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Visit the CW table in the Ferg today from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for a chance to win free tickets to Voodoo Festival

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Thursday, October 28, 2010

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Vol. 117, Issue 51

Breaking down the BCS Many disappointed in poll that determines national championship bids Computer Poll +

Harris Poll + USA Today Poll

Highest

Elections face mixed UA interest

Fast Facts Computer Facts • All computers take into account win-loss record and strength of schedule. • Computers do not consider victory margin.

By Ethan Summers Staff Reporter summers.ethan@gmail.com

Lowest

6 computer algorithms Points assigned by computer to each team The highest and lowest rating per team is dropped.

Total Points of Median 4 Computers 100

= Computer Poll Average

114 voters

Harris Poll Composition Media members Former coaches and administrators

59 voters

Points are assigned based on voter rankings of the top 25 teams.

Points are assigned based on voter rankings of the top 25 teams.

Combined Points from Rankings

Combined Points from Rankings

Max Possible Points (1475)**

Max Possible Points (1475)**

= Harris Poll Average

Computer + Harris + USA Today 3

= BCS Average

“To vote, not to vote?” or “Can I even make it to the polls?” are questions on many students’ minds as the Nov. 2 elections approach. In 2008, then-Sen. Barack Obama’s campaign for president heavily targeted young voters. Record numbers of voters, both young and old, showed up at the polls that November to cast their ballots. However, next week’s voting will most likely be nothing like 2008 in terms of voting numbers, said Bill Stewart, professor emeritus of political science and former chair of the department of political science at the University of Alabama. “President Obama, then Sen. Obama, considerably [roused] young people in 2008, but neither he, nor any other politician, has [roused] young people this year,” Stewart said. “Statistics published [Wednesday] show

USA Today composition Current Coaches

= USA Today Poll Average

Point Distribution #1 ranking = 25 points #2 ranking = 24 points #25 ranking = 1 point **Maximum possible points are determined by number of voters participating. If a team recieves 114 first place votes in the Harris Poll, this is equivalent to 2850 points.

See VOTE, page 2

HOW TO VOTE ON CAMPUS

CW | Brian Pohuski By Jason Galloway Sports Editor crimsonwhitesports@gmail.com

improvement, a mess, a monopoly, fair, unfair and just about everything in between. Advocate it or not, the Bowl It has been described a number Championship Series, through of ways: corrupt, controversial, an human opinions and intricate

Students say shorter break hinders travel By Jaley Cranford Contributing Writer A traditional hiatus for students has been cut in half by the University breaking up fall break into one day off Oct. 29 and another day off on Nov. 18. This change has brought differences in opinions from UA students. Some students have often utilized fall break as an opportunity to return home and to spend time with family and friends. With this new change, many students from other states have lost travel time, Kellie Hoyt said. Hoyt, a sophomore majoring in accounting, said her 10-hour drive to North Carolina warrants more than a three-day vacation. “Last year with the twoday fall break being together, I was able to go home and spend time with my family both days,” Hoyt said. “But now the Thursday fall break is almost useless to me because I can’t go home when we have class on Friday.” J.J. Fadely, a junior majoring in communication studies, said having class on Friday Nov. 19 is going to be difficult. As a member of the Million Dollar Band color guard, she said going to class after performing at a night game will le this

By Anna Kate Delavan Contributing Writer

IF YOU GO ...

Autherine Lucy Foster, • What: Early Days of James Hood and Vivian Malone UA Desegregation Panel Jones took steps toward desegregation in 1956 and 1963 by • Where: Ferguson being the first black students to Center Ballroom enroll at the University. Foster, Hood and a family • When: Nov. 3 at 9 member of the late Jones will a.m. participate in a panel discussion as a part of the dedication of the Foster Auditorium Clock Tower, according to Nicole Bohannon, executive an e-mailed statement by vice president of the Student

• Where: Student Recreation Center • When: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Nov. 2 • More Info: Visit alabamavotes.gov

Government Association. “It is absolutely a once-in-alifetime opportunity to be able to hear from a panel of people who made such an impact on our campus in such a big way,” Bohannon said. “We owe so much to the courage of these former students, and I hope as many students as possible will take advantage of their visit.” Foster was the first black student to attend the University, enrolling in the graduate program in library science for three days. Unruly mobs and

threats against of her life led the board of trustees to expel Foster for safety reasons. Malone and Hood successfully enrolled at the University in June of 1963 after several years of legal maneuvering by the NAACP. George Wallace attempted to block the students’ admittance with his infamous “stand in the schoolhouse door,” which was covered by media worldwide. Wallace eventually stepped

See PANEL, page 3

Local artists kick off Oz music series By Cameron Kiszla Staff Reporter wckiszla@crimson.ua.edu Local record store Oz Music will feature sets from local groups The Brooms, Callooh! Callay! and several others when it hosts the kickoff party for the upcoming free concert series “Oz Live” on Friday. The show will run from 4 to 9 p.m. and will feature a variety of local groups. Oz Music store manager Jason Patton, an organizer of the event, said the concerts are designed for those who are unable to see live music at bars or clubs. “We’re trying to give another outlet for people to hear live music,” Patton said. “There’s a lot of people who are either grown with a family and aren’t going to go out to a bar at 10:30

p

Please ec

r

• er

• What: General state elections

Pioneers of integration to speak

Sparrow + The Ghost will be playing at “Oz Live” on Friday, along with several other bands like Heathens & Belles and The Brooms.

IF YOU GO ... • What: Oz Music’s “Oz Live” kickoff party

• Where: Oz Music on 14th Street

• When: Friday, 4 to 9 p.m.

• Cost: Free or 11 o’clock at night, or are young high school or young college kids that can’t get into a bar or a club yet to hear live music. We’re going to give them an outlet to be able to hear live music.” The party will feature sets from local acts Heathens & Belles, The Brooms, Callooh! Callay!, Sparrow + The Ghost

Submitted Photo

and Blaine Duncan and the founder of Hackberry Records, Lookers, as well as sets from said in an e-mailed statement members of Baak Gwai and that “Oz Live” is a culmination The Motions. Reed Watson, owner and See OZ, page 3

INSIDE today’s paper

er •

Plea s

yc rec

See BREAK, page 3

computer formulas, determines system could continue to build who plays for college football’s come December, as it seems to have done since it was created. national championship. “It’s not perfect,” said Bill With a slew of undefeated teams remaining in this 2010 season, the controversy over the See BCS, page 7

ap

e

be challenging. “I think it would be better if we did have class on Thursday and were off on Friday,” Fadely said. By having the second day of fall break on Friday Nov. 19, she said, students who do live out of state could go home for the weekend. “If one of the big issues with splitting fall break is a lack of opportunity to go home, then moving the break from the day of the Georgia State game to the day after could give students another opportunity to go home,” Fadely said. Other students who live closer to the University do not have to plan travel so closely. Shan Nazeer, a junior majoring in finance, said the one day break this upcoming weekend will not inconvenience him as much as those students who come from other states. “Being from Birmingham, going home doesn’t have to involve a lot of planning,” Nazeer said. “I can see how a student who does have to plan to go home and buy a plane ticket would be inconvenienced by dividing the break.” He said that freshman students might not feel any

