Page 1

10 LIFESTYLES

Toy Story 3 a worthy sequel

Thursday, July 1, 2010

13 SPORTS

Ingram wins SEC athletic award

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Vol. 117, Issue 5

Library receives historical collection By Jaley Cranford Contributing Writer

On Monday, the University’s libraries received the largest donation in their history, Dean of Libraries Louis Pitschmann said. Pitschmann accepted the A.S. Williams III Collection of History and Culture of the South in Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library alongside University President Robert Witt. A.S. Williams III, a UA alumnus, donated more than 20,000 books and 12,000 photographs, which have been appraised at $12 million, Pitschmann said. “The real importance of the collection is not the monetary

value but instead the size and potential for scholarly research and moving the University of Alabama forward,” he said. Williams, a Eufaula native, graduated from the University in 1958 and has spent more than 40 years collecting manuscripts, books and photographs of Americana. What makes his collection rare, Pitschmann said, is his collection of items pertaining to Southern history. The Williams Collection includes some 3,000 works of Southern fiction, including many first editions, limited editions, manuscripts and signed copies. The collected works, currently in 1,500 boxes, will move into the third floor of

Gorgas and be open to the public in October, Pitschmann said, meaning students will have access to resources that have never been studied. More than 4,000 images in the collection are the work of Southern photographers from 2,500 different studios, Pitschmann said, and it also contains unpublished letters, diaries and documents written by Alabamians dating back to 1820. Matt Blumenfeld, a senior majoring in political science, said benefactors like Williams give students at the University opportunities to better themselves as researchers. “This collection will enrich the research of many under-

The Tuscaloosa County Park and Recreation will continue its annual July Jubilee on July 4 at Sokol Park. The event is a familyoriented patriotic celebration that is open to the public. July Jubilee will feature live music, food and fireworks choreographed to music. It will also feature old-fashioned games and an array of activities for children. Live music will be housed in the Jenkins Multi-Purpose Arena located just south of Sokol Park. Tuscaloosa’s own Eat My Beats will perform along with the Alabama Blues Project. The music will begin at 7 p.m. West Alabama’s largest fireworks display will begin at 9 p.m. The fireworks display is choreographed to patriotic music and will be viewable across northern Tuscaloosa. Children’s activities and family-oriented games will take place from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The activities will include carnival-style games, an ice cream eating contest and old-fashioned potato sack races, as well as several climbing walls and bounce houses. These

IF YOU GO ... • What: July Jubilee • Where: Sokol Park • When: 6 p.m. • Cost: Free activities will take place in the Jenkins Arena. Last year’s turnout was higher than expected, which caused trouble for many of those who attended. Most frustration stemmed from major traffic issues as well as extremely long concession lines. Blair Plott, director of community relations for Tuscaloosa County Park and Recreation, said PARA and police officials are hoping to make this year’s Jubilee more accessible and manageable for those who attend. “This year we have a totally different setup for vendors and we hope the community will enjoy the quantity and the variety of vendors,” Plott said. “Also, we’ve been working closely with the Tuscaloosa Police Department to relieve some of the traffic issues. “Additionally, Clear Channel radio will also be

See EVENT, page 2

Greeks prepare for recruitment By Katherine Martin Contributing Writer Fall recruitment is just around the corner and fraternities and sororities are gearing up for what could be the largest recruitment season greek life has ever seen. Gentry McCreary, director of Greek Affairs, said he anticipates between 1,600 and 1,700 women and around 1,000 men will participate in recruitment this fall. Last year, more than 1,490 women and 900 men le this

See RECRUITMENT, page 2

UA landmark to be demolished due to high maintenance costs By Jaley Cranford Contributing Writer

The structure has been part of the Capstone since 1967, but University officials decided in Demolition of the 240-ft. February that the smokestack Central Plant Smokestack behind needed to be demolished to cut B.B. Comer Hall began June 1 and mounting upkeep costs. “The smokestack requires a is set to be finished by the end of July, Assistant Vice President for lot of maintenance to keep it up, and it is nonfunctional,” Leopard Construction Tim Leopard said.

By Ethan Summers Contributing Writer If you’ve ever wondered why you have to buy the expensive new edition of a textbook instead of a much cheaper older version, your professors will be able to tell you beginning today. A provision of the Higher Education Opportunity Act will require publishers to provide in-depth textbook content and pricing information to faculty when they are selecting content from the publisher, according to a

p

Please ec

r

• er

said. “We felt like it was better to spend that money eliminating a maintenance problem and save the University money long term.” The project will cost about $225,000, but according to The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees documents, the University will save $85,000

every five to 10 years in scheduled maintenance and $125,000 in deferred maintenance. Since demolition began, the structure is down to 190 feet. “Two methods are being used in this demolition,” Leopard said.

See SMOKESTACK, page 2

New law requires notation of textbook changes

release by the Student Press Law Center. The act requires that publishers include, in writing, the prices of bundled and unbunPublishers must provide: edition dled texts, descriptions of content changes changes, price for bundled versions between editions, prices and availabilities of other formats of the texts, copyright dates for and most recent three copyright years the most recent three editions and the price of the textbook in question. Whitney Durham, a junior majoring in somebody advocated for the students in relasocial work, said she supported the act’s tion to how expensive all our books are.” Some faculty on campus said they’ve goals. “I think that the law couldn’t have come at a better time,” Durham said. “It’s about time See TEXTBOOKS, page 2

FAST FACTS

INSIDE today’s paper

er •

Plea s

yc rec

joined a sorority or fraternity at the University, McCreary said. “To my knowledge, we had the largest number of women pledge to sororities after formal recruitment,” McCreary said. “I know of only one school, Indiana, that had more participate in the recruitment process.” According to the University’s greek life website, sorority recruitment will begin on Sunday, Aug. 8 with

Submitted photos | Rachel Dobson The photos above show the slow demolition of the B.B. Comer smokestack over the last several weeks.

ap

e

See COLLECTION, page 2

CW | Jerrod Seaton Library patrons observe two interesting pieces recently donated to the University: a check made out by President Reagan to support the Democratic Party and paperwork signed by George Washington.

Farewell, smokestack

City to hold July 4th event By Charles Scarborough Staff Reporter cjscarborough@crimson. ua.edu

graduate and graduate students interested in the history of the South and the culture representative of this region,” he said. Williams said the occasion was bittersweet. After looking for a way to keep the extensive collection together, he said, the University of Alabama seemed an opportune place. “I am very pleased that it will stay here in Tuscaloosa and be held together,” he said. “This is just ideal to me, that it can be in Tuscaloosa and be a part of the University of Alabama.” Witt reiterated the significance the donation will have for students.

P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-4116 | Advertising: 348-7845 | Classifieds: 348-7355 Letters, op-eds: letters@cw.ua.edu Press releases, announcements: news@cw.ua.edu

Briefs ........................2

Sports ..................... 12

Opinions ...................4

Puzzles.................... 15

Lifestyles.................. 10

Classifieds ............... 15

WEATHER today Isolated Friday 88º/72º Thunderstorms Partly Cloudy

90º/71º

ycle

this pa

p


ON THE GO

University holiday

• Victor Luckerson, editor-inchief, editor@cw.ua.edu • Ben Culpepper, online production editor • Hannah Mask, news editor, hannah.r.mask@gmail.com • Kelsey Stein, lifestyles editor • Laura Owens, sports editor • Tray Smith, opinions editor • Adam Greene, chief copy editor • Hannah Lewis, design editor • Brian Pohuski, graphics editor • Jerrod Seaton, photo editor • Jon Lunceford, web editor • Marion Steinberg, community manager • Paul Thompson, staff development manager

ADVERTISING • Dana Andrzejewski, Advertising Manager, 348-8995, cwadmanager@gmail.com • Drew Gunn, Advertising Coordinator, 348-8044 • Hallett Ogburn, Territory Manager, 348-2598

Sidewalk closure The sidewalk between Lloyd Hall and Smith Hall has closed for replacement and will reopen July 6.

Alumnus receives employer recognition award from UA

What: The 25th Annual

Chris J. “CJ” Searcy, Jr., a junior mechanical engineering student at The University of Alabama, recently received the American Council of Engineering Companies’ Small Firm Council Scholarship, worth $5,000. Searcy, from Selma, was nominated for an ACEC General Scholarship by the ACEC of Alabama. As one of three national winners selected for general scholarships, Searcy’s application was reviewed based on cumulative grade point average, an essay, work experience, recommendation letters and extracurricular college activities.

Where: Gulf Shores, AL When: 8 -10 p.m.

Continued from page 1

“Right now [the construction workers] are literally demolishing it with air hammers, and once the building gets down to 90 feet, we will remove the men and the scaffold and use a hydraulic excavator.” John Lyles, a University alumnus, set up a Facebook group called “Remember the Smokestack!” “I created the group because people should know and care about what is happening on and to their campus,” Lyles said. The University is a home for many students, Lyles said, and they should monitor changes to its infrastructure. While the group stands as a way of remembering the smokestack, it also acts as a way to make students more

aware of decisions UA administrators make that may affect them. “It brought character to the campus, and with its removal, we lose a little bit of what makes our campus unique,” Lyles said. For many students, the smokestack has become a campus landmark, Jenna Tidwell, a junior majoring in French and English, said. “My first day of class here at UA, that smokestack helped me find my class,” she said. “Obviously, students will find their way around campus without it, but it is just sad to lose something of historic value on this campus.” Shan Nazeer, a junior majoring in finance, said the demolition of the smokestack is something he is against. “I feel like the University of Alabama is built on tradition, and we should keep it that way,” he said.

LARGE

• Brittany Key, Zone 4, 348-8054

PIZZA

• Robert Clark, Zone 5, 348-2670 • Emily Richards, Zone 6, 3486876 • Amy Ramsey, Zone 7, 348-8742

organization Homegrown Alabama will host its weekly farmer’s market.

Engineering student receives national scholarship

faculty placing a copy of the text on reserve at the library,” said Victoria Peeples, an assistant professor of human development and family studies. Peeples added that she thought there are plenty of options for formats for students who are looking to keep costs down, including hardcovers, binder-ready and e-books. “In addition, there is a new

• Rebecca Tiarsmith, Zone 8, 3486875 • Caleb Hall, Creative Services Manager, 348-8042

Cheese or Pepperoni

5

The Works

8

55

$

88

$

Carry-Out Additional Toppings Available

Carry-Out

Pepperoni, Sausage, Ham, Green Peppers, Onions & Mushrooms (No Substitutions Please. Deletions Ok.)

ORDER 4 OR MORE & WE’LL DELIVER!

copal Church

TUSCALOOSA TUSCALOOSA HILLCREST NORTH RIVER/HOLT Publix Shopping Center

LUNCH SPECIALS

LARGE PIZZA 99 11:00 4:00

3

Each

TO

AM PM

• Small 1-Topping Pizza • Five Howie Wings & Cajun Bread • Chef Salad • Small Oven Baked Sub Pizza, Meatball, Deluxe Other $ Extra

When: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

SUNDAY What: July Jubilee Where: Sokol Park When: 7:00 p.m.

FRIDAY

E-mail your events and briefs to calendar@cw.ua. edu

Putnam County Spelling Bee

campus initiative to offer textbooks through a rental program,” Peeples said. “I have even heard of publishers exploring options for conveying course material using iPads.” For Rachel Mitchell, a junior majoring in chemical and biological engineering, current options on campus are insufficient. “Prices in general are extremely high,” said Mitchell. “However, the prices online are much cheaper than the prices of the SUPe store.” Mitchell also said she did not think the HEOA would have much of a long-term impact. “I’m not sure how it will affect the textbooks professors choose,

EVENT

Continued from page 1 running a live traffic feed to tell people the best way to enter and leave the park.” The event had long been held near the Black Warrior River but was moved to the 400acre Sokol Park in 2008 to give attendees more space after the event became too crowded. Chelsea Monaco, a junior

but I can’t see how it will help students much, at least not at UA, since pricing information is already online,” Mitchell said. Bruce Barrett, an associate professor of statistics at the University, agreed with Mitchell. “I don’t think it’s going to make any difference,” said Barrett in reference to the HEOA’s requirements. “I think the free market can make it work.” Barrett, unlike Peeples, said that new editions do not always contain valuable new information, at least for hard sciences and math. “For most introductory level courses, the basics of the discipline just don’t change that

quickly,” Barrett said. He added that faculty recognize the burden students face, but typically do not have many options for their classes. “In general, faculty are aware that at the introductory level you may have a large number of competing texts,” said Barrett. “But for upper level division courses, they’re probably more concerned with how the text aligns with the course objectives.” Despite claims the information would not change prices, Whitney Durham said she thinks the information is still needed. “They better use the access to this info,” Durham said. “There is no reason they shouldn’t.”

majoring in restaurant and hospitality management, said she thinks the low cost may attract a high turnout of college students. “It doesn’t sound like the most exciting Fourth of July ever, but it’s a really cheap way to have some fun and show your patriotism, so I’ll probably go for part of it,” Monaco said. “I bet some college students will make their way over there.” Logan Ortega, a senior major-

ing in business management, said the Jubilee seems like a good idea for those who have children, but doesn’t excite him too much as a college student. “If I had a kid, I would go,” Ortega said. “But I don’t have a kid, so I’ll probably go to Gallette’s.” Sokol Park is located on the corner of Watermelon Road and Old Colony Road. All components of the event except concessions are free.

