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Friday, April 29, 2011

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Vol. 117, Issue 121

YEAR IN REVIEW IN 3D glasses inside

CHECK OUT THE BIGGEST STORIES OF THE YEAR

FALL 2010 SECTION A

SPRING 2011 SECTION B CW | Drew Hoover


Friday, April 29, 2011

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

The Crimson White

AUGUST

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Page 2• Friday, April 29, 2011

3D EDITON EDITORIAL • Brandee Easter, 3D edition editor • Drew Hoover, assistant 3D photo editor • Tyler Crompton, 3D photo editor • Victor Luckerson, editor-in-chief, • Jonathan Reed, managing editor • Will Tucker, news editor • Kelsey Stein, lifestyles editor • Jason Galloway, sports editor • Adam Greene, chief copy editor • Jessie Hancock, designer • Natalie Peeples, designer • Daniel Roth, multimedia editor

ADVERTISING • Dana Andrzejewski, Advertising Manager, 348-8995, cwadmanager@gmail.com • Drew Gunn, Advertising Coordinator, 348-8044 • Hallett Ogburn, Territory Manager, 348-2598 • Emily Frost, National Advertising/ Classifieds, 348-8042 • Jessica West, Zone 3, 348-8735 • Courtney Ginzig, Zone 4, 3488054 • Robert Clark, Zone 5, 348-2670 • Emily Richards, Zone 6, 3486876 • Amy Ramsey, Zone 7, 348-8742 • Brittany Key, Zone 8, 348-8054 • Nikki Amthor, Zone 44, 3486153 • Will DeShazo, Zone 55, 3488041 • Kelly Sturwold, Creative Services Manager, 348-8042 The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The advertising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published four times weekly when classes are in session during Fall and Spring Semester except for the Monday after Spring Break and the Monday after Thanksgiving, and once a week when school is in session for the summer. Marked calendar provided. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 354032389. The Crimson White is entered as periodical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright © 2010 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical Publication” categories of the U.S. copyright laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

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CW | Drew Hoover

BIGGER, BADDER BRYANT-DENNY By Jordan Eichenblatt

seen was complete. “After the north end zone was Two unfamiliar shadows towered complete, we did not think we over the Crimson Tide football team would expand any more in the comat Bryant-Denny Stadium during its ing years,” Moore said, “but Coach Saban came into our program and championship season in 2009. On July 25, the cranes that soared the demand of tickets was very high, over the stadium were removed and so we decided we should expand.” The expansion increased the an addition that Athletic Director Mal Moore said he had never fore- capacity of the stadium to 101,821,

making it the fifth largest college football stadium in the country. The only universities with bigger stadium capacities are Michigan, Penn State, Tennessee and Ohio State. “You’re not going to get any negatives out of me relative to the great venue that I think BryantDenny Stadium has been to play in,”

Alabama football head coach Nick Saban said. “I’m sure now it will be even better – maybe one of the best in the country.” Coincidentally, the sum of each individual number in the total capacity of the stadium adds up to 13, which is also the number of national championships Alabama has won over the years.

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UA hosts biggest rush in nation By Sydney Holtzclaw

Early Aug. 9, 1,610 women lined up at 15 doors on sorority row, taking part in the largest formal recruitment in UA and U.S. history. “For the past several years we have been among the top three universities with the largest group of women going through formal recruitment,” said Gentry McCreary, director of Greek Affairs. Although McCreary said he is excited by the number of women involved in rush this year, he is more excited by the number who received bids. “One thousand three hundred and thirty-six women

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received bids to join a sorority this year,” he said. “It’s one thing to have a large number of girls go through the process of rush, but it’s another to have such a high retention percentage such as ours.” “Typically that [retention] rate is around 70 percent,” said Sarah Suggs, President of the Alabama Panhellenic Association. “Eighty-nine is unheard of. It’s a true testimony to our sororities’ chapters.” According to McCreary, the University’s student involvement in greek life has doubled from 3,000 students to 6,000 since 2003. “It’s really exciting and we’re continuing to grow,” McCreary said.

UA faces Dining Dollars lawsuit

CW File By Jennie Kushner In 2009, undergraduate enrollment at the University was about 23,700. With Dining Dollars costing $300 per semester per student, the fee extracts more than $14 million from students, according to one of three lawsuits that were filed on Aug. 11. The three class action lawsuits were filed against the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Auburn University for imposing these mandatory fees upon students. Each lawsuit was filed by a separate group of students.

Attorneys Danny Evans and John Whitaker of G. Daniel Evans law firm in Birmingham filed the class action lawsuits on behalf of these students. Evans said in an emailed statement that the Dining Dollars program coerces students into making a payment that constricts students’ free choice but rewards the University. “These fees are not tuition and not related to classroom instruction,” Evans said. “Instead, these food fees are mandated because these state schools have contracted to give certain food vendors control over these student dining dollars.”


The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Friday, April 29, 2011

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1 SEPTEMBER

All applicants receive block seating By Charles Scarborough The Student Organization Seating Committee finalized its seating section with block newcomers Honors College Assembly, Alpha Phi Alpha and Air Force ROTC, among others, claiming prominent spots in the seating section. Student Organization Seating Chair Clay Armentrout said every organization that applied for SOS received a designated seating section. Thomas Walker, president of Alpha Phi Alpha, said this has been a great sign of progress at the University. “Now it’s 2010, and we are making remarkable steps moving this University forward, integrating different organizations,” Walker said. “It’s just a powerful thing to see. “This was monumental for us and not just for us. It was monumental for all black fraternities and other organizations,” he said. S tu d e n t G ove r n m e n t Association Vice President of Student Affairs Stephen Swinson said it has been a “memorable year” for the University, and said he believes that the new system gives organizations across campus an incentive to excel in all areas. “The SGA did not just talk about being inclusive and opening up to new organizations; we actually did it,” Swinson said.

