the war Eric went to London to join the Metropolitan Police, which was a good job to be in. Out of the three hundred and seventy five people that applied, only thirty-seven of the people got the job. Eric was rejected because of his age; he had only just gone eighteen at the time and that was the minimum age to join the police. Eric was glad not have got the job after his ride into London. It was a terrible place with the bombing, as London is the capital city. So after that Eric was drafted into the fire service, where he was stationed at Cudworth fire station near Barnsley. Eric did most of his training inland but he went to many of the fishing ports which were bombed. During the war one of the most memorable places Eric was sent to Dartford in Kent when they were to prepare for an invasion which never took place, the Germans turned and then went to Russia. Eric hated the people of Kent and the people of Kent hated the Yorkshire people so they weren't on the fire service's side so this didn't help at all. Down in Kent Eric worked with the local people and the other two hundred firemen that were sent down from

Yorkshire. Eric was never bombed himself during the war, but one of the most sickening scenes he ever saw was one morning while some ladies were working in the field. There were eight of them, pulling beans for their tea when an aeroplane came down from the clouds, these eight ladies ducked but the plane machine-gunned at the women. It was a bald headed man, he shot a number of times but only three of the women were badly hit. When the plane had gone, Eric and some others went into the field to help the ladies and help get them to the hospital. Later on the plane was brought down by some of the English gunmen on the ground and the pilot was killed in the crash. One of the operation names for the attacks that Eric could remember was `Operation Sea Lion'. Many of the operation were named after animals. Evacuation: Were any of your family ever evacuated, was anybody ever evacuated to you? Name of Eric's family from Cudworth were ever evacuated because Cudworth and Barnsley weren't classed as danger areas as far as they new, and there was never any bombing or shooting in Cudworth or Barnsley. There were hundreds of people from London were evacuated to the Barnsley are and they stopped there for three years while the war was going. Family effects: Were your family effected, can you remember being re-united with your family after the war? The war had no effect on Eric's family bombing wise, as they weren't in a danger area of the war, but his family were effected mentally, they were always Story continues on page-7

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worrying about Eric as you can imagine, `is he alive, is he injured?' and those sort of questions. When Eric was re-united with the rest of his family they all threw a party for every one. In the local park there was a bonfire and fireworks, food and music, every one was glad to see their relatives.

Environment: Can you give me a description of what the environment was like and did it affect the way people felt? The environment was terrible, there was smoke all over, rubble on the streets and dirt everywhere, it was winter at the time and it was extremely cold, no one wanted to do anything.

Bombing: Do remember any major buildings or area's being bombed? Monkton Pit was one place that was bombed that he could remember. Sheffield iron works was another. Eric was called out to the fire at that one, when he was in Barnsley. He also told me about when the Bassets factory was bombed, everyone in the building grabbed a handful of sweets before running out, when my grandad went inside the factory he said there were sweets and cans and things flying all over the place. A large majority of places that were bombed were the main roads, these were bombed with the intention of stopping the emergency services from getting around. Something else that they did to the roads was taking all the signs down so the German troops didn't know where they were. During the bombing no one was aloud to talk. They had a motto they had to remember which he can still remember today:

Extra information on the war given to me by Eric: He hated the Germans, he was not a pacifist in the war, he wanted to get revenge on all the people that were involved on the German side. It was terrible he said, they just shot at the children and the women. When the war started no one had any idea how long it was going to last. The Germans just kept on coming, shooting and bombing. People didn't know how long the war went on for, they began to lose count of the days and months.

"Careless talk costs lives!" In the war one of the bombs they used was called a DoodleBug or sometimes called a Buzz Bomb. These bombs were filled with explosives and had a jet engine on the top. They were filled with just enough fuel to get to where they were going to be dropped. Then they would be launched off a ramp and off they went. When they were flying they made a buzzing noise, so when they stopped buzzing, 100's of feet in the air you had to take shelter, and down it would come.

After the war: After the war it was difficult for people to find jobs due to all the damage. When the war was over Eric went to see a number of people, one of them being the Prince of Wales and he also saw the richest man in England at the time but he couldn't remember his name. Summary In the interview I have learnt a lot of information about the war, behind the scenes of the fighting. In class we have done about the fighting side of the war but here I have learnt a bit about the fire service, some mottos and posters, and I have heard some interesting stories about the war from a person that has been able to say: ‘I’VE BEEN THERE, DONE THAT AND GOT THE T SHIRT’

Ben Siddons

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COMMITTEES O give me your pity, I'm on a committee Which means that from morning 'till night We attend and amend and contend and defend Without a conclusion in sight. We confer and concur, we defend and demur, And reiterate all of our thoughts. We revise the agenda with frequent addenda And consider a load of reports. We compose and propose, we support and oppose, And the points of procedure are fun. But though various notions are brought up as motions There's terribly little gets done. We resolve and absolve but never dissolve Since it's out of the question for us. What a shattering pity to end our committee, Where else could we make such a fuss.

