Page 1

Monday, December 1, 2008

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Vol. 115, Issue 63

HEY TIGERS! WE JUST BEAT THE HELL OUTTA YOU

Linebacker Eryk Anders takes down Auburn quarterback Kodi Burns during the 3rd quarter game in Alabamaʼs win over Auburn. It was one of 2 sacks.

CW | Drew Hoover

Tide shuts out AU, ends six-year streak By Ryan Wright Sports Editor

A dense fog enveloped Bryant-Denny Saturday, seemingly enclosing the 93,000 inside from the rest of the world. Not much was visible beyond the stadium lights. It was altogether fitting; not much outside the haze mattered. That’s because it was late November in the Heart of Dixie, and the 73rd edition of the Iron Bowl was in session. The fog slowly faded into

UA weather

TODAY

the night, and so too did the Tigers. Alabama dominated a reeling Auburn 36-0, finishing off its perfect 12-0 regular season and a six-game series skid in the process. “It was very important,” said safety Rashad Johnson, just one player in a group of seniors who had yet to knock off the Tigers in his lengthy career. “It’s always a big game, in-state rivalry. It’s been a long time since we beat those guys. We had a lot riding on the game. A six-game winning streak for

INSIDE Today’s paper

College Store relocates to new center...............2

Chance of snow

47º/29º

Quiz Bowl recognized nationally ................2 Opinions: Tide has turned in Alabama..............4

Tuesday

47º/29º

Inexpensive holiday gift ideas .......................7

Wednesday

52º/34º

Sports: Volleyball season closes with win.........9

Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy

Football: Seniors finally knock off Auburn ... 12

those guys. For us, [a chance] to remain No. 1 in the country and undefeated.” The shutout, Alabama’s first ever win over Auburn at BryantDenny Stadium, marked the most lopsided Iron Bowl since 1962. The Crimson Tide relied on the same formula it used in the first 11 games to grab its twelfth victory: physical gameplay in the form of a suffocating defense and a ground-pound offense. Junior Glen Coffee, jersey smeared with turf before the end of the first quarter, rushed for 144 yards and a touchdown on just 20 carries. Running back Mark Ingram, a Michigan native, showed out as well in his first taste of the historic rivalry. The freshman accounted for 64 yards and two third-quarter touchdowns to

See TIDE, page 9

ALABAMA

AUBURN

FIRST DOWNS

FIRST DOWNS

21

8

RUSHING YARDS

RUSHING YARDS

234

57

PASSING YARDS

PASSING YARDS

178

113

TURNOVERS

TURNOVERS

3

1

TIME OF POSSESSION

TIME OF POSSESSION

35:37

24:23

UA’s Sig Ep chapter closed for hazing By Phil Owen Managing Editor

P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-4116 | Advertising: 348-7845 | Classifieds: 348-7355 Letters, op-eds: letters@cw.ua.edu Press releases, announcements: news@cw.ua.edu

ice the game for the Tide. “It was a very physical game. I think the biggest thing was that we were able to control the line of scrimmage,” head coach Nick Saban said. “We were able to run the ball. Glen had a good game. That was probably the difference. They couldn’t run it on us. We put their quarterback in a situation where he had to beat us a different way.” Emphatically, he didn’t. As Auburn struggled to grind out just 57 yards on the ground (while Alabama piled up 234), the Tigers looked to quarterback Kodi Burns and a mangled pass offense to bail them out. Burns, pressured by the Tide defense all game, connected on just nine of his 23 attempts and was sacked twice. Alabama stuck to its

University supports that decision,” Lane said. Lane said the chapter was The Alabama Beta chapter removed because of the chapof Sigma Phi Epsilon frater- ter’s “repeated violations of nity has been removed from the student code of conduct” campus, UA spokeswoman and its hazing practices. Gentry McCreary, director Deborah Lane said. “The [Sigma Phi Epsilon] of the Office of Greek Affairs national board has decided at the University, said the to close the chapter, and the chapter became inactive Nov.

24 at 8 p.m. “We are pursuing an investigation regarding the individuals involved,” McCreary said. He said the University would have no further comment about the specifics of the violations while the investigation is ongoing. Lane said the Sigma Phi

Epsilon national board and the UA Office of Greek Affairs will begin discussions about the chapter’s return to campus. Lane said the date of return has yet to be set, but the target date is fall 2010 or spring 2011. Brett Bralley contributed to this report.


10 Monday, December 1, 2008

SPORTS

The Crimson White

Iron Bowl Recap

• Top Left: Freshman Mark Ingram walks into the end zone untouched after scoring his second touchdown of the game. Ingram finished with 64 yards on 15 carries. • Botton Left: Nose tackle Terrence Cody holds up the ball after recovering a fumble during the third quarter. After the turnover, Alabama drove down the field and scored to make it 22-0. • Above: Running back Glen Coffee breaks free from the Auburn defense en route to a 41 yard touchdown run. Coffeeʼs score in the second quarter was his ninth of the season. • Bottom Right: Alabama head coach Nick Saban waves to the fans to show his appreciation after the game. Saban said after the game the atmosphere was the best it has been since his arrival. Photos | CW | Drew Hoover


The Crimson White

SPORTS

VOLLEYBALL

Tide ends season with win By Will Barry Senior Sports Reporter The Alabama volleyball team ended its regular season last Friday with a 3-0 sweep of the Mississippi State Bulldogs by scores of 25-21, 25-21 and 25-15. The win on Senior Night gave the Tide a 16-13 overall record for the season, finishing SEC play at 9-11. The victory gave seniors Amy Pauly and Lindsey Buteyn a win in their final collegiate match. The two were a part of three Alabama teams that went to the NCAA tournament. “We said before we came out into the arena that we wanted to end our season on a win, to close this chapter,” head coach Judy Green said. “We wanted to start next season on a win for the future, and we wanted to send our two seniors out with another career win under their belts. I’m really proud of our team.” Buteyn had 10 kills and a team-high .625 attack percentage as she wrapped up her playing career at Alabama. “There’s not another kid in our team right now or in our program that has worked as hard as Lindsey has for four years,” Green said. “She’s an undersized middle [blocker] who doesn’t know it. She’s very explosive, and she’s taught our younger kids since she’s been here a lot about playing the middle position, and I think she’s helped prepare us for the future.” Buteyn contributed in all four seasons at Alabama. She said she will miss the entire college experience. “I think it’s just wonderful,” Buteyn said. “I love Alabama. It’s in my blood now. I’ll probably come down when I’m older [and] come back to games and watch them play. I’m really glad I chose this school.” Pauly had 13 digs and 3 assists in the win to close out her career with the Tide. “Amy’s just a tough kid,” Green said. “She’s a toughminded competitor. She certainly had the heart for winning and certainly you could see that in how she played the game.” For Pauly, the experience of playing at Alabama goes farther than winning and losing on the court. “I’m going to miss it all,” she said. “I love the atmosphere. You’re not going to find anything like it anywhere else. Just the girls, I love my teammates. I’ve been fortunate to have really nice girls

CW | Matt Abbey Alabama Sophomore Alyssa Meuth (16) spikes the ball against Mississippi State on Friday night in the Cave. Alabama won, 3-0. on all the teams that I’ve been on all four years. That’s what I’ll miss the most.” With the seniors moving on, the volleyball program will have to find a way to develop its young talent in order to compete in the SEC next season. “I think next year they’ll still be building a little bit,” Pauly said. “They still have sophomores and freshmen who are going to come into play but the coaches know how to recruit. They’re going to find good players. I expect big things. I’ll be watching.” The team has a long off-season to get better and raise its standards for next year. “We’ve got to do a better job as coaches at creating the right team atmosphere and what exactly is expected when you’re a part of the Alabama volleyball team and program,” Green said.

Monday, December 1, 2008

TIDE

Continued from page 1 smashmouth football game plan, running the ball on 50 plays compared to just 18 passing plays. Quarterback John Parker Wilson finished a respectable 8-of-16 for 134 yards and a touchdown. For Wilson and the other seniors, their farewell to Bryant-Denny seemed scripted. After closing the last three regular seasons with losses to their archrivals, the seniors left the field of deflated Tigers to a chorus of applause and then a curtain call. “It’s fun to be able to finish these guys off,” Wilson said. “Not only to win but to finish them off like we did after so many years of not being able to put them out … It’s a special experience for me and all the other seniors.” Alabama dominated the entire game but managed just three points in the first quarter after starting its first two drives of the game pinned inside its own 10yard line. Leigh Tiffin made a 37yard field goal to give Alabama a 3-0 lead midway through the first. As it turned out, those three points would be all the Alabama would need, but that didn’t stop the Tide from pouring it on later. On the next Alabama drive, Coffee hit the edge and broke a 41-yard run down the Auburn sideline to reach the end zone, putting the Tide up 10-0. Just before the half ended, Auburn tried to get on the board with a 39-yard field goal. In his first career attempt, Auburn

9

kicker Morgan Hull sent the ball sailing through the uprights, but Saban had called timeout just before, voiding the kick. Hull tried again, but senior defensive lineman Bobby Greenwood blocked the kick to preserve the shutout. Alabama scored three touchdowns in the third quarter to break the game open. Wi t h Ka r e e m Jackson barreling down on him on a corner blitz, Brad Lester fumbled away Auburn’s first possession of the second half. On the first play after the turnover, Wilson connected with senior receiver Nikita Stover on a 39-yard touchdown pass. Tiffin’s extra point was blocked and Alabama led 16-0. Burns fumbled three plays later, and Ingram punched in touchdown runs of one and 14 yards on the Tide’s next two possessions for a 29-0 lead. Sophomore Greg McElroy and several reserves entered the game late. McElroy and wide out Marquis Maze made the most of it, connecting on a 34-yard touchdown pass to put the final at 36-0. The game ended Auburn’s season. The loss kept the Tigers (5-7) from the sixth victory it needed to become bowl eligible for the first time since 1999. Meanwhile, Alabama will play No. 4 Florida in the SEC Championship Saturday, a date it set earlier in the month with a win over LSU to clinch the SEC West division title. The game has been billed as a de facto play-in to the BCS national championship game. The loser will likely be invited to the Sugar Bowl.

Upgrade to a Rumsey House!

Season Wrap-Up Season record: 16-13 SEC Record: 9-11 Standings: Finished 3rd in SEC West; 8th in the SEC

Graduating Seniors: Amy Pauly, Lindsey Buteyn

Postseason: The Tide has no postseason prospects

1407 10th Avenue 205.758.5371 rumseyproperties.com

‹*VTLJOLJRV\[V\Y NHTLKH`QL^LSY`MVY [OL:,**OHTWPVUZOPW ‹:[YPUNPUNJSHZZLZ +LJ WT +LJ WT *HSSZ[VYLMVYTVYLKL[HPSZ

‹>VUKLYM\SNPM[ZMVY[OL OVSPKH`Z



17975

2113B University Blvd.