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By Tony Tsoukalas

Bryant-Denny Stadium. The Crimson Tide completely The University of Alabama controlled the Spartans all beat San Jose State 48-3 game, out gaining the Spartans in its season opener in in yardage 591-175. By far the most exciting part front of a sold out crowd in

of the game was when freshman AJ McCarron connected with wide receiver Julio Jones for a 29-yard touchdown to but the Tide up 28-3. The play featured a diving one-handed

CW | Jerrod Seaton

catch by Jones, which many claimed was the best of the receiver’s career. “I’ve made some great catches in practice, but not in a game,” Jones said.

Kappa Sig loses national charter for violating alcohol rules

By Jennie Kushner

CW | Megan Smith

JONES HELPS TIDE GRAB VICTORY IN OPENER

The UA chapter of the Kappa Sigma fraternity lost its national charter on Sept. 8, according to University and national organization sources. “[They lost their charter due to] violation of our code of conduct for alcohol and social function violations,” said Mic Wilson,

executive director of Kappa Sigma. Gentry McCreary, director of Greek Affairs, said in an emailed statement Sept. 13 the national organization of Kappa Sigma has withdrawn the charter of the UA chapter for violations of Kappa Sigma policy and violations of the Code of Student Conduct. “The chapter was suspended

earlier this semester and the charter was withdrawn following an investigation by UA and the national organization,” McCreary said. Cathy Andreen, director of media relations, said in an emailed statement the University is taking the appropriate actions regarding the violations of the Code of Student

Conduct. She said students living in the house will continue living there under the supervision of a UA-employed house director throughout the appeal process. Several anonymous members of the fraternity said on Aug. 17, two freshman girls showed up drunk to the Kappa Sigma fraternity house. Later that night, they went the Druid City Hospital

for alcohol poisoning. Members said this incident contributed to the revocation of the fraternity’s charter. “The problem is the freshman girls at this school that can’t control their alcohol consumption,” one Kappa Sigma member said. “It causes problems for themselves and everyone around them.”

UA Ah hosts ostts biggest biggest rush in nat nation tion


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Friday, April 29, 2011

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

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The Crimson White

Attorney General speaks at Mockingbird event

By Will Tucker

Shane Sharpe’s voice reflected the Honors College dean’s excitement about the event’s keynote speaker before the “To Kill a Mockingbird” 50th Anniversary Celebration at the UA Law School on Sept. 21. “It brings national attention to have the attorney general come to the University of Alabama to talk about and commemorate the book ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’” Sharpe said before the event. “We’re excited.”

The themes of integration and equality weighed heavily in Attorney General Eric Holder’s remarks. “It is really an honor to support the work being done on the University of Alabama campus to ensure that this place of learning is also a place of healing,” Holder said. “Because of that work, this University, once a battleground in America’s civil rights struggle, is now a force for tolerance and for inclusion, a forum for the peaceful exchange of ideas. Holder reminded the audience,

though, that change starts with individual people. “Individual actions count, individual actions matter,” he said. “‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ contains a simple but important message—the pursuit of justice can take many forms, but no matter what form, it always begins the same way, with a simple action by a hopeful person.” Sharon Malone, Holder’s wife and the sister of Vivian Malone Jones, one of the first two black students who attended the University, was moved by the

celebration of the novel’s 50th anniversary. “My family has longstanding ties with the University of Alabama, and over the years, [Vivian] came to love it here and so do we,” she said. “The historical significance of having an attorney general be responsible for getting my sister into the University of Alabama, and now bringing my husband back here as the attorney general is something that will forever be a warm spot in my heart,” she said. AP

16 STUDENTS PROTEST AREA STRIP MINE By William Evans Exhausting heat did not stall students and concerned citizens from protesting a strip mine to be potentially located near the Black Warrior River in Birmingham. The University owns most of the property Shepherd Bend LLC desires to lease for its strip mine. If built, the mine will be located 800 feet upriver of Birmingham Water Works, the supplier of drinking water to the surrounding areas. John Wathen, chairman of the Citizen Coal Council and a participant at the rally, said the University’s property could be put to more environmentally friendly uses. “We believe in a more responsible way for power [to be harnessed] in this city,” Wathen said. Wathen said the University could ruin its reputation for being “green” by leasing the property to Shepherd Bend for the coal mine. He said the University should instead invest its attention in wind and solar energy if the land is to be put to use as a source for energy production. He said an “overlapping grid” of solar panels and wind turbines would be a preferable alternative to coal mining. The protest was held across the street from Moody Music Hall on a patch of grass next to University Boulevard. The area was chosen because the University has specific zones designated as “free speech zones,” said Jim Hall, director of New College.

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The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Friday, April 29, 2011

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Friday, April 29, 2011

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

The Crimson White

OCTOBER 2

Kappa Sig appeal denied By Jennie Kushner

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On Oct. 2, undergraduate representatives, members of the fraterThe UA chapter of Kappa Sigma nity’s house corporation and alumni fraternity was denied an appeal con- traveled Charlotte, N.C., to make the cerning the revocation of its national appeal, Mic Wilson, executive director charter, Cathy Andreen, director of of Kappa Sigma national chapter, said. Andreen said a national officer will media relations, said in an emailed interview the chapter membership to statement.

determine whether the local chapter can re-colonize at some point. “[Kappa Sigma] is going to send a national representative to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of reviewing the chapter’s membership and the overall operation and see what the reorganization plan would be,” Wilson said.

Wilson said the representative will make a recommendation to the board concerning the future of the chapter should be after the representative reviews the fraternity. “We are still in the process, it is going to take more time, but our board is reviewing,” Wilson said.