Singing In The Rain This young lady, pictured at the 1972 Cudworth Youth Festival, still has the outgoing personality of her youth. When it rained heavily at a Jubilee barbecue, she did an impromptu version of Gene Kelly's, Singing In The Rain. She featured in the June edition of the magazine looking very demure at Buckingham Palace. Anyone know who? It is Wendy Bell MBE Why Are Fire Engines Red? Fire engines have 4 wheels and 8 firefighters, 4 plus 8 equals 12. There are 12 inches in a foot. A foot is a ruler. Queen Elizabeth is a ruler and the Queen Elizabeth is one of the largest ships on the seven seas. Seas have fish. Fish have fins. The Finns fought the Russians. The Russians are red. Fire engines are always rushin'. Therefore fire engines are usually

TO ROUND OFF THEIR STAY:- in CudTO ROUND OFF THEIR STAY:- in Cudto invited to were invited partywere youthparty Germanyouth theGerman worththe worth Modern Cudworth Modern the Cudworth dance atat the farewell dance a afarewell 1956 Schoolinin1956 School

Photograph and information supplied by Malcolm Pritchard cc

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The Old Splash — Lewis Reynolds. July 2002 My nephew, John Reynolds who now lives in Darfield, received a copy of Chewin 'T Cud from his sister Marion who lives in Sydney, Australia!! Until then I had never heard of Chewin 'T Cud, but what memories it brought back. The article about the 'Splash' and the picture of the lads swimming there reminded me of Curly Broadhurst, Dek Lonsdale, myself and a few others, together we were the founders of the 'New Splash' near Dearne Bridge. The old splash had silted up after a bad winter! You could paddle across what used to be at least six feet deep!! It took us over a week to discover a really deep part to dive and swim. We cleared it out over a week, one Alsatian dog and a stolen motorbike were dragged out!! We also had a football tournament, usually on the middle green, and as Mick Parkinson said once (or twice) they were the first floodlit matches. Kev Fitch had a decent sized ball and how Belliss's & Wilson's windows didn't get smashed in was a miracle. Parky's team were the 'Fish Shop Rovers.' Our Jack, alias 'Sippy Salt' led the Top Green team (Joyce Tay-

lor was their star winger) and Clacca Meigh ran the Bottom Greens for a while. When the council made us a playing field near the club, the teams combined and we would play teams from Bow St, Jackson St, Market St and Sidcup, real 'battle royals'!! Yes, they were happy times, we may not have had much money but we enjoyed ourselves. I think Cudworth Secondary Modern School must have been one of the happiest schools in the area. We had a school choir, drama group, swimming club, a school song 'Follow Up' and a good football team at one time. Billy Howarth, Jack Shepherd, Les Leadbetter and Jack Victory in goal. Some turned professional, some played for Barnsley Boys. Me, Charlie Merrill, Dek Lonsdale and Bill Taylor joined the army more or less together in 1953. Sam Mynett, my mate, joined the Guards a year later and spent most of his career at Buckingham Palace and Windsor on ceremonial duties. I could go on forever. Lewis Reynolds.

Development of Chewin ‘T’ Cud Web Site — Jane Atkinson – Aug 2002. I would like to draw our readers' attention to our website which was launched on the 31st May this year. It gives a 'taster' of what's actually in the current magazine. Our Chairman, Malc Pierrepont, who I’m sure a lot of you will know from Cudworth Employment Resource Centre (CERC), designed it. It was Malc's first attempt at creating a website and he's made a very good job of it! He has modified it a couple of times since

it was first launched on the Internet. At time of writing this website, has had 285 visitors. If any of our readers don't have access to the Internet and would like to visit our website they are quite welcome to use a computer at ‘CERC’ and also receive friendly help and advice if needed. It would be helpful to phone first or call in to make an appointment, as the classes can get quite busy.