RECRUITMENT Continued from page 1

commencement and end on Bid day, Sunday Aug. 15. This spring, Greek Affairs put a stop to spring recruitment events because of a few challenges, McCreary said. Over the summer, a group of students and alumni have been evaluating all of the University’s recruitment policies and will be releasing a list of recommendations when students return in the fall, McCreary said. “This will include a number of new policy recommendations regarding spring recruitment,” McCreary said. McCreary said preparation for fall recruitment is in full swing, despite setbacks during the spring process. “We just finished the final edits to the recruitment manual that will be mailed to all students that registered for sorority recruitment,” McCreary

said. Candice Rosenkranz, director of recruitment for Panhellenic, said her team was planning the logistics to make the week run smoothly. Rosenkranz said this includes meeting with sorority recruitment chairs and advisors, the University of Alabama Police Department, parking and transportation. “Most people have no idea how much planning really goes into one week of recruitment,” Rosenkranz said, “but it takes a lot of time and teamwork to pull it off.” Allison Pace, vice president of Chi Omega sorority, said the Chi Omega recruitment team has been actively preparing for girls by organizing paperwork and other necessities. “Chi Omega is so excited to meet all the girls and cannot wait for an amazing rush week,” Pace said. McCreary advised participants to be open-minded during the recruitment process. “Know what it is you are

• Receive daily e-mails matching your search • Keywords track the type of bid notices you are looking for • 10 counties per subscription • Only $35 per month! If you are looking for construction bids, road repair bids, consulting or even food service bids, AlabamaLegals.com can help you find them easily.

the pe rfe ct job AlabamaLegals.com is a fully searchable database of legal notices

published in the newspapers of Alabama. This site is made possible by the newspapers of Alabama and the Alabama Press Association. Free public notice searches

In Publix Shopping Center

333-2633 345-6000 345-3737 $

Archeological Park

When: 3 – 6 p.m.

1844 McFarland Blvd. 1105 Southview Lane 4851 Rice Mine Rd. NE in BIG K Shopping Center

What:Saturdays in the Park Where: UA’s Moundville

Shouldn’t the perfect job just drop into your lap (or your in-box)? AlabamaLegals.com now offers subscriptions.

56>67,5

TUSCALOOSA NORTHPORT

SATURDAY

What: The student-led

Where: Canterbury Epis-

SMOKESTACK

• Jessica West, Zone 3, 348-8735

Where: Jupiter Bar & Grill When: 12 a.m.

Keith Hanson, a 2008 graduate of the operations management master’s program at The University of Alabama, recently received the 2010 Employer Recognition Award for his service to UA students during their career search. The award recognizes alumni who give back to the University as employers by advancing students’ knowledge of companies and careers and by assisting in preparing students for a successful career search. Faculty and staff nominate alumni based on willing involvement in Career Center programs, mock interviews, career fairs, mentoring and networking.

always been focused on helping the students and controlling prices. “I have found that stakeholders on this campus are very sensitive to the expense of texts, and work to provide options for students, with some

• Emily Frost, National Advertising/ Classifieds, 348-8042

The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The advertising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published four times weekly when classes are in session during Fall and Spring Semester except for the Monday after Spring Break and the Monday after Thanksgiving, and once a week when school is in session for the summer. Marked calendar provided. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 354032389. The Crimson White is entered as periodical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright © 2010 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical Publication” categories of the U.S. copyright laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

What: Jupiter bikini contest

Continued from page 1

EDITORIAL

THURSDAY

UA will be closed on July 5 in observance of Independence Day.

TEXTBOOKS

Page 2• Thursday, July 1, 2010

ON THE CALENDAR

ON CAMPUS

Any Way You Want (Up to 3 Toppings) and 2 Bottles of Frubob

$

10

• Baked Spaghetti & Howie Bread Plus tax. Delivery extra. CW-6 Expires 7/31/10 Plus tax. Delivery extra. CW-6 Expires 7/31/10

HURT BY THE OIL SPILL? Thousands of barrels of crude oil are being released into the Gulf of Mexico every day. The extent of damages is not yet known, however thousands of people will be affected. The oil spill may result in Property Damage, Rental Damage and Business Loss. If the massive oil spill affects your business or livelihood (i.e: fishermen, shrimpers, oystermen, tourism), you need to review your legal options, call James Rolshouse & Associates toll free at 1-888-676-5291 or visit online at www.OilDamagesLawyer.com. James Rolshouse & Associates Attorneys at Law

1-888-676-5291

Lawyers at the Rolshouse firm are licensed in MN but associate with attorneys in the Gulf Coast area. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

looking to gain from the experience, and be yourself,” he said. Emma Keener, an incoming freshman from Baltimore, Maryland, said she registered for recruitment in the spring and attended Panhellenic weekend, a weekend of spring sorority recruitment. “I am very excited about rush, but I am also very nervous,” Keener said. John Voltz, an incoming freshman from Tuscaloosa, said he is excited to join a fraternity in the fall. “I am looking forward to meeting a good group of lifelong friends and a great college experience,” Voltz said. Rosenkranz said the most difficult part of recruitment for potential members is making their final decision at the end of the week. “Some people worry about the right thing to say, or the cutest clothes to wear,” Rosenkraz said, “but the biggest decision you have to make is where you’ll fit in for the next four years of your life.”

COLLECTION Continued from page 1

“[Williams] has entrusted it to the University to help students and scholars,” he said. The Williams Collection is comprised of a smaller subcollection, Pitschmann said, which includes Southern maps, African American experiences and materials pertaining to the financial history of the United States. Ashley Hamilton, a sophomore majoring in history and anthropology, said the collection will mean a lot to her academic career at The University of Alabama. “My focus is on SouthernAmerican history, so this collection will provide new resources to expand my knowledge and understanding,” she said.


The Crimson White

NEWS

Thursday, July 1, 2010

3

Student travels to the twin cities of Chile By William J. Tucker News Editor

I now know what inspired Patagonia Co.’s logo. At five in the morning, flying into Santiago, the purple, blue, black and orange mountains stamped on all the clothing company’s products appeared just out the airplane window. The Andes welcomed the plane to Chile. It was an amazing sight, and Chile hasn’t let me down since. Especially living in the coastal metropolis of Valparaíso and Viña del Mar—two hours west of Santiago—the mountainous backdrop seems omnipresent. In the two cities, which sit in a manner reminiscent of Minneapolis and St. Paul, running together without clearly defined boundaries between each, the views are amazing. Since I live in Viña and have class in Valparaíso, each morning I take a bus down the main road immediately by the Pacific. Across the shallow bay Valparaíso utilizes for its shipping industry, the steep hills are completely covered with multicolored houses. Every morning it’s like a real-life Where’s Waldo picture of houses on the way to class, and it’s hard to miss some-

thing new every day. Valparaíso, because of its convenient, central location on the Pacific in southwest South America, once served as a major shipping port for ships traveling around the Americas. Once they had passed through the dangerous Strait of Magellan, ships would stop in Valparaíso and recoup before the rest of their journey into the Pacific or up the coast. The opening of the Panama Canal, however, changed all of that—Valpo quickly became a had-been city, neglected and abandoned in many places. Today, the city has essentially rebranded itself. Now, registered as a World Heritage Site, the city utilizes old, turn-of-the-century buildings for new enterprises—many of which deal with the arts. To someone from Alabama, it brings to mind images of Birmingham’s abandoned steel mills now used for new projects, like Sloss Furnace. The geography and city layout, though, are decidedly different than Birmingham. Bars and clubs line the streets that climb up from the waterline at fifty-degree angles up the steep hills. At night, the streetlights lining the roads look like orange veins on the hill from far

William Tucker rides horseback across the Chilean beaches near the Pacific Ocean. Behind him Valparaiso lies an hour and a half across the water.

away. Intensely colorful graffiti lines literally every smooth vertical space in Valparaíso, and nearly every bit of it has a political twist of some sort. Politically, Chile is fascinating. The country remains only 20 years removed from the brutal dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, who seized power in a bloody coup d’état backed by the Nixon administration and the CIA on September 11, 1973. The event occurred after Chile democratically elected their first Marxist president, Salvador Allende—the first time in the world, in fact, that a Marxist won a democratic presidential election. Allende remains a muse to many of the grafitti artists in Valparaíso. I mention all that to say that those events weigh heavily on the collective Chilean conscience. Many Chileans are intensely liberal from an American point of view, despite the huge prevalence of Catholicism. My “cultura” class professor is Marxist, and my host brother is communist, for example. All this makes my experience doubly interesting as an American, or “gringo,” in this environment. Ultimately, I’ll remember Chile as

one of the most fascinating places I’ve ever been to, and not just from an intellectual standpoint. Chile is just fun, too. I’ve gone to a fourstory club and ridden horses on the beach and across 150-foot sand dunes at Ritoque. I’ve had tea with the Chilean Constitution Co m m i s s i o n e r ’s assistant in the Chilean National Congress building and toured the chambers of Chile’s upper and lower houses with him. I’ve eaten shrimp and scallop empanadas in the tiny hippie fishing village of Horcón to the north. I’ve played guitar with a street performer on the curb in Valparaíso and experienced what was supposedly a magnitude-four earthquake from the 10th floor of a 10-story building. I’ve watched more “fútbol” than I ever thought I would— ¡Viva Chile! —and had the time of my life for the past three weeks. I’m just now nearing the halfway

WORLD is...?

mark of my trip. Now, with a growing collection of Chilean friends and a few new American friends—including Molly Barret and Froy Batsielilit from the University — I only look forward to the next three weeks against the backdrop of the Andes.

Will Tucker is the news editor of the Crimson White.

Editor’s Note: “Where in the World” is a summer series giving UA students studying abroad an opportunity to write about their summer adventures in their own words. If you’re studying abroad in a fascinating place and would like to tell your story, e-mail editor@cw.ua.

Tucker visits the chambers of Chileʼs higher legislative house.


OPINIONS

OUR VIEW

Kagan qualified for high court

US students ages 7-13, including a buffer for administrative costs. As we all are aware, education is the only effective winch that can lift a person out of poverty. The average high school and college graduate makes $700,000 and $1.7 million more, respectively, than a high school dropout over his or her lifetime. If the success rate of payment for performance was only 10 percent, the benefits to the quality of life and productivity for both that small group and our economy would be enormous. Since the US is already spending $400 billion on various welfare programs, the long-term savings are apparent and will serve as an additional weapon for the War on Poverty. Such a program could also be a tool for getting our economy out of the doldrums. When our parents were in elementary school, they were not imbued with the instant gratification plague. They found that longterm benefits were worth the toil put forth in school. The model of yesteryear will not work in our time, where video games and the Internet offer rewards immediately compared to the investment of an education. Dividends are regularly paid to investors who stay loyal to a company’s stock. It’s time to apply that same “dividend” to those children who are likewise committed to success in their education.

During three days of intense questioning before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, Elena Kagan, President Obama’s nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, has demonstrated the intellect and judgment needed to win Senate confirmation. Kagan, who described her views as “generally progressive,” would not alter the ideological balance of the court if sworn in to replace Stevens, who has lead the Court’s liberal wing for some time. She would, however, enhance the diversity of the Court, which would have three female Justices serving together for the first time in history. Kagan would also be the In short: Elena Court’s third Jewish member. Kagan has the This would be a boost credentials and for the nation, as the judgment to beSupreme Court has been come the next slow to reflect the changSupreme Court ing demographics and Justice. increased diversity of the country at large. Kagan’s dry humor would also add a needed sense of vitality to the court’s normally drab proceedings. When Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), asked where she spent last Christmas, she wryly replied, “Like all Jews, I was probably at a Chinese restaurant.” Graham proceeded to ask her about the attempted airline bombing that day. Kagan did exhibit some cause for concern when she deferred to precedent on several cases, even calling one recent decision by the Court “settled law.” The Supreme Court can overturn its past decisions. The Court has been wrong on many occasions, most infamously when it ruled slaves were personal property not entitled to constitutional rights in the Dredd Scott case and when it upheld segregation under the “separate, but equal” doctrine in Plessy v. Ferguson. The former was overturned by the 14th Amendment; the latter by the court itself in Brown v. Board of Education. Still, Kagan is a qualified nominee with impressive credentials. While some senators have criticized her for never having served as a judge — as all of the current Justices had when they were nominated — it is refreshing to have someone from outside of the judiciary elevated to the Supreme Court. Since Obama appointed Kagan Solicitor General, she has been responsible for representing the federal government before the Court in all cases in which it is involved. During the committee hearings, Republicans, under the leadership of Senator Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), have asked tough and probing questions, as they should. Supreme Court appointments are very serious matters. However, calls for more time to review Kagan’s nomination ring hollow. Senators have had seven weeks to question her and analyze her extensive record in academia and government. She has proven herself a worthy nominee. Now, partisan politics should be put aside and the Senate should confirm Elena Kagan.