6 Monday, December1, 2008

NEWS

The Crimson White

New tobacco product alarms some health officials By Vicki Smith The Associated Press

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. | They’re discreet, flavorful and come in cute tin boxes with names like “frost” and “spice.” And the folks who created Joe Camel are hoping Camel Snus will become a hit with tobacco lovers tired of being forced outside for a smoke. But convincing health officials and smokers like Ethan Flint that they’re worth a try may take some work. Snus — Swedish for tobacco, rhymes with “noose” — is a tiny, tea bag-like pouch of steampasteurized, smokeless tobacco to tuck between the cheek and gum. Aromatic to the user and undetectable to anyone else, it promises a hit of nicotine without the messy spitting associated with chewing tobacco. Just swallow the juice. “I think I’d rather throw up in my mouth,” says Flint, an 18-year-old West Virginia University student, emerging from a convenience store with a pack of Winstons and a coupon for free Camel Snus. “I’d rather not swallow anything like that.” Reynolds America Inc., the nation’s No. 2 tobacco company,

can also expect resistance from the public health community. Experts wonder whether snus will help wean people off cigarettes and snuff, or just foster a second addiction. While snus has been around, it hasn’t been prominent in this country. “I think we’re all holding our breath in terms of what’s going to be coming down the pike,” says Dorothy Hatsukami, director of the Tobacco Use Research Center at the University of Minnesota. “There’s not much known about these products — what’s in these products, how they’re going to be used, who’s going to be using them and what the effects of that use will be. ... Will it create more harm or less harm?” Reynolds is confident its new product will find a following. It launched Camel Snus in Austin, Texas, and Portland, Ore., in 2006, and has since expanded to test markets nationwide, with customers in nearly every state. Early next year, it’s taking snus national with a marketing blitz that spokesman David Howard says will include direct mail, print and Web advertising, and point-of-sale promotions. Popular for decades in Sweden, where it was invented, snus has been banned in every other European Union nation since

2004 over concerns about carcinogens. But smokeless tobacco is legal in the U.S., where there are two schools of thought: Some researchers suggest the lower risk of lung cancer makes snus an attractive alternative to smoking, while others fear an increase in problems including mouth lesions or pancreatic cancer. The American Cancer Society supports any tool that helps smokers quit. “But we don’t have any good scientific evidence that snus is one of those tools,” said Tom Glynn, director of cancer science and trends. “If all smokers switched to snus tomorrow, in a few years we’d certainly see less heart disease, less lung disease and fewer cancers,” he said. “But there’s no evidence that smokers can switch and stay switched.” Prevention officials already have their work cut out for them in West Virginia, which has the third-highest adult smoking rate in the U.S. at nearly 27 percent and the highest rate of “spit” or chewing tobacco use at 16 percent. “The industry is brilliant, and whatever they want to outspend us by — $1 million, $10 million, $100 million — they can do it,” said Bruce Adkins of the state

Division of Tobacco Prevention. To sustain its current level of sales and combat tobacco-related deaths, Adkins says, the industry must find 4,000 “replacement smokers” a year in West Virginia alone. U.S. tobacco companies developed snus in response to both declining cigarette sales and consumer demand. With more public bans on puffing, they say smokers need socially acceptable alternatives. Danny Wolfe, a 38-year-old computer draftsman, gave up regular spit tobacco and has been using Copenhagen tobacco pouches for several years. He spits out the juice; it gives him heartburn. “It’s the same product, just packaged differently. It doesn’t get in your teeth. It doesn’t have the mess,” says Wolfe, who was sick of smoking outside his Morgantown office. “You’re not quitting anything. You’re replacing.” Snus is also popular with hunters, who try to avoid scent detection by their prey, and with coal miners, who work in underground mines where the smallest spark can trigger an explosion. “I find that more rednecks use it,” Wolfe says. “I won’t lie to you about that.”

At least two tobacco companies besides Reynolds are also test-marketing snus. “There’s no secondhand smoke. There’s no spitting. We see it as a win-win,” says Howard, the Reynolds spokesman. “It’s also in line with company strategy. We’re moving toward becoming a total tobacco company.” Reynolds is even developing dissolvable tobacco strips, orbs and sticks that it will start test-marketing early next year in Portland, Indianapolis and Columbus, Ohio. Though “very appealing” in form and flavor, Hatsukami also finds those products worrisome. Researchers have little information about nicotine absorption and toxicity for any of the new products, she says, and there’s too little data on snus to make per-dose comparisons to cigarettes or spit tobacco. Still, Camel Snus recently tested by WVU contained at least two carcinogens. “It’s not like chewing gum,” warns Robert Anderson, deputy director of West Virginia University’s Prevention Research Center. “This product is not a safe alternative to cigarettes.” And because its use is easy to conceal, WVU researcher Cindy Tworek worries children could

suck on the pouches in front of oblivious parents or teachers. The brightly colored tins seem designed to attract both female and young users, she says. The same age restrictions that apply to other forms of tobacco also apply to sales of snus, although they vary from state to state. Tworek has surveyed more than 600 college students in the Morgantown test market and will release her conclusions next year on whether Reynolds’ marketing efforts work. Flint, the teenage smoker, suspects they do. “It looks fun, actually,” he said of the bright blue camel logo. “As a little kid, I’d probably buy this just because it looks cool. But I know better than that, and I’d rather choke to death.” Howard denies suggestions that Reynolds targets underage users. He says it’s selling best among adult male smokers and moist snuff users. “It didn’t quite get as much consideration among female adult smokers just because it’s different,” he concedes. “They’re a little more hesitant. But obviously we think that with continued communication with all adult smokers, they’ll come to try it.”

Astronauts tinker with urine-to-water machine By Mike Schneider The Associated Press

HOUSTON | Astronauts tinkered Sunday with a troublesome piece of equipment designed to help convert urine and sweat into drinkable water, which is vital to allowing the international space station crew to double to six. Station commander Michael Fincke and space shuttle Endeavour astronaut Donald Pettit changed how a centrifuge is mounted in a urine processor, which is part of the newly delivered $154 million water recovery system. The centrifuge is a spin-

ning device that helps separate the water from urine. It was on rubber grommets to reduce vibrations, and Mission Control asked Fincke to remove them and just bolt the piece down. “We’re very hopeful for this, and if not, we have a few other tricks up our sleeves,” Fincke said from the space station after the task was finished. The astronauts have been trying to get the system running for four days, but the urine processor has worked for just two hours at a time before shutting down. A normal run is about four hours. An initial test after the repair

ran for 3½ hours and processed about a gallon of urine before shutting down Sunday night. Engineers again were trying to figure out a fix. “It looks like we made things better, but we’re maybe not there yet,” Fincke radioed to Mission Control. As a last resort, Endeavour could bring the problematic part back to Earth for repairs when the shuttle departs on Thanksgiving. That option could complicate plans to add crew members to the station since several water samples need to brought back for tests before astronauts can drink from the contraption.

Samples will be brought back on Endeavour and in February on space shuttle Discovery. The water recovery system, delivered a week ago by Endeavour, is essential for allowing six astronauts to live on the space station by the middle of next year. “Without being able to recycle urine, that does take down some of our capability,” Fincke said. “It’s not necessarily a showstopper but it’s something that we definitely need to address.” Engineers were studying whether six people could still live at the station with the urine processor working two hours at a time, said flight director

Courtenay McMillan. “We don’t know if it’s a good idea to start and stop it multiple times,” McMillan said. “We may be breaking something further until we really understand what’s going on.” Flight controllers had hoped the water samples would have a mixture of 70 percent from condensation and 30 percent from urine. Given the problems with the processor, that ratio stands at 90 percent condensation and 10 percent urine. Mission managers have decided not to extend Endeavour’s trip by an extra day since the astronauts have enough

water samples. While Fincke worked on the processor, Endeavour’s seven astronauts had part of the day off Sunday, except Pettit who gave up some of his off-duty time to work on the water recycler. Astronauts Stephen Bowen and Robert “Shane” Kimbrough prepared for the fourth and final spacewalk of the two-week mission. The spacewalkers will finish cleaning and lubing a jammed joint, which allows the station’s solar wing to rotate in the direction of the sun. They also will lubricate a twin solarwing joint, which is running without any problems.


6 Monday, December1, 2008

NEWS

The Crimson White

New tobacco product alarms some health officials By Vicki Smith The Associated Press

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. | They’re discreet, flavorful and come in cute tin boxes with names like “frost” and “spice.” And the folks who created Joe Camel are hoping Camel Snus will become a hit with tobacco lovers tired of being forced outside for a smoke. But convincing health officials and smokers like Ethan Flint that they’re worth a try may take some work. Snus — Swedish for tobacco, rhymes with “noose” — is a tiny, tea bag-like pouch of steampasteurized, smokeless tobacco to tuck between the cheek and gum. Aromatic to the user and undetectable to anyone else, it promises a hit of nicotine without the messy spitting associated with chewing tobacco. Just swallow the juice. “I think I’d rather throw up in my mouth,” says Flint, an 18-year-old West Virginia University student, emerging from a convenience store with a pack of Winstons and a coupon for free Camel Snus. “I’d rather not swallow anything like that.” Reynolds America Inc., the nation’s No. 2 tobacco company,

can also expect resistance from the public health community. Experts wonder whether snus will help wean people off cigarettes and snuff, or just foster a second addiction. While snus has been around, it hasn’t been prominent in this country. “I think we’re all holding our breath in terms of what’s going to be coming down the pike,” says Dorothy Hatsukami, director of the Tobacco Use Research Center at the University of Minnesota. “There’s not much known about these products — what’s in these products, how they’re going to be used, who’s going to be using them and what the effects of that use will be. ... Will it create more harm or less harm?” Reynolds is confident its new product will find a following. It launched Camel Snus in Austin, Texas, and Portland, Ore., in 2006, and has since expanded to test markets nationwide, with customers in nearly every state. Early next year, it’s taking snus national with a marketing blitz that spokesman David Howard says will include direct mail, print and Web advertising, and point-of-sale promotions. Popular for decades in Sweden, where it was invented, snus has been banned in every other European Union nation since