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RECOLLECTIONS Chewin 'T' Cud Volunteers I was born in Cudworth in 1945 and lived at 35 The Grove for a long time. I joined the ATS when I was 17½, made me grow up fast. I was demobbed in 1946 and went to work as a shorthand typist at Monkton 1, 2, & 6. In those days I had to walk to work down Royston Lane, pass Shotties Island and down under the railway bridge over the fields to Royston, then up to the Colliery. Now to Issue 20 – The Girl Guides, I’m the one standing next to Miss Walker and the little girl with the fuzzy hat is Margery Armstrong. Going back to 1946/1947, in 1947 of course came nationalisation of the pits, I worked in an office overlooking the pit yard where ponies where pulling tubs and men had their meetings. In 1947, I was transferred to Grimethorpe Colliery, easier to get to. I had acquired a bike by that time, I earned £3 a week. When I got my first job on nationalisation it went up to £5. I met my future husband and married in 1948 and we had a daughter, Greta in 1949 and were living at 125 Barnsley Road. I have enclosed a photo of Greta at a school concert at Pontefract Road Juniors. We later moved to ‘The Gables’, Barnsley Road and from there to Bridlington in 1976/77. Because Jim was a

sick man and died in 1989, I moved to Harrogate in 1993 to be near Greta and Antonia, my granddaughter and pleased to say I am very happy there.

Pontefract Rd Junior School Approx 1960 Left to Right Susan Bondi. Margaret Turton. Greta Haigh. John Chamberlain. ??? Andrew Stothard I got sight of your magazine form Mrs Eva Seaman via Antonia my granddaughter. I still have an aunt at Cudworth, Mrs Sally Cooke, my mother’s youngest sister and keep in touch with her. I have enclosed a donation and hope you will be able to send me any future copies. Good luck in all you do. E Haigh – July 2002. Ed:- Thank you for your generous donation.

Congratulations To

Some of the names of the photo

Darren & Lisa Pierrepont On the birth of their daughter

Newtown Ladies Football Club

Emily Louise Born on 25/07/02

1926 Miners Strike — Issue 22 page-7 1. Ernest Blenkinsop’s Sister 2. Rodburn 3. Fawcett 4. Morrison Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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L IC EN S ED C AF E BA R Planning a Special Occasion? Talk to John and Shirley they will be pleased to help.

W h a te ve r The Oc c a si on G ib s on s Are The Be st Good food, good service and always a welcome

From Shirley John and Staff. 266 Barnsley Rd, Cudworth tel: 01226 780105

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Star Inn—Cudworth

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L·S·J Supermarket Darfield Road Cudworth For Large Variety Of

Groceries Beer

Wine

Spirits

tel % 01226 710462 Pontefract Road Infants School — 1930/31 Teacher Miss Lumber, later married became Mrs Sunderland

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CUDWORTH LOCAL HISTORY & HERITAGE GROUP CUDWORTH SECONDARY MODERN SCHOOL—1935 — BOYS DEPARTMENT Do you remember the school opening? plus the collection of bees, poultry and rabbits? Did you get a Jubilee pen on May 3 rd? 1935? What was it like? Have you still Did you ever make gloves etc. out of the got it? rabbit pelts? Do you remember listening to a radio broadcast at school describing the departure of the Queen Mary on her maiden voyage? King George V died on January 22 nd 1936. Did you go to the Pond to hear the Royal Proclamation on January 27 th? Did you pay 4d. to travel on Rowe's 'bus to see King George VI & Queen Elizabeth on the way to Barnsley on October 21 st. 1937? Were you at the school during the war years 1939 – 1945? Did you help to fill cardboard boxes with soil to protect parts of the school building from bomb damage? Some boys helped with these precautions at the Junior Mixed schools at Snydale Road and Pontefract Road. Do you remember the "Wartime Garden",

Were you in the School Cadet Force? Can you remember what you did at the Victory in Europe party at the school on May 11th? and the bonfire in the park at night? After the war, wood from the Air Raid Shelters was salvaged and used in Woodwork lessons. Did you make anything from the salvaged wood? Were you in the play "Toad of Toad Hall"? The stage curtains were made out of material from the decontamination centre. The costumes were made out of blackout curtains. Perhaps these questions will give you food for thought. If you have a story to tell about this period in your schooldays send it to Chewin 't' Cud at the Resource Centre, 2 Carlton Street or to the Local History & Heritage Group at the Library, Barnsley Road, Cudworth.

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Having just returned from a cruise to Norway, and seen the midnight sun, I thought that this prayer that I have acquired might be of some interest to those of you about to embark on your travels this summer. It has significance to all travellers, not just those on ships.