Gregory Poole is a University alumnus.

Our View is the consensus opinion of The Crimson White’s Editorial Board.

MCT Campus

Merit pay for students

Thursday, July 1, 2010 Editor • Tray Smith letters@cw.ua.edu Page 4

{ YOUR VIEW } HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE DEMOLITION OF THE SMOKESTACK?

“Iʼve been here for five years and itʼs always been here. I guess Iʼll miss it for nostalgic reasons.” -Lyndsey Adkins, raduate student, women’s studies

By Gregory Poole

As political campaigns around the nation move past the primary season toward the general election, education will certainly be a common issue, as always. The candidates will issue their talking points, stating that American education is failing (which it is). Some will then add that more money needs to be pumped into the system for more hi-tech gadgets that no one knows how to operate and consultants that attempt to state the obvious by teaching teachers how to teach. I am always in favor of providing adequate funding for schools and instructors; I sincerely believe that additional funding is necessary. However, it should be channeled toward providing incentives for reading more books and gaining better comprehension of the material. After all, a student can’t succeed if he or she cannot read the textbook. No, I’m not talking about merit pay for teachers; I’m talking about merit pay for students. This is not an entirely new concept. For years, the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) charter schools have given weekly paychecks in the form of virtual dollars based on students’ classroom performance and discipline, which can be redeemed for snacks and miscellaneous items at the school store. In the underprivileged areas of Houston, where minorities comprise 98 percent of the school’s

student body and 86 percent of students are eligible for the free or reduced lunch program, the results have been nothing short of miraculous. Eighty-five percent of the graduating class pursues a college education, and 94 percent of those are first generation attendees. Compare this with the traditional inner-city campus, which education scholar Robert C. Kohler calls the school-to-prison pipeline. I’ll take the results of the former, please. KIPP isn’t the only evidence of the success of financial incentives. For nearly three years, Harvard economics professor Roland Fryer has been paying students in Dallas $2 per book read and comprehension test passed. The results have been very promising. Reading comprehension scores jumped for those that were paid, and this trend of success continued even after the payments ceased. The students developed a love for reading that transcended the financial payments. In the interest of time, I will refrain from listing the further successes of incentivizing student performance. It is obvious that offering carrots instead of sticks works best. Still, naysayers will try to tell us that such programs are too expensive to carry out, or that it isn’t worth the investment. Sadly, their arguments are deliberately misleading or misinformed, as simple “back of the envelope” calculations will show that the program only costs $10 billion a year to implement for all

{

Political correctness killing this country By Reid Stuart

“Iʼll notice itʼs gone. Iʼll miss it. Itʼs gone visually.” -Isabelle Akers, senior, political science

“I donʼt care either way, but if itʼs going to keep tuition down, blow if up with dynamite.” -Sam Arnold, junior, philosophy

EDITORIAL BOARD Victor Luckerson Editor Jonathan Reed Managing Editor Tray Smith Opinions Editor

WE WELCOME YOUR OPINIONS Letters to the editor must be less than 300 words and guest columns less than 800. Send submissions to letters@ cw.ua.edu. Submissions must include the author’s name, year, major and daytime phone number. Phone numbers are for verification and will not be published. For more information, call 3486144. The CW reserves the right to edit all submissions.

Political correctness is the scourge of our First Amendment rights and is the most frustrating invention since the lid of a pickle jar. The fact that anything said has to pass through several filters so as to not offend anyone makes anything worth accomplishing ten times more difficult. This is a virus that has been plaguing our democracy since its conception, and will more than likely never leave. The name of the game in political correctness is to try to take offense to anything possible. In an argument, the vic-

tor is never determined by who is right, but by who is offended first. This may seem completely ridiculous, but try it out with some friends. It works. Therein lies the problem; political correctness is the most effective and easiest way to win an argument and is a great way to make up for being a poor debater. Political correctness can also cover up for someone who simply does not know what he or she is talking about. The person debating such an unknowledgeable opponent now has to apologize repeatedly for what he or she said and is no

longer in a position to argue again. Now this tactic is fine for schoolyard arguments, but when fully-grown men and women employ political correctness in debates, it jumps into the upper echelons of irrationality. Arguments between senators and representatives now almost always involve some kind of he said/she said deal that is fueled by the media. Being politically correct can not only be irritating, but can be deadly as well. On November 5, 2009, there was a massacre at Fort Hood in Bell County, Texas. A lone gunman killed 13 unarmed people and injured

30 others. Major Nadal Malik Hasan worked as a psychiatrist at Fort Hood and several of the officers that knew him had reported his radical Islamic beliefs and behaviors. Emails were intercepted between Hasan and a radical imam with alleged links to Al-Qaeda. No action was ever taken on either account though, because those who would have reported it feared being labeled as antiMuslim. So Major Hasan remained free to slip through the nets until the massacre. The U.S. Army was too sensitive; as a result, 13 innocent American soldiers were killed.

It is impossible to be for or against anything without being labeled. If you’re against illegal immigration, you’re a racist; if you are afraid someone is a terrorist, you are anti-Muslim; and if you’re a Democrat you are a baby-killer. Being labeled something negative breeds fear which then keeps men and women from exercising their rights and speaking out against anything, from legislation in Washington, D.C. to textbooks in Texas. This road leads directly to censorship. Reid Stuart is a sophomore majoring in political science.

Landmark ruling a win for Second Amendment By John Anselmo On Monday, the Supreme Court made a landmark decision that not only affects Chicagoland, but will be felt miles away from the city of the Big Shoulders. In McDonald v. Chicago, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in favor of McDonald, declaring a Chicago prohibition of handgun ownership unconstitutional. The court ruled that the right to “keep and bear arms,” protected by the Second Amendment, is applied to the states through the Due Process Clause, found in the 14th Amendment. Therefore, state governments are prohibited from infringing on that right, just as the federal government is. In an age of rapid government growth, this decision is refreshing and comforting. Americans do have the right to defend themselves, despite several attempts to take away this right by many on Capitol Hill and politicians in state capitols and city halls. This ruling will reawaken a

battle that has been a main issue in the past. The war on a basic right, the right to bear arms, is one that incorporates unsound logic and false findings. The soldiers in the war against this fundamental right employ several angles to push forward with their agenda, which in many cases scarily match the plans of history’s most evil rulers. I heard an argument not too long ago, embraced by the antigun lobby, which claimed that when the Second Amendment was penned, the founders did not envision the sophistication of modern firearms. This man claimed the founders meant only muskets when writing the Second Amendment and that anything further is a danger. Setting aside the fact that a musket of 18th century technology can still inflict fatal damage today, what precedent do such arguments set for modernization? Could blogs and other Internet sites that host opinions be banned, as the founders did not envision this enhancement of free speech when writing the

First Amendment? Is this proliferation of free speech too much? Much like several other government decisions, gun control laws infringe upon the rights of the people for the so-called “good” of the community. We must be aware what intrusions of such liberties can lead us to: the intrusions Hitler, Stalin and Zedong forged. “Fewer guns, less violence” is common sense in this violation of liberty. Yet, despite the rationale of so many in the antigun movement, guns do not kill people. Bad people with guns can kill people. Those who do perform harmful acts with guns are naturally criminals. What is going to make a criminal turn in a gun to authorities when a ban is enacted, when they have no respect for the law or their fellow citizens? Nonetheless, local governments have repeatedly lumped criminals together with lawabiding citizens who want selfprotection. Because of the innate nature of a criminal, no law can keep those who do wrong from

doing so. The logic of gun control and its application also produces an environment prone to more gun violence. If those who are criminals know, because of gun control laws, that law-abiding citizens do not have matching means to protect themselves, what is going to keep criminals from committing crimes? FBI and CDC data has proven year after year that higher private gun ownership and more states with right-to-carry laws have produced lower gun violence. With gun ownership at an all-time high in 2008, the FBI found that violent crimes were at a 35-year low and murder at a 43-year low. To further laud law-abiding citizens, in the seven years following the passage of Florida’s right-to-carry legislation in 1987, 221,443 citizens obtained a permit to carry a concealed firearm. In 1998, a study found that not one licensee had ever shot a police officer in Florida, and only one permitted carrier had shot someone following a

traffic incident. The one man who fired upon another after the traffic incident was acquitted by a grand jury after it was ruled self defense. Florida saw handgun homicide rates fall by 41 percent in the nine years after the rightto-carry law passed. In the four years before former President Clinton’s signing of the Assault Weapons Ban, less than 1 percent of homicides were committed with the banned weapons. More children die every year from choking accidents than firearm accidents. The same for fatal fire accidents. The right to self-defense is embedded in natural law, and our Constitution. Ironically, also found in natural law is the inherent mandate of personal responsibility. Gun owners should be well versed in handling firearms to prevent accidents, for it is their responsibility. Having this right to self-defense, we must cherish it and be responsible.

John Anselmo is a junior majoring in economics.


The Crimson White

NEWS

Thursday, July 1, 2010

5

More stimulus not the answer to developing economic problems By Tray Smith

to what the costs of complying with the bill’s requirements will be, are much more reluctant to hire new employees for whom they are now legally mandated to provide governmentapproved insurance plans. Adding to this uncertainty is the possibility of a cap-and-trade program to ration the use and increase the costs of energy. The president continues to entertain the possibility of enacting such a scheme despite the enormous costs it would impose on families and businesses. European governments, to their credit, have largely ignored Obama’s advice. Times have indeed changed when normally free-spending European governments are reining in their budgets against the wishes of the U.S. president. The European leaders know, from the ongoing turmoil in Greece, that a broader financial crisis much worse than the one we have just survived lingers if markets lose confidence in the ability of governments to service their debts. European governments have already had to pool their resources to bail Greece out, and are imposing austerity measures in order to reduce market uncertainty and fuel confidence in their ability to manage their budgets. These lessons are lost on our president, who in his letter wrote that global governments “need to commit to adjustments that stabilize debt-to-GDP ratios at appropriate levels over the medium term.” Gone is any ambition of eventually balancing the budget, and the pretense of even trying. Rather, the president touts his administration’s plan to halve the deficit by 2013, which is a farce for two reasons. First, because the administration, through discretionary and stimulus spending, has so increased the budget deficit that even halving it by 2013 would still mean a larger deficit that year than in any year during the Bush presidency. Secondly, because government projections show the deficit increasing again after 2013 as a result of mandatory increases in entitlement obligations. If the president were serious about reducing spending in the “medium-term,” he would propose a serious solution to rein in those obligations even as he urges for more “temporary” stimulus measures. That work has instead been handed off to a committee, which will conveniently not report its findings until after the November elections. What the economy needs now is confidence that the government is aware of its perilous fiscal situation and is willing to take actions to correct it. Until then, the economy will remain stagnant as businesses and consumers restrain their economic activity under the daunting prospect of ever more taxes and debt.