2004 over concerns about carcinogens. But smokeless tobacco is legal in the U.S., where there are two schools of thought: Some researchers suggest the lower risk of lung cancer makes snus an attractive alternative to smoking, while others fear an increase in problems including mouth lesions or pancreatic cancer. The American Cancer Society supports any tool that helps smokers quit. “But we don’t have any good scientific evidence that snus is one of those tools,” said Tom Glynn, director of cancer science and trends. “If all smokers switched to snus tomorrow, in a few years we’d certainly see less heart disease, less lung disease and fewer cancers,” he said. “But there’s no evidence that smokers can switch and stay switched.” Prevention officials already have their work cut out for them in West Virginia, which has the third-highest adult smoking rate in the U.S. at nearly 27 percent and the highest rate of “spit” or chewing tobacco use at 16 percent. “The industry is brilliant, and whatever they want to outspend us by — $1 million, $10 million, $100 million — they can do it,” said Bruce Adkins of the state

Division of Tobacco Prevention. To sustain its current level of sales and combat tobacco-related deaths, Adkins says, the industry must find 4,000 “replacement smokers” a year in West Virginia alone. U.S. tobacco companies developed snus in response to both declining cigarette sales and consumer demand. With more public bans on puffing, they say smokers need socially acceptable alternatives. Danny Wolfe, a 38-year-old computer draftsman, gave up regular spit tobacco and has been using Copenhagen tobacco pouches for several years. He spits out the juice; it gives him heartburn. “It’s the same product, just packaged differently. It doesn’t get in your teeth. It doesn’t have the mess,” says Wolfe, who was sick of smoking outside his Morgantown office. “You’re not quitting anything. You’re replacing.” Snus is also popular with hunters, who try to avoid scent detection by their prey, and with coal miners, who work in underground mines where the smallest spark can trigger an explosion. “I find that more rednecks use it,” Wolfe says. “I won’t lie to you about that.”

At least two tobacco companies besides Reynolds are also test-marketing snus. “There’s no secondhand smoke. There’s no spitting. We see it as a win-win,” says Howard, the Reynolds spokesman. “It’s also in line with company strategy. We’re moving toward becoming a total tobacco company.” Reynolds is even developing dissolvable tobacco strips, orbs and sticks that it will start test-marketing early next year in Portland, Indianapolis and Columbus, Ohio. Though “very appealing” in form and flavor, Hatsukami also finds those products worrisome. Researchers have little information about nicotine absorption and toxicity for any of the new products, she says, and there’s too little data on snus to make per-dose comparisons to cigarettes or spit tobacco. Still, Camel Snus recently tested by WVU contained at least two carcinogens. “It’s not like chewing gum,” warns Robert Anderson, deputy director of West Virginia University’s Prevention Research Center. “This product is not a safe alternative to cigarettes.” And because its use is easy to conceal, WVU researcher Cindy Tworek worries children could

suck on the pouches in front of oblivious parents or teachers. The brightly colored tins seem designed to attract both female and young users, she says. The same age restrictions that apply to other forms of tobacco also apply to sales of snus, although they vary from state to state. Tworek has surveyed more than 600 college students in the Morgantown test market and will release her conclusions next year on whether Reynolds’ marketing efforts work. Flint, the teenage smoker, suspects they do. “It looks fun, actually,” he said of the bright blue camel logo. “As a little kid, I’d probably buy this just because it looks cool. But I know better than that, and I’d rather choke to death.” Howard denies suggestions that Reynolds targets underage users. He says it’s selling best among adult male smokers and moist snuff users. “It didn’t quite get as much consideration among female adult smokers just because it’s different,” he concedes. “They’re a little more hesitant. But obviously we think that with continued communication with all adult smokers, they’ll come to try it.”

Astronauts tinker with urine-to-water machine By Mike Schneider The Associated Press

HOUSTON | Astronauts tinkered Sunday with a troublesome piece of equipment designed to help convert urine and sweat into drinkable water, which is vital to allowing the international space station crew to double to six. Station commander Michael Fincke and space shuttle Endeavour astronaut Donald Pettit changed how a centrifuge is mounted in a urine processor, which is part of the newly delivered $154 million water recovery system. The centrifuge is a spin-

ning device that helps separate the water from urine. It was on rubber grommets to reduce vibrations, and Mission Control asked Fincke to remove them and just bolt the piece down. “We’re very hopeful for this, and if not, we have a few other tricks up our sleeves,” Fincke said from the space station after the task was finished. The astronauts have been trying to get the system running for four days, but the urine processor has worked for just two hours at a time before shutting down. A normal run is about four hours. An initial test after the repair

ran for 3½ hours and processed about a gallon of urine before shutting down Sunday night. Engineers again were trying to figure out a fix. “It looks like we made things better, but we’re maybe not there yet,” Fincke radioed to Mission Control. As a last resort, Endeavour could bring the problematic part back to Earth for repairs when the shuttle departs on Thanksgiving. That option could complicate plans to add crew members to the station since several water samples need to brought back for tests before astronauts can drink from the contraption.

Samples will be brought back on Endeavour and in February on space shuttle Discovery. The water recovery system, delivered a week ago by Endeavour, is essential for allowing six astronauts to live on the space station by the middle of next year. “Without being able to recycle urine, that does take down some of our capability,” Fincke said. “It’s not necessarily a showstopper but it’s something that we definitely need to address.” Engineers were studying whether six people could still live at the station with the urine processor working two hours at a time, said flight director

Courtenay McMillan. “We don’t know if it’s a good idea to start and stop it multiple times,” McMillan said. “We may be breaking something further until we really understand what’s going on.” Flight controllers had hoped the water samples would have a mixture of 70 percent from condensation and 30 percent from urine. Given the problems with the processor, that ratio stands at 90 percent condensation and 10 percent urine. Mission managers have decided not to extend Endeavour’s trip by an extra day since the astronauts have enough

water samples. While Fincke worked on the processor, Endeavour’s seven astronauts had part of the day off Sunday, except Pettit who gave up some of his off-duty time to work on the water recycler. Astronauts Stephen Bowen and Robert “Shane” Kimbrough prepared for the fourth and final spacewalk of the two-week mission. The spacewalkers will finish cleaning and lubing a jammed joint, which allows the station’s solar wing to rotate in the direction of the sun. They also will lubricate a twin solarwing joint, which is running without any problems.

Day one and you’re part of the team Day one. It’s when you have the opportunity to focus on your career, your life and your community. It’s when your experiences, ideas and opinions count. And it’s when you’re welcomed into an environment embracing diversity and encouraging inclusiveness. From your very first day, we’re committed to helping you achieve your potential. So, whether your career lies in assurance, tax, transaction or advisory services, shouldn’t your day one be at Ernst & Young?

What’s next for your future? Visit ey.com/us/eyinsight and our Facebook page.

©2008 ERNST & YOUNG LLP Ernst & Young refers to a global organization of member firms of Ernst & Young Global Limited, each of which is a separate legal entity. Ernst & Young LLP is a client-serving member firm located in the US.


LIFESTYLES

Monday, December 1, 2008

Ryan Mazer • Editor

7

ryan.mazer@cw.ua.edu

Inexpensive Holiday Gifts By Jessica Cheek Lifestyles Reporter

Holiday gift giving is not easy, especially for students on a small budget. Here are just a few suggestions for useful, meaningful gifts below $20.

1. Gift certificates from restaurant.com or Ebay

1. Video rental gift cards

You can buy gift certificates at a price below the credited value online. For example, at restaurant. com, yo u can find $10 gift cards to D e sp e r a d o ’s Steakhouse on sale for $3, and Ebay usually has good deals also.

A $10 gift certificate is good for several movie or game rentals, so you can give a practical gift that will be used several times without breaking your budget. 2. Mix CD with a personal, detailed track list

2. Homemade coupons Instead of spending money on a gift card, you can make your own coupons that your relatives can “cash in” for chores that you wouldn’t normally do, i.e. wash the car or clean the entire house. This may remind you of the gifts you gave when you were in elementary school, but it still works.

FRIENDS (GIRLS):

FRIENDS (GUYS):

PARENTS AND ADULT RELATIVES:

Make a playlist of your favorite songs and include a track listing with comments about why you like each song or why you put it on your friend’s CD. 3. Homemade treats

1. Framed photo or small personalized scrapbook Use a picture of both of you and buy an inexpensive frame. Decorate it with quotes or other memories so your friend has a personal keepsake. 2. Homemade gift basket Make a themed basket based on your friend’s interests. For example, give a movie lover a new DVD, a bag of popcorn and a package of her favorite candy in a nice gift basket — remember that previously viewed movies are a good value at most video stores.

3. Alabama T-shirt, hat, etc. There is a plethora of UA merchandise in Tuscaloosa, and your relatives will probably be proud to wear a T-shirt and tell everyone that their grandchild goes to the University.

Chocolate covered pretzels or fruit, cookies, brownies or rice krispie treats are simple to make, and one batch can be spread between a couple of friends.

OTHER IDEAS: 1. Gift drawing: Instead of each person in your group of friends buying a gift for every other person, put everyone’s name in a jar. Each one of you can draw out someone else’s name and buy a gift for only that person — this way everyone gets a gift and no one goes broke. 2. Plan ahead: Decide ahead of time how many gifts you are buying so that you do not run out of money before you buy grandma’s present.

Coffeehouse & Gourmet Deli

still

>

3. Think about hobbies: Give a musician sheet music to a popular song or an athlete accessories for his or her sport. There is a higher probability that you are giving something that the recipient will enjoy, and a personalized present shows that you put some thought and effort into selecting a good gift.

Got Dining Dollars?

We Accept Dining Dollars 1301 University Blvd. “On the Strip” (205) 750-0203

3. Jewelry You will never hear someone complain about having too much jewelry, and stores like Target carry attractive accessories at reasonable prices.


TODAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

• Dickens Downtown Victorian Christmas Celebration — 5 to 9 p.m., downtown Northport

• Women’s Basketball vs. Central Florida — 6 p.m., Coleman Coliseum

• Artrageous Riverfront Art Tour — 5 to 9 p.m., call 758-1257 for locations

2 S TUDY WEEK • STUDY WEEK (all week)

PAGE Monday

• Men’s Basketball vs. Alabama A&M — 7 p.m., Coleman Coliseum

December 1, 2008

QUOTE OF THE DAY

“People that I work with think I’m the smartest person ever just because I know a few random facts.” — Chela Canler, a senior majoring in international marketing.

“Pepsi is very eager to work with us. It’s been very much a team project and we are just looking to accommodate students on campus and prevent distractions in the classroom.” — Louise Crow, SGA vice president of student affairs on providing school supplies in vending machines.