THE PASSENGER'S PRAYER Heavenly father, look down on us, Your humble, obedient passengers, who are doomed to travel the waterways and seas of this world, taking photographs, posting cards, and buying useless souvenirs. We beseech you, O Lord, to see that our plane is not hijacked, our luggage is not lost, and that oversized, overweight cabin bags go unnoticed. Protect us from surly and unscrupulous taxi drivers, avaricious porters, and unlicensed English-speaking guides in foreign places. Give us this day Divine guidance in the selection of our cruise ships and travel agents - so that we find our bookings and dining room reservations honoured, our cabins of generous proportions, that our luggage arrives before the first evening meal, and that our beds are made up. We pray that our telephones work, the operator (human or electrical) speaks our tongue, and that there are no calls from our children forcing us to abandon our cruise early. Lead us, dear Lord, to good, inexpensive restaurants in the world ashore, where the food is superb, the waiters friendly, and the wine included in the price of the meal. Grant us the strength to take excursions, to visit the museums; cathedrals; spice stalls, and gift shops listed in the guide books. And if on the return journey we slip into

slumber, have mercy on us, for our flesh is weak, hot and tired. Give us the wisdom to tip correctly at the end of the holiday. Forgive us for undertipping out of ignorance, and over-tipping out of fear. Please make the staff love us for what we are and not for what we can contribute to their worldly goods or comment sheets. Dear God, keep our wives from shopping sprees and protect them from bargains they do not need or cannot afford. Lead them not into temptation in the Duty Free shops of the world, for they know not what they do. Almighty Father, keep our husbands from looking at foreign women and comparing them to us. Save them from making fools of themselves in cafes and nightclubs. Above all, please do not forgive them their trespasses for they know exactly what they do. And when our trip is over and we return home to our loved ones, grant us the favour of finding someone who will look at our home videos and listen to our stories, so our lives as tourists will not have been in vain. This we ask you in the name of our chosen cruise line, tour operator and travel agent, in the name of American Express, Visa, Mastercard, and our banks. Amen

THANKS YET AGAIN To all our readers who have so generously donated money to the magazine during the last three months. It doesn't matter how small or large the donation they are all invaluable to us. Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Does anyone out there have any memories of Mr Stan Brazier - former Headmaster of Snydale Road Junior School? Dear Volunteers I remember my mother saying Mr Brazier was a teacher at the school when she was a girl. It is good to know he climbed the ladder, as he had a good knowledge of the school and what the pupils needed. Looking back, as a former pupil, Mr Brazier was a good headmaster, very fair, encouraged a variety of learning skills and seemed to have a punishment system that worked. I was told a cane was present in his office but I never saw it and I'm not sure it was ever needed.

shows, Friday night concerts, jumble sales - all over and above the school curriculum. We did two Christmas pantomimes that I remember - "The Pied Piper of Hamlyn" and "Widdecombe Fair". Sport was a subject we were all encouraged to take part in. Not being a 'sporty' person I hold certificates from Sports Days for winning the egg and spoon races and skipping. Our Sports Days were held on the cricket field where the Hyman Stadium is now. We even had fancy dress for the not too competitive minded. (Great fun).

As children at Snydale Road, good manners were encouraged. Girls were taught to be ladylike, the boys more like little gentlemen. Bad behaviour was stamped on immediately by all the staff. "Courtesy" badges were given out in assembly as rewards to polite and helpful pupils.

There were times when Mr Brazier scared me to death, but there were also times when I found him very entertaining. For instance when he was reciting poems which he knew by heart. They were usually very funny. However, "Jaberwocky" used to fill me with awe! I'm sure it was the way he told it!

Under his guidance we had opportunities to be involved in many types of activity not just the 3 Rs. I remember the Thursday Clubs where we could learn different types of crafts such as weaving, fabric printing, art, potato printing and so on.

If a teacher was absent, he would take their class. I remember Mr Brazier teaching our class arithmetic on a couple of occasions and I used to think he had ways of making numbers and arithmetic fun, which for me was so much better as I thought it a chore. I only came across one other maths teacher who made the subject easy and that was after I'd struggled for years and was ready to leave school!

Music was a strong subject at Snydale Road, and hymn practise every week was a must. Sometimes the whole school was in the hall singing their heads off in hymn practise. We also had small singing classes in that amazing hall, and learned some quite quirky songs which I still sing today. I remember needlework, country dancing, cricket, football, netball, rounders, film

Has anyone else any memories of this exceptional teacher?