In a letter to the leaders of the world’s 20 most economically developed nations last week, President Obama called on the group to “reaffirm our unity of purpose to provide the policy support necessary to keep economic growth strong.” He then arrived at the group’s summit in Toronto and lobbied for more stimulus spending in industrialized countries, including European nations who have recently begun to impose budget cuts and other measures aimed at trimming their deficits. Yes, the Obama spending binge has gone global. No longer satisfied with running up our own national debt, the president is now encouraging other world leaders to continue adding to their own deficits, writing, “I am committed to the restoration of fiscal sustainability, but it is critical that the timing and pace of consolidation in each economy suit the needs of the global economy, the momentum of private sector demand and national circumstances.” As Obama travelled to Toronto, his Democratic allies on Capitol Hill tried unsuccessfully to advance yet more stimulus spending. This after the $862 billion stimulus bill they enacted last year failed to spur employment growth and left the economy staggering. Administration officials say they “misread” the economy last year, “underestimating” the magnitude of the recession they “inherited” from Obama’s predecessor. The problem, they say, is that the stimulus wasn’t big enough. The problem is the stimulus. Research done by Harvard economists Alberto Alesina and Silvia Ardagna, released last fall, shows stimulus plans based on tax cuts are more likely to increase growth than plans based on government spending. The pair arrived at this conclusion after analyzing every major stimulus plan enacted in developed economies between 1970 and 2007. The stimulus program Obama signed into law last year included little in the way of tax cuts. The tax cuts Democrats did include were mostly temporary tax credits, not the type of marginal reductions in tax rates that spur economic growth. Far from using tax cuts to stimulate growth, the Democrats have instead opted to let the Bush tax cuts expire at the end of the year, leading to higher tax rates on capital gains, dividends and income. Additionally, the health care plan enacted earlier this year imposed an array of new taxes and regulations that will be levied on everything from medical devices to tanning beds. Health care, an issue the Democrats foolishly endeavored to take on in the midst of a sagging economy, has only added uncertainty to the eco- Tray Smith is the opinions editor of The nomic environment. Businesses, still unsure as Crimson White.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Nothing but net ... neutrality By Wesley Vaughn A significant decision from the United States Court of Appeals in April passed mostly unnoticed, though it has the potential to directly affect many more people than it first appeared to. It involves net neutrality, an issue that has surfaced on occasion without drawing much media attention. Net neutrality is a policy that requires Internet providers to treat all web services equally. The court of appeals ruled that the Federal Communications Commission lacks regulatory power over

broadband Internet, voiding its 2008 attempt to stop Comcast’s blocking of certain Internet uses. The entire conflict boils down to one word: information. As of now, the FCC regulates “telecommunication services” and not “information services,” which is the current label for Internet access services. Thankfully, an easy fix is at hand. As Susan Crawford wrote in a recent New York Times op-ed, “The FCC has the legal authority to change the label, as long as it can provide a good reason. And that reason is obvious: Americans buy an

Internet access service based on its speed and price — and not on whether an email address is included as part of a bundle.” I find it unbelievable that the FCC allowed the court system to deal with the Internet in the first place. If the necessary and obvious steps are taken to finalize net neutrality once and for all, the FCC can focus on more important ventures, such as expanding the high-speed Internet highway across America. Wesley Vaughn is a junior majoring in public relations and political science.

SPECIALS JUNE

2 Months FREE or $300.00 Best Buy Gift Card

JULY

1 Month FREE or $300.00 Best Buy Gift Card!

AUGUST

1/2 Month FREE or $300.00 Best Buy Gift Card & ALL fees waived!


6

Thursday, July 1, 2010

NEWS

The Crimson White

Bentley, Byrne sling UA professors accusations at debate awarded grant to research oil spill By Charles Scarborough Staff Reporter cjscarborough@crimson.ua.edu

Party affiliation. “I have always been a Republican,” Bentley said in response to a question about growing the Republican base. Byrne, who was first elected as a Democrat but Robert Bentley and Bradley Byrne faced off in their second debate June 25 at the Cahaba Grand switched parties in 1997, said Bentley is backed by Democratic leaders who are attempting to “hijack” Conference Center in Birmingham. The only clear policy disagreement came in the runoff. Throughout the debate, Byrne cited Bentley’s conregards to how to best handle the issue of legalized nection to Alabama Education Association Executive gambling in Alabama. “The only way that you can rid this state of gam- Secretary-Treasurer and influential Democratic bling is to have a clear vote,” Bentley said. “I believe Party leader Paul Hubbert, linking Bentley to the AEA. the Christian people of this state will vote it down.” “Paul Hubbert and the Democrats have held this Byrne disagreed with Bentley’s assessment, saying a statewide vote would end in favor of gambling. state back for decades,” Byrne said. “They have con“The gambling interests would love to have a refer- trolled our education system. They have blocked ethics reform, and they even block things we try to do to endum,” Byrne said. In his last response, Bentley pledged to not run any move our economy forward.” “It is time, it is high past time, that we tell Paul negative campaign advertisements against Byrne. Hubbert and the Bentley faced a Democrats that smattering of boos “The only way that you can rid this state of gamhave controlled during his closing bling is to have a clear vote, [and] I believe the this state for so statement after telllong, ‘Paul we want ing an anecdote Christian people of this state will vote it down,” our state back.’ ” about a Huntsville After Byrne’s native who told him —Robert Bentley fifth reference he had been contactto Paul Hubbert, ed by the Ron Sparks campaign and instructed to vote for Bradley Byrne, Bentley said, “I think this is a forum on Paul Hubbert.” stating, “We can’t beat Robert Bentley.” The AEA funded a radio advertisement attackThe two candidates largely agreed on every other issue discussed. However, Bentley and Byrne pointed ing Byrne for supporting the teaching of evolution in public schools, and Bentley said it was unfair for criticisms at each other. In the wake of Byrne attacking the insurance Byrne to suggest he was an AEA “lackey.” “I vote against them and I vote for them,” Bentley industry, Bentley accused Byrne of accepting large said. “It depends on whether they are right or they donations from insurance companies. “It’s hard to stand up to the large insurance com- are wrong. Who do you think gets the most money panies in this state if you’ve taken hundreds of thou- from special interests? It’s not me.” The Young Republican’s Federation and the sands of dollars from those companies,” Bentley said. Alabama and Auburn Student Government “My opponent has done that.” Byrne interjected repeatedly with statements such Associations hosted the debate. SGA President as, “That is a lie,” and “That is not true,” until the James Fowler was featured on the panel along with moderator, John Paepcke, NBC 13 anchor, told Byrne Kurt Sasser, Auburn’s SGA Chairman. The Republican Gubernatorial runoff election he had to wait until his next question to respond. Bentley also mentioned Byrne’s prior Democratic takes place July 13.

{

}

AP A crab moves past an oil tar ball on Belle Fontaine beach in Jackson County, Miss. By Ashley McDaniel Contributing Writer

apartment homes

Now Only $300/bedroom! Newly renovated apartments provide a stress-free, quiet environment ideal for those looking to get away. Affordable rates and a convenient location on Veterans Memorial Parkway makes Quail Valley perfect for students.

‡KDHGZDUGVFRP 2030 9th Street-Tuscaloosa, Alabama

The National Science Foundation Rapid Response Grant was awarded to two University of Alabama biology professors to perform research on environmental clean up solutions in the

Gulf of Mexico. Behzad Mortazavi, an assistant professor of biological sciences, and Patricia Sobecky, the biology department chair, both received a grant for $124,999 allowing them to further their research. Following the accident on the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform

in the Gulf of Mexico on April 21, crude oil has been continuously discharging at an estimated rate of 35,000 to 60,000 barrels per day. So far, attempts at stopping the oil spill have not been successful and, according to the latest estimate, the spill from the well may continue until a relief well becomes operational in August. The team’s main research objective was to determine means of enhancing rates of biodegradation of the hydrocarbons in the coastal zone of the northern Gulf of Mexico that were a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. “We process materials for a variety of analyses including chemical and biological determinations to assess the microbial oil degradation capacities,” Sobecky said. Some of the team’s other objectives include identifying sources of naturally occurring marine organic matter in the affected areas, identifying the composition and genomic potential of the microbial consortium, and examining changes in the rate processes and composition of the microbial consortium as the oil is weathered over the course of a year. Once the oil reaches the coast, clean up of the spill will be an arduous task. Passive and active bioremediation can provide a solution to the spill in the coastal zone, according to the project summary. “Our long term goal is to develop based on biological data generated from this research feasible engineering solutions to assist in mitigating the effects of oil contamination in our coastal waters,” Mortazavi said. Bruce Hamilton, program director of environmental sustainability at the National Science Foundation stated that the primary goal of this proposal is to determine means of enhancing rates of biodegradation of the hydrocarbons in the coastal zone of the northern Gulf of Mexico resulting from the catastrophic Deepwater Horizon oil spill. “The scope and impact of this ongoing oil spill disaster are of unprecedented scale, and information on key environmental data is critically needed as quickly as possible,” Hamilton said. “A longer term objective is to develop feasible engineering solutions based on sound biological data to assist in mitigating the long-ranging effects of offshore and coastal oil contamination.”


The Crimson White

Thursday, July 1, 2010

*

Sign a Lease. Receive a Free iPad. Or up to $900.

Clubhouse

Lake Tamaha

Resort-Style Pool

Campus Shuttle

Green Space

Great Location

FREE LATE NIGHT BUS & GAME DAY SHUTTLE

BAMA’S MOST POPULAR COMMUNITY

ALL-INCLUSIVE STUDENT COTTAGES | FROM $495/MONTH THE RETREAT CLUBHOUSE 745 TAMAHA TRACE NE, TUSCALOOSA, AL 35404 205.553.6453 | WWW.RETREATALABAMA.COM *Offer applies to new leases only, effective June 3, 2010 through June 30, 2010, and can be discontinued at any time and without notice. Pricing, amenities and availability subject to change without notice. Information is believed to be accurate but is not warranted. Speak with a leasing agent for additional details.

7


8

Thursday, July 1, 2010

NEWS

The Crimson White

This week in pictures:

1

2

3

4

Don’t let money drive you to cancel your golf plans! FULL MEMBERSHIP for only $100/month @ Woodland Forrest CC! (Special Rate for ages 30 & under)

NO initiation fee! NO contracts!

Now Taking August Deposits! Call Today! Private Shuttle Service to The University of Alabama

Driving Range Pool & Grill

18 Hole Golf Course Full Service Bar open 7 days a week

*Ages 31 & above $125/month with 1-yr contract

1 & 2 Bedroom Apts with FREE Amenities:

Located off Skyland Blvd. & Buttermilk Rd.

Golf Privileges For Residents • Full Size Washer & Dryer • Complete Kitchen Fitness Center • Swimming Pool • Tanning Beds • Activity Room w/ Billiards Business Center • Golf Course Views (select units) • On-Site Management Open 7 Days A Week • Fully Furnished Executive Suites Available

www.wfcc.net

Affordable Furnished Package- Additional Fee of Only $50/mo (2BR)

View Virtual Tours, Floor Plans, Rates & Apply Online

@ www.lindseymanagement.com

(205) 556 - 1232

Follow the CW on Facebook facebook.com/thecrimsonwhite

1800 Links Blvd #6700

1800 Links Blvd #7501

(205) 342-3339

(205) 247-9978

Call, Come by, or Text “greentusc�or “linktusc� to 47464 for more info! Standard Rates Apply

Professionally Managed by Lindsey Management Co., Inc.

6WD\WXQHGIRUFRQWHVWV JLYHDZD\VDQGSROOV


The Crimson White

NEWS

Thursday, July 1, 2010

9

A photographic essay on the past seven days

5

7

6

8

1: The U.S. Supreme Court ordered a new review of the convictions in the government corruption case against former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman and ex-HealthSouth CEO Richard Scrushy. 2: Norecio Salazar and Leonardo Salinas place a sheet of designated plywood over a window on Jim and JoAnne Farberʼs home on the Delta Lake Reservoir in preparation for Tropical Storm Alex. 3: Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan testifies on Capitol Hill during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. 4: Patti LaBelle, Janelle Monae, Esperanza Spalding and Alicia Keys perform “Purple Rain” at the BET Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles. 5: Gen. David Petraeus testifies on Capitol Hill to be confirmed as President Obamaʼs choice to take control of forces in Afghanistan. 6: Governor Rileyʼs task force on illegal gambling attempts a shut down of bingo at Greenetrack in Eutaw, Ala., on Tuesday. The governorʼs gambling task force was ordered out of the Greenetrack casino by a circuit judge. 7: Indian policemen throw stones at Kashmiri protestors in Srinagar, India, Wednesday. Authorities extended a curfew to new areas of the Indian-controlled portion of Kashmir on Wednesday, trying to control the worst street violence in a year triggered by accusations that government forces killed 11 people in recent weeks. 8: Mike Tyson poses in a traditional Kazakh outfit at the 1st Astana International Action Film Festival in Kazakhstan. Tyson presented his movie “Tyson” at the festival on Tuesday. All photos are from the Associated Press.

Buying your

Used textbooks

from us will give you a savings of 25%.