The Crimson White will not print Friday or Monday due to fall break

P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-4116 | Advertising: 348-7845 | Classifieds: 348-7355 Letters, op-eds: letters@cw.ua.edu Press releases, announcements: news@cw.ua.edu

Briefs ........................2

Puzzles......................9

Opinions ...................4

Classifieds .................9

Sports .......................6

Lifestyles.................. 10

WEATHER today Partly cloudy

72º/43º

Friday Clear

67º/36º

ycle

this pa

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ON THE GO Page 2• Thursday, October 28, 2010

EDITORIAL • Victor Luckerson, editor-in-chief, editor@cw.ua.edu • Jonathan Reed, managing editor, jonathanreedcw@gmail.com • Brandee Easter, print production editor • Marcus Tortorici, multimedia editor • Will Tucker, news editor, newsdesk@cw.ua.edu • Kelsey Stein, lifestyles editor • Jason Galloway, sports editor • Tray Smith, opinions editor • Adam Greene, chief copy editor • Emily Johnson, design editor • Brian Pohuski, graphics editor • Jerrod Seaton, photo editor • Brian Connell, web editor • Marion Steinberg, community manager

ADVERTISING

ON THE MENU LAKESIDE

FRIDAY

TODAY

Lunch Char-Grilled Rosemary Pork Buttered Rice Black Eyed Peas Mediterranean Pasta Vegetable Lasagna

What: ‘Side by Side’ Unites Cuban, American Photographers in UA Show

Where: Grand Gallery of Smith Hall

Dinner Rotisseries Style Chicken Escalloped Potatoes Sauté Asparagus Mediterranean Pasta Fried Vegetable Egg Rolls

When: 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Crãving

Where: 103 Garland Hall, Sarah Moody Gallery of Art

When: 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

BRYANT Chicken A La King Slow Roasted Beef Brisket Brown Butter Potatoes Green Peas & Mushrooms Vegetable Chimichanga

What: Farmers Market Where: Canterbury Episcopal Chapel

When: 3 to 6 p.m.

FRESH FOOD

What: Tegrity and A&S Multimedia Classrooms Q&A Sessions workshop Where: 121 Bureau Mines, Building 1

SATURDAY What: Halloween in Oz — A Community Music School Event — $5 per person, free if under 2 years old Where: Moody Music Building When: 2 - 4 p.m.

When: 10 - 11:30 a.m.

What: Lester Van Winkle:

BURKE Beef Stroganoff with Noodles Seasoned Lima Beans Spinach Sausage, Onion & Pepper Calzone Vegetable Chimichanga

Buttermilk Fried Chicken Ham Macaroni and Cheese Brussels Sprouts Potatoes Au Grain Vegetarian Lasagna

What: Wonderful Life: Works Inspired by Biological Entities reception Where: Alabama Museum of Natural History, Smith Hall

What: Student Recital featuring Arthur Diaz, French horn Where: Moody Concert Hall When: 5 p.m.

When: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

What: ‘Side by Side’ Unites

What: Lester Van Winkle:

Cuban, American Photographers in UA show Where: Grand Gallery of Smith Hall When: 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Crãving Where: 103 Garland Hall, Sarah Moody Gallery of Art When: 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Submit your events to calendar@cw.ua.edu

ON CAMPUS

Health Center to give out flu shots Students can receive flu shots without visiting the Student Health Center. The SHC will host events at Mary Burke Hall on Nov. 3 from noon to 4 p.m., at Rose Towers on Nov. 10 from noon to 4 p.m. and at Tutwiler Hall on Nov. 17 from noon to 4 p.m. Each flu shot costs $20, and will be charged to the

student’s University account. The SHC regularly offers flu shots Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Fridays, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

the SGA’s Ride with the Tide program has been extended to Nov. 1. The program will provide students with transportation to Baton Rouge for the LSU game Nov. 6. By purchasing a $45 ticket, students will receive transportation to Ride with the Tide and from the game, admisdeadline extended sion to an SGA-sponsored tailgate, a meal at the tailgate to Nov. 1 and an opportunity to watch the game at the tailgate. To The deadline to sign up for purchase tickets for the Ride

with the Tide initiative, visit 231 Ferguson or call 348-2742.

Bush, will visit the University of Alabama Thursday, Nov. 4. Rice will sign copies of her new book, “Extraordinary, People: A Memoir Former Secretary of Ordinary of Family,” at the newly renovated Foster Auditorium from State Condoleezza 1 to 2:30 p.m. She will also Rice to visit UA participate in a discussion with students in the Ferguson Condoleezza Rice, who Center Theater from 10:30 served as National Security to 11:30 a.m. The events are Advisor and Secretary of State hosted by the Blackburn under President George W. Institute.

Fowler: Changes to SGA expenditure reporting could hurt transparency By William Evans Senior Staff Reporter wjevans@crimson.ua.edu

• Dana Andrzejewski, Advertising Manager, 348-8995, cwadmanager@gmail.com

As it stands, the Student Government Association’s Code of Laws requires that each • Drew Gunn, Advertising expenditure of SGA funds be Coordinator, 348-8044 published in a permanent, pub• Hallett Ogburn, Territory lic and weekly record. Manager, 348-2598 Two bills authored by • Emily Frost, National Advertising/ Christian Smith, an SGA Senator Classifieds, 348-8042 for the College of Commerce • Jessica West, Zone 3, 348-8735 and Business Administration, • Brittany Key, Zone 4, 348-8054 propose to amend the language of the Code of Laws so that only • Robert Clark, Zone 5, 348-2670 expenditures in excess of $500 • Emily Richards, Zone 6, 348are recorded on a monthly basis. 6876 SGA President James Fowler • Amy Ramsey, Zone 7, 348-8742 convened with fellow SGA members Wednesday evening in the • Elizabeth Howell, Zone 8, 348SGA Board Room to discuss the 6153 implications of Smith’s legisla• Caleb Hall, Creative Services tion. Manager, 348-8042 The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The advertising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published four times weekly when classes are in session during Fall and Spring Semester except for the Monday after Spring Break and the Monday after Thanksgiving, and once a week when school is in session for the summer. Marked calendar provided. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 354032389. The Crimson White is entered as periodical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright © 2010 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical Publication” categories of the U.S. copyright laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

ON THE CALENDAR

{

“If we stick with $500, we may not reach the transparency mark we have been talking about.” — James Fowler, SGA president

Fowler said the bills bear a direct relationship to his administration’s campaign for transparency. “These are two bills that can really play an impact in the message of transparency,” he said. “We need to look through these and make them bills that help to achieve that goal.” Recording of expenditures per week cannot be carried out, Fowler said, because the Office of Student Affairs reports the financial and accounting data pertaining to SGA funds on a