Yours sincerely Patricia Allman

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Darfield Road Mother & Toddler Group Meets every Monday and Thursday 9:30-11:30 At Darfield Road Community Centre We have been awarded £1000 for toddlers play equipment by

Voluntary Action Barnsley Please come along for a chat We have summer trips and party’s Paintings — Colouring — Sand & Water Pit — Story Time — Play Doh Climbing Caterpillar — Trampoline — Sticky Pictures — Play Kitchen Plus many more activities

Anyone is more than welcome to come. Tea, Coffee. Soft drinks, Toast, Sweets

St John The Baptist. Parish Church. Cudworth Here at St John’s we have been very privile ge d to atte nd two Ordinations. On Sunday 30th June, we went to Wakefield Cathedral for the Ordination of our new Curate Father Michael Carpenter by Bishop Jarrett. Then on Thursday 4th July we went to Holbrooks, Coventry to attend the Ordination of Father Philip Calvent by the Bishop of Ebbsfleet. It is so good to witness young men dedicating their lives to God’s work. Both these two were of special interest to us, because we were so happy that Father Michael was to

come to live and work in our Community, and Father Philip, because he was formerly a member of our Congregation. We constantly pray for more Vocations to the Priesthood. Our prayers, have really been answered, in these two new Deacons. Why not come along to St John’s and see our new Deacon Father Michael, you will always be assured of a warm welcome. Love & Prayers from us all. Sincerely

Monica Street

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24 1. 2.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11. 12.

13.

Quiz

Which country scored the first goal in the 2002 World Cup competition? After how many years marriage do you celebrate your Pearl wedding anniversary? What was Elvis Presley’s middle name? Add together a gross, a score, and a baker’s dozen and give the total? With which song did Abba have their first No 1 hit in Britain? Which comedian had the catchphrase ‘Hello My Darlings’? Who was the first wife of King Henry VIII? How many times did Lester Piggott win the Derby? What is the name of the second book in the Bible? Brothers Brian, Carl and Dennis Wilson were all members of which pop group? In Charles Dickens’s book ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ what were the two Cities? In which city did the notorious murderers and grave robbers Burke and Hare operate? Where in the human body would you

ABOUT

THIS

The magazine is issued every three months free of charge, it has proved to be very popular. If you have enjoyed reading this magazine and would like to have something included in the next one (Dec 2002), articles, news, events, suggestions please write it out, it doesn’t matter what it is written on or how it is written and drop it in at the:Chewin ‘T’ Cud Volunteers Cudworth Employment Resource Centre 2 Carlton Street Cudworth. S72 8ST

Q u est i o n s 14. 15.

16. 17. 18. 19.

20. 21. 22.

find the Mallet, Anvil, and Stirrup bones? Which is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea? Archibald Leach was a famous actor and film star. By what name was he better known? Which singer was nicknamed ‘The Old Groaner’? Who wrote the novels ‘Kidnapped’ and ‘Treasure Island’? Which football team play their home matches at St Mary’s stadium? In horseracing, what term is used to describe a horse that has not yet won a race? What relation to you is your mother’s mother’s mother’s mother? Which state in the USA has the largest population? In comics, films, and TV Clark Kent

(alias Superman) worked as a reporter for which newspaper? 23. What was the name of the pop group singer Elvis Costello’s backing group? 24. What was Mrs David Beckham’s maiden name? Answers on page-20

MA GAZINE The Committee have to find the money to finance the cost of the magazine and rely on advertising to bring some of that money in, if you would like to advertise let us know, the cost is:

Full Page £20 (Each Issue) 4 prebooked will cost £70 Half Page £13 (Each Issue) 4 prebooked will cost £45 Qtr Page £10 (Each Issue) 4 prebooked will cost £35

CONTACT THE COMMITTEE

We the Chewin `T` Cud Volunteers gratefully acknowledge the award of a grant from the National Lottery Charities Board which is helping with the cost of this magazine. Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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B a rn sl ey Rd, C u dw or th

Weddings and Buffets Catered For TAKE AWAY READY FOOD CAKES

COOKED MEATS

SOFT DRINKS

SANDWICHES

PH ON E O RD ER S TAKE N

TEL (01226) 713877 W E A R E P L E AS E D T O B E A S S OC I AT E D W I T H T H E C UDW O RT H & W E S T G R E E N C O M MU NI T Y P ART NE RS HIP

Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Did you know that Old Folks are worth a fortune? Silver in their hair, gold in their teeth, stones in their kidneys, lead in their feet and lots of gas in their stomachs. I have become older and wiser since I saw you last, and a few changes have come into my life. Frankly, I have become a frivolous old girl and I am seeing six gentlemen every day. As soon as I wake up, WILL POWER helps me out of bed; then I have to visit JOHN, then it is time for MR. TETLEY, or my other friend - just call him by his initials PG. Then comes someone I do not like at all, ARTHUR RITUS. He knows he is not welcome, but he insists; and what is more,

he stays for the rest of the day. He does not like to stay in one place, so he takes me from joint to joint. After such a day I am really tired and go to bed gladly with JOHNNY WALKER. What a hectic life!!! Oh yes, I am now flirting with AL ZEIMER. The priest called the other day and said that at my age I should be thinking of the Hereafter. I told him, "Oh I do all the time. No matter where I am, the bedroom, kitchen, sitting room, or even in the garden, I stop and ask myself, `Now, what am I HERE AFTER?"' Scarborough—1956

Unusual Paragraph What is so unusual about this paragraph? Allowing for its poor grammar! -o-0-o-

Walking through Cudworth last Thursday morning, I ran into an old school chum – Jack, who is now living in Royston, his dad who I also know was with him. Alas, both Jack and his dad didn’t know who I was! -o-0-o-

There are 156 letters in the paragraph – but NOT the letter E (The most commonly used letter in the English language). Mr Neville – July 2002. ANSWERS 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Senegal (beat France 1-0 in the opening match) 30 Years Aaron 177 (144+20+13) Waterloo Charlie Drake Catherine Of Aragon 9 times

TO 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

QUIZ

ON

Exodus The Beach Boy London and Paris Edinburgh In the ear Sicily Cary Grant Bing Crosby Robert Louis Stephenson

Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002

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18. Southampton 19. A Maiden 20. Your Great Great Grandmother 21. California 22. The Daily Planet 23. The Attractions 24. Victoria Adams Questions and Answers Supplied by Bob Allison


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S p e c i a l M om e n t s Your

F r u it e re r & Flo r ist F r e sh F ru it & Ve ge t a bl e s Da il y

H ome de l i ve r y Se r vi ce F lo ra l A r ran gem ent for any oc ca s ion

P r ovi din g d eli ver ies Lo ca l F REE Tel e No : ( 0 12 2 6) 71 7 2 9 9 2 5 4 Barnsl e y Ro ad Cu dwo rt h S7 2 8 S S

The Jubilee Party Joyce & Ann (nee Hall) – July 2002. We would like to let the Cud-worthians know about a party we attended at Belle Green Court Nursing Home, where our Mother Ann, is a resident. It’s built on the site where the old Village Club used to be. I am still visiting from Australia, and the party was one of the best I have ever been to, the lovely staff did a wonderful job and all the food was prepared, by the cook at Belle Green. It was excellent, everybody enjoyed themselves, plus they had great entertainment, with all the old time singing and keyboard preformed by Roy & Terry. The Nursing staff and carers did everything possible to make it an enjoyable day for everyone. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts to everyone concerned

Reunion Dear Chewin 'T Cud, I want to thank you very much for putting my husband and myself back in touch with our long lost friends, Betty and Norman Chapman in South Africa, who we hadn't seen or heard of in 30 years. I met my husband, Ronald, at my friend Betty's in Bradford while he was visiting his old army chum Norman. We met in late Nov. 1959 and were married in March 1960, that was 42 years ago! Anyway you bringing us in touch again has resulted in my taking a trip to South Africa to visit them early in July, it will be lovely to see them both again after all these years. Thanks Ed.!!

Yours Robina Dix, Cudworth.

Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Life in the Trenches – By Ronald Parton Served in the British Army from 06/01/1944 to 26/09/1945 with 18 platoon 'A' Coy, 4th Batt. Wiltshire Regiment (After service in K.O.Y.L.I.) W. Yorks. Took part, in the Normandy Landings during the Allied Invasion of Europe in June 1944. Wounded in action 12/11/1944 during the Allied advance into Germany The following is a short account from ‘The Fighting Wessex Wyverns’ (Patrick Delaforce), of just one action Ron took part in. On 4th October 1944 Sgt F. A. Eyers, commanding 18 Platoon, ‘A’ Coy, 4 th Wiltshires earned the DCM. With ten men he attached a large burnt-out house, about 50yds ahead, and after a desperate struggle, brought in 98 prisoners, including 4 officers. Since 29 th September the battalion had lost 18 killed-in-action and 52 wounded. The following from a local newspaper account:Fine work by a Salisbury Sergent and 9 men of his Platoon, including Pte. R. Parton of Cudworth, recently led to the capture of nearly 100 Germans during particularly difficult fighting in Holland. A West Country Company of a British Division with which Sgt. F. Eyers MM. of Salisbury, is serving, was detailed to hold a line running along a railway embankment. For three days the company held on against considerable enemy opposition, with Germans infiltrating in their positions in some strength. During the whole of this time our men were subjected to some of the worst shelling they had experienced, while direct enemy observation made