LIFESTYLES

Toy Story 3 sends series out on high note By Carter Glascock Contributing writer Is there really any doubt about Pixar’s greatness? Over the last 15 years, the studio has dominated the animated film genre, and rightfully so. Every film the studio has produced since 1995’s landmark “Toy Story” has been an artistic breakthrough for the genre in terms of technical achievement and emotional depth, all while remaining thoroughly entertaining for both adults and children. With an enviable track record of films like “Ratatouille” and “WALL-E,” expectations were exceedingly high for this long awaited sequel to the film that put them on the map. Thankfully, “Toy Story 3” is anything but a disappointment, being every bit as good as the first two entries in the series, as well as being a truly fitting way to cap off what is probably the best animated film trilogy of all time. The film picks up 11 years after the events of 1999’s “Toy Story 2,” with Andy, the owner of the toys, getting ready to

move to college. Woody, Buzz and the rest of the toys, who have begrudgingly come to terms with the fact that Andy is too old to play with them anymore, await their trip to the attic when he moves out. A complication with Andy’s mother gets the toys donated to a daycare, where they are greeted by a new lot of toys, led by a strawberry-scented teddy bear named Lots-O-Huggin’ Bear (voiced by Ned Beatty). To give away anymore of the story would be doing a disservice to Lee Unkrich’s direction and Michael Arndt’s screenplay, which alternately has you on the edge of your seat, laughing hysterically, or crying your eyes out throughout the entire film. For his second screenplay in a major feature (his first was “Little Miss Sunshine”), Arndt demonstrates that he may be one of the best screenwriters working today. He takes the familiar settings and characters of the Toy Story world and makes it his own, all while staying true to what made us love these characters like family to begin with. The entire original voice cast

‘Toy Story 3’ Runtime: 103 minutes MPAA rating: G Release date: June 18 CW critic’s rating:

Bottom line: “A beautiful way to end a beautiful series. The best film of the year so far.” returns for the film (with the exception of Jim Varney, the original voice of Slinky Dog, who died in 2000 shortly after the release of “Toy Story 2”), as well a handful of new faces, including Beatty as Lotso and Michael Keaton as a smitten Ken, the counterpart to Barbie. Timothy Dalton (the third James Bond) is particularly hilarious as Mr. Pricklepants, a porcupine doll dressed in lederhosen. Don Rickles continues

{

}

The humor of the film is a very welcome buffer for the emotional wallop at the end. There are moments of nail-biting tension and such sentimental gorgeousness, it makes you reminisce on how you’ve grown as a person since the first film.

to steal every scene he’s in as Mr. Potato Head (including a particularly hilarious scene in which he has to change forms). The dialogue is crafted with such care to keep the story flowing that it seems like a real treat the film is as funny as it is. The humor of the film is a very welcome buffer for the emotional wallop at the end. There are moments of nailbiting tension and such sentimental gorgeousness, it makes you reminisce on how you’ve grown as a person since the first film. Not to give anything away, but the final scenes in the film are so poignant and moving, that it is guaranteed you will hear sniffling from the audience while watching it, if not out and out bawling. To be sure, this is a beautiful film. It performs the trick of transcending the tag of

extremely entertaining, marketable family fare into the realm of high art. It retains the trademark of the series in humanizing children’s playthings into a metaphor about family and the excitement of childhood imagination. It also retains Pixar’s high mark of quality, which is a relief, but at this point, is to be expected. Highly recommended. Side note: The short film “Night and Day,” which plays before “Toy Story 3,” also lives up to Pixar’s esteemed reputation for delivering visually stimulating shorts with great lessons for kids. Also, watch “Toy Story 3” carefully for numerous Pixar “Easter eggs,” which include past characters of Pixar films like “Finding Nemo” as well as future Pixar characters like a lead role in the upcoming “Cars” sequel.

Page 10 • Thursday, July 1, 2010 Editor • Kelsey Stein kmstein@crimson.ua.edu

rottentomatoes.com Pixar’s newest “Toy Story” film is one of the year’s best.

SUNDAY • Swimming vs Tennessee: 12 p.m.


The Crimson White

11

LIFESTYLES

Thursday, July 1, 2010

COLUMN

Vinyl solutions By Morgan Dowdy Contributing Writer

Yesterday, as a late birthday present to himself, your columnist purchased an old Technics turntable on eBay for about $80. It’s a direct-drive model from the early ‘80s, fully-automatic, with linear-tracking that grants almost CD-like controllability. According to audiophile websites, the table should yield low rumble, high output clarity, and very little of something called wow & flutter, which basically measures how uniformly the plate spins. In 1981 it sold for $400, which is about $900 adjusted for inflation. This won’t be my first turntable. A Phillips and a Sony, both very much of the early ‘70s, lie stacked in the corner of the living room, cables tightly wrapped and shut beneath scratched dust covers. Neither work very well; both came from thrift stores. Before those I relied on a former roommate’s brand new Sony automatic, and before that on my parents’ old budget all-in-one tape/record/receiver deck, the kind of shiny plastic crap you might imagine finding on a Sears discount table in Southern California in 1985. Needless to say the search for a quality player with which to spend the best years of my life deserved more, so I went for the Technics. Did you know that vinyl sales represent the only growth area within physical media sales for music over the past several years? That is, while the CD market proceeded to take a nosedive last decade amid the rise of digital downloads, legal and otherwise, the market for vinyl actually expanded. In fact it exponentially expanded, increasing by almost 200 percent between 2007 and 2009, while CDs suffered double-digit declines each of those years. With the widespread prevalence of vinyl-only indie labels, many of which don’t record sales data at all, the numbers might actually be considerably higher. Of course vinyl accounts for an extremely miniscule share of the entire physical media market — only about one-seventh of a percentage point. Still, that 200 percent increase is an incredible figure, and notable enough for national retailer Best Buy to dedicate eight square feet of floor space exclusively to records. Vinyl pressings of brand new releases, once the territory of localized punks and indie rockers, are again being adopted by major label artists for national distribution. What’s going on? How can a medium rendered obsolete 25 years ago suddenly regain relevance in an era dominated by digital technology and the internet? Two reasons. The first is a pretty straightforward one

that quickly pans out into basic economic terms. CDs function solely as vehicles for the distribution of digital music — the song sounds the same whether you’re spinning a disc or accessing a ripped MP3. On the other hand, vinyl offers a sound and experience not available anywhere else or any other way. At a time when CDs provide almost exactly the same service as the digital downloads that are taking over the marketplace, vinyl maintains a strikingly viable niche. A second reason for the upsurge boils down to the same nostalgia for the past that’s been a pretty constant condition within greater pop cultural tastes from the beginning. Turntables and vinyl records have retro appeal. Spending an evening listening to your favorite Miles Davis record evokes a certain lost sophistication. Sitting cross-legged around the turntable with a pile of 45s and a friend affords long-forgotten charms. Charms that are up to this point only half-gleaned by our generation via echoes suspended in the mass media firmament, but rarely experienced in any direct way. The demystification of a central experience of former youth generations is one potentially meaningful implication of that retro appeal. Of course, in this case, retro also connotes obscure, that troubled virtue of postmodern cool. There is always a hipster population (separate article parsing this muddled term forthcoming) attracted to a given retro trend’s obscurity-factor like mosquitoes to standing water. The hipster appreciates vinyl not for its historical or formalistic merits, but for the objectified cultural capital its obscurity imparts. Despite this element, vinyl remains a worthwhile pursuit for a generation reared on instant digital music. Albums you’ve listened to a million times on CD suddenly transform on the record player. The clichÊ that you haven’t heard an album until you’ve heard it on vinyl is usually true. To find yourself a good turntable, check around thrift stores, pawn shops or on eBay. There’s more than enough information on the internet to point your search in the right direction. As for getting the records themselves, first start by talking to older family members who might still have a vinyl collection. Again, thrift stores will often carry old records, and America’s Thrift Store on Skyland Boulevard usually has a pretty impressive selection of 45s, especially if you like classic funk and soul. Finally, we’re lucky to have a quality record store in Oz Music. They’re the place to find reissues of classic albums, as well as new vinyl releases with a tilt toward contemporary indie.

The Jupiter bares all By Jordan Staggs Senior Staff Reporter jlstaggs@crimson.ua.edu Summer in the South just wouldn’t be the same without barbecues, beaches and those teeny bikinis. Although T-town is a few hours from the beach — and the coast might not be the best summer escape right now — The Jupiter Bar & Grill is working hard to bring residents a little bit of those summer classics with its annual bikini contest. The contest has been held every Thursday in June, all culminating up to the big finale this week, July 1 at around midnight. “The finals are always the biggest night,� said Jupiter owner and manager Jeremiah Jones. “We’re doing it in the small room this year, so we’re expecting to be at full capacity.� With last year’s finals drawing over 500 people, there’s no doubt it will be a fun event for everyone involved. The contest up until now has consisted of four preliminary rounds, with the top three contestants from each round moving on to Thursday’s final. Contestants will first be introduced by host DJ Pete in their “street clothes.� Each one will then compete individually, followed by all the girls on stage together. The contestants are judged after strutting their stuff, and the final winner

will receive $500 cash. “The contest has always done really well,� Jones said. “Thursdays are usually kind of a hit-or-miss night in the summer, so we try to do some smaller, but entertaining, events.� Although it is still drawing a pretty good crowd, this year’s bikini contest has been less fruitful than last year’s, Jones said. This might be due to the event’s move from May to June, or due to the economy. “This year it’s been a lot harder finding girls to participate,� said Kayla Perlstein, a Jupiter employee in charge of the bikini contest. “A few of the finalists are going out of town, but we should have eight to ten competing this week.� One of the contestants, 23-yearold Heather Whitfield said she has had a lot of fun with the event. “One of my friends was doing it, so I decided to just for fun,� Whitfield said. “I had never done it before. All the girls competing are really cool.� Whitfield said she might not make it to Thursday’s finals, but that she had a blast doing the contest anyway. “It was like being in front of 200 people in your underwear,� she said. “I figured that was a good fear to try and get over.� Will Whitfield be competing in any more bikini contests? Probably not. “It’s kind of my last hurrah,� she

said. “But it was a really fun time.� Drink specials will accompany Thursday’s festivities, with $1 Natural Lights and $3 Baby Bombs. There will be a $5 cover after 9 p.m., and you must be 19 or older to get in. The bikini contest won’t be The Jupiter’s last cool summer event. Beginning July 8, the bar will be hosting its summer 2010 Battle of the Bands. Each Thursday in July, three bands will compete to move on to the finals and win stage time at the county fair, $350 in gift certificates and a demo recording at Old Capitol Recording Studio. All proceeds from the Battle of the Bands will go to aiding cerebral palsy. Other upcoming events at The Jupiter include fall concerts from Citizen Cope, Drive-By Truckers and Brantley Gilbert, according to owner Jeremiah Jones. The bar is currently undergoing some major renovations, which Jones said he hopes will make the place much more inviting. “Before it was just sort of an awkward space,� he said. The new Jupiter will include much more standing room, 52-inch televisions and working garage doors, if approved by the city. The project will be complete by August 18, Jones said, and there’s one more big change, which hasn’t been decided just yet. “I just can’t think up a name,� he said.

CW|Matt Abbey

Jupiter Bar and Grill on the Strip concludes its bikini contest tomorrow night.

Summer Sale 50% Off Original Price on All BAMA Clearance Apparel

Live The Good Life!

Experience Living at          Rock Point Rental s Newly Renovated Apartment Complex

Only 0.85 Miles From Campus!

Amenities Include:  Pool and Grill Area  Gated Complex  Spacious Bedrooms  Walk-In Closets  Aordable Rates

564 to 0 5 4 3 ) 5 0 2 ( l Cal ay d o T r u o T a e Schedul FIND US ON FACEBOOK & RockPointRental.com


SPORTS Page 12 • Thursday, July 1, 2010 Editor • Laura Owens sports@cw.ua.edu

BASEBALL

Gamecocks take the NCAA Championship By Eric Olson Associated Press

South Carolina’s Jackie Bradley, Jr. holds the trophy as players exchange high-ďŹ ves with the crowd at Rosenblatt Stadium.

&HQWHUIRU7HDFKLQJDQG/HDUQLQJ $FDGHPLF6XSSRUW6HUYLFHV

‡)UHHWXWRULQJIRUPDQ\8$FRXUVHV ‡6XSSOHPHQWDU\YLGHRWDSHVDQGGLJLWL]HGYLGHRVIRUPDQ\8$FRXUVHV ‡6WXG\6NLOOVFRXUVHVDQGZRUNVKRSV ‡0DWK&KHPLVWU\DQG3K\VLFVKHOSVHVVLRQVDQGRUWHVWUHYLHZVHVVLRQV ‡*UDGXDWH6FKRROHQWUDQFHH[DPSUHSDUDWLRQ