}

monthly and not weekly basis. To demonstrate the impracticality of weekly record-making, Fowler passed out a letter from Molly Lawrence, associate vice president of student affairs, that reads, “Monthly financial reporting is the UA standard reporting cycle. Weekly reporting is burdensome and will not provide any additional information. At the present time we are not staffed to provide weekly financial reporting.” Fowler said reporting expenditures weekly isn’t feasible,

VOTE

Continued from page 1

Thursday The Benjy Davis Project with Ingram Hill $12 at the Door

Saturday

Halloween Party with DJ Pete Costume contest with CASH prize! NO COVER *Please Drink Responsibly

1307 University Blvd. 205-248-6611

the number of Alabama voters has gone up only slightly recently.” Stewart attributed the slight increase not to increased voter interest, but to more young people reaching voting age. S tu d e n t G ove r n m e n t Association President James Fowler encouraged students to vote in the upcoming election. “As citizens, it is our civic responsibility to voice our opinions and choose who will best represent not only us, but the whole state,” Fowler said in an e-mailed statement. “As an SGA, we hope we have helped educate all students through our voter registration drive and gubernatorial debate. Please become engaged in the issues surrounding our state, make an educate choice and vote on Nov. 2.” Christopher Wilson, a senior majoring in public relations, said he wants to vote, but is choosing not to this year. “I’ve really been too busy to follow the race,” Wilson said. “I actually usually make it a point to vote, but my school load and my workload have been a lot this year.” Wilson, an Anniston, Ala.,

and the beauty of the legislative process is that it necessitates discussion to reach a balanced consensus when legislation is passed. He said the suggestion to amend the recording of expenditures in excess of $500 could only detract from the SGA’s goal of transparency. “If we stick with $500, we may not reach the transparency mark we have been talking about,” he said. “We need to really investigate if this $500 is where we want to be.” Fowler said he preferred 100 percent transparency pertaining to the spending of SGA funds. However, he said, he wants the students to make the decision. “Who’s to say it’s important?”

he said. “Let’s let the students decide that.” Mark-David Kennedy, SGA treasurer, said the suggested switch from weekly to monthly recording is a result of trial-anderror. “The reason that we wanted to have it changed is because the accounting office [under the Office of Student Affairs] only reports on a monthly basis,” he said. David Simpson, SGA Senator for the College of Arts and Sciences, said the communication between the executive and legislative branches was a sign of a healthy relationship between the branches. “Tonight’s meeting was good in showing the collaboration between the different branches in the SGA,” he said.

native who hasn’t registered to vote in Tuscaloosa County, also said the journey home is a problem. “I have to drive two hours to vote, and I’m not doing that,” he said. Wilson said his choice is mainly because he’s uninformed about this year’s candidates, but that voting is something informed students should do. “The main reason I’m not voting is because I don’t know the issues, and I encourage those who do know the issues to vote, and those who do not to stay at home,” Wilson said. On the other hand, Stewart said even those who haven’t studied candidates and topics in detail could get to the polls and vote for someone who’s beliefs generally match theirs. “Obviously, I would not vote if I knew absolutely nothing about the candidates,” Stewart said. “However the ‘D’ and ‘R’ beside candidates’ names are reasonable guides to their belief systems. “If one is a moderate liberal, most Democrats represent this perspective,” he said. “If one is conservative, he or she could rightly assume that the Republican candidate is more conservative than the Democrat.” For some students, voting

isn’t an option, but a duty. “I feel that it is an important civic responsibility [and] that if we’re going to have a democracy, we still need to participate,” said Andrew Hutto, a senior majoring in history. “I feel like I wouldn’t have a right to complain if I didn’t vote.” Hutto, who is from Alabaster, Ala., and registered to vote there, said he made the trip home for the 2008 presidential election and the 2010 Alabama primary and will do so again Tuesday. “I’m not registered here, which is really a pain in the butt, but it’s worth it to vote,” he said. “It’s worth a little gas money.” The issue is simpler for David Kilborn, a senior majoring in communications studies. “I don’t have cable, so I can’t make an informed decision unless I do research online,” Kilborn said. “So I’m not going to vote.” Polls will be open at the Student Recreation Center from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Nov. 2 for students who live on or near campus. Students must be registered in Tuscaloosa County in order to vote. For more information on how to register and to find other polling locations in Tuscaloosa, visit alabamavotes.gov.


The Crimson White

NEWS

Students participate in scientiďŹ c research

Thursday, October 28, 2010

3

Students remember domestic abuse victims

By Jasmine Cannon Contributing Writer

BREAK

Continued from page 1

change since they were not at UA last year to experience the consecutive two-day fall break. Ashley Henderson, a freshman majoring in education, said she is looking forward to fall break being split up.

PANEL

Continued from page 1

aside and Malone became the first black student to graduate from the University. The discussion will be held Wednesday, Nov. 3 at 9 a.m. in the Ferguson Center Ballroom. Breakfast will be served by the Ferguson Center after the discussion, Bohannon said. Panelists will answer questions regarding the integration of the University. E. Culpepper Clark, former dean of the College of Communication and Informational Sciences at the University and author of the book “The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation’s Last Stand at The University of Alabama,� will be moderating the event. Any questions related to the topic are welcome, Bohannon said. “I’ve heard from many students a desire to just hear about what life on UA’s campus was like when the University was experiencing desegregation,� she added. Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend the event. Tickets are free but required for entry. Tickets are available through www.crimsonartstickets.com, according to Bohannon. “I hope that students learn from this event that their actions and their voices matter, and if they don’t use them to prevent the wrongs from the

CW | Teresa Portone Chelsea Raulerson, a CBH student and a Biology major, is participating in a study on the heirarchical behavior of animals, specifically fish. “We do this by examining changes in the expression of ‘immediate early genes’ like FOS immediate early genes, which, as their name implies, come online very early to regulate numerous cellular processes,� he said. “In the brain, these processes include: 1) enhanced neurotransmitter/ hormone synthesis, 2) greater neurotransmission rates, and perhaps 3) reorganization of the brain’s neural circuits.� Students are using a variety of techniques as well as paying close attention to metabolic parameters, where they are looking at energy storage in the liver and muscle. The information will assist in helping to develop new hypotheses about the mechanisms that cause major behavioral changes, according to Earley. The project is constructed around the brain, and the students use animals because they are considered good model organisms that can serve as virtual petri dishes. The chosen species is the Anolis carolinensis or the green anole lizard. “We use the green anole lizard to address our questions because they are highly territorial, engage readily in fights over space and exhibit dramatic changes in behavior based on winning/losing or the intensity of a previous aggressive con-

test,� Earley stated. Aquino said they also study the Mandarin killifish, the only self-cloning vertebrate on the planet. He says using this organism is important because of the extreme similarities between the fish and humans. Parts of the project have already been completed and 2011 is set to mark the end for this study on behavior. “There are phases,� Aquino said. “There is behavioral modification and then there’s a molecular biology section and then there’s a physiological analysis section. We’re just beginning the physiological analysis and the molecular portion, which are the final phases.� “Some of the students are developing the tools for examining brain gene expression and are refining their skills in brain sectioning and identification of neuroanatomical features,� Earley said. “The team has done a fantastic job thus far. “This project will be finished by summer 2011. At that point, we will have extraordinarily cool data on behavior, tissue metabolism, and brain activity patterns in the lizards. We will be able to explore how these physiological changes relate to winning/losing and to the intensity of the aggressive contests.�

“I think it’s going to be really nice to have the day of the Georgia State game off,� she said. She said that because she is a Tuscaloosa native, going home would not be affected by either fall break schedule. “I am just glad not to have to go to school two days,� she said. Dylan Montgomery, a freshman majoring in mechanical

engineering, said whether together or separate, the twoday break will be a welcome one. “I plan on going to the game so it is way more convenient that we don’t have to go to class so we can all tailgate before the game,� Montgomery said. Samantha Greenberg, a sophomore majoring in

past from reoccurring, we will be doomed to relive them,� SGA Senator Ryan Flamerich said. The Malone Hood Plaza at the Historic Foster Auditorium will feature the Autherine Lucy Foster Clock Tower as a memorial for the three courageous students, according to the

University’s website. “George Wallace’s stand at Foster Auditorium was a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights movement; it was essentially the last stand of racism and hatred as a social norm,� Flamerich said. Today the University’s

CW | Drew Hoover Angela Miller, a freshman majoring in elementary education, holds a candle during the Vigil for Domestice violence on the Quad on Oct. 27.

OZ

Continued from page 1

of about a year of planning. “We’re excited to get it done,� Watson stated. “Hackberry is sponsoring Oz Live, and I’m helping book the acts for it. It’s an all-ages venue that opens our music community up to a completely new demographic.� “Right now I know for a fact that two of the artists who will be playing this week, the two guys from Baak Gwai and then the three guys from The Motions, they are both going to be playing acoustic sets, and that is not something they would normally do,� Patton said. “So, you would get a different feel from a bar or club gig, but some of the other bands will be doing the same material, the same show as they would at a normal bar gig.� Patton also said the mix of acoustic and electric sets could continue throughout the concert series. “It’s going to be totally up to the band,� he said. “We’re not going to require them to be acoustic. We have our own in-house PA. If they all want to come in and plug in and blow the doors out, that’s fine too. biology, said while tailgating before the game will be nice, the break day only being Friday, Oct. 29 will make her flying home not worth the trip. “The flight to Maryland for three days won’t be worth it,� she said. “With only a three-day weekend instead of a four-day weekend, there is no point in me flying home since two of the three days I will be travelling.� campus is much different but still has social issues to talk about, he added. The dedication of the Autherine Lucy Foster Clock Tower will take place outside the Foster Auditorium at 1 p.m. on Nov. 3. This event is also open to students, Bohannon said.

We’re not going to tell them to quiet down or anything like that.� The “Oz Live� concerts will be for all ages, taking place about every two weeks with the musical groups playing for exposure and a chance to sell their merchandise. “All the shows will always be free,� Patton said. “We’re never going to pay anyone to play, so we’re not going to ever charge anyone to come in and listen.� “It gives local artists a great place to sell their music,� Watson said. “We’ll have national acts stop in for intimate performances as well.� John Vallas, a sophomore majoring in microbiology, said he is excited about the opportunity to see local music.

“The way music is today is really hurting local music,� Vallas said. “Those who don’t steal it are forced to pay way too much. On top of that, concert prices are through the roof and even covers at bars start adding up after a while. I love the fact that an actual music store like Oz is organizing a way for local music to be heard for free.� The kickoff concert begins at 4 p.m. on Friday at Oz Music’s location on 14th Street, and will run to 9 p.m. More information can be found at ozmusiconline.com. “I couldn’t be more thrilled that Tuscaloosa finally has this option — especially inside one of the state’s last independent record stores,� Watson stated.

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Ryan Earley researches behavioral changes at the University, but his project began much earlier. “This particular project is an extension of Mark Garcia’s undergraduate research project that he conducted at California State University Fresno with me,� Earley said in an e-mailed statement. “My research has historically focused on social experience, and Mark and his team have taken our earlier data on lizards and transformed those into a series of new hypotheses, which they are currently testing, she said. My initial role was to develop the conceptual basis for the experiment. Now, I assist the students in the development of tools, experimental design, data analysis, presentations and writing manuscripts.� Joining in collaboration are undergraduate students Josh Aquino, Matt Honkanen, Martin Johnson, Joseph Murphree and Jonathan Wilson. Alumni have contributed to the project in the past couple of years as well. Earley serves as the project’s principal investigator in the lab. Aquino has been working on the project since spring semester of 2010. “In the Earley lab we research various topics. They include aggression in animals, social attractions such as social eavesdropping and hierarchal structures,� Aquino said. “We study these interactions in order to understand neurological pathways and how the brain processes information and how this information can be used to affect social behaviors.� Earley continued, “The project is a truly integrative endeavor that asks questions about behavior, neurobiology, endocrinology and gene expression. The goal of the project is to understand how animals translate previous social experiences (winning or losing) into future changes in behavior.� According to Earley, the collaborators will use the behavioral changes they observe to evaluate which parts of the brain are affected by fighting experiences.

Tuesday - Saturday

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OPINIONS

OUR VIEW

Thursday, October 28, 2010 Editor • Tray Smith letters@cw.ua.edu Page 4

{ YOUR VIEW } WEB COMMENTS: IN RESPONSE TO “EVOLUTION ALTERNATIVE SHOULD BE TAUGHT” “Just because two views are opposing does not mean that the truth or suitable compromise lies halfway between the two. One can simply be wrong, as in this case.” — Stuart

“There isnʼt one iota of science to support creationism. Even the religious cannot even agree on what it is. Itʼs total nonsense. How can people be so completely clueless? Religion is a bad influence in this country. It makes people dumb.” — Chris

“Interesting article. Read the whole thing. I wonder if you have a mind open enough to see the other side of the same coin.” — Jimmy

EDITORIAL BOARD Victor Luckerson Editor Jonathan Reed Managing Editor Tray Smith Opinions Editor Adam Greene Chief Copy Editor

WE WELCOME YOUR OPINIONS Letters to the editor must be less than 300 words and guest columns less than 800. Send submissions to letters@ cw.ua.edu. Submissions must include the author’s name, year, major and daytime phone number. Phone numbers are for verification and will not be published. Students should also include their year in school and major. For more information, call 348-6144. The CW reserves the right to edit all submissions.