TIDE LOSES FIRST REGULAR-SEASON GAME By Jason Galloway Sports Editor crimsonwhitesports@gmail.com They say all good things must come to an end. Before Alabama’s longstanding winning streak ended in Columbia, S.C. on Oct. 9, however, there was a feeling that it never would. “We can’t just show up and win just because you’re Alabama,” said junior running back Mark Ingram. “I don’t think guys were ready to come out here. Guys thought they could just show up and win.” With a 35-21 defeat at the hands of No. 19 South Carolina, the No. 1 Crimson Tide snapped a 19-game winning streak and lost its first regular-season game since 2007. “I think this team has been very fortunate up to this point by creating positive outcomes after negative outcomes,” senior quarterback Greg McElroy said. “We shot ourselves in the foot just too many times. I think everybody just needs to look in the mirror and regroup. “This team is capable of amazing, amazing things. We can still do everything that we want to do. I promise I will do everything in my power to get these guys ready to go and put this loss in the rear-view mirror.”

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The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Friday, April 29, 2011

BAMA CELEBRATES HOMECOMING WEEK

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From staff reports

The UA community enjoyed homecoming festivities during the week of Oct 11. Local busineses along the strip participated in the “Paint the Town Red” event, where students painted storefronts with Crimson Tide art. A dance competition was held in Coleman Coliseum on Thursday, Oct. 15. Foster Auditorium saw its first use in decades on Friday, Oct. 16, when Alpha Kappa Alpha fraternity and Kappa Alpha Psi sorority won the annual step show competition. On Saturday, the Homecoming parade cruised through downtown and featured several floats, the Million Dollar Band and area high school bands. Tyrone Prothro served as the grand marshal. After the parade the Crimson Tide football team downed the Ole Miss Rebels 23-10. Though the team came out strong, the Tide struggled in the second half. Alabama was quite unimpressive after the break, as Ole Miss gained on the Tide in the second half. “We’re still waiting on that game where we dominate our opponent for 60 minutes,” wide receiver Marquis Maze said. “When we put it all together, I think we’re unstoppable. It’s going to come.” “It’s all mental, really,” junior safety Mark Barron said. “You just have to be able to focus for 60 minutes. It’ll probably be a great thing [when it happens]. I feel like it’s on the way.” At halftime, Shellie Street was named the homecoming queen. She was crowned by Gov. Bob Riley.

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Republicans sweep state elections

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

2

The Crimson White

3FOSTER AUDITORIUM REOPENS

CW | Drew Hoover

Rice: ‘Racist overused’

By Ethan Summers Republican candidate Robert Bentley won the campaign for governor of Alabama after Democrat Ron Sparks conceded with more than 1,100,000 votes tallied. The margin was 56 percent to 44 percent in Bentley’s favor, reflecting a difference of more than 130,000 votes. Bentley thanked God, his wife, his staff and the people of Alabama and mentioned that his work would start immediately. Bentley also mentioned Nick Saban’s famous 24-hour rule, where any loss or victory can be mourned or celebrated for no more than 24 hours before moving on to the next challenge. Twentyfour hours is twice as much time as Bentley said he would take. “The Robert Bentley rule is we’ve got 12 hours, because I’m going to work in the morning at 8 o’clock.” During the campaign, Bentley promised he wouldn’t take a salary until Alabama reached full employment, an economic term meaning that all or almost all of people in an area seeking employment can find employment. Full employment accepts that 3 to 4 percent of the working population will be unemployed due to transitions among industries and in personal lives. John DuBois, vice president of College Democrats, said many Alabamians probably voted for Bentley based on the tradition of Alabama being a conservative, Republican state. “He’s been harping on creating jobs,” DuBois said, “which is something we need. Hopefully the legislature and Bentley can get along well and work together.”

CW File By Amanda Sams All that remained of those historic first steps toward integration taken by Autherine Lucy, Vivian Malone and James Hood was a legacy. However, a clock tower and plaza now stand outside of Foster Auditorium as a concrete tribute to the

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inspired so much change,” Hogan said. “I think these individuals were important, not just to Alabama, but to the nation,” said U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. “Barack Obama and I stand on their shoulders. The courageous actions of these people in the 1950s and 1960s made it possible for women and African Americans to find their voices.”

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The Crimson White

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2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Friday, April 29, 2011

Witt aims for 35,000 students by 2020

Rice: ʻRacist overusedʼ

By Taylor Holland

Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice returned to her childhood home of Tuscaloosa Nov. 4 to discuss her latest memoir, “Extraordinary, Ordinary People” in the Ferguson Center Theater. “The title of the book really speaks to the two aspects of my family,” Rice said. “In an ordinary sense, my mother was a schoolteacher and my father a high school guidance counselor. What’s extraordinary is that they provided every educational opportunity to me. Education was a kind of armor against segregation.” In a press conference after her book sign-

ing at Foster Auditorium, she said the word “racist” is overused, prevents progress and acts as a virtual mute button in conversation today. “Don’t rest on your laurels,” Rice said. “Turn the volume down on race, but keep the conversation going.” Rice emphasized that race, creed or color should not be an issue at all, but mentioned that she has faced discrimination. “Working hard allows us to push forward. Certainly sometimes people looked at me as a black woman,” Rice said, regarding her stint on the national political scene. “But since I couldn’t recreate myself as a white man, I just kept pushing forward.”

By Charles Scarborough

CW | Jerrod Seaton

UA President Robert Witt announced a new enrollment goal of 35,000 students by 2020 at the Nov. 4 board of trustees meeting, according to the Tuscaloosa News. Enrollment reached Witt’s initial goal of 28,000 in fall 2009. According to the Tuscaloosa News report, Witt said he feels the University can handle the growth with its current facilities. “We feel the University can grow from where we are now without having to construct any new academic buildings,” Witt said, according to the report. The Tuscaloosa News reported that Witt considered the downsides of a new, higher enrollment goal, among them a change in the University’s on-campus culture. “We believe adding 5,000 students is not going to affect that culture, but we will be monitoring it on the way,” he said.