/HWWKH&7/KHOS\RX VWXG\VPDUWHUQRWKDUGHU

South Carolina closed out the final College World Series at Rosenblatt Stadium with its first baseball title and big-time bragging rights. “To be the last team to win it here,� winning pitcher Matt Price said, “that’s amazing.� The Gamecocks provided the perfect send-off for the stadium that has been home to college baseball’s biggest event since 1950 with a 2-1 victory over UCLA in 11 innings Tuesday night. The CWS moves to a new stadium in downtown Omaha next year. “It dawned on me, it would be wonderful to go deep into this thing and be around at the end,� coach Ray Tanner recalled thinking when the AP CWS began nearly two weeks ago. “I know the new stadium will be very special and a great facility. “But this is history. And we’ll be a part of the College World Series and Rosenblatt for a long, long time.� Not only because they won it, but how the Gamecocks accomplished it. South Carolina (54-16) trailed in the middle innings of all three of its NCAA regional games and had to win two one-run games in the super regionals to make it to the College World Series. Once they got to Omaha, the Gamecocks lost their first game and had to stave off elimination four times to reach the

finals, even winning one game after being down to their last strike. In a fitting end to a fantastic season, South Carolina came from behind again Tuesday night, tying the game in the eighth inning and beating UCLA (51-17) in the 11th on Whit Merrifield’s RBI single. “It’s just a great run,� Tanner said. “You have to have a lot of things happen for you and you have to have the right kind of people around you. But it’s not impossible to be sitting where we are. But the odds are against you being here. No matter how good your program is, there are a lot of great programs out there.� The Gamecocks won six straight games after losing their CWS opener against Oklahoma, and became the third first-time champion since 2006 after sweeping the best-ofthree series. Merrifield was surprised UCLA closer Dan Klein didn’t intentionally walk him and Jackie Bradley, Jr., the CWS Most Outstanding Player, to set up potential forceouts all around and a possible double play. “When I saw the catcher squat down, I knew I had something to prove,� Merrifield said. “They wanted to get me out.� Scott Wingo drew a leadoff walk and took second when catcher Steve Rodriguez, perhaps distracted when Evan Marzilli squared to bunt, let an inside 1-0 pitch get past

him. Wingo moved to third when Marzilli got a bunt down, and scored when Merrifield drilled Klein’s 2-0 pitch past the pulled-in outfield of the Bruins and into right field. “I worked the count in my favor and got a fastball, even though it was kind of down, I got the barrel on it,� he said. “And it finally went the other way and shot it into the gap. And it fell for me. And it was a great feeling.� Price (5-1) allowed one hit over two 2-3 innings for the Gamecocks, who also went to the CWS finals in 1975, ‘77 and 2002, but came up short. “I could have gone another two innings if I had to,� Price said. “The adrenaline kicked in.� Klein (6-1) took the loss after working three 1-3 innings for the Bruins — “the greatest club we played the entire year,� Tanner said. South Carolina had runners in scoring position in four of the first six innings, including loading the bases in the second, but could push nothing across until the eighth. UCLA also missed out on early scoring chances and went 1 for 8 with runners in scoring position. “To get so close and to fall short hurts,� said UCLA starter Rob Rasmussen, who allowed six hits in six scoreless innings. “I think maybe later tonight or tomorrow, as it all kind of sinks in, and as we look back on it, we’re all going to be proud of what we did.�

BASKETBALL

Mikhail Torrance signs with Heat From staff reports Former Alabama point guard Mikhail Torrance believes a heart condition kept him from being selected in the NBA draft. Torrance told The Birmingham News and Mobile Press-Register on Monday

that he has signed a free agent deal with the Miami Heat and will play for the franchise’s Summer League team. Torrance says the heart condition was “the only reason� he wasn’t drafted last week. Torrance says he was diagnosed before last season with athletic heart syndrome,

a condition where the heart is slightly bigger than normal due to prolonged exercise. Torrance says Alabama team doctors cleared him to play and told him the condition was common. He led the Crimson Tide in scoring and assists, averaging 15.6 points a game.

LEASE A PAD!

get an iPad! BENT TREE

RIVER MONT

1 & 2 Bedrooms 7 Blocks from campus New hot tub Great roommate floorplan Heated swimming pool WiFi around pool Tennis court Volleyball & basketball court Pet Friendly Monitored Intrusion Alarms in every apartment 24 Hour maintenance service Professional On-site management

1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms Private river walk Large pool & sundeck Fitness Center Lighted tennis court Clothing care center Garages 24 hour emergency maintenance Pet Friendly Washer/dryer connections Balcony with storage Professional On-site management

205-391-6070 benttreeapts.info

205-349-1787 rivermontapts.info

Free iPad With 12 Month Lease!* 1200 Greensboro Ave. Tuscaloosa, AL. 35401 391-6000  sealyrealty.com *Within 24 hours of viewing.


The Crimson White

13

SPORTS

Thursday, July 1, 2010

BASEBALL

FOOTBALL

Ingram named SEC athlete of the year

Tide sends several players to MLB By Marquavius Burnett Sports Reporter

The Alabama Crimson Tide baseball team had a successful 2010 Major League Baseball draft. The Tide had a total of 11 players taken in the draft; seven players from this year’s roster and four Tide signees were selected. Alabama has had at least one player drafted for 32 consecutive years, dating back to 1979. “We are very excited and pleased for all of our players and signees taken in the Major League Draft,” head coach Mitch Gaspard said. “We had six players, three on our current team and three

signees, taken in the first 10 rounds. That says a lot about what type of players they are. We are very excited for Nelson and Rutledge, who were both taken in the top three rounds. I know it was a big day for them.” Nelson was the 64th overall pick, taken by the Milwaukee Brewers in the second round. It was the second time the Niceville, Fla., native has had his name called in the MLB Draft. He was selected in the 39th round by the Cincinnati Reds in the 2007 draft. In addition to Nelson and Rutledge, junior second baseman Ross Wilson was selected in the 10th round

(308th pick) by the Chicago White Sox. Senior third baseman Jake Smith was a 15th round pick (471 overall) by the Philadelphia Phillies. Sophomore right-hander Tyler White was a 20th round pick (613th selection) by the Detroit Tigers. Senior first baseman Clay Jones and junior right-hander Jason Townsend had their names called on the final day of the 2010 Major League Draft and in day two of the first-year player draft on Wednesday. The Tide had three signees taken in the first five rounds, including shortstop Matt Lipka, Reggie Golden and John McGuarian.

Lipka, a product of McKinney (Texas) High School, was the 35th overall pick in the draft by the Atlanta Braves. Golden, an outfielder from Wetumpka (Ala.) High School, was taken in the second round (65th pick) by the Chicago Cubs. McGuarian, a standout righthander at Pensacola Catholic High School, was taken in the fifth round (157th pick) by the Cincinnati Reds. UA signee Austen Smith was taken in the 48th round by the New York Mets. The Pensacola (Fla.) Catholic High School standout was the 1,442nd overall pick. “It’s always a risk when you sign talented players like

we do,” Gaspard said. “Matt Lipka is a tremendous talent, and we knew that he had a chance to play in the majors. It is a part of the business.” Gaspard says he understands that all players want to go pro. He just tries to give them good advice, but he knows it is their decision. “Every player hopes to get drafted,” Gaspard said. “It’s a boyhood dream. We just want them to be smart and understand how the minor leagues work. We also want them to get their education and a degree, but at the end of the day that is more of a personal and family decision.”

From staff reports

Sophomore Mark Ingram was recently named the 20092010 Roy F. Kramer SEC Male Athlete of the Year by a vote of the league’s athletics directors, Commissioner Mike Slive announced Tuesday. Ingram became the first A l ab a m a football player to win the Heisman Trophy on the way to leading Mark Ingram the Crimson Tide to a 12-0 regular season and the 2009 SEC and National Championships. He is only the sixth player since 1950 to win the Heisman and lead his team to a national championship in the same season. A unanimous first-team AllAmerican, Ingram was named the Sporting News National Player of the Year and the AP SEC Offensive Player of the Year. He was also a unanimous first-team All-SEC selection. Former Florida quarterback Tim Tebow won the award the past two years. Ingram is Alabama’s ninth all-time SEC athlete of the year winner and third football player since the award’s creation in 1976. The Tide’s most recent winner was gymnast Jeana Rice in 2004. Past winners include Andree’ Pickens (gymnastics) 2002, Dee Foster (gymnastics) 1990, Derrick Thomas (football) 1989, Cornelius Bennett (football) 1987, Lillie Leatherwood-King (track and field) 1987, Penney Hauschild (gymnastics) 1985 and Reggie King (basketball) 1979.

WIMBLEDON

Federer loses to Berdych in quarterfinals By Stephen Wilson Associated Press For the first time in eight years, Roger Federer won’t be striding onto Centre Court for the Wimbledon final. The six-time champion was upset in the quarterfinals by big-hitting Tomas Berdych on Wednesday, stopping his bid for a record-tying seventh title at the All England Club and extending his recent stretch of disappointing play. The 12th-seeded Berdych used his big serve and forehand to beat Federer 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4, on Centre Court for the biggest victory of the Czech’s career. Berdych will meet No. 3 Novak Djokovic for a spot in the final, with No. 2 Rafael Nadal facing No. 4 Andy Murray in the other semifinal. It’s the first time since 2002 that Federer has failed to reach the final. Since losing in the first round eight years ago, Federer had played in the championship match a record seven consecutive times. He won the title six times and finished runner-up once, bolstering his reputation as the greatest player of alltime. Winner of a record 16 Grand Slam titles, Federer said he was unable to play his best tennis Wednesday because of pain in his back and right leg.

“I couldn’t play the way I wanted to play,” said Federer, who had been chasing the record of seven titles won by Pete Sampras and 19th-century player William Renshaw. “I am struggling with a little bit of a back and a leg issue. That just doesn’t quite allow me to play the way I would like to play. It’s frustrating, to say the least.” Berdych said he didn’t notice anything wrong with Federer. “I don’t know if he is just looking for some excuses after the match or something like that,” he said. “I think he was 100 percent ready.” Berdych ripped a clean forehand winner on his second match point to become the first Czech to reach the men’s semifinals since Ivan Lendl in 1990. “Not many other moments can compare to this one,” Berdych said. “Standing on Centre Court here in Wimbledon, beating the sixtime champion here. It couldn’t be better. But there is still one match to feel better feelings than this one. I hope I can get to that.” Berdych will next face Djokovic, who swept past Yenhsun Lu in straight sets to reach the semifinals for the second time. The third-seeded Djokovic never faced a break point as he beat the 82nd-ranked Taiwanese player 6-3, 6-2, 6-2 in

AP Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic, walks off court with defending champion Roger Federer after defeating him in their menʼs singles quarterfinal. less than two hours on Court 1. With the loss, Federer will drop to No. 3 in the ATP rankings next week for the first time since Nov. 10, 2003. Since winning the Australian Open in January, he has failed to win a tournament. The 6-foot-5 (1.96 m) Berdych was on the offensive for most of the match, smacking first

serves consistently in the 130s mph (above 210 kph), winding up to rip forehand winners and not buckling under pressure. He hit 51 winners, compared to 44 for Federer. “He played well when he had to,” Federer said. “It was brutal for me. Every time he had a chance, he took it. On the break points, he played great on those.

... When I did have chances, I played poorly. It was just a frustrating match the way it all went.” Berdych broke Federer four times, with the final break coming in the seventh game of the fourth set. Berdych served 12 aces, was broken just once and saved seven of eight break points.

Serena, not Venus, still around for Wimbledon Associated Press Five-time Wimbledon champion Venus Williams doubled-faulted five times, made a total of 29 unforced errors and was beaten 6-2, 6-3 Tuesday by Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria, the lowest-ranked woman still in the draw. “I would have loved to have been around, you know, to come close and hopefully make it an all-Williams final this year,” the second-seeded Venus said. “But that won’t be.” Over and over, she would shank a shot, then turn toward the Court 1 player guest box where her parents were seated and put her palms up or shrug her shoulders, as if to indicate, “I don’t know what’s happening here.” “Didn’t do myself any favors,” Venus said. “I missed all shots today: fore-

hand, volley, backhand. You know, if there was a shot to miss, I think I missed it.” Venus participated in eight of the past 10 women’s finals, losing to her sister three times, including in 2009. She beat Serena for the 2008 title. Tuesday’s match was the older Williams’ 77th in singles at the All England Club, and never had she won so few games. The only time she’s been beaten at Wimbledon by someone ranked lower than Pironkova was all the way back on June 28, 1997, when the American lost her tournament debut to No. 91 Magdalena Grzybowska. Really, the only factor preventing this result from truly being considered one of the sport’s biggest upsets ever is that Pironkova has done it before:

She defeated Williams at the 2006 Australian Open. Still, even the first woman representing Bulgaria to make it to the final four at a Grand Slam tournament in the 42-year Open era was not anticipating this. “No one expected me to (reach a) semifinal in Wimbledon,” Pironkova said, “and to beat Venus Williams like that.” On the other side of the draw, defending champion Serena Williams smacked 11 aces — lifting her total for the tournament to a Wimbledonrecord 73, one more than she hit last year — and made only six unforced errors in a 7-5, 6-3 victory over No. 9 Li Na of China. Serena next faces yet another unheralded member of this year’s final

STUDENT SPECIAL! 24/7 Summertime Memberships Now

1031 13th Street E.

Behind Big Lots

Associated Press

The date has been circled on calendars around the NBA for years. July 1, 2010: The day LeBron James becomes a free agent. The day the league might begin to change forever. “I think the landscape could really shift,” former Phoenix general manager Steve Kerr said. Shopping season starts at 12:01 a.m. EDT Thursday with James as the biggest prize, a two-time MVP just reaching his prime and one of the most sought-after players ever to hit the free agent market in any sport. Deals can be agreed to but can’t be signed until July 8. With so many potential good options, he might want to take his time. With free agency turning into must-see TV, NBA TV will air a live special starting at midnight, and the Knicks’ MSG network will debut a show at the same time.

Send us your snapshots and they will appear in the 20102011 edition of the Corolla, UA’s Official Student Yearbook!