Bentley bad, Sparks worse MCT Campus

ALABAMA GUBERNATORIAL RACE

A case for Sparks

A case for Bentley

By Michael Patrick

By CadeAnn Smith

The election is less than a week away, and it seems like everyone ne couldn’t care less about what is going to happen in the Alabama ma gubernatorial race. Both parties ties lost their reformation hopefulss — Bradley Byrne and Artur Davis. That leaves Alabama with Democrat Ron Sparks and nd Republican Robert Bentley as the he front-runners in the race for govvernor. It seems these candidatess have skirted their way around d the social issues that are playing ng more significant roles elsewhere re in the country, like the legalization on of marijuana and gay marriage. This was highlighted by the lack of social ocial issue questions at both debates here at the Capstone and the debate e on the other side of the state at Cam am Newton University. The socially dry nature of these ese two campaigns can partially be blamed for the apathy of voters this year. It seems like the only social issue that keeps coming up is Robert Bentley shooting off about how he is pro-life, as if it is the 1970s and that actually matters. Education has proven to be one of the key issues in this election. Ron Sparks has introduced his plan for a lottery-funded scholarship system who would help more Alabamians get to go to college. However, Robert Bentley vehemently opposes the lottery. Bentley was recorded in August saying, “Why should the government have to pay for your child going to college? And not every child is going to college, and not every child is supposed to go to college.” Dr. Bentley then suggested that students that can’t afford college should get jobs to help pay for expenses or take out student loans. Sparks’ lottery plan, on the other hand, would provide thousands of scholarships for Alabama students to receive college educations they could not otherwise acquire. Bentley’s opposition to the lottery is grounded in the idea that the government should stop people from hurting themselves and the lottery is an immoral tool for self-deprecation, but it is time for Alabama to join 43 other states in adopting a lottery plan that will bring additional revenue to our great state. For job creation, Ron Sparks supports Amendment 3, which is a bridges and roads reconstructions bill that would put up to 38,000 Alabamians back to work. Bentley says, “We don’t need more government jobs” and supports a plan that would cut taxes in order to give financial relief to small businesses in the state. Bentley has also said he would offer businesses that plan to leave the state incentives to keep them here. On immigration, Ron Sparks has said recreating the immigration law in Arizona would be a “kneejerk reaction.” Bentley has praised Arizona’s law and would consider creating a similar law here in Alabama. The Birmingham News reported Bentley saying on the issue, “We will pick our battles with the federal government. This may be one we will pick.” The key difference between these two candidates is how they view the role of the government itself. Bentley believes the government is a speed bump for progress with people and businesses. Sparks, on the other hand, views the government as a medium for people to overcome their everyday problems. Bentley, ultimately, is unprepared. Bentley has not set forth a real plan for creating jobs, has no pragmatic ideas for improving Alabama’s education system and fails to connect with real issues. When he does, he exhibits a strong connection with ultra-right wing agendas. Sparks, in contrast, has brought forth a real plan to bring jobs to Alabama. He wants to use a lottery to better Alabama’s education system, has a better grasp on current issues and maintains more moderate views on the issues. Ron Sparks is the better candidate this cycle because he is better connected to the needs of Alabama and has a plan to put people back to work and improve our education systems.

On Tuesday, voters from every corner of Alabama will head to the polls to cast the their ballots in a momentous e election. In the next four years, the state will face deep budget defifac ccits, including education budgets that will leave schools across the th state facing record proration. Thousands pro of Alabamians, including many recent coli lege graduates, will be l searching for jobs. Through these challenging t times, Alabama needs t a leader who will tackle l wasteful spending in state government, keep taxes low to grow small businesses MCT Campus and boost the economy, and create Alabama jobs for the 9.3 percent of our state’s workforce that currently lacks employment. That leader is Dr. Robert Bentley, the Republican candidate for governor. Alabama needs widespread ethics reform. Just three weeks ago, four state legislators were indicted and charged with taking money in exchange for their support of gambling legislation. Anyone who has walked the halls of our state capitol can see the filthy and undue influence that special interests have on state government. Dr. Bentley offers voters a unique candidate who will stand up to powerful Montgomery lobbyists by working to pass a ban on PAC-toPAC transfers. He also supports requiring full disclosure of all money that lobbyists spend in regards to legislators. Under his leadership, we can expect to see a cleaner, more ethical state government. Dr. Bentley also understands that a lottery and legalized gambling are not the only solutions for the state’s economic problems. While he doesn’t personally believe in legalizing gambling, he vocally supports allowing the people of Alabama to vote on the issue. By supporting this vote, he will allow the people of Alabama to choose once and for all whether to allow gambling in the state. If elected, Dr. Bentley would be the first governor since 1983 to have previous experience serving in the Alabama state legislature. The importance of this experience can’t be emphasized enough. Dr. Bentley’s relationships with current legislators could make the difference in whether certain pieces of legislation pass. And, as the state legislature is set to be controlled by Republicans for the first time in 136 years, Bentley’s collegial relationships with the members of his party in the legislature will surely result in an efficient legislative process that will improve Alabama for years to come. This election provides a clear contrast between two candidates. One candidate, Democrat Ron Sparks, wants to throw together quick fixes like an education lottery, while another candidate, Dr. Bentley, understands the value of hard work and wants to solve the chronic problem of joblessness in our state. Robert Bentley is a rare breed in politics today. Coming from near last in the polls to snag the Republican nomination against the establishment favorite, Dr. Bentley truly is an outsider who will shake up Montgomery. I urge you to research the candidates and vote. Elections are important, and they have a lasting impact. The problems we face are too severe for voters to stay home on Election Day. So do your part, and let your voice be heard. Decisions are made by those who show up, and on Nov. 2 I urge you to go to the polls and cast your vote for Dr. Robert Bentley.

Michael Patrick is a junior majoring in political science and the president of College Democrats. He is a regular columnist for The Crimson White.

CadeAnn Smith is a senior majoring in criminal justice and political science. She is chair of the College Republicans.

For an election year that has generated enormous excitement and energy nationwide, the state of our own gubernatorial race is disapIn short: Neither pointing. Neither candidate has Republican candiearned our date Robert Bentley votes, but Robnor Democratic canert Bentley is at didate Ron Sparks least marginally has meaningfully better than his engaged the electorone-issue oppoate or presented a nent. compelling vision for the future of Alabama. Both have questionable ties to special interest groups in Montgomery that have long records of fighting progress in our state. As a result, important issues like growing our economy and fixing our schools have been reduced to whether or not the governor will take a salary or legalize gambling. It is hard to get excited about voting for either; neither has earned our votes. Yet, we have to elect a governor. After careful consideration, we have concluded that Bentley, who has few ideas, is preferable to Sparks, who has one. We continue to support efforts to legalize and regulate gambling, as long as those policies are developed in a way that will most benefit the state’s tourism industry and education system. Gambling is not, however, the most important issue for voters, even though it is the driving force behind Spark’s campaign. More money alone is not going to help an education system that is structurally broken. Bentley, who has at least expressed a willingness to experiment with charter schools, has provided somewhat more leadership on education reform than his opponent. Regardless of who is elected governor, any attempt to legalize gambling will have to be approved by the voters. Bentley has said if the state legislature sends him a gambling bill, he will allow it to go to the public for a vote. The people will have their say either way, unless the legislature fails to act on the issue. But that will be the legislature’s prerogative, not the governor’s. Even if voters did approve a lottery and/or casino gambling, the revenue generated for the state would not be enough to replace expiring economic stimulus funds, provide college scholarships to students meeting minimal academic standards, and supply additional resources to primary and secondary schools. Gambling could help, but it is not the cure-all Sparks promises. Alabama desperately needs a dynamic leader with innovative ideas to move forward. Unfortunately, such a candidate is not on the ballot. Given the choice, Robert Bentley is the best we can do.