BIRTHDAYS December 2 DeSarah Beth Averitt, senior, English

We want to list your birthday here. Send your name, birthdate, year and major to cwnews@sa.ua.edu. Put “birthday” in the subject line. And look for birthday greetings from us on your special day.

THIS DAY IN ALABAMA HISTORY 1955: Rosa Parks, a black seamstress, was arrested for refusing to give up her seat for a boarding white passenger as required by a Montgomery city ordinance. Her action prompted the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott and earned her a place in history as “mother of the civil rights movement.” Parks was inducted into the Alabama Academy of Honor in August 2000. Source: Alabama Department of Archives and History

THE CRIMSON WHITE EDITORIAL • Corey Craft, editor-in-chief, craft@cw.ua.edu, 348-8049 • Phil Owen, managing editor, owen@cw.ua.edu, 348-6146 • James Jaillet, production editor • Megan Honeycutt, outreach manager • Breckan Duckworth, design editor • Robert Bozeman, assistant design editor • Marion Walding, photo editor • RF Rains, assistant photo editor • Matt Ferguson, chief copy editor • Paul Thompson, opinions editor • Dave Folk, news editor • Brett Bralley, news editor • Ryan Mazer, lifestyles editor • CJ McCormick, assistant lifestyles editor • Ryan Wright, sports editor • Greg Ostendorf, assistant sports editor • Eric McHargue, graphics editor • Andrew Richardson, Web editor

ADVERTISING

• Drew Gunn, advertising manager, 348-8995, cwbiz manager@sa.ua.edu • Jeff Haas, territory manager, 348-8044, territorymg2@ sa.ua.edu • Joe Greenwood, zones 3 and 7, (McFarland and Skyland boulevards), 348-8735, smcwzone3-7@sa.ua.edu • Lance Hutchison, zone 4 (Northport), 348-8054, zone4@sa.ua.edu • Braxton Jett, zone 6 (15th Street), 348-6876, zone6@ sa.ua.edu

348-6875, zone8@sa.ua. edu • Dana Andrzejewski, zone 44 (downtown and downtown Northport), 348-6153, zone44@sa.ua.edu • Jarrett Cocharo, zone 55 (campus), 348-2670 • Torri Blunt, nontraditional advertising, 348-4381, smterritorymanager1@sa.ua.edu • Emily Frost, classifieds coordinator, 348-7355, smcwclassmgr@sa.ua.edu

• Ashley Brand, creative services manager, 348-8042, • Carly Jayne Rullman, zone cwadv@sa.ua.edu 8 (the Strip and downtown), The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The advertising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published weekly June, July and August, and is published four times a week September through April except for spring break, Thanksgiving, Labor Day and the months of May and December. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White is entered as periodical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright © 2008 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical Publication” categories of the U.S. copyright laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

The College Store to change locations By Drew Taylor Senior Staff Reporter

After decades of business on Bryant Drive, the University of Alabama apparel and merchandise store known as the College Store will be moving to a new location next year. The College Store, only a couple of blocks away from Bryant-Denny Stadium on Bryant Drive, has been in business for over five decades, first built as a book depository before World War II. Joe Price, assistant manager of the store, said it will not lease a new contract for the University-owned lot, and will move

to a new retail center on the corner of 15th Street and Hackberrry Lane, behind the Checkers fast-food restaurant. Price said the store would not change its phone number or items of purchase; the new location will be the only thing different about the store. The Nebraska Book Co. purchased the store in 1994, changing its name to the College Store. “Life goes on,” Price said. “I don’t have any hard feelings.” An article in The Tuscaloosa News last week said the store’s new location will be 4,500 square feet, as opposed to its current size of 3,500 square feet. In the article, Chris

Church, general manager of the store, said that there will be more parking, a feature the current site does not have. Price said it is hard to tell how business will be affected this early in the plan, but knows the store will do fine financially, given the amount of student traffic that goes through the vicinity. “Game days will not do us well,” Price said. “We’ll have traffic like we do here, however.” As of now, there is no set date for the move, but Price said he predicts it will take place some time in February, depending on the completion of the new retail center’s construction.

UA Quizbowl team nationally recognized By Josh Veazey Staff Reporter What do Mark Twain, the Hardy-Weinberg equation, opera, electron-splitting, the Pope, W. E. B. Du Bois and the dad from the Brady Bunch all have in common? They’re all topics covered during a 30minute practice session for the Alabama Academic Quizbowl Team. “People that I work with think I’m the smartest person ever just because I know a few random facts,” said Chela Canler, a senior majoring in international marketing. “It’s pretty impressive when you say, ‘This author wrote that, or this composer did that.’ But I just learned it from Quizbowl.” A typical Quizbowl game is a face-off between two teams with up to five players, each that answer a set of twenty questions on random subject matter. The competition centers on “toss-up” questions in which the first player to buzz in must immediately answer the question. The questions are multiclued, making the correct answer easier to identify as they progress, and you can get bonus points for buzzing in before a

Contributed Alabamaʼs B team — from left featuring Katrina Windon, Bobby Bozeman and Matthew Kelly — face off against UAʼs grad team on the right featuring Dan Marion and JT Thompson during a tournament at Mississippi State. Alabamaʼs grad team won 1st place. certain point in the question. Typical questions usually cover science, math, history, geography and literature, but other subjects like mythology and music are often covered. Questions even include some sports, and “trash” – questions

Tuscaloosa Location

Now Open!!!

Open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

about pop culture and celebrities. “Last year, we started assigning people topics to study within their field of interest. Everybody has their strength,” Canler said. UA’s Quizbowl team was started in 2006 by students who transferred from Faulkner University, where they were national community college champions two years in a row. “Almost every school in the nation has a Quizbowl team, and most high schools, but Alabama didn’t,” Canler said. “The very first year, we paid for everything out of our pocket and went to a bunch of tournaments, and we went to nationals and placed seventh, which was a huge deal for our first year.”

409 23rd Avenue - Termerson Square - Downtown 205-345-5501 - www.mommagoldbergsdeli.com

GAMEDAY SATURDAYS $3 Miller Lite Pitchers Coupon Redeemable at Tuscaloosa location only.

Momma’sNachos

Free!

With purchase of sandwich & large drink... Good Mondays only, Coupon Required

$21.99

Full-Set Acrylic 1130 University Blvd.

Also that year, UA student Jonathan Thompson placed 7th in the nation out of hundreds competing at nationals. Now, an entire case in Nott Hall is designated simply for Quizbowl trophies. Teams from the University have won first place in competitions at Vanderbilt, Berry College, Shorter College and Mississippi State, and bowlers Jonathan Thompson and Andy Knowles have won first place individual awards. The team got invites and traveled to nationals the past two years, and only 32 teams get invites to nationals in each division. A team can clinch an invitation to nationals by winning sectionals, and then the remaining spots are filled by the top ranked teams who didn’t win their section. Members practice six hours a week, and Canler says some members take specific classes simply to learn more information that might be potential questions. Sean Randall, a junior majoring in theater and philosophy, said they also learn more, and raise money, by writing their own question packets and hosting tournaments. “We host two annual tournaments — the Titanomachy [a series of battles in Greek mythology] and the Admiral Ackbar [a secondary character in “Star Wars: Episode VI — Return of the Jedi”]. Yes — we’re nerds,” Randall said. Canler said that although she thinks Quizbowl has a “geeky” element to it, the subject matter and the competitive nature appeals to a large range of people. Quizbowl is open to any UA undergraduate or graduate student. The team practices on Mon., Tues. and Thurs. from 6-8 p.m. in Bidgood room 375. Tuesday is designated as beginners’ night and features easier questions. Anyone who shows up gets a spot on a team, and members say they are always looking for students with various areas of specialty. “You’d have to be a mental behemoth to memorize every single question that’s out there. Everyone has an area of expertise,” Randall said. “We try to be open, and even if you can’t answer questions, you can still come and learn.”


The Crimson White

NEWS

SGA’s Office of Student Recruitment plans to help freshmen get ready for finals by hosting the first—ever “Study or Die” session today and Tuesday in the Heritage Room in the Ferguson Center from 7 to 10 p.m. Collin Taylor, director of Student Recruitment, said “Study or Die” is an effort to help recruit and retain students at the University. “Study or Die” offers a calm and relaxed environment for freshmen to study for their final exams, Taylor said. Kendra Key, a junior majoring in political science and coordinator of the SGA recycling initiative on campus, said she remembers her experience as a freshman preparing for finals.

“I remember Dead Week being overwhelming for me,” Key said. “I wasn’t anticipating it to be as intense as it was. I was very focused on studying and staying in the library until the wee hours of the morning,” Key said. The study sessions are for freshmen only, but upperclassmen shouldn’t feel left out, Taylor said. “Upperclassmen are welcome to come and help by tutoring and can get volunteer hours,” Taylor said. As an upperclassman, Key said she can attest to how nerve racking Study Week can be and said she knows freshmen could gain real insight by participating in “Study or Die.” “I think that’ll be good for freshman so that they can get a different perspective. Study groups can provide a unique way to remember something,”

By Amy Castleberry Contributing Writer

Key said. After a month and a half of planning, preparation and support, Taylor said he feels positively about the event’s outcome. “I think it will be a great turnout. Administration was very cooperative and thought that this was a great idea. Freshman Forum, Crossroads Community Center and other programs involved with SGA have supported the program. It’s an effort to help freshman students out,” Taylor said. Taylor said he hopes success from this study session will lead to more in future semesters. To help with convenience for this year’s Study Week, the Ferguson Food Court and Starbucks will extend its hours to 9 p.m. so all students who need edible energy can help themselves.