14 QUIDDITCH SWEEPS THE CAPSTONE By Stephanie Brumfield

On Nov. 14, hundreds of first-time Quidditch players and nearly 1,500 spectators gathered for World Cup Quidditch on the Quad. The tournament began with Denny Chimes playing music from the Harry Potter soundtrack, then four fields representing the four Hogwarts houses released the Snitches, gold-clad crosscountry runners, to begin each game. The teams began on opposite sides of each field, and the Chasers and Beaters raced to the middle at the sound of the referee’s whistle to capture the Quaffle and Bludgers, which they used to make and defend goals. Meanwhile, the Seekers left the field in search of the golden Snitch which, when caught, would end the game. On the other side of the Quad, tents advertising face-painting at Hogsmeade and wand-making at Ollivander’s attracted young children and college students alike, and within an hour “butterbeer” was completely sold out. The final match of the tournament featured two very different teams — Afghanistan and Sweden. Team Afghanistan had practiced twice before beginning the tournament, and team members weren’t part of any overarching organization. “We’re just a bunch of Harry Potter fanatics who wanted to play Quidditch,” said Camellia Aslami, a senior majoring in interior design. “We’d definitely do it again.” Team Sweden, made up of law students, hadn’t practiced before beginning tournament play. Despite not having practiced, Sweden won in the finals. A book drive, a large component of the event, raised 1,074 books for the Alabama Literacy Initiative.

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Friday, April 29, 2011

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

The Crimson White

18

‘Deathly Hallows’ breaks records, enchants fans By Jordan Staggs

Magic was in the air the night of Nov. 18 as hundreds of fans gathered at the Cobb Hollywood 16 Cinema in Tuscaloosa for the midnight premiere of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1.� Potter watchers showed up hours early for the film’s release and snaked all the way around the back of the theater, which was completely sold out for the event. “This is the first midnight premiere I’ve ever been to,� said Courtney Stinson, a freshman majoring in English. Stinson said she is an avid Potter fan and went all-out for the debut midnight event, dressed as a Golden Snitch with a gold cape and glittering makeup. In fact, the building was a cornucopia of Potter characters and Hogwarts students decked out in robes, scarves and ties. The movie broke the record for highest-grossing opening day for the franchise by earning $61.2 million on Nov. 19, topping last year’s “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince� by about $3 million. This makes it the fifth-highest opening day ever. “The Twilight Saga: New Moon� comes in at No. 1 with $72.7 million. The Potter series’ passionate fans were not disappointed by the film, which earned 8.4 out of 10 stars online at the Internet Movie Database, imdb.com. The final installment in the Harry Potter series, “Deathly Hallows: Part 2,� will apparate into theaters in July and conclude J.K. Rowling’s story of The Boy Who Lived.

26 TIDE COLLAPSES AGAINST TIGERS By Jason Galloway

football. After building a 24-point lead, Alabama was beating up on Cam Alabama watched the Tigers slowly Newton and the No. 2 Auburn Tigers chip away until a 28-27 final score left Auburn with a 12-0 record and maglike no one had all season. But just like the Crimson Tide has nified national championship hopes. “Around here, we pride ourselves done all year, or has failed to do, it could not play four quarters of solid on finishing, and we just didn’t finish

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tonight,� said junior running back Mark Ingram. “Everybody’s frustrated. We just didn’t execute as much in the second half.� AJ McCarron got a chance to lead the Tide from its own 19 with less than a minute to go, but four straight incomplete passes secured Auburn’s

one-point victory. “I’m responsible for the fact that we didn’t finish the way we needed to,� Saban said. “This team will learn from this. Hopefully, when we get another opportunity, we’ll be able to be a better team because of some of the lessons learned today.�

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Friday, April 29, 2011

SECTION B

BEHIND THE SCENES The Crimson White culminated its year by inďŹ ltrating Bryant-Denny Stadium to shoot a front-page photo for the 3D Year in Review. We also took a little time to point out what our traditions are built on. Whether in the newsroom, or on the gridiron, the CW staff knows how to protect this house.

SEE THE VIDEO AT CW.UA.EDU

CW VIDEO STILLS | Daniel Roth

CW | Drew Hoover


Friday, April 29, 2011

JANUARY

2

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

The Crimson White

1TIDE BLOWS OUT MICHIGAN STATE By Jason Galloway

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CW File

Winter weather shuts down Tuscaloosa

seen upward of eight inches of snow and ice, and travel to Tuscaloosa has been hindered for many students. Westbound lanes of highway By Jennie Kushner I-20 out of Atlanta were closed, Just nine days into the New making travel to Tuscaloosa Year, an intense weather system almost impossible. “My travel plans were originaltook the Southeast by storm. Some parts of the South have ly to travel back, but because of

congratulations to our

the accumulation of snow in my area I cannot leave,” said Desiree Dodd, a sophomore majoring in political science. “The snow has still not melted.” Atlanta natives are dodging highways in an effort to make classes promptly. Edward Bailey, a senior majoring in engineering, risked his

graduates.

safety just to make it to class. “I am risking going back to school because I am scared to miss class because I only get two excused absences for the semester,” Bailey said. “I am worried because the weather isn’t going to get any better and if I don’t go back, I would miss three days of classes.”