Unlimited Tanning Available Daily Group Fitness Classes Sauna / Steam Room

for 3 months

Free agency set to begin

Put those Facebook Pictures to Good Use!

CALL 205-345-6496

$99

four, 62nd-ranked Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic, who saved five match points and erased third-set deficits of 4-0 and 5-2 to eliminate 80th-ranked qualifier Kaia Kanepi of Estonia 4-6, 7-6 (8), 8-6. Pironkova (her first name is pronounced sve-TAH-nuh, her last peeRON-ko-vuh) and Kvitova (keh-VIToh-vuh) give Wimbledon two unseeded women in the semifinals for the first time since 1999. Indeed, Serena Williams is the only remaining woman with a Grand Slam championship; she owns 12. “It’s not mine to lose; it’s mine to win, if I can get it,” the three-time Wimbledon champion said. “There’s three other people that are vying to win it. They have just as good a chance as I do.”

NBA

Follow uss on

Submit Today at YourUAPhotos@gmail.com

2009-2010 Corollas are still available @ corolla.ua.edu


14 Thursday, July 1, 2010

SPORTS

MLB

Jurrjens returns, Braves beat Nats, 4-1 Associated Press Jair Jurrjens gave up one run and had a run-scoring single in his first start in two months, and the Atlanta Braves beat the Washington Nationals 4-1 on Wednesday night. Jurrjens (1-3) gave up six hits and one run in five innings in his first major league start since injuring his left hamstring on April 29. He struck out six with two walks. Four Atlanta relievers combined to give up two hits in four scoreless innings. Billy Wagner gave up a leadoff single to Ivan

The Crimson White

WORLD CUP

USA eliminated by Ghana

Rodriguez in the ninth before striking out Cristian Guzman, Alberto Gonzalez and Ian Desmond to earn his 16th save. Jurrjens, who was a combined 27-20 with a 3.10 ERA in his first two seasons, has had health problems most of the year. He was slowed in spring training by inflammation in his right shoulder and suffered a setback with his hamstring in May. Jurrjens led 3-0 after five innings and was pulled after giving up singles to Ryan Zimmerman and Adam Dunn and walking Josh Willingham with no outs in the sixth.

AP This June 27 file combination of six photos shows Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer looking at the ball that hit the bar and bounced over the line during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between Germany and England in Bloemfontein, South Africa. By Jordan Eichenblatt Contributing Writer Finally, after scoreless games ending in 0-0 ties, the World Cup moved on to the elimination round with no ties and 16 teams. Missing in those 16 teams were defending World Cup champions, Italy, and runner-up France. The French team fell apart after head coach Raymond Domenench sent home striker Nicolas Anelka after the team’s 2-0 loss to Mexico. Two days later Domenench was involved in another team problem after the strength coach Robert Duverne threw his badge on the practice field and stormed off. Five minutes later the French team boarded the buses early and returned to their hotel. Also not included in the final

16 teams is host country South Africa. The only African team left is Ghana. Ghana, who placed second in Group E, faced the United States, winner of Group C. The United States, who won their group in a thriller against Algeria, a game which some have suggested was once again overshadowed by horrible officiating, won their first group title since 1930. After the US allowed an early goal to Ghana, Landon Donavan was given a penalty kick to even the score 1-1. After 90 minutes of play and many missed opportunities, the game headed into extra time where Ghana struck early, and the US could not get a goal to equalize. Ghana eliminated the US 2-1. England, who came in

second to the US in group play, was also eliminated following a loss to Germany. A goal in the first half, which would have made the score 2-2, was not counted for England because the referee didn’t see the ball cross over the line, though replay evidence showed the ball crossing into the goal. The should-be goal was shot by Steven Gerrad, bounced off a post and went two yards into the goal before the German goalie picked the ball up. To everyone’s surprise, the referee did not signal a goal. Argentina faced Mexico. Mexico also appeared to be a victim of questionable officiating when Argentina striker, Carlos Tevez was 15 feet offside and scored a goal. The video boards inside the arena showed he was offside and the entire Mexican

team crowded the official and pointed that out. FIFA declined to comment on the officiating but also told each stadium to stop the use of instant replays during the game. Brazil, the favorite to win, defeated Chile 3-0. The Netherlands defeated Slovakia 2-1. Spain beat boarding country Portugal 1-0 and in the first penalty kick shootout of the World Cup, Paraguay defeated Japan 5-3 in penalty kicks. Each team needs two more wins to reach the final. Uruguay will face Ghana, the Netherlands will face Brazil, Argentina will face Germany, Paraguay will face Spain and the Americans will face waiting another four years until the country gets another chance.

We’re the Base Camp for your four-year summit. We have more format options for all your textbook and course material needs - including new, used, rental, binder-ready and digital*. In addition, we have more officially licensed Bama apparel and souvenirs; and we are an authorized Apple Campus Store. So start your journey here. We have everything you need to help prepare you for achieving great heights. ®

*

Fall textbooks are in! Come in and get yours today or order online at supestore.ua.edu. We are conveniently located at the Ferguson Center, Tutwiler Hall and the School of Law.


0255,621 $3$57 0(176  %'50  PRQWK DQG 6WXGLR  PRQWK KDOIZD\ GRZQ WRZQDQG8$&DOO  &$0386 %5 +286 (6 )DOO   PR 1R SHWV /HDVH  'HSRVLW 5H TXLUHG +286( )25 5(17 $YDLODEOH1RZEUEWK PLQXWHV IURP FDPSXV DQG'&+)HQFHG\DUG KDUGZRRGÃ&#x20AC;RRUV\DUG PDLQWDQFHLQFOXGHG FHQWUDO KHDW DLU   <285 6($5&+ ,6 29(5 %5  6WRU\ &ORVH WR &DPSXV 6SD FLRXV .LWFKHQ +DUG ZRRG Ã&#x20AC;RRUV )LUHSODFH )HQFHG <DUG /DUJH 'HFN :RQ¶W /DVW &DOO 1RZ +286( 52206 72 5(17 &/26( :$/. 7281,9*,5/621/<  %(+,1' 0,'72:1 9,//$*(  VW 6WUHHW ( /DUJH 9HU\ 1LFH  )HQFHG EDFN \DUG 1HZ FHQWUDO DLU PRQWK    6($621 5(7$,/   DQ+RXU6PDUW5HVSRQ VLEOH 6DOHVSHUVRQ&D VKLHU /RQJ KRXUV -XQH -XO\  )D[ 5HVXPH  &$0386 +286(6   EHGURRP KRXVHV IRU UHQW :ULJKW +XUG 3URS HUWLHV//&  $1'  EHGURRP KRPHV DYDLODEOH LQ $X JXVW   DQG  &DOO 0LFKDHO -DFREVRQ 5HDO (VWDWH    %81*$/2: +286( 'RZQWRZQ DYDLODEOH IRU )DOO +DUGZRRG Ã&#x20AC;RRUV ELJ IURQW SRUFK FORVH

&$0386 %HKLQG WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ 6WULS 6PDOO (I¿FLHQF\ $SDUWPHQWV  PR 8WLOLWLHV LQFOXGHG/HDVHDQGGH SRVLW UHTXLUHG 1R SHWV &DOO &$0386'2:1 72:1   EORFNV IURP VWULS  %5 $SWV  PR /HDVH DQG GH SRVLW UHTXLUHG 1R SHWV %URDGVWUHHW$SDUWPHQWV &DOO &$0386  %/2&.  DQG %5 DSWV   )DOO  OHDVH DQG GHSRVLW UHTXLUHG 1RSHWV:HDYHU5HQWDOV  :,//2::<&.EHG URRP  EDWK SHUIHFW IRU URRPPDWHV ¿YH PLQXWHV IURP &DPSXV

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Ã&#x20AC;RRUV IUHVK  SDLQW  QG $YH  )! (&22  ') PR   6&& .+($,# ).+   *+-' (-

#  !%

SPECIAL:

Highland Apts 2 BR 2 bath on Jack Warner

' ($-$ , 3)&!! +$/$& " , 3(($("   30$''$(" ))& 3$-( ,,  (- + 3,# ++2 + ((&..   1-4&$(%-.,5)+4"+ (-.,5 -)

!)+')+  $(!)+'-$)( -(+- ,**&2

Call: (205) 242-0528 gmrealty.org

     "  "! "!!  %!   %! %!   $"!  !"! $$$ !% " Professionally Managed by Lindsey Management Co., Inc.

Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday (7/1/10). This could be your luckiest year to date. Maximize possibilities by following your passions, and by exerting your will in career and work matters. Soothe relationships with co-workers by identifying and explaining opportunities, including necessary details. To get the advantage, check the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 7 -- You imagine everything as simple. When you get into it, you obsess over details. Stick to one task at a time for best results. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 5 -- Although you obsess about accuracy, you discover that others donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to care. No point in convincing. Get your own ducks in a row. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 6 -- To get anything done today, do it yourself. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t waste time arguing. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work, and you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 5 -- Exert your willpower to handle a partnership crisis. Use your imagination before speaking. Less talk and more action solve the problem. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 5 -Challenge yourself to remain focused all day. Make notes to yourself as reminders. Steady attention to details gets the job done efficiently.

68%/($6( $3$57 0(17 8QLYHUVLW\ 9LO ODJH  UDUH ¿QG ¿UVW Ã&#x20AC;RRU RQH EHGURRP RI  %5 DSDUWPHQW SLFN \RXU RZQ URRPDWH GH SRVLW ZDLYHG PR   )(0$/( 52200$7( :$17(' (QJOLVK PD MRU VHHNLQJ URRPPDWH WR VKDUH %5 $SW RQ WK $YHZDON WR FDP SXV : ' LQ XQLWODUJH EDOFRQ\ HDFK  GHSRVLW   XWLOLWLHV $YDLO $XJ  6XE OHDVH SRVVLEOH LI QHHG HG VRRQHU 7(;7 RU PDFKLQHVDQGFDQG\$OO FDOO   IRU    5  $771 '5,9(5 7UDLQ HHV 1HHGHG  VWX GHQW GULYHUV QHHGHG QRZ  GD\ &'/ WUDLQ LQJ DYDLODEOH    D ZHHN SOXV  %5$YDLODEOH1RZ EHQH¿WV$7'7  )DOO %5V LQFOXGH  5  VWXG\ ZDWHU  :' %,//< %$51(6 (1  %5%$  7(535,6(6,QFLVKLU &RQWDFW &DQGDFH  LQJ H[SHULHQFHG Ã&#x20AC;DWEHG GULYHUV ([FHOOHQW SD\   &/26,1* EHQH¿WV +RPH PRVW 5HTXLUH &2676 3$,'  %5 ZHHNHQGV PHQWV &ODVV $ &'/  %$SRROODNHODQDL 0LQ IURP 8QLYHUVLW\ \HDU WUDFWRUWUDLOHU H[SH  .LP *RRG ULHQFH FOHDQ 095  \HDUV ROG  &DOO  ZLQ'0*5HDO(VWDWH  ([W  RU  FRPSOHWH TXHVWLRQQDLUH ZZZELOO\EDUQHVQHW 5  &'/$ '5,9(56 :H KDYH PRUH PLOHV MXVW DVN RXU GULYHUV <RXU KDUG ZRUN HDUQV D VROLG SD\FKHFN 9DQ DQG Ã&#x20AC;DW EHG GLYLVLRQV &'/$  %$57(1',1*  PR 275  JRRG GULYLQJ GD\SRWHQWLDOQRH[SHUL UHFRUG UHTXLUHG :HVW HQFH QHFHVVDU\ 7UDLQ HUQ([SUHVV LQJ SURYLGHG    5  ([W ',5(&79 )5(( 67$1 $// &$6+ 9(1',1* '$5' LQVWDOODWLRQ )UHH 'R \RX HDUQ  LQ 6KRZWLPH  6WDU]  D GD\" <RXU RZQ ORFDO PR  )UHH +''95 XS FDQG\URXWH,QFOXGHV JUDGH (QGV 