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Our View is the consensus of The Crimson White editorial board.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Energy crisis creates opportunities for engineering and science students By Chelsea Lucas

Last Monday evening, entrepreneur and alternative energy proponent T. Boone Pickens visited Tuscaloosa to promote his alternative energy movement. The Pickens Plan is a coordinated, comprehensive plan to use natural gas to reduce U.S. dependency on foreign oil, especially the oil we buy from OPEC. The major thrust of the Pickens Plan is to convert our commercial transport in the U.S. from diesel fuel to natural gas. The United States has 98 percent of the world’s resources in natural gas, which is a clean burning fuel. Mr. Pickens also wants to use the wind corridor that stretches northward from Texas through the Great Plains and onward to Canada for a wind farm. This would require subsidies from the federal government, which is already deeply in debt. The environmentalists may not fully support this plan, as it will require disturbing local wildlife. However, it does provide an alternative source of energy and much needed jobs for our citizens. While not a permanent solution to our energy crisis, the Pickens Plan will definitely help the U.S. to rely less on foreign oil and will help reduce the large trade deficit that the purchase of foreign oil is partially responsible for. The savings will give us the time to develop new alternative energies and allow us to restore our competitive edge. As new challenges arise pertaining to alternative energy sources, scientists will be required to use creativity and problem solving skills to create sustainable energy systems. Their opinions and expertise will be invaluable in allocating investment resources and creating new technology. Because future obstacles cannot be predicted, it is important that students not just be taught the basics of their disciplines, but also how to analyze and apply critical thinking skills which will aide them as they begin to exert influence on the world. Through movements like Pickens’, America is beginning a new stage of development that leaves an infinite number of opportunities open for exploration by graduating students.

Chelsea Lucas is a freshman majoring in chemical engineering.


The Crimson White

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Phil Poole

Secured $8 million dollars for the new Capstone College of Nursing Building

Senator Poole is in negotiations with text book companies and has a bill in place to reduce the price of text books Over $1 Milion Dollars in College Scholarships  " 

     

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On November 2nd, Vote Phil Poole for State Senate and keep Phil fighting for us in Montgomery! SAMPLE BALLOT GENERAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ELECTION TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA

ABSENTEE OFFICIAL BALLOT GENERAL ELECTION

A

B

INSTRUCTIONS TO THE VOTER

TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA

FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL

TO VOTE YOU MUST BLACKEN THE OVAL (R) COMPLETELY! DO NOT MAKE AN X OR . USE ONLY THE MARKING DEVICE PROVIDED TO MARK THE BALLOT. IF YOU SPOIL YOUR BALLOT, DO NOT ERASE, BUT ASK FOR A NEW BALLOT.

FOR COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEALS JUDGE

(Vote for One)

JIM MAIN

Democrat

(Vote for One)

GREG REED SCOTT GILLILAND Democrat

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 62

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

Republican

KELLI WISE Republican

JIM FOLSOM, JR. Democrat

GLEN ZORN

TOM EDWARDS

Republican

MICHAEL F. "Mike" BOLIN Republican

WILLIAM G. BARNES Democrat

Write-in

(Vote for One)

JAN COOK

Republican

DON CHAMBERLAIN

TERRI A. SEWELL

FOR PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION, PLACE NO. 2 (Vote for One)

FOR COURT OF CIVIL APPEALS JUDGE

Republican

Democrat

(Vote for One)

DON CHAMBERLAIN Republican

BILL POOLE

Write-in

Write-in

(Vote for One)

ERIN WIGGINS

(Vote for One)

ERIN WIGGINS Write-in

Write-in

FOR MEMBER, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION, DISTRICT NO. 6 (Vote for One)

Write-in

Write-in

FOR MEMBER, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION, DISTRICT NO. 5

CHRISTOPHER JOHN ENGLAND

Write-in

Republican

TOMMY BRYAN Republican

Democrat

(Vote for One)

Democrat

MARK C. NELSON

TERRY DUNN

Democrat

Write-in

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 70

Republican

Democrat

DEBORAH BELL PASEUR

EDMUND M. "Ted" SEXTON, SR.

FOR MEMBER, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION, DISTRICT NO. 5 Democrat

SUSAN PARKER

Write-in

Write-in

PROPOSED STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NUMBER THREE (3) Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended, relating to the Alabama Trust Fund, to provide for the appropriation of funds in the Alabama Trust Fund to be distributed for state and local transportation purposes and to provide for funds for the County and Municipal Government Capital Improvement Fund. (Proposed by Act No. 2010-555)

(Vote for One)

Republican

Republican

TOM PARKER

Democrat

FOR TUSCALOOSA COUNTY SHERIFF

TWINKLE ANDRESS CAVANAUGH

Democrat

TERRI A. SEWELL

(Vote for One)

Write-in

Democrat

MAC PARSONS

STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 2 YES STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 2 NO

Democrat

SUSAN PACE HAMILL Democrat

Write-in

(Vote for One)

(Vote for One)

JOEL R. CHANDLER

(Vote for One)

(Vote for One)

FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT, PLACE NO. 3

FOR UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE, 7TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

FOR DISTRICT COURT JUDGE, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, PLACE NO. 2

Write-in

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 63

FOR PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION, PLACE NO. 1

Write-in

RICHARD C. SHELBY Republican

Write-in

STEVEN KNEUSSLE Constitution

JOHN McMILLAN

Democrat

(Vote for One)

JIM GUIN Democrat

Democrat

Write-in

FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR

(Vote for One)

(Vote for One)

JOHN MERRILL Republican

(Vote for One)

Write-in

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 62

Write-in

(Vote for One)

FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT, PLACE NO. 2

Republican

PROPOSED STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NUMBER TWO (2) Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to amend to Section 269 of the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended by Amendment No. 111 to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, now appearing as Section 269 of the Official Recompilation of the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended, relating to special county educational taxes, to provide that the taxes may be levied by a majority vote, not by three-fifths vote, of those voting at the election. (Proposed by Act No. 2009-551)

Write-in

FOR DISTRICT COURT JUDGE, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, PLACE NO. 1

Write-in

FOR COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRIES

Write-in

KAY IVEY

ROBERT SPENCE Independent

Republican

SAMANTHA "Sam" SHAW

Democrat

(Vote for One)

ALAN HARPER Democrat

FRANK CHANDLER

Democrat

RHONDA CHAMBERS

TOMMY SMITH Democrat

Write-in

Write-in

SPENCER BACHUS

(Vote for One)

BOBBY SINGLETON Democrat

(Vote for One)

MIRANDA KARRINE JOSEPH

STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 4 YES STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 4 NO

STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 1 YES STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 1 NO

(Vote for One)

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 61

Write-in

FOR STATE AUDITOR

(Vote for One)

Write-in

FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, 6TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

Write-in

(Vote for One)