The 2010 football season did not end the way Crimson Tide fans expected back in August. But it was a win, and a dominant one at that. Alabama’s 49-7 victory over No. 9 Michigan State in the Capital One Bowl was its most impressive of the season and likely the most impressive bowl performance by any team this year. “It was annihilation,” offensive lineman David Ross said. “Pure and utter annihilation.” Alabama controlled the line of scrimmage on both sides of the ball. Offensively, six of the Tide’s seven touchdowns were rushing scores. Running backs Trent Richardson and Mark Ingram combined for three first half scores, and Ingram’s second broke Shaun Alexander’s school record of 41 career rushing touchdowns. Upshaw, the Capital One Bowl MVP, had two of the Tide’s five sacks, five solo tackles (3 for loss) and one forced fumble. Sophomore safety Robert Lester snagged his eighth interception of the season on Michigan State’s first drive of the game. That tied him with Hawaii’s Mana Silva and Virginia Tech’s Jayron Hosley for the nation’s lead. Running back Eddie Lacy added two touchdowns late in the game, and Michigan State finally got on the board with 5:45 remaining to make the final score 49-7. “We asked the players to focus on taking advantage of their talent today and have enough poise to do it for 60 minutes,” Saban said. “We wanted to define this team as winners, and I think this 10-win season defines this group as winners.”


The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Friday, April 29, 2011

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PixelCon gathers gamers at Ferg By SoRelle Wyckoff

On Jan. 29, the Ferguson Center was taken over by television screens, gaming consoles, graphic posters and fans of the gaming world. Hundreds of gamers attended the second annual PixelCon gaming convention, a joint project of the University of Alabama’s ABXY Gaming Network and Creative Campus, as well as the Student Government Association and Housing Residential Communities. The convention included tournament play, discussion panels, an art display and various activities for attendees. “It was a lot of work, but it’s worth it when you see it come together,” said Erin Smelley, a senior and Creative Campus intern. The technical side of gaming was well represented at the PixelCon tournament, most notably in the “Art Room,” dedicated solely to the art of video games and anime. The art ranged from student drawings and cartoons to 3D “Mario” stand-ups. Another part of the convention was “cosplay,” a chance for attendees to dress as their favorite characters from their favorite video games or anime. Serving the community has been an aim of both ABXY and Creative Campus in many of their events. PixelCon, while free to attend, raised money through $5 tournament fees. The proceeds from the tournament fees, as well as those from the raffle, were donated to St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. Many guests said their favorite part of PixelCon was the opportunity to join with other gamers and fans of the community. “I mean, most people play games by themselves in their rooms, and I think it’s better for everyone to get together,” said PixelCon attendee Jessica Pruitt. “It’s nice to…celebrate gaming.”

18 CW | John Michael Simpson

TIDE IMPROVES THROUGHOUT SEASON Despite a game plagued with turnovers, the Alabama Crimson Tide managed to pull a 68-66 victory over the No. 12 Kentucky Wildcats in Coleman Coliseum on

Jan. 18. Sophomore Ben Eblen had only three points in the game, but they were perhaps three of the most important points, earning the Tide a perfect 10-0 at home this season. “At the end, Ben was in great

position there, very alert to come up with the steal,” said head coach Anthony Grant. “I’m just very happy for him to have the opportunity to step in and impact the game the way he did.” The Tide rallied behind the

Kentucky win, finishing at 25-12, one game away from claiming the NIT title. “We grew and we learned over the course of the year, and as a basketball team, we got better,” Grant said. “As a coach, that’s real-

“Yo ur

On

ly what you want to be able to do. We had some things this year that we had to overcome. A lot of it was ourselves. I think over the course of the year, I was able to grow as a coach, and I think our players grew.”

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The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

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4 Racial incidents plague campus

FEBRUARY

Friday, April 29, 2011

FOSTER DEBUT SPARKS RUN

By Patty Vaughan and Jonathan Reed An email sent by UA President Robert Witt to students on Feb. 5, addressing concerns about a racial slur was prompted by a Feb. 4 incident in which someone inside the Delta Tau Delta fraternity house verbally harassed a student, according to UA administrators. Justin Zimmerman, a second-year graduate student in public administration, was walking home from work at the Crossroads Community Center around 4:25 p.m. Feb. 4 when someone shouted at him from inside the house, he said. “I heard ‘nigger,’ so naturally I turned around,” he said. “After he said ‘nigger’ he said ‘Come here, boy.’ “I would say that the blatant use of the word…was out of character for UA, but racism itself is not that odd,” he said. “Socially, we don’t deal with each other, and it shows. And that’s why people think they can use the word…out on the street with no repercussions.” Delta Tau Delta President Sean Keeler said the individual involved has been suspended from the fraternity and plans to apologize to Zimmerman. On the morning of Feb. 9, students found the words “First Amendment” along with racial slurs chalked on sidewalks filtered throughout campus. David Fernandez, a senior majoring in business management, said he was walking from Lloyd Hall to Bidgood Hall and saw the word “kike” first. Fernandez said he saw “First Amendment” written near the word and continued to walk over to Gorgas Library where he saw the word “nigger.” “Given the things that went on this weekend, I can’t say I didn’t expect it,” Fernandez said. “Definitely not the first time I’ve seen or heard something like this out in public.” “We need to make progress on this issue,” he said.

CW | Margo Smith By Brett Hudson Contributing Writer Foster Auditorium was full of Alabama legends and wild fans as Alabama overcame a 10-point deficit at halftime to eventually win 64-59 over the Gators in the grand opening

of Foster Auditorium. Hudson had high praise for the atmosphere in Foster’s debut. “I feel like this was one of those games where it’s real simple: home court advantage,” Hudson said. “Once we got the crowd back in the

game, the players really fed off of that energy.” The Tide went on to win four of its last five regular-season games after starting 1-10 in SEC play. Alabama got a bid to the Women’s National Invitational Tournament

(NIT) and pulled two upsets – at Memphis and at Northwestern – before getting knocked out at Toledo, 74-59, on March 22. The Tide’s run to the Sweet 16 of the NIT gave Alabama a winning record on the season at 18-15.