 &$5( WK6WUHHW 7XVFDORRVD$/ )DPLO\0HGLFDO&OLQLF

1RZSURXGWRDFFHSW8QLWHG+HDOWK&DUH 2SHQ'DLO\1R$SSRLQWPHQWQHFHVVDU\

HPHUJLFDUHFOLQLFFRP

1R2QH&DUHV/LNH(PHUJL&DUH

1HZ FXVWRPHUV RQO\ TXDOSNJV)URP PR'LUHFW6WDU79  5  '5,9(5&'/$Ã&#x20AC;DWEHG FDUULHU VHHNLQJ GULY HUV WR KDXO IUHLJKW IURP 7XVFDORRVD $/ ZLWKLQ D  PLOH UDGLXV +RPH 1LJKWO\ 7RS SD\   '5,9(56  )22' 7DQNHU 'ULYHUV QHHGHG 275 SRVLWLRQV DYDLODEOH 12: &'/$ ZLWK WDQN HUUHTXLUHG2XWVWDQGLQJ SD\  EHQH¿WV &DOO D UHFUXLWHU72'$<  ZZZRDNOH\ WUDQVSRUWFRP 5  (;3(5,(1&(' 5(6 7$85$17 0$1$*(5 QHHGHG 5HORFDWLRQ DV VLVWDQFH 2[IRUG 6\O DFDXJD+HÃ&#x20AC;LQ3HOO&LW\ %&%6.SDLGYDFD WLRQ DQG PRUH )D[ UH VXPH )5((+')25OLIH2QO\ RQ'LVK1HWZRUN/RZHVW SULFHLQ$PHULFD PR IRU RYHU  FKDQ QHOVERQXV  5  +2/0$& &25325$ 7,21 &1& PDFKLQLVWV ZHOGHUV URERW ZHOG HQ JLQHHUPDQDJHPHQWGH VLJQ HQJLQHHU 7RS ZDJ HV $SSO\ DW  +Z\  6RXWK %D\ 6SULQJV 06KU#KROPDF FRP(2( ,7¶6 7+( %(67 RI ERWK ZRUOGV([FHOOHQWPRQH\ DQGFDUHHUVWDELOLW\6DW HOOLWHV8QOLPLWHGLVKLULQJ WHFKQLFLDQVLQ\RXUDUHD $V',6+1HWZRUNVOHDG LQJ SURYLGHU ZH RIIHU SDLG WUDLQLQJ EHQH¿WV FRPSDQ\ YHKLFOH WRROV HTXLSPHQW XQLIRUPHG VKLUWV (DUQ  D \HDU DQG PRUH 5H TXLUHPHQWV H[FHOOHQW FXVWRPHU VHUYLFH  \HDUV DQG ROGHU YDOLG

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 5 -- You wonder when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll actually finalize a particular project. It feels done already. Allow time for group members to approve. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 5 -- Balance efforts between personal details and expansive ideas from a partner. Take in a movie or other fun that this partnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been talking about. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- Plow through errands and shopping. You get a lot more done by yourself, so leave everyone else at home with their own chores. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 5 -- Think outside the box. In fact, leave the box in the bottom drawer and pursue a dream instead. A little hard work gets you miles ahead. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 6 -- Things go smoothly today if you take charge early. Listen to others, but make your own decisions. An opportunity arises from afar. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is an 8 -- Dream big dreams. Then apply your practical knowledge to make them come true. The size of your team is commensurate to the size of the dream. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -- Circumstances dictate your actions today. An older individual points out details you may have overlooked, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rush it.

GULYHU OLFHQVH QR FULPL QDO KLVWRU\ GUXJ IUHH ZRUNSODFH$SSO\RQOLQH Z Z Z 6 8 , ' , 6 +  F R P  &DOO  H[W(PDLO5HFUXLW LQJ#VXLGLVKFRP /($51 72 23(5 $7( D FUDQH RU EXOO GR]HU +HDY\ HTXLS PHQW WUDLQLQJ 1DWLRQDO FHUWL¿FDWLRQ )LQDQFLDO  SODFHPHQW DVVLVWDQFH *HRUJLD 6FKRRO RI &RQ VWUXFWLRQ ZZZKHDY\ FRP 8VH ³$/&1+´  1(: &$5((5  &'/ 7UDLQLQJ -REV DYDLODEOH LI TXDOL¿HG &DOO WRGD\ VWDUW WRPRUURZ :,$ 9$  5HKDE (6'7'6 //&  ZZZHVGVFKRROFRP 5  6(1,25 ),1$1&,$/ $1$/<67 $ VHQLRU )L QDQFLDO 5HSRUWLQJ 0DQ DJHU6HQLRU )LQDQFLDO $QDO\VW ZLWK D GHPRQ VWUDWHG WUDFN UHFRUG RI RSHUDWLRQDO DQG DGPLQ LVWUDWLYH LPSURYHPHQWV ([WHQVLYH H[SHULHQFH LQ WKH DUHDV RI ¿QDQFH  DFFRXQWLQJ ¿QDQFLDO SODQQLQJ  DQDO\VLV 6XEPLW \RXU FRYHU OHWWHU  UHVXPH WR IDPHVFU\V WDO#KRWPDLOFRP 6287+(51 81,21 67$7( &RPPXQLW\ &RO OHJH LV DFFHSWLQJ DSSOL FDWLRQV &KLHI RI &DP SXV3ROLFH&RVPHWRORJ\ ,QVWUXFWRU$XWR&ROOLVLRQ 5HSDLU,QVWUXFWRU3W5D GLRJUDSK\,QVWUXFWRUDQG 3W /LEUDULDQ0HGLD 6SH FLDOLVW 9LVLW ZZZVXVFF HGX KWWSZZZVXVFF HGX! DQG  $ODEDPD (PSOR\PHQW $JHQF\ IRU GHWDLOV686&&LV(2( 7+( +5& 2)),&( DW 7KH 8QLYHUVLW\ RI $OD EDPD LV VHHNLQJ DQ$F FRXQWDQW ,, PDQDJHU RI

¿VFDODIIDLUV UHVSRQVLEOH IRU GDLO\ ¿VFDO PDQDJH PHQW  DFFRXQW UHFRQ FLOLDWLRQ )RU DGGLWLRQDO LQIRUPDWLRQ RU WR DSSO\ IRU WKLV SRVLWLRQ  SOHDVH YLVLW  MREVXDHGX (2( $$

MINI-STORAGE of Tuscaloosa manager on site Student Discounts Open 7 days 7am-8pm

Call for rates! 3208 Rice Mine Rd. NE Tuscaloosa, AL 35406 (205) 758-0379

)TIJIUI;\]LMV\["

5W^QVO7NN +IUX][' Once you find a place to live, JOIN OCA! OCA covers your utility deposits and makes your service requests!

=HPGMBF>

)25&/26(' +20( $8&7,21   6( KRPHV  DXFWLRQ  2SHQ +RXVH -XO\      5('&  9LHZ IXOOOLVWLQJVZZZ$XFWLRQ FRP5(%UNU

0RYH,Q 6SHFLDO 3UH OHDVLQJ $YDLODEOH   1(:   %('5220 $3$570(176 *DW HG &RPPXQLW\ 12: 6,*1,1* )$//  /($6(6  6WDUWLQJ DW PR /2)7 '2:172:1 8QLTXH +XJH %5 %$URRISDWLRXSGDWHG NLWFKHQ ELJOLYLQJDUHD    %($87,)8/ 1(: $376 %5%$ ZLWK KDUGZRRG Ã&#x20AC;RRUV WLOH LQ NLWFKHQ  EDWKV 66$S SOLDQFHV :' LQFOXGHG 1HDU 3DOLVDGHV  PRQWK 0XVW 6HH &DOO &DQGDFH

Mankl]Zr Cner*%+)*) <eZllb_b^]l<hhk]bgZmhk >fber?khlm

THE CRIMSON WHITE CLASSIFIED RATE â&#x20AC;¢ Open Line Rate: 50¢ per word

â&#x20AC;¢ Student/Staff Line Rate: 35¢ per word â&#x20AC;¢ Display Rate: $8.15 per column inch

HD9;=QGMJ ;D9KKA>A=<K9L OOO&;O&M9& =<M'K=DD *The Crimson White places these ads in good faith. We are not responsible for fraudulent advertising.*

OYfllgk]]qgmj[gea[ ^]Ylmj]\`]j]7

L^g]rhnklZehg`pbmarhnk gZf^%r^ZkZg]fZchkmh \p9nZ'^]n'

www.BamaOCA.com

&$6+ 12: *HW FDVK IRU \RXU VWUXFWXUHG VHW WOHPHQW RU DQQXLW\ SD\ PHQWV +LJK SD\RXWV &DOO -* :HQWZRUWK 6(77/(0(17   5DW HG$E\WKH%HWWHU%XVL QHVV%XUHDX 5  &+(55< %('5220 6(7 6ROLG ZRRG QHYHU XVHG QHZ LQ IDFWRU\ ER[HV (QJOLVK 'RYHWDLO 2ULJLQDOFRVW6HOO  &DQ GHOLYHU 7RP  5  (/(&7521,& )/< 6:$77(5 /HDYHV QR PHVV RQ ZDOOV ,QVWDQWO\ NLOOV IUXLW Ã&#x20AC;LHV PRVTXL WRHVVSLGHUVJQDWV\HO ORZMDFNHWVKRUQHWVFDU SHQWHU EHHV HWF ZZZ 7,=FRP )5((+')25OLIH2QO\ RQ'LVK1HWZRUN/RZHVW SULFHLQ$PHULFD PR IRU RYHU  FKDQ QHOVERQXV  /($7+(5 /,9,1* 5220 6HW LQ RULJLQDO SODVWLFEUDQGQHZ2ULJL QDOSULFHVDFUL¿FH  &DQ GHOLYHU %LOO  5  1((' 72 $'9(57,6( VWDWHZLGH"  $/$6&$1 FDQ SODFH \RXU ZRUG DG LQ  QHZVSDSHUV DFURVV$ODEDPDIRURQO\  DGGLWLRQDO ZRUGV    0DNH RQH FDOO WR WKLV QHZVSDSHU D SDUWLFLSDWLQJ $/$6&$1 PHPEHU WR¿QGRXWKRZ HDV\ LW LV WR DGYHUWLVH VWDWHZLGH 5  7, 3/86 &$/&8/$ 725 $OO RULJLQDO PDWHUL DOVFRUGVLQFOXGHG9HU\ JRRGFRQGLWLRQRER &DOO 7:2 $. & 7($&83 <25.6+,5( 7(55,(5 3833,(6 )25 )5(( 0)  &217$&7 PUV DYDJUHHQ#JPDLOFRP

',925&( :,7+ 25 ZLWKRXWFKLOGUHQ :LWK IUHH QDPH FKDQJH GRFXPHQWV DQG PDULWDO VHWWOHPHQW DJUHHPHQW )DVW DQG HDV\ &DOO XV KUVGD\V   ZZZ&RXUW 'LYRUFH6HUYLFHFRP 5  ,) <28 86(' W\SH  'LDEHWHV GUXJ $YDQGLD DQGVXIIHUHGDVWURNHRU KHDUWDWWDFN\RXPD\EH HQWLWOHG WR FRPSHQVD WLRQ $WWRUQH\ &KDUOHV -RKQVRQ   35,9$7( 3,/27 /(6 6216 (DUQ \RXU SUL YDWH SLORW FHUWL¿FDWH DW WKH 7XVFDORRVD $LUSRUW &RQWDFW -RVK DW   63$1,6+ 75$16/$ 7,216  025( 6SDQ LVKWUDQVODWLRQVOHVVRQV FRQYHUVDWLRQV +RPH ZRUNV HWF FKHDS IDVW FKHFN Z XV VSDQ LVKODQJXDJH#OLYHFRP  


16 Thursday, July 1, 2010

The Crimson White

t our Ask abou IVE LUS ALL-INC

GES! PACKA ing at start

$

580

erson per bed / p

ds e B n i T e l b a l i a v A w No

First Month’s Rent FREE

*

*Limited time offer. See leasing office for details.

Road

69

r arne Pkwy kW Jac

University of Alabama

R i ve

15th Street

U niversit

r ❖

y Blvd.

1/4 mile

Apartment Homes ❖ Condominiums

just st

d

82

sity Blvd. ver Uni

359

r

a Ro

McFarland Blvd.

Rice Mine

University Mall

to the University of Alabama campus Close to campus, dining and shopping.

Apt Features:

Condo Features:

• Walk-In Closets • Private Baths • Washer/Dryer • Patio/Balcony • High-Speed Wireless Internet

• Granite Countertops • All Wood Cabinetry • Stainless Steel Appliances • Crown Moulding • Hardwood and Ceramic Tile Flooring

Property Amenities: • Gated Community • 8000 sq. ft. Activity Center • Media Room and Game Center • Carwash • Charcoal Grills • 2 Swimming Pools • Business Center • Fitness Center with Flat Screen TV’s

Ask About Our New

ALL-INCLUSIVE PACKAGES!

Apartments $ Starting at

Leases from

$

580

Condominiums $

per bed / person

Starting at

610

per bed / person

FURNITURE PACKAGE AVAILABLE

490

All-inclusive packages bundle a flat rate for power, water, cable, wi-fi, washer/dryer into your monthly rent.

Ellis Trick M U L T I F A M I L Y

per bed / person

Featured at University Downs: •Premium Services and Amenities •NEW “All-Inclusive Package” •Roommate Matching Service See why University Downs is yourbest choice for student living! Visit our website

www.universitydowns.com to follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

120 15th St E • 205-752-3232

www.universitydowns.com

CW - 7.01.2010  

The July 1st issue of the Crimson White.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you