North Korea serious about Dec. 1 shutdown

Seoul, South Korea | North Korea said Monday it will suspend a joint tourism project and halt cross-border train service with South Korea starting next week because of Seoul’s hard-line stance on the communist nation. The North’s army also said it will “selectively expel” South Koreans from a joint industrial zone in the city of Kaesong, but stopped short of shutting down South Koreanrun factories that are a key source of hard currency for the impoverished nation. Monday’s announcement laid out the first concrete measures the North plans to take in implementing its threat to restrict traffic to the South starting Dec. 1 and marked a new escalation of tension between the two countries still technically at war. “The South Korean puppets are still hell-bent on the treacherous and anti-reunification confrontational racket,” the North said in a message to the South, according to North Korea’s state-run Korean Central News Agency. “The prospect of the interKorean relations will entirely depend on the attitude of the South Korean authorities,” the message said, adding that the North’s threats are never “empty talk.” Separately, the North sent a series of messages to the South confirming the planned measures, according to Seoul’s Unification Ministry. One message, addressed

to South Korean companies operating at Kaesong, said the North will “guarantee” their business activities, though the number of company staff allowed to remain in the zone will be cut down, the ministry said. South Korean business leaders were meeting Monday with North Korean officials to discuss the border restrictions. Relations between the two Koreas have been tense since the conservative President Lee Myung-bak took office in Seoul in February with a pledge to change policy on the North. He said he would be different from his liberal predecessors and accused them of being too soft on their communist neighbor. North Korea since has suspended reconciliation talks and threatened to cut any remaining ties with Seoul. Despite the chill in government-level ties, civilian exchanges have continued with South Korean-run factories continuing to operate in the industrial complex in Kaesong and a South Korean firm operating tours to the

city’s historic downtown. A third landmark interKorean project — tours to the North’s scenic Diamond Mountain — were suspended after the shooting death of a South Korean tourist in July. KCNA’s report said some South Koreans still working at Diamond Mountain would also be expelled next month. Monday’s announcement means the North will shut down the Kaesong tours and enforce stricter border control for traffic connected to the Kaesong industrial park. The North also said it will halt train service between the South and the Kaesong industrial complex — a symbolic rail line that was one of the first inter-Korean projects to emerge from a warming of relations under past South Korean administrations. Kaesong is home to more than 80 South Korean factories that employ about 35,000 North Korean workers. The two Koreas fought the bloody 1950-53 Korean War that ended in a truce, not a peace treaty, leaving the divided peninsula still technically at war.

Collegiate Wear! Wear!

student body by way of survey very much a team project and polls in order to see how suc- we are just looking to accomcessful the machine has been modate students on campus The SGA, University Supply and whether more machines and prevent distractions in the Store and Pepsi Products have would be beneficial around classroom.” Crow said partnered on a trial the SGA wants ”Now we are offering a middle ground location basis to supply stustudents’ opindents with a vendwhere supplies are easily accessible, even ions on whether ing machine that after the SUPe stores have closed.” or not the SUPe will offer general vendor is benschool supplies, — Louise Crow, SGA vice president of student affairs eficial or convesaid Louise Crow, nient. To make SGA vice president a suggestion or of student affairs. give input, visit the SGA Web campus. The vending machine, known “Pepsi is very eager to work site at sga.ua.edu to offer sugas the SUPe Vendor, will offer items that range from pens, with us,” Crow said. “It’s been gestions and reviews. pencils, highlighters, locks, batteries, blank CDs, flash drives and more. The supplies are sold for less than $10 at market value, but will have a convenience price increase. “The SGA recognized that the only available options for students to purchase school supplies on campus were at the very north and very south ends of campus,” Crow said. ”Now we are offering a middle ground location where supplies are easily accessible, even after the SUPe stores have closed.” The SUPe Vendor is now located and is in full operation at Bidgood Hall right next to the Bidgood Bistro. Although it does not have ACTion card capability yet, those accommodations will be implemented next semester if the project is successful. “We were lucky that Pepsi agreed to lend us a machine that was specifically designed to dispense school supplies,” Crow said. “In order to place more machines at the most needed spots on campus according to student input, this will be a test run to see how successful and profitable the machines will be.” After the trial period has ended, the SGA plans on polling the

Funny how a lot of people don’t see the need for health insurance until it’s too late.

17820

By Jae-Soon Chang The Associated Press

the

SUPeStore

• Mat Board (and computerized cutting) • PRISMACOLOR Markers • Oils, Acrylics, Watercolors • Pencils, Pens, Brushes • Art Paper, Sketch and Drawing Pads • Portfolios

3

Supe store to set up supply vending machines

‘Study or Die’ helps freshmen By Amethyst Holmes Contributing Writer

Monday, December 1, 2008

Unexpected medical bills can be devastating for your financial future. That’s why it’s so important to have dependable health insurance before you suddenly find yourself needing it. If you’re uninsured, sign up for affordable coverage today with Individual Blue from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama. Just call 1 888 234-8282 or visit www.bcbsal.com/individual to get the security you need from the Alabama company you trust.

supestore.ua.edu www.bcbsal.com/individual 1 888 234-8282


OPINIONS

Monday, December 1, 2008

Paul Thompson • Editor

4

paul.thompson@cw.ua.edu

OUR VIEW

The Tide has turned

Easily one of the most electrifying games any member of The Crimson White’s editorial board has attended, this year’s Iron Bowl will go down in history as one of the best in the series for the Crimson Tide. The last time the Tide shut out the Auburn Tigers was 1992 — coincidentally, the same year we last won a National Championship. Saturday’s game also marked the 12-0 mark for this regular season, also the first time in 16 years. The editorial board wants to extend our “thank you” — for whatever it is worth — to the players of the Alabama Crimson Tide football team. Your hard work and dedication have gained us national prestige and helped to return us to our rightful place among the most elite college football programs in the nation. To the fans, we also offer our appreciation. With no one to watch, the football players could go 12-0 every season, but it wouldn’t matter. Arriving to games three hours early just to get a good seat and screaming yourselves hoarse — just like we did on Saturday night

— shows the true loyalty of UA students to their peers down on the field. Saturday’s victory was especially significant for all seniors here at the Capstone, too. For the last six years, we have been laboring under the cloud of Auburn dominance. That streak is now over and we welcome that with great enthusiasm. This was a victory for the University, the students and the fans spread across the nation and our state. In short, a spotless season capped off by a victory over our biggest rival was the perfect end to a perfect regular season. So, football players, consider this a collective “thank you” from the entire staff of The Crimson White. Keep up the good work next weekend as we take on Florida in our first SEC Championship Game since 1999 and stay focused for our likely bowl game in January (if not the National Championship.) “Hey Tigers…” Our View is the consensus of The Crimson White’s editorial board.

MCT Campus

The root, or stem, of the issue In early November, Japanese scientists successfully cloned mice from cells frozen for 16 years. Before this successful experiment, researchers believed ice crystals within the frozen cell caused permanent damage to DNA. More recently, scientists at Pennsylvania State University successfully mapped a large portion of the genetic code of the woolly mammoth, an animal that became extinct around 10,000 years ago. This mapping, according to an Associated Press article, marks the first time scientists have decoded the DNA of an extinct animal. The mammoth’s genetic code was retrieved from frozen balls of the animal’s hair found in the Siberian permafrost. All this research and experimentation can be traced back to Dolly, the sheep who was cloned in 1996. Since then, the International Herald Tribune says that more than 10 mammal species have been cloned. Ever since Dolly made cloning an international success story and Steven Spielberg created “Jurassic Park,” our imaginations have run amok. Even so, stories of dinosaurs and saber-toothed tigers on display at your hometown zoo still seem somewhat ridiculous. And for good reason. Stephan Schuster, the Penn State biochemist who coauthored the wooly mammoth research, said one day scientists should be able to recreate any extinct animal that lived within the last 100,000 years — which excludes those dangerous dinos that lived somewhere around 140 million years ago. AP reporter Seth Borenstein likened future scientific experiments more to “Ice Age 3” than “Jurassic Park IV.” Still, many scientists working on research with animal DNA hope to use their work to help endangered species rather than bring back extinct

Callie Corley ones. So what does this mean for us as humans? You already know of one hot-button cloning issue — stem cells. The Human Genome Project Web site states that “therapeutic cloning” is used to create human embryos from which stem cells can be harvested after five days. At this point in its development the egg — or blastocyst — has not yet become a human fetus. However, extracting the stem cells does destroy the embryo. And, for many, therein lies the ethical rub. Yet, stem cells are vitally important in medical research because they can be used to create almost any type of specialized cell in the human body. Scientists hope that someday stem cells may be used to replace cells damaged by heart disease, Alzheimer’s, cancer and other diseases. If scientists can clone entire animals, it’s hard to deny humans will one day be on the laboratory table as well. However, with human cloning, the ethical and moral issues weigh heavier than with a woolly mammoth. Physicians from the American Medical Association and scientists with the American Association for the Advancement of Science have released statements against cloning entire humans,

and legislation has been introduced in Congress against human cloning. Scientists and doctors alike agree that the risks with cloning are too great to attempt with a human life. Most attempts to clone mammals fail; several successfully cloned animals died prematurely due to complications. All these issues could be expected in human cloning as well. Plus, when it comes to cows and sheep, intellectual ability isn’t always a considered variable, so researchers don’t know how mental development would be affected by cloning. With stem cells, though, the outcomes are much more favorable. On Nov. 22, The Financial Times reported on a woman in Spain who received a new trachea created from her own stem cells. The woman suffered from breathing difficulties due to tuberculosis. Because the trachea was created using her stem cells, the woman’s immune system didn’t reject it as a foreign object. Stem cells are also used in bone marrow transplants for leukemia patients, in insulin production for diabetics and for joint repairs. This isn’t cloning for the sake of novelty. This isn’t freezing the DNA of a famous author or politician to bring him back in the future, as macabre as that may seem. This is helping people survive, giving them back a chance at life. President-elect Barack Obama has indicated he’ll lift restrictions President Bush imposed on federal funding for research on human stem cells. This action would breathe new life into stem cell research, potentially offering millions a new chance at life. Callie Corley is a senior majoring in political science and journalism. Her column runs on Mondays.