movement impossible. Houses and woods in the area were on fire and the position extremely difficult. Fighting throughout was close range, with the Germans digging themselves in on the other side of the railway embankment. "We couldn’t sleep at night as the Germans were so close, they were less than 100yds away," said Sgt. Eyers. "On the 3rd morning I was called in to Company H.Q. and received orders to attack the Germans in a house and the area around. It was just as well as we had no rations." It had been impossible to get rations up with the Germans watching every movement. In order to get back to his Coy. HQ, Sgt Eyers had risked crawling along a bank which no-one else had succeeded in reaching without drawing fire and becoming casualties. "I went into the attack with nine men" said Sgt. Eyers. "A German fired a Spandau machine-gun at us as we moved forward. I threw a grenade which pitched outside the machine-gunners trench and then three of our shells hit the house in which where the Germans was”. The combined effect of the accurate artillery fire and the determination with which Sgt. Eyers and his men went into the attack resulted in a great superior number of Germans being forced to surrender. They were lying down in their slit trenches pretending to be dead and we had to force some of them out.

Ronald Parton. We would like to thank Ronald, for his generous donation.

Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Ladies Football Team – 1926 Looking at the photo of Newtown Ladies Football Team (Jun 2002 - Issue 22, page7) brought back memories for my husband, Raymond Handley.

By Carol Handley

Monk Bretton Ladies in the 1926 strike. His Mother and Auntie Eveline are on the front row left hand side. Their names are, Eveline Wilson and Nellie Handley. They played for loaves of bread while the strike was on. Our daughter, Denise Handley still has the football shirt her Grandma played in. Raymond says his dad met Nellie at that football match and soon after were married. They lived at Snydale Road. Aunt Eveline married Joe Wilson who was known as the fish man and whose son, Alan has Wilson’s Motors on Barnsley Road.

The football team in the photo played

Carol Handley — July 2002

RECOLLECTIONS By chance, I was given a copy of (Chewin T Cud) which I found fascinating and this prompted me to reminisce about some aspects of life in the 1940's at Snydale Road School. I remember the daily trek from Darfield Road which ended going up 'Gandy Backs` and calling at Wigleys shop for a halfpenny tie of liquorice root. I recall with fondness the Junior Head, Mr Douglas, and Mrs Sinclair who used to send me every Tuesday for her Potted Meat from Johnny Walkers butchers. Then there was Mrs Ferguson who used to teach us country dancing (music supplied by an ancient gramophone, 1 play = 1

needle). Miss Olga Lee who I recall taught us `double writing' and Mr Allsop, back from the war, who took us for P.T. I also remember going to school each day during the summer holidays to collect a bottle of milk each. Anyway, keep up your good work putting the magazine together. I am sure it will serve to remind others about, the best days of our lives'! George Merry (Now living in Cheshire, but enjoys frequent visits back to his roots).!!! Ed:- Thank you for your generous donation..

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CUD WOR TH EMPLOYMENT RESOUR CE CEN TRE 2 Ca rlto n S tree t, C udw o rth, Ba rns le y. S. Yo rks . S72 8 ST T e l (0 12 26 ) 7 150 19 /780 70 8 F a x:- (0 12 26 ) 715 574

JO BSEARCH FREE SERVICES ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯

Individual advice. Guidance and practical support. A professional CV. Help with application forms or letters. Stationery and postage. Use of telephone. Access to jobs via Internet. ‘Worktrain’, Employment Services, Local Authorities. Photocopying, Faxing and e-mailing. Local Newspaper Vacancies. Computer packages, ‘Adult Directions’, ‘Careerscape’, ‘Funderfinder’ I n t e r a c t i v e I n t e r v i e w s k i lls a n d p r e p a r a t io n . L e a r n d ir e c t e n r o l m e n t . C h a l le n g e s & C h o ic es A c c r ed it a t io n .