Here’s hoping this summer’s not a

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The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

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Friday, April 29, 2011

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Greek organizations look to be more inclusive By Hannah Mask After a member of Delta Tau Delta used a racial slur against graduate student Justin Zimmerman on Feb. 4 outside of the fraternity’s house, about 35 students representing around 15 greek organizations met Feb. 16

to implement Greeks for T.I.D.E., with T.I.D.E. representing the idea of greeks together for inclusion, diversity and engagement. Christy Boardman, a member of Alpha Chi Omega, was one of the frontrunners of the movement and said though the idea for Greeks for T.I.D.E. had been in the works

for awhile, the weeks following the racial slur and University President Robert Witt’s subsequent email seemed like the perfect time to move forward with implementing the group. At the meeting, attendees discussed ideas for an outward show of solidarity between greek orga-

nizations, such as holding a candlelight vigil or staging a walk to demonstrate the idea of inclusivity. Boardman said she was encouraged by the way the meeting played out. “It shows that people really do want a change,” she said.

Submitted photo

TREES AT TOOMER’S CORNER POISONED From Staff Reports

Jr., a 62 year old man from Dadeville, was arrested and After the oaks surrounding charged with first-degree Toomer’s Corner were delib- criminal mischief for poisonerately dosed with an herbi- ing the oak trees at Toomer’s cide designed to kill trees, it is Corner, Auburn University doubtful that they will survive, Police Chief Tommy Dawson Auburn University reported said in a news conference on Feb. 17. on Feb. 16. Toomer’s Corner is most Harvey Almorn Updyke

notably known as the epicenter of celebration after AU victories, and during these celebrations, fans line the trees — which are believed to be more than 130 years old — with toilet paper. In January, a man called The Paul Finebaum Show, a nationally syndicated radio

show based in Birmingham, and said he had dosed the trees with the herbicide. The caller expressed anger at a Cam Newton jersey appearing on Paul “Bear” Bryant’s statue during the Iron Bowl weekend last year. “Let me tell you what I did,” the caller said. “The weekend

after the Iron Bowl, I went to Auburn, Alabama, and I poisoned the two Toomer’s trees…they’re not dead yet but they definitely will die… roll damn tide.” Alabama fans organized a fundraising drive for the trees called Tide for Toomer’s. As of 5 p.m. on Feb. 22, the Tide for

Toomer’s Facebook page had raised at least $40,000, half of the total $80,000 in donations that Auburn University had receivedto that point by supporters and alumni nationwide to restore Toomer’s Corner, according to the Interim Vice President of Development at Auburn, Rob Wellbaum.

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The Crimson White

Tuscaloosa votes for Sunday alcohol sales

By Taylor Holland

around 8:30 p.m., Tuscaloosa voters approved a referendum Overwhelming voter support permitting the sale of alcohol on helped overturn Tuscaloosa’s Sundays between the hours of Sunday alcohol sales laws Feb. noon and 9:30 p.m., beginning on March 6. 22. All polling locations opened By way of an 8,519 to 2,462 vote, an unofficial number released at 7 a.m., and multiple limousine

and van companies escorted voters to and from the different precincts. Mark Porter, a sophomore majoring in business, said he thought Tuscaloosa voters would pass the referendum. “I think it’ll be really good for

Tuscaloosa as a whole if they pass it,” Porter said. “It could bring in a lot of extra money from the bars being open on Sundays and restaurants will get more business as well.” The last time the issue had been brought up to vote, in 1998, 54 per-

cent of voters said they were not in favor of Sunday sales. As of Feb. 11, the deadline to register to vote, Tuscaloosa had 67,009 registered voters, 1,104 of which registered in the week preceding the deadline, according to various reports.

19 WILDER WINS STATE’S FIRST PRO BOUT By Tony Tsoukalas

It took only two rounds for Deontay Wilder to knock out DeAndre Abron at Shelton State’s Umphrey Center on Feb. 19. The victory moved the Tuscaloosa native to 15-0, all wins by way of the knockout. The only problem was that Abron did not feel he was knocked out. After sustaining a multitude of hard jabs to the head and body, the referee determined that he could no longer fight and declared Wilder the winner by way of technical knockout. “I couldn’t have asked for more,” Wilder said. The boastful Wilder even managed to put on a little show for the crowd. After delivering a powerful jab to Abron, Wilder performed a little shimmy for the crowd. “I just learned it tonight,” Wilder said. The night marked the first state-sanctioned professional boxing event held in Alabama. Fight promoter Jay Deas said he was happy with the turnout, and he said the event was extremely positive for the new commission. “The energy, the interest is phenomenal,” Deas said. “This shows that this can be something really big. We’ve had to prove a lot of people wrong. A lot of people didn’t want this thing to happen. We’ve had to fight every inch of the way. To see it come through tonight, it’s just been unbelievable.” CW File


The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

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Friday, April 29, 2011

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Cochran wins SGA presidency By Stephen Nathaniel Dethrage

CW File

SUNDAY SALES SEE FAIR TURNOUT By Taylor Holland When Tuscaloosa residents voted Feb. 22 to allow alcohol sales on Sunday, bars and restaurants made plans to accommodate an influx of customers on the added weekend day. Tyler Bigbie, co-owner of 1831, said they were hesitant to open the bar on Sunday because they weren’t

sure how much traffic to expect. But after considering the possibilities, they decided to plan themes for each week. “Some Sundays we’re going to have cookouts, and we’re going to have themes like Mardi Gras,” he said. “I suspect more and more people will start coming out as they get used to this.” Following the first day of Sunday

sales, Cameron Kennedy, owner of Kennedy’s Bar, said the bar had a fair number of customers. “It’s been about like it is on a standard week day, maybe a little better,” Kennedy said. “This law is brand new, so we really weren’t expecting a huge crowd to come out today. After people are done feeling out the law, we’re expecting business to start booming.”