Crump’s editorial completely wrong By Nick Rose I am writing again in response to an editorial that appeared in the Nov. 21 edition of The Crimson White. The letter from Mr. Judson Crump launched a verbose condemnation of my support of the automotive industry assistance in my editorial from Nov.19. The letter, more a personal attack than fact based, lent little creditability to his arguments. I felt it necessary to defend my position. I have never met Mr. Crump, so I would like to introduce myself to him. I am a 2007 UA graduate with a double major in political science and history completed in 3 1/2 years. I was accepted and on route to attend law school when I had a change of heart and entered the elementary education graduate program here at the Capstone. I enjoy working with young children and watching their minds develop. I will be a good instructor to these young Americans in a formative period of their lives. His attack on my elementary education major insults and belittles all educators across our great land. Mr. Crump says he is not a Republican. I am not either. In fact, I had the honor and privilege of serving as the chairman of the College Democrats on campus several years ago. Today I am vice chair of the Tuscaloosa Democratic Party. However, let me make this

clear, this is not a Democratic or Republican issue. This is an American issue! Don’t get caught up in all the smoke and mirrors and talk of corporate jets. This assistance is about the American autoworker and all the suppliers and small businesses across the country that are tied to this important industry. Thirteen percent of the nation’s income comes from the auto industry, not just Detroit, but car dealers, suppliers and used car lots across America. Mr. Crump believes Alabama would benefit from GM or Ford closing their doors. The devastation it would cause car dealership employees, finance companies, detail shops and newspapers that depend on advertising would all be sorely felt all over the state. These are Alabama jobs as well as our nation’s jobs. If 3 million people lose their jobs, this will hurt the economy in a way unseen since the Great Depression. Crump’s inappropriate comments about high school dropouts working in our auto plants making a good wage insults hard working people everywhere, including many in our Hyundai and Mercedes plants across the state as well as our neighbors building Hondas and Toyota’s in our neighboring states. Mr. Crump, I hope you feel as privileged as I do. My

father paid for my education here selling cars at a domestic auto dealership for the last 28 years. He now sells Toyotas, but I’m just as proud of him. You insult some of the hardest workers in the country for having jobs and benefits despite their level of education. You call their management style “idiotic and shortsighted,” yet you suggest that people will go ahead and buy BMWs once the Big Three is gone. What world do you live in? You sound privileged, but in a different way than I do. There are other issues, including national security, which depend on automakers to provide transportation to our soldiers. Parts, transmissions, tanks and Jeeps all are provided by these stalwarts of American manufacturing! Even our beloved NASCAR would be in turmoil. This is a national and local issue and it affects everyone. It is not about you or me. It is about America. Her vitality and economy are at the root of all its citizens. The economy is already in free fall. The loss of the Big Three will cause irreparable damage to the U.S. economy and not just the “rust belt states.” We have to aid them so as to not compound the already bad decisions that have been made.

Nicholas Rose is a graduate student in elementary education.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Craftʼs ʻTwlightʼ review flawed By Lauren Anders Corey Craft, I wasn’t sure if my response to your review of the “Twilight” film in the Nov. 24 edition of The Crimson White should be sarcastic or irritated at your apparent lack of “Twilight” knowledge. Laugh at me if you will for calling it that, but your article proves how little you know and is a

perfect example of what you call “great trash.” My first problem is you spouting off on a subject you know nothing about. Instead of researching it, you decided your ideas held water. Everyone is “chaste” in the first novel and movie, but the last couple of books are, well, racy. There are torn pillows and broken houses, and not because people are abstinent. The movie is fueled by eroticism over the idea of being bitten by an extremely goodlooking vampire. Ask any girl

that has read these books. Edward is her fantasy. You disagreeing or thinking the movie is dumb is one thing, but completely debasing it because you did absolutely no research is ridiculous. People who read the book understood the movie for what it was: a shortened, compact version of the novel. So please, next time you decide to grace us with your knowledge, don’t. Lauren Anders is a junior majoring in advertising.

WE WELCOME YOUR OPINIONS Editorial Board

Corey Craft Editor Phil Owen Managing Editor Matt Ferguson Chief Copy Editor

James Jaillet Production Editor Breckan Duckworth Design Editor Paul Thompson Opinions Editor

Letters to the editor must be less than 200 words and guest columns less than 500. Send submissions to cwopinions@gmail.com. Submissions must include the author’s name, year, major and daytime phone number. Phone numbers are for verification and will not be published. Students should also include their year in school and major. For more information, call 348-6144. The CW reserves the right to edit all submissions.


The Crimson White

NEWS

Monday, December 1, 2008

5

Gender-segregated classes draw praise, concern By Rena Havner The Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. | Pencils in hand, the sixth- grade girls were encouraged to use as many descriptive words as possible as they wrote about their dream wedding cake. Would you like chocolate or vanilla? What colors should the icing be? Is 30 inches too big for the bottom tier? Down the hall, the boys in another sixth-grade class were asked one-by-one to give examples of action verbs used in sports. Throw. Sack. Slam. Intercept. Applaud. This year, Hankins Middle School in Theodore separated all of its academic classes into all-girls and all-boys. Girls and boys even eat lunch at different times. The students steal glances at members of the opposite sex in the hallways as they change classes, but the only time

they’re together is if they’re enrolled in some of the elective courses, such as band, art or journalism, or if they’re on the bus, at a school dance or on a field trip. Officials said this is an attempt to improve the school. So far, average daily attendance is up 2 percent, and fewer students are being sent to the office, said Principal Cheryl Wittner. But a couple of Hankins parents have expressed concern over the social effects of separating the sexes. They said they were given no warning that the classes were being split and no choice about whether their children would participate. The American Civil Liberties Union — which has sued a school in Kentucky and got ten involved in similar cases in Georgia and Florida — is representing those parents. Student reactions are mixed. “You learn more like this,”

said 11-year-old Brenda Orduna, who made the A-B honor roll last quarter for the first time ever. “When boys are around, you’re shy. And you won’t ask questions if you don’t get it.” Yet, Orduna admitted, she misses the boys. And when you put more than 20 girls together in the same class room, it can get dramatic. Eleven-year-old Tyler Johnson said he can pay better attention to the teacher without the girls around. “You can concentrate on what you’re trying to do,” he said, adding that he likes the fact that his teacher can center her lessons around topics that boys relate to. But 12-year-old E.J. Irons said that because he and the other boys like to play around in class and make noise, they sometimes still get in trouble. “If we had some girls, they’d calm us down,” he said. “Plus, I

miss them. They’re pretty.” Wittner said she and her teachers had been thinking about dividing the classes up by gender for three years before they actually did so. They attended workshops over the summer locally and in Nashville to learn about the different ways that boys and girls learn. And they announced at a parent meeting in May that they were dividing up the courses and making several other curriculum and uniform changes. Wittner said she would like to continue with the separated classes for a couple of years, so that she and her staff can evaluate student grades, standardized test scores and other data. Anecdotally, teachers said, they’ve seen a positive difference. The boys, for example, aren’t shy now about reading journal entries aloud in class. The U.S. Department of Education relaxed restric-

tions on single-sex education in public schools in 2006, with officials saying that some students may learn better in single-sex classrooms. But the department stressed that such programs had to ensure equal opportunities for boys and girls. The National Association for Single Sex Public Education lists at least 442 schools across the country offering single-sex classes, but that list is likely incomplete. Several schools locally have experimented with it over the last couple of years, including Foley Intermediate School in Baldwin County, Mobile County Training School in Plateau and Hollinger’s Island Elementary in south Mobile County. Foley Intermediate officials have noted some success, while Mobile County Training and Hollinger’s Island have since abandoned the philosophy. “I tried it with my fifth-

grade class, and they loved it. They really loved it. The girls especially liked it because they thought the boys were too boisterous, and they liked having a quieter class,” said Hollinger’s Island Elementary Principal Shirley Thompson. “But we didn’t see a big difference academically.” As Mobile Count schools Superintendent Roy Nichols has said, overall, the research is mixed, with some studies showing academic benefits and others not much of a difference. Wittner said she would welcome representatives from the ACLU to come and sit in some of her classes to see what they’re like for themselves. “Without the peer pressure of the opposite sex, they’re able to focus more on academics,” Wittner said. “I think it’s been wonderful for our children.” Hankins has about 1,100 students in grades 6-8.

Space shuttle Endeavour finishes 16-day mission By John Antczak Associated Press Writer

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. | Space shuttle Endeavour and its seven astronauts safely returned to Earth on Sunday, taking a detour to sunny California after storms hit the main landing strip in Florida. Endeavour wrapped up a 16-day trip that left the international space station freshly remodeled and capable of housing bigger crews. The shuttle dropped off all kinds of home improvement equipment, including a new bathroom, kitchenette, exercise machine, two sleeping quarters and a recycling system designed to convert astronauts’ urine and sweat into drinking water. But the mission wasn’t without its problems. Astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper let go of a $100,000 tool bag during the first spacewalk, muttering “Oh, great” as it floated away. And Endeavour’s astronauts also had to put in extra effort to get the urine processor working. About seven liters of recycled urine and condensation were coming back aboard Endeavour

for extensive testing. No one at the space station will drink the recycled water until the equipment runs for 90 days and ground tests ensure it’s safe. More samples will be returned on the next shuttle flight. The shuttle crew also conducted four spacewalks to clear metal shavings from a solar wing rotary joint at the space station. The joint had been jammed for more than a year and hampered energy production at the orbiting outpost. Initial tests indicated the repairs on the joint were successful. The space station additions — and a few more scheduled to go up on the next shuttle flight in February — should enable NASA to double the size of the space station crew by June. On Sunday, NASA ordered the detour to California after dangerously high wind and a stormy sky prevented a Florida landing. “Welcome back. That was a great way to finish a fantastic flight,” Mission Control radioed. “And we’re happy to be here in California,” shuttle commander Christopher Ferguson replied. Congratulations also came down from the space station.

“Wow,” said skipper Mike Fincke, who watched the landing broadcast live. Returning home from a sixmonth mission was former space station resident Gregory Chamitoff, who had rocketed away from the planet at the end of May. The space shuttle’s journey, short by comparison, spanned 6.6 million miles and 250 orbits of Earth. After landing, the astronauts inspected the shuttle’s underbelly. Accompanied by three crew members, Ferguson spoke briefly on the tarmac. He said Endeavour “fared entry pretty well” and called the mission extremely successful. He noted that Chamitoff wasn’t present because it takes longer for a person who has been in space so long to reacclimatize to gravity, and said the other two astronauts — StefanyshynPiper and Donald Pettit — were just keeping an eye on him. “The crew members who are not with us are doing just fine,” he said. NASA always prefers to land the space shuttles at their home base in Florida. It takes about a week and costs $1.8 million to transport a shuttle from

AP Photo | Mark J. Terrill The space shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base, Sunday, in California. California to Florida, atop a modified jumbo jet. The astronauts also had been rooting for a Florida touchdown; that’s where their families were waiting. As Endeavour soared over Houston, home to Mission Control, Ferguson could see all the bad weather in Florida. “I think you made a good call,” he radioed. It was the first space shuttle landing at Edwards in more than a year. When Endeavour

hurtled over metropolitan Los Angeles, firefighters responded to a report of an explosion that turned out to have been the spacecraft’s signature sonic booms. Ferguson landed on a temporary runway that’s shorter and more narrow than the Kennedy landing strip. Edwards’ main runway — which parallels the temporary one — just underwent maintenance and upgrades, and has yet to be equipped with all the neces-

sary navigation equipment. NASA officials said both Ferguson and his co-pilot, Eric Boe, had practiced on the temporary runway in training aircraft. Endeavour’s crew members were expected to be reunited with their families on Monday in Houston. Early Sunday morning, a Russian supply ship arrived at the space station with Christmas presents, food, clothes and other items.