FOR ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT, PLACE NO. 1

PHILIP N. LISENBY Republican

DANIEL H. BOMAN Republican

FOR STATE SENATOR, DISTRICT NO. 24

Republican

Write-in

ROBERT BENTLEY Republican

WILLIAM E. THIGPEN, SR. Democrat Write-in

YOUNG BOOZER

Constitution

RON SPARKS Democrat

(Vote for One)

GERALD ALLEN

CHARLEY GRIMSLEY Democrat

Republican

STEVEN KNEUSSLE

Republican

Democrat

Republican

(Vote for One)

JOHN MERRILL

(Vote for One)

Write-in

FOR CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, 6TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PLACE NO. 6

(Vote for One)

PHIL POOLE

(Vote for One)

SCOTT DONALDSON Republican Write-in

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 16

Write-in

FOR STATE TREASURER

Write-in

(Vote for One)

RICHARD BAUGHN Republican

FOR STATE SENATOR, DISTRICT NO. 21 (Vote for One)

Republican

FOR GOVERNOR

Democrat Write-in

BETH CHAPMAN Republican

GERALD ALLEN

THE CONSTITUTION PARTY OF ALABAMA

KEN GUIN

Republican

(Vote for One)

PHIL POOLE Democrat

FOR CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, 6TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PLACE NO. 5

NOVEMBER 2, 2010

PROPOSED STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NUMBER FOUR (4) Relating to Blount County, proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to prohibit any municipality located entirely outside of Blount County from imposing any municipal ordinance or regulation, including, but not limited to any tax, zoning, planning, or sanitation regulations, and any inspection service in its police jurisdiction located in Blount County and to provide that a municipality prohibited from imposing any tax or regulation under this amendment shall not provide any regulatory function or police or fire protection services in its police jurisdiction located in Blount County, other than public safety mutual aid. (Proposed by Act No. 2010-226)

PROPOSED STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NUMBER ONE (1) Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to provide that the provision in Amendment 778, now appearing as Section 269.08 of the Official Recompilation of the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended, which prohibits the payment of any fees, charges, or commissions for the assessment and collection of any special ad valorem tax on taxable property levied by the county commission pursuant to Amendment 778 (Section 269.08) shall only apply to any ad valorem tax first levied and collected pursuant to Amendment 778 (Section 269.08) for the tax year commencing October 1, 2006. (Proposed by Act No. 2009-286)

Write-in

(Vote for One)

F

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS WHICH APPLY TO THE STATE AT LARGE

BRAD ALMOND

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 14

BRETT WADSWORTH Democrat

TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA

"Shall the following Amendments be adopted to the Constitution of Alabama?"

Republican

(Vote for One)

Write-in

FOR SECRETARY OF STATE

FOR STATE SENATOR, DISTRICT NO. 21

ALABAMA REPUBLICAN PARTY

FOR UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE, 7TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

FOR STATE SENATOR, DISTRICT NO. 5

Republican

LUTHER STRANGE Republican

ALABAMA DEMOCRATIC PARTY

(Vote for One)

E

FOR CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, 6TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PLACE NO. 1 (Vote for One)

JAMES H. ANDERSON

STRAIGHT PARTY VOTING

FOR UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE, 6TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

GENERAL ELECTION

D

THESE OFFICES WILL NOT RUN IN ALL PRECINCTS.

(Vote for One)

Write-in

THIS PARTY WILL NOT APPEAR ON ALL BALLOTS

This is a common ballot, however, some offices will appear only in certain precincts which will apply to your districts.

NOVEMBER 2, 2010

C

Democrat

STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 3 YES STATEWIDE AMENDMENT NO. 3 NO

MARK C. NELSON

FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT NO. 71

Republican

(Vote for One)

Write-in

ARTIS 'A.J.' McCAMPBELL Democrat

JOE BOTELER Republican

Write-in Write-in A

B

BALLOT STYLE - 6

CONTINUE VOTING ON BACK

C

Typ:01 Seq:0006 Spl:01 © Election Systems & Software, Inc. 1981, 2002

D

E

BALLOT STYLE - 14

F

Typ:01 Seq:0014 Spl:01

END OF BALLOT

Paid For by Phil Poole Campaign P.O. Box 609, Moundville, AL. Victor Poole, Chairman.

5


SPORTS

FOOTBALL

Page 6 â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, October 28, 2010 Editor â&#x20AC;˘ Jason Galloway crimsonwhitesports@ gmail.com

SPORTS

this weekend

Ross an unexpected leader By Tony Tsoukalas Senior Sports Reporter ajtsoukalas@crimson.ua.edu Many people may not know his name, and unless you pay attention to the game when Alabama has a big lead, you may have never seen him play. Despite not getting a start in his five years with the Crimson Tide, senior offensive lineman David Rossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence is definitely felt by the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is a leader on and off the field,â&#x20AC;? senior tight end Preston Dial said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a guy who is in the starting five, but he is a guy we rely on. If [center William] Vlachos were to go down, we know he could come in a do a great job.â&#x20AC;? Despite playing a limited role in Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense, head coach Nick Saban has awarded Ross as the honorary captain for two of the Tideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games this

Ross has had high ambitions for helping the Tide. However, despite his lack of playing time, Ross said he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever regret his decision to attend the University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized a long time ago I can only control what I can control,â&#x20AC;? Ross said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever question [coming to UA]. This is the place where I wanted to be. On the field and off the field, it was the right choice for me.â&#x20AC;?

Though Dareus did not get as much playing time as he would have liked, he said he remembers the great atmosphere of Death Valley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was so loud,â&#x20AC;? Dareus said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear yourself think too well. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got crazy fans, and it is a good atmosphere. I liked it. It was fun.â&#x20AC;? One thing Dareus said he remembers quite well is the live tiger LSU places outside the visiting teams locker room. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh man, they put that tiger right by the locker room,â&#x20AC;? Dareus and the Dareus said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay no attention, but it got up and tiger the cage started moving. When I looked at it I was jumping. That The last time Marcell Dareus tiger, it scared the life out of me.â&#x20AC;? When the imposing 300visited LSU, he was a freshman. Terrance â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mountâ&#x20AC;? Cody was pound defensive lineman was just returning from an ankle asked who would win between injury and was to retake his spot him and the tiger, Dareus said, from Dareus on the defensive â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be running for my life.â&#x20AC;? line.

CW | Daniel Roth Senior offensive lineman David Ross runs drills during practice on Oct. 20. He is not a starter, but has been selected as an honorary captain by the UA coaching staff twice this season.