Houndstooth security guard Andrew Prior said in February that he anticipated more business as the weather got warmer. “Really, once the weather improves, people will want to go out on Sundays and come and sit on the patio,” Prior said. “We’ve had a mediocre first day but are expecting much better once it’s nice. Business here has a lot to do with the weather.”

HAS GONE

Grant Cochran won the office of Student Government Association president on March 8, defeating Coresa Nancy Hogan, according to numbers released by the University’s SGA Elections Board. Cochran drew 5,288 votes, or 58 percent of the total vote, to Hogan’s 3,862, or 42 percent of the vote. Voter turnout this year was higher than in 2010, with almost 32 percent of the student population casting a vote in the presidential race. In the 2010 election, 28 percent of students voted. “I want to thank all my really close friends that kept me motivated when things got really tough, when everything was hectic,” Cochran said. “My family did the same thing, and my supporters, too. Everyone that helped me keep my chin up and stay motivated, they made this happen; they have my thanks. “We were all just anticipating a close race here at the end.” Cochran said. “I knew my opponent was a very good one. I knew that we both stood for two different ideals, but in the end, I guess the voters favored mine, and I can’t thank my voters enough.” Hogan, a junior from Birmingham majoring in fashion retail and accounting, also thanked everyone who supported her during the campaign and gave her blessing to her victorious opponent. “I want to thank each and every student for heading to the polls today in support of a better, more unified Alabama,” Hogan said. “I congratulate Grant on his victory and look forward to working with him in the future.”

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26

CREATIVE CAMPUS HOSTS DCAF

By Alexandra Ellsworth

By Karissa Bursch

This summer students will have to look elsewhere for Chinese food options on The Strip. Lai Lai’s lease, which is contracted by the University, is expiring, meaning the business must vacate the property. Jennifer Chen, manager of Lai Lai, said the University sent a letter in November 2010 notifying them of the expiration of their lease on March 31. Later, the University decided to extend the restaurant’s lease for another month, so the closing won’t happen until the beginning of the summer. Chen said they know the University wants the property, but they weren’t given any more information. Lai Lai, which opened in July 1998, is in its 13th year of business on The Strip. Chen said she was unsure of the status of other businesses on The Strip, but employees at Pepito’s and Pita Pit said there are no plans to close or move. Lai Lai plans to reopen in the future, Chen said, but a location still has to be found. Cathy Andreen, director of media relations for the University, explained the expired lease and University-owned property. “The University purchased the building where Lai Lai is located in 2007 and agreed to honor the leases that were already in place,” Andreen said. Now that the lease is up, the University will be offering a Request for Proposals, which is the opportunity for any entity that may wish to rent the space to submit a proposal. Lai Lai will get a chance to submit an RFP to regain that location as well, Andreen said. “RFPs are advertised publicly,” Andreen said. “The RFP will be sent to Lai Lai when it is ready and they may submit a proposal.” Andreen said the proposal must include detailed information about how the space would be used, any renovations or work that the renter would do to the space, the amount of rent they are willing to pay and how the business would benefit the University community.

A weekend of music and arts brought approximately 4,000 people to Government Plaza for Creative Campus’ second annual Druid City Arts Festival on March 26. The festival ran from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., concluding with a performance by musician Matthew Mayfield. The free festival gave members of the community the opportunity to support local artists and musicians. “The festival was bigger [than last year’s] in an overall general way,” said Kelly Watts, a senior and a Creative Campus intern. “This year we had so many more artists and musicians. We had bigger headliners and more food.” The festival began Friday night with a music crawl. Several bars in Tuscaloosa hosted local artists and bands playing original music. Bands also played Saturday in Government Plaza on the main stage. All around the main stage there were tents and booths set up displaying different kinds of art, from photography and jewelry to clothing and paintings. DCAF also provided new artists an opportunity to get people to see their work and jumpstart their businesses. Visitors could also check out poetry and storytelling at the pavilion. Festival goers also had the opportunity to reach out and give to causes such as World Vision and Apwonjo.

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The Crimson White

2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

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Flamerich named first speaker of the SGA senate By Katherine Martin

Sen. Ryan Flamerich beat out Sen. Andy Koonce, 27 votes to 23 votes, on April 14 to become the first-ever speaker of the senate. Flamerich is the first nongreek student to lead an elected branch of the Student Government Association in 25 years, according to Ian Sams, former

SGA communications director. “When I ran for reelection, I didn’t have the position of speaker of the senate in my mind,” Flamerich said. “I didn’t expect it.” Flamerich said he refuses to believe that other senators voted for him based on the fact that he is an independent. Will Pylant, a senator from the College

of Arts and Sciences, said the speaker position has enormous power. “Ryan has the opportunity to shape this position in a way that will help all students,” Pylant said. “I think that our student body benefits from a diverse SGA that is reflective of the student body.” The last time an independent student was elected to office was in 1986, when

John Merrill served as SGA President, Sams said. Merrill, who now serves as a state representative, said it is fantastic that Flamerich was able to put together a coalition of senators to support his election. “He will be in a position to reflect the entire student body,” Merrill said.