Bush sends Rice to India in aftermath of attacks By Anne Gearan AP Military Writer

WASHINGTON | President George W. Bush on Sunday dispatched Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to New Delhi in support of India following the terrorist attacks that killed nearly 200 people, including six Americans. Rice and Bush wanted an opportunity “to express the condolences of the American government directly to the Indian government and the Indian people,” Rice spokesman Sean McCormack said. Rice was scheduled to leave

Sunday night for a meeting in London and then travel to Brussels for a NATO gathering. On Wednesday, following the NATO meeting, she will travel to New Delhi, according to her new itinerary. “Secretary Rice’s visit to India is a further demonstration of the United States’ commitment to stand in solidarity with the people of India as we all work together to hold these extremists accountable,” White House press secretary Dana Perino said in a statement. Rice had planned to attend the meeting of NATO

foreign ministers Tuesday and Wednesday, with talks focusing on a broad international agenda, including Afghanistan, Georgia and the Ukraine. From there she was to visit Rome, Helsinki and Copenhagen, but it was unclear whether the trip to India would cancel or only postpone those visits. Rice spoke with Presidentelect Barack Obama about India earlier on Sunday, McCormack said. It was the third phone conversation between the two since the attacks. Rice has also been in daily phone contact with

Order Your Books Online Spring Textbooks Now Available Online •Avoid the lines!

Indian and Pakistani officials. The announcement of Rice’s trip came hours after Bush assured India’s leader that the U.S. government will put its full weight behind the investigation into the attacks in Mumbai. Earlier Sunday, a Republican senator endorsed a campaign suggestion from Presidentelect Barack Obama — appointment of a special envoy, perhaps former President Bill Clinton, to the disputed region of Kashmir — as the U.S. seeks to ease tensions between India and its nuclear-armed neighbor Pakistan.

The lone gunman captured by police after the attacks told authorities he belonged to a Pakistani militant group with links to Kashmir, a senior Indian police officer said. India has blamed “elements” from Pakistan for the 60-hour siege during which suspected Muslim militants hit 10 sites across India’s financial capital, leaving at least 174 dead. Bush told India’s prime minister, Manmohan Singh, in a telephone call that “out of this tragedy can come an opportunity to hold these extremists accountable and demonstrate the world’s shared commitment

to combat terrorism,” White House spokesman Gordon Johndroe said in a statement. In addition to the Americans killed in the coordinated shooting rampage in India’s financial capital, the foreigners among the dead included Germans, Canadians, Israelis and nationals from Britain, Italy, Japan, China, Thailand, Australia and Singapore. Bush told the prime minister that “he has directed the state and defense departments along with other federal agencies to devote the necessary resources and personnel to this situation,” Johndroe said.

ADVANCE LEASING! your being (Sorry to hear e dorms!) kicked out of th

•Order early for the best selection!

WE CAN HELP!

•Pick up in the store!

Advance Leasing for Spring & Fall ‘09! Studio, 1,2,3 Bedrooms & Town Homes Great Roommate FloorPlans!

•Have your books shipped to your home!*

*Shipping/handling fees apply

supestore.ua.edu

17978

Because you LOVE being a know it all...

We Also Accept Sealy Bucks To Use As Rent Or Deposit! Call Any Sealy Property For Details!

391-6000  sealyrealty.com


8 Monday, December 1, 2008

The Crimson White 0802561

LIFESTYLES

NOW PRE-LEASING FOR FALL 2009!

6 82

UA CAMPUS LEASING OFFICE

25th Ave.

er Warn Jack Pkwy.

215

University Blvd.

THE RETREAT


The Crimson White

CLASSIFIEDS

Monday, December 1, 2008

Advertise with CW Classifieds

High River Apartments Great for students!

1, 2,& 3 Bedrooms 24hr maintenance

Pool Minutes from Campus!

Move in Special

349-2200

NEWLY BUILT 3 B E D R O O M / 3 B AT H avaliable at the end of October. Located in Forest Lake $975 mo (205)427-4855 CAMPUS Huge 3BR +RXVHKDUGZRRGĂ€RRUV very nice. Helen Keller Blvd area. $800/mo. Available Nov. 1. Call 752-1277 Lease & deposit required. 1320 1/2 6TH Ave. NOW-Central heat/Air; IUHVKSDLQW1(:&DUSHW $550. Next Semester & Fall--Houses Close-toClass www.delview.com. 205-345-4600 CAMPUS Huge 3BR +RXVHKDUGZRRGĂ€RRUV very nice. Helen Keller Blvd area. $800/ mo. Available Nov. 1. Call 752-1277 Lease & deposit required. CALL NOW FOR SPRING SPECIAL At The Grove @ University Park luxury townhomes.  EU  ED LQVLGH 55 WUDFNVWK$YHDQGWK St. 296-4327.

SUBLEASE-REDUCED 2 BR 1 BA. Located next WR 3XEOL[ JURFHU\ VWRUH within walking distance. Rate negotiable. Call Gordon Miller 242-0528 ONE BEDROOM BOGO -2 Baths $550. Two Bedrooms/2 Baths $660. :DONLQFORVHWV:DVKHU Dryer hookups. COURT WOODS 1600 Veterans Memorial Pkwy. 5566200 CLOSE 2 CAMPUS & DCH, 2 bedrooms 1 &  %DWKV :DVKHU 'U\HU 'LVKZDVKHU,1&/8'('  WK $YH 1( :$7(5%$1.  www.delview.com 205345-4600. AFORDABLE STUDENT APARTMENTS DQG +RXVHV &/26(WR &/$66  ZZZGHOYLHZ com 205-345-4600. CAMPUS- Behind the University Strip. Small (IÂżFLHQF\ $SDUWPHQWV $400/ mo. Utilities included. Lease and deposit required. No pets. Fall 2008. Call 752-1277.

CAMPUS-DOWNTOWN 4 blocks from strip. 1 BR Apts. $375/ mo. Lease and deposit required. No pets. Broadstreet Apartments. Call 752-1277 CAMPUS- EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS next door to Publix Supermarket. $350/ month. Water included. Cobblestone Court Apartments. Lease  'HSRVLW UHTXLUHG QR pets. 205-752-1277 2BR 2BTH APARTMENT FOR RENT Large. 3 miles from campus. Available late December. short lease available. Great community and swimming pool. 205-393-3413 or 205393-3381 NOW AVAILABLE FOR Spring semester: beauWLIXO EU EDWK # 6DQdalwood condominiums. DSSOLDQFHV RSWLRQDO IXUnishings. Convenient to campus. 5 or 71/2 month OHDVHSOXVGHSRVit. Karen 256-498-3592 INDIAN LAKE 2BR 1.5BA duplex with fenced-in yard available for lease/ sublease. $615/ mo. (205)8869502 2 BR APT FOR RENT!! $450/MTH! Located off JW PKWY. MUST 5(17 &RQWDFW  585-1492 COME LOOK- LEASE 8SGDWHG ZFHUDPLF WLOH new carpet & more. 1 & 2 bdrm apts. $400-$500. &ORVH WR FDPSXV &ULPVRQ5LGHDFFHVVHQHUJ\ HIIFW %HVW 9DOXH &DOO 205-553-6292 United Country BEST LOCATION & PRICE! Stadium Apts. is leasing through the spring. $325-$420 per month. For more info or WR VHH DQ DSW FDOO  345-7905 or 205-3451810 MALE $310PLUSUTILITIES. 1BR in 3BR/2BA Yorktown Commons on +DUJURYH3RRO)LWQHVV5RRP6HFXUH$YDLODEOH on/after 11/30/08 Great Roomates. 256-5915875. ROOM FOR RENT +286( :  27+(5 GIRLS. LOOKING )25)(0$/(5(17(5 FOR SPRING 09. 13th Ave. Walk to Campus. Rent $450/mo -------(240)893-1923

Luxury Townhomes 2 and 3 br/ 2.5 ba washer dryer available, all electric near campus Only 3 Units left!

leasing now call 553.5787 Wright Properties wright901@aol.com

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED 4BR/4BA in University Village. $425/ month. Call 404-5382080 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share very nice 2BR/2BA TownKRPH  PLQ WR FDPpus. $375 Monthly / Split Utilities. (256) 476-7843 ROOMMATE NEEDED 2BR/1BA House 8th Ave 3 blocks from campus. $375/mo (404)6645005

BARTENDERS & BANQUET SERVERS Banquet Servers & Bartenders are needed for WKH DUHDV ÂżQHVW KRWHOV and Country clubs. Must have prior serving experience. Flexible schedules available. Apply immediately- Five Points 6WDIÂżQJ   COLLEGE STUDENTSHOLIDAY HELP! 1-5 ZHHNZRUNSURJUDP EDVHDSWĂ€H[LEOHVDOHV VHUYLFH FRQGLWLRQV DSSO\ &$// 12:  344-9292 CRIMSONTIDENEEDJOBS.COM Paid Survey Takers needed in Tuscaloosa. 100% )5(( WR MRLQ &OLFN RQ Surveys. EMPLOYMENT : 'DPLFR (OHFWURQLFV LV currently hiring a self motivated individual to work as a Payment Collector for the company. The main focus of this position will be accounts receivable (collections of payments). Submit your resume to Damicoelect@gmail.com for immediate consideration. SEASON RETAIL $10 AN HOUR 6PDUW 5Hsponsible Salesperson/ Cashier. Long hours. Dec. 26-Jan. 1. Fax Resume 758-2687 SPRING ADVERTISING/MARKETING/S /(6,17(516+,3(DUQ great $$$ and gain valuable sales & marketing exp working LOCALLY IRU Âł3ODQ,W´ WKH )5(( student day planner at 8$  37 KUV  *5($7 5(680( %2267(5 Send resume to: ALA09. oc101@hiredesk.net

SEC CHAMPIONSHIP TICKETS!!! 7ZR 6(& Championship Tickets for the Alabama vs Florida Game in Atlanta. Fanfare Package and 0H]]DQLQH /HYHO 6HDWV IRUERWK   0209 2 ALABAMA VS. AUBURN TICKETS FOR 6$/( :HVW 6LGH ORZHU level. $100 each. Must sell. NOT Student tickets. Call 662-549-2900

FOUND Gold Bracelet RQ 6DWXUGD\ 1RYHPEHU 15th in the area behind Bookstore right off University Blvd. Please call to identify. 251-867-6038 or 251-809-5107. ITS GETTTING CLOSE 72 7+( (1' 2) 7+( <($5 $1' <285 &5(',7 ,6 67,// 127 &/($5 +$9( 12 )($5 <28 &$1 *(7 <285 /2$1 +(5(  866-353-9746 BAHAMA SPRING BREAK SALE! $200 6DOH,QFOXGHV5RXQGWULS &UXLVH  1LJKWV %HDFKIURQW +RWHO 0HDOV   3DUWLHV 7H[W 0HVVDJH 635,1*%5($. WR  WR UHGHHP VDOH /LPLWHG 6SDFH %RRN 1RZ    www.XtremeTrips.com

Need Legal Help?