Either call in, telephone (01226) 780708, Fax (01226) 715574 or:- e-mail malcolm.houston@barnsley.org OPENING HOURS:- MON—FRI. 9:30am—12:30pm & 1:00pm—4:00pm Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Cromwell’s Clump — Ronald Dix (Dixie) – July 2002. It all began for me in 1972 when metal detecting was in its infancy. I saw an advert for a metal detector called a "QTone". I sent off for it, and when it was unpacked it looked just like a walking stick with a loop on the end, a flimsy thing indeed. The next step was to decide where to go. Thinking back to my history lessons at Cudworth Modern, I decided to visit the site of the battle of Marston Moor. I decided to make it a family trip, with my wife putting up a lovely pile of sandwiches, a big thermos and a load of chocolate biscuits. We set off in my old car, and arrived at 11:00am. I surveyed the fields before me and noticed a hill some way back from the battlefield. On the map this was called "Cromwells Clump". It was used as an observation post by Cromwell, to C HE W I N

‘ T ’ CU D V O LU NTE E R S

Chairman. Malcolm Pierrepont Hon. Secretary. Anne Higgs. Hon. Treasurer. John Higgs Events Co-ordinator Jane Atkinson The views and opinions expressed in this Magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishing Committee. Charges for small Community Groups With publication costs soaring and Chewin ‘T’ Cud costing £480 per quarter to produce, money which has to be found by the Volunteers, it has now become necessary for us to make a small charge to community groups which are run as a business.

direct the battle. This would be an ideal place to start. It was a scorching day, and after struggling through tall nettles and grass, I arrived at the top with a great sweat on. I switched on my machine and nothing happened. No matter what I did, I could not tempt it to work. So incensed was I, that I raised the detector high in the air and brought it down at great speed to the ground. Then I had several pieces of metal detector! Not wishing to litter the area, I took it home and put it in the dustbin. Thus ended my first expedition. I wrote this in response to the appeal by staff of "Chewin' Cud" for people to help fill this topping mag. I have many funny stories to tell about detecting, perhaps I will tell them later. Come on you ex Cudworth Modern wallah's you did comprehension at school, support this mag. Chewin ‘T’ Cud Volunteers are an entirely independent group and they and Chewin ‘T’ Cud magazine are not affiliated in any way with any other organisation either locally or nationally. Chewin ‘T’ Cud Volunteers hold the copyright on Chewin ‘T’ Cud Magazine. The Editor of Chewin ‘T’ Cud Magazine reserves the right to edit any material submitted for publishing in Chewin ‘T’ Cud. Can you please have any articles or advertising reach us by 31st Oct 2002 for Dec 2002 issue. Thank you.

To All Church And Community Groups May we remind you that we are always happy to print church or community news, events etc., all we ask is that you restrict your news to no more than half a page.

Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


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Ladies and Gents Hairstylists 254B Barnsley Road Cudworth

Tel:- 01226 717272 Perms Colours Highlights Cutting To The Highest Standard Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002


CU D W ORT H E M P L OY M E N T RE SOU RCE CE N T RE 2 Ca rl to n S t re e t, C u dwo rt h , B a rns le y. S 7 2 8 S T. OUR REGULAR TIMETABLE OF COURSES AND SERVICES WILL CONTINUE IN Oct 2002 WITH THE FOLLOWING ADDITIONS

Learndirect Cudworth Employment Resource Centre Is now a registered Learndirect Access Point.

Learning by computer - Learndirect, a nationwide initiative, offers a wide range of online learning opportunities including the following categories: Basic, Intermediate & Advanced Computing, Word Processing, Database, Spreadsheets, Internet, Web Publishing, Electronic Paper Computer Courses linked to European Computer Driving Licence Reading, Writing & Working With Numbers Business Management Courses - and much more BROADBAND - The Resource Centre now has Broadband ICT connectivity to the building, providing speedier connection to the Internet – fast, effective, efficient. TRY OUR IMPROVED INTERNET SERVICES - whether you’re new to Learndirect or have tried it before call in, find out more about our improved services, enrol and start learning. Learndirect Computer courses & Basic Skills Courses are free of charge. LEARNDIRECT - Free access to and use of Learndirect computers at times to suit learners. Varing study periods 10 minutes, an hour, 2 hours – flexible to fit in with the needs of learners and the Centre. You can undertake your learning in the Resource Centre or at home, work or anywhere with Internet access.

We enrol all year round - interested? or need more details phone on (01226) 715019 - or - call into the centre and speak to our friendly staff Courses are free of charge.

Chewin t Cud - Issue No 23 - Sept 2002

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Chewin t Cud - September 2002 Issue