1THE AVETT BROTHERS OPEN NEW VENUE

APRIL

By Kelsey Stein

A sea of fans rose to their feet and cheered as Band of Horses, the opening act for the Avett Brothers at the new Tuscaloosa Amphitheater, took the stage on the venue’s opening night, April 1. The two groups played the soldout opening concert to an amphitheater packed to its capacity of 7,470. A staff of more than 350 people worked to make opening night run smoothly. The event, which was put on by the Ferguson Center staff, the SGA and Birmingham-based Red Mountain Entertainment, raised $20,000 for student scholarships. When Band of Horses took the stage, lead singer Ben Bridwell acknowledged the crowd’s excitement by saying, “Welcome. First night, huh? Let’s break this thing in.” The Avett Brothers, the night’s headliners, opened with “Head Full of Doubt, Road Full of Promise.” “It was a great show because everyone in the crowd just seemed really happy and excited to be there,” said Christin Clevenger, a junior majoring in telecommunication and film. “The amphitheater was beautiful, and, even though it was sold out, it still seemed really spacious. I don’t think there was a bad seat in the house.” The entire crowd became increasingly excited as the night wore on, until the Avett Brothers closed their set with “I And Love And You.” When they left the stage, a chant of “One more song” began until the group returned for a three-song encore to end the night.


Friday, April 29, 2011

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2010-2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

The Crimson White

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GYMNASTICS WINS FIFTH CHAMPIONSHIP

Former UA president dies By Amanda Sams and Jasmine Cannon

CLEVELAND | In January, the Alabama gymnastics team was inexperienced and untested. On April 16, though, Alabama was the most complete team in the country, at one point had a freshman save its season, and, to nobody’s surprise, won the fifth national championship in program history. “At the beginning of the season, the coaches voted us No. 2,” Patterson said. “When I saw that poll, I said, ‘Are you kidding me?’ That’s what people expect us to do – somehow, someway… we would find a way to be competitive. “I guess my peers were off by one.” Alabama finished with a 197.65, UCLA was second with a 197.375 and Oklahoma took third with a 197.25. It was the 20th time in the last 26 years the Tide finished in the top three at nationals, and it was its first national championship since 2002. The nine-year drought from 2002 to this season was the longest Alabama has gone without winning the national title since the championships began in 1982. In the third rotation, senior Kayla Hoffman fell off the beam, but freshman Sarah DeMeo and junior Geralen Stack-Eaton saved the Tide’s season by hitting behind Hoffman. With the score close as the meet wound down, Alabama pulled ahead of UCLA with floor routines of 9.925 from StackEaton and 9.95 from Hoffman. “There were so many emotions going through my head,” Hoffman said of her floor routine. “I just took a deep breath and knew I needed to do this for my team. It was a great way to end my senior year. I couldn’t think of a better way to end it.” Hoffman is the only senior on the team who competes regularly, and All-American Ashley Priess, who was out all season due to injury, is expected to be back next season.

The University of Alabama’s 25th president, Andrew Sorensen, died on April 17 at age 72. Many former and present UA faculty and staff members remember Sorensen, president from 1996-2002, as a savvy person who was not afraid of the limelight. “Even during difficult financial times and with no faculty raises for motivation, the University still moved forward under his leadership,” said Joseph Phelps, chair of the public relations department. “And that’s a pretty good legacy to have.” A System Chancellor Malcolm Portera said Sorensen’s presidency was a time of significant achievement for the UA system and the state “We were saddened to learn of his sudden death, and we extend our deep condolences to his beloved wife Donna and their family, who were such a vibrant part of this community,” Portera said. Emily Jamison, director of volunteer and special services, told The Crimson White in a farewell story to Sorensen in 2002 that he took the University from the fourth tier to the top tier in six years. She called it an “amazing accomplishment.” Sorensen’s last job was senior vice president for university development at The Ohio State University, as well as president of The Ohio State University Foundation. He is survived by his wife of 42 years, Donna; two sons, Aaron and Benjamin and one grandson, Art.

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EA Sports

INGRAM WINS NCAA COVER VOTE From Staff Reports

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Friday, April 29, 2011

Ingram won the honor based on a fan vote conducted through Facebook, Former Alabama running back Mark beating out other college stars like Ingram will be featured on the cover Auburn defensive tackle Nick Fairley, of EA Sports’ NCAA Football ’12 video Washington quarterback Jake Locker game, as announced by Electronic and Oklahoma running back DeMarco Arts on ESPN2’s First Take on April 19. Murray.

“Thanks so much to all my fans for making a dream come true!!” Ingram said in a Twitter post. “Just so all my fans know, I won by at least a 1,000 votes everyday of the voting and won by over 25,000 votes. #bestfansever #rolltide.”

The cover shows Ingram in uniform posing like the Heisman Trophy, his extended arm showing the inside of his Nike glove with a script “A” on the palm. The game will be released in stores on July 12.

Weather downs trees around campus

By Jennie Kushner

woman Cathy Andreen. “The grounds department’s tree Rain wasn’t the only thing fall- crew is already clearing up those ing in April 20’s morning down- trees and other large branches that are down on campus,” Andreen pour. A tree by the Gorgas House said. Some small new trees were and one in the vicinity of Paty Residence Hall fell due to the knocked down at the softball comweather, according to UA spokes- plex and will need to be restaked,

Andreen said. According to WeatherChannel. com, there have been more than 5,200 severe weather reports, which include tornadoes, hail and high winds/wind damage, so far in April. On average, there are only 3,300 severe weather reports for the entirety of April nationwide.

Despite the damage, Andreen said she knew of no reported injuries. Sarah Anderson, a junior majoring in fashion retail, was driving to the Student Recreation Center around 9 a.m. Thursday. Although she was planning on working out, the weather postponed it.

“I was scared driving to the Rec center; I could barely see anything in front of me,” Anderson said. “When I got there, I saw several students sitting in their cars with their windshield wipers on. The rain and lighting was so bad everyone was scared to get out of the car.”


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3D Year in Review