â&#x20AC;˘DUI/ MIP â&#x20AC;˘Free Consultation Call Bret R. Smith Attorney at Law 345-1314 bretsmithlaw.com No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

Sellinogks?

your bo

Advertise with &:&ODVVLÂżfLHGV

11


The Crimson White

SPORTS

VOLLEYBALL

Tide ends season with win By Will Barry Senior Sports Reporter The Alabama volleyball team ended its regular season last Friday with a 3-0 sweep of the Mississippi State Bulldogs by scores of 25-21, 25-21 and 25-15. The win on Senior Night gave the Tide a 16-13 overall record for the season, finishing SEC play at 9-11. The victory gave seniors Amy Pauly and Lindsey Buteyn a win in their final collegiate match. The two were a part of three Alabama teams that went to the NCAA tournament. “We said before we came out into the arena that we wanted to end our season on a win, to close this chapter,” head coach Judy Green said. “We wanted to start next season on a win for the future, and we wanted to send our two seniors out with another career win under their belts. I’m really proud of our team.” Buteyn had 10 kills and a team-high .625 attack percentage as she wrapped up her playing career at Alabama. “There’s not another kid in our team right now or in our program that has worked as hard as Lindsey has for four years,” Green said. “She’s an undersized middle [blocker] who doesn’t know it. She’s very explosive, and she’s taught our younger kids since she’s been here a lot about playing the middle position, and I think she’s helped prepare us for the future.” Buteyn contributed in all four seasons at Alabama. She said she will miss the entire college experience. “I think it’s just wonderful,” Buteyn said. “I love Alabama. It’s in my blood now. I’ll probably come down when I’m older [and] come back to games and watch them play. I’m really glad I chose this school.” Pauly had 13 digs and 3 assists in the win to close out her career with the Tide. “Amy’s just a tough kid,” Green said. “She’s a toughminded competitor. She certainly had the heart for winning and certainly you could see that in how she played the game.” For Pauly, the experience of playing at Alabama goes farther than winning and losing on the court. “I’m going to miss it all,” she said. “I love the atmosphere. You’re not going to find anything like it anywhere else. Just the girls, I love my teammates. I’ve been fortunate to have really nice girls

CW | Matt Abbey Alabama Sophomore Alyssa Meuth (16) spikes the ball against Mississippi State on Friday night in the Cave. Alabama won, 3-0. on all the teams that I’ve been on all four years. That’s what I’ll miss the most.” With the seniors moving on, the volleyball program will have to find a way to develop its young talent in order to compete in the SEC next season. “I think next year they’ll still be building a little bit,” Pauly said. “They still have sophomores and freshmen who are going to come into play but the coaches know how to recruit. They’re going to find good players. I expect big things. I’ll be watching.” The team has a long off-season to get better and raise its standards for next year. “We’ve got to do a better job as coaches at creating the right team atmosphere and what exactly is expected when you’re a part of the Alabama volleyball team and program,” Green said.

Monday, December 1, 2008

TIDE

Continued from page 1 smashmouth football game plan, running the ball on 50 plays compared to just 18 passing plays. Quarterback John Parker Wilson finished a respectable 8-of-16 for 134 yards and a touchdown. For Wilson and the other seniors, their farewell to Bryant-Denny seemed scripted. After closing the last three regular seasons with losses to their archrivals, the seniors left the field of deflated Tigers to a chorus of applause and then a curtain call. “It’s fun to be able to finish these guys off,” Wilson said. “Not only to win but to finish them off like we did after so many years of not being able to put them out … It’s a special experience for me and all the other seniors.” Alabama dominated the entire game but managed just three points in the first quarter after starting its first two drives of the game pinned inside its own 10yard line. Leigh Tiffin made a 37yard field goal to give Alabama a 3-0 lead midway through the first. As it turned out, those three points would be all the Alabama would need, but that didn’t stop the Tide from pouring it on later. On the next Alabama drive, Coffee hit the edge and broke a 41-yard run down the Auburn sideline to reach the end zone, putting the Tide up 10-0. Just before the half ended, Auburn tried to get on the board with a 39-yard field goal. In his first career attempt, Auburn

9

kicker Morgan Hull sent the ball sailing through the uprights, but Saban had called timeout just before, voiding the kick. Hull tried again, but senior defensive lineman Bobby Greenwood blocked the kick to preserve the shutout. Alabama scored three touchdowns in the third quarter to break the game open. Wi t h Ka r e e m Jackson barreling down on him on a corner blitz, Brad Lester fumbled away Auburn’s first possession of the second half. On the first play after the turnover, Wilson connected with senior receiver Nikita Stover on a 39-yard touchdown pass. Tiffin’s extra point was blocked and Alabama led 16-0. Burns fumbled three plays later, and Ingram punched in touchdown runs of one and 14 yards on the Tide’s next two possessions for a 29-0 lead. Sophomore Greg McElroy and several reserves entered the game late. McElroy and wide out Marquis Maze made the most of it, connecting on a 34-yard touchdown pass to put the final at 36-0. The game ended Auburn’s season. The loss kept the Tigers (5-7) from the sixth victory it needed to become bowl eligible for the first time since 1999. Meanwhile, Alabama will play No. 4 Florida in the SEC Championship Saturday, a date it set earlier in the month with a win over LSU to clinch the SEC West division title. The game has been billed as a de facto play-in to the BCS national championship game. The loser will likely be invited to the Sugar Bowl.

Upgrade to a Rumsey House!

Season Wrap-Up SEC Record: 9-11 Standings: Finished 3rd in SEC West; 8th in the SEC

Graduating Seniors: Amy Pauly, Lindsey Buteyn

Postseason: The Tide has no postseason prospects

1407 10th Avenue 205.758.5371 rumseyproperties.com

17975

Season record: 16-13


SPORTS

Monday, December 1, 2008

Ryan Wright • Editor

12

ryan.wright@cw.ua.edu

FOOTBALL | UA 36 - AU 0

Senior class snaps Iron Bowl streak By Greg Ostendorf Assistant Sports Editor Tommy Tuberville didn’t run off the field holding up seven fingers after the game Saturday. Instead, the Auburn head coach ran off serenaded by the Million Dollar Band’s sixth rendition of “Rammer Jammer” after Alabama shut out the Tigers 36-0. “It was a great win for our players,” head coach Nick Saban said. “We don’t have a player on our team who ever experienced this before, so

that was the goal. There’s a lot of history in this game, and there’s a lot of passion in this game.” Auburn’s streak of six straight Iron Bowl victories over the Crimson Tide came to an abrupt halt Saturday night. It was the first time Alabama had ever beaten Auburn in Bryant-Denny Stadium, and the crowd made sure that Tiger fans didn’t forget it. “It feels great,” senior Rashad Johnson said. “To end it like this in Bryant-Denny with a shutout of Auburn, 12-0, ranked No. 1 in the nation and now

moving on the SEC Championship, I couldn’t have pictured it any better than this.” For Johnson and the rest of the senior class, it was their last chance to beat Auburn. The group had been through its ups and downs throughout their careers but went out on a high note in their final home game. “I’m really pleased and happy for our seniors, and I want everybody to know that they should always be recognized as the group that had a tremendous amount to do with changing the culture here in terms of how we play football,” Saban said. Senior quarterback John Parker Wilson, who has struggled in the past against Auburn, didn’t do anything spectacular Saturday but did what he’s been doing all year. He managed the game well and made no mistakes. The highlight of the game for Wilson was when he found fellow senior Nikita Stover on a 39-yard touchdown pass to make it 16-0 early in the second half. Wilson finished 8-of-16 for 134 yards and one touchdown. “The seniors, we didn’t want to leave without beating Auburn,” Wilson said. “It’s something big for us, for everybody in the state. Talking to the guys who didn’t get a chance to do that and being able to finish [Auburn] off, it’s big for us.” For Stover, it seems like he saves his biggest games for when he plays Auburn. Two years ago, Stover hauled in five catches for 101 yards and a touchdown. Saturday, he had just one catch, but it was the most important one of the game for the Tide. “Everybody’s watching the game. Everybody remembers

CW | Drew Hoover Senior defensive end Bobby Greenwood (93) and nosetackle Terrence Cody (62) team up to sack Auburn quarterback Kodi Burns (18). Burns was sacked twice in Saturdayʼs game. Alabama-Auburn,” Stover said. “We got the win, and that’s all that matters. I don’t think about the past because there’s no need, it already happened. I’m just happy that it happened this year.” On the defensive side, Johnson had his typical solid performance with five tackles and a fumble recovery, but it was senior Bobby Greenwood who stood out for Alabama. Greenwood had two tackles, a sack and maybe the biggest play of the game when he penetrated the line to block an Auburn field goal at the end of the first half to keep the shutout intact and give the Tide the

momentum back going into the break. “It doesn’t get any better than this,” Greenwood said. “That atmosphere out there, to see that loud crowd, I’ve never heard it that loud, and to wave that flag of victory at the end, it’s something special.” After the final seconds ticked off the clock, the team and especially the seniors knew how much the win meant and how long it had been since any Alabama player had experienced that feeling after an Iron Bowl. “They were pretty excited,” Saban said. “It was a pretty unique three or four minutes

Classroom experience is dependent upon the exchange of textbooks for cash at Off Campus Bookstore.

Please Note These Four Points: (1) Park at the door. It’s free, safe and convenient. (2) Sell back your textbooks for cash on the spot. (3) Use cash to purchase this semester’s textbooks or fabulous TideGear™. (4) Complete your holiday shopping in-store or online!

M-T - 9am - 6pm F - 9 am - 5 pm Sa - 10am - 3pm

504 14th St. (205) 345.3910 1.866.303.3910 w w w . t i d e o l o g y . c o mTM

©2008 EHA OCB-0137

[after the game]. I think that’s one of the great things about being a part of a team is that you only have so many great victories.” Now with all the streaks behind them and Auburn fans no longer able to hold any fingers up, Alabama looks to maybe start a streak of their own. “With this team and the guys we have, I kind of knew this would be our year to turn it around,” senior captain Antoine Caldwell said. “I know coach has got a lot of good players coming in, so hopefully we can start a streak of our own coming up.”

12.1.08  

Today's Issue of The Crimson White.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you