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SOCCER

Tide must rise at Auburn for tourney bid By Jasmine Cannon Contributing Writer

FRIDAY

Friday marks the end of the regular season for the Alabama soccer team. The team will travel to Auburn to take on the

â&#x20AC;˘ Softball vs Auburn: 7 p.m.

season. Ross said he is honored to be named a captain, and he tries to help the team in any way he can. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just think that it is something that reflects on some intangible things I can bring to the field,â&#x20AC;? Ross said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not being noted for what I am doing on the field as much as maybe on the sidelines and in the huddle during practice. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just trying to carry through some leadership values.â&#x20AC;? In practice, Ross is someone who players look to for leadership. Dial, who was Rossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former roommate, said Ross shows leadership in everything he does. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a guy that everybody respects,â&#x20AC;? Dial said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He does things the right way. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a vocal leader and he leads with his actions, too.â&#x20AC;? Since arriving at Alabama from Homewood High School,

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Tigers at 7 p.m. at the Auburn Soccer Complex. The Tide must win this game in order to be one of eight teams to enter the Southeastern Conference tournament, which begins Nov. 3 in Orange Beach, Ala. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My first thought is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be fun,â&#x20AC;? head coach Todd Bramble said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just so much excitement around it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty much winner take all in a lot of ways. Bottom line is we have to win to extend our season. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working since the beginning of August as a team for it to all come to the Auburn game, our last regular season game. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a lot of fun.â&#x20AC;? The Tide enters the season finale with 3-5-2 SEC record, while Auburn comes in with a 4-4-2 record. The team has played in big games throughout the entire season, but Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game could be considered to be the biggest one yet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think responding to the

pressure is going to be the most important thing that we do a good job with,â&#x20AC;? Bramble said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We played really well this past Sunday up in Knoxville. That gives me a lot of confidence already that this group can handle pressure. We just got to have better execution in front of the goal so we can score a goal thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to win the game for us.â&#x20AC;? For the Tide to be successful, they have to get their shot count up and stay aggressive on offense as well defense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to take our half chances and we need to just shoot the ball,â&#x20AC;? senior midfielder Rosaly Petriello said. ��&#x20AC;&#x153;Take your chances, no matter how far you are or how close you are. Let it ricochet off something and go in.â&#x20AC;? Junior defender K. K. Duffy said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We play our best soccer when we take those chances. The games that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve won 2-1, 2-0 were when we had thirty

shots on goal on the board. The past few games weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve only had 10-15 shots. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re better at half chances; we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t capitalize on those 10 shots. We need thirty shots and we get a few goals in, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our game.â&#x20AC;? The Tide is coming off of a 0-1 double overtime loss to the Tennessee Volunteers. However, Alabama heads into Auburn after playing one of the best games all season. Petriello said if the team can come with the same mentality against Auburn that they did against Tennessee, a victory will hopefully follow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is just so excited,â&#x20AC;? Petriello said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the rivalry with Auburn, we just have to go out there with a bang and leave everything on the field. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited because I know that we can win this game. We need to be as positive as possible.â&#x20AC;? Duffy continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the beginning of the year, our

team set a bunch of goals and one of them was to win the Iron Bowl.â&#x20AC;? Auburn will be coming off of a 2-1 victory over the Georgia Bulldogs. To stop the Tiger offense, the Tide has to stay tight on defense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we need to carry over what we did in Tennessee,â&#x20AC;? Duffy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had ten players behind every ball. They barely got a look at goal because of how committed we were to everyone being behind the ball.â&#x20AC;? What can Alabama fans expect to see from the Tide this weekend? â&#x20AC;&#x153;A freaking fired up Alabama team,â&#x20AC;? Duffy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the only game of the weekend. We have nothing to hold back. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to sacrifice everything. We have nothing lose.â&#x20AC;? A victory will have the Tide leaving Auburn with the Iron Bowl trophy and a ticket to the SEC tournament.

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The Crimson White

SPORTS

BCS

7

BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP/CONTROVERSY SERIES

Continued from page 1

Hancock, the executive director of the BCS. “Nothing is. The BCS has a very limited purpose, which is to match No. 1 and No. 2 in a bowl game, and it’s been tremendously successful at that.” The Bowl Coalition (1992-95) and the Bowl Alliance (1995-97), which were created by conference commissioners, Notre Dame representatives and four bowl committees were the first steps in creating that annual No. 1-No. 2 matchup. In 1997, the BCS was created to guarantee the top two teams in the country played each other for the national championship. The Harris Poll, the coaches’ poll and a computer poll average each account for one third of the BCS rankings. The computer average is composed of six independent computer ranking systems. For each team, the highest and lowest rankings are dropped, and a point system is used to produce an average. The same point system is used (per vote instead of per ranking) to determine an average for the two human polls, and the averages of the three polls are then averaged together to generate the BCS rankings. “I like to say it’s a blend of art and science,” Hancock said. “The two human polls are the art. You have coaches, former coaches, current media people, former administrators, who are each voting their conscience and their own opinion. Then you bring in the science — the hard, impartial review of the data. The science helps shape the art.” Each computer poll is required to factor in certain aspects, like win-loss record and strength of schedule, among others. Each computer system is also required to not weigh margin of victory. Hancock said this requirement was for sportsmanship purposes, but many believe this is one of the major flaws of the system. “There’s an aspect that the computers can’t capture, and there’s an aspect that the coaches’ poll can’t capture,” said Danie Vollenweider, a senior majoring in English. “I don’t think anybody is ever going to be fully

Thursday, October 28, 2010

1992

1995

1998

2003

2004

2005

2006

2009

The Bowl Coalition was formed in an attempt to increase the chance that the top two teams in the country play each other in a bowl game.

The Bowl Alliance was formed. It was an improved version of the Bowl Coalition, eliminating conference tie-ins in three bowls and including two atlarge spots.

The first year the Bowl Championship Series was implemented, ensuring a No. 1-No. 2 matchup in a bowl game.

Following the 2003 season, the Associated Press ranks USC No. 1 despite LSU beating Oklahoma in the BCS National Championship game.

Auburn and Utah go undefeated and are left out of the BCS National Championship game.

The Associated Press backs out of the BCS formula due to the debacle of the 2004 season.

The first season in which the BCS National Championship game was its own game, not one of the BCS bowls.

After undefeated Utah gets left out of the BCS National Championship game in favor of two one-loss teams in 2008, Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff investigates the BCS for a possible violation of deferral antitrust laws.

satisfied with any system.” In the 56 years before the Bowl Coalition, the No. 1 and No. 2 teams played just eight times in the postseason. In the 12 years of the BCS era, nine BCS National Championship games have matched up the top two teams in the Associated Press Poll. The benefits of the system have also exaggerated its shortcomings, like years when more than two teams finish undefeated, and years when mid-majors get passed over. Many say the only solution to crowning a true college football champion is to implement a playoff system and increase the number of teams with a chance to win the championship. “I’ve always been an advocate of the plus-one system for how you determine a national championship game and who is in it,” Alabama head coach Nick Saban said in 2009. “Instead of picking two teams, why not pick four? You play the game a week after the [New Year’s Day] bowls anyway.” The AP, instead of the Harris Poll, used to be one of the polls associated with the BCS. But in 2004, the most controversial season for the BCS caused the AP to stop allowing the system to use its rankings. Auburn and Utah were undefeated and left out of the title

game that season, which caused likely the biggest public cry for a playoff in college football history, but the bigger problem for the AP was the battle between Texas and California to get into a BCS bowl game. Some AP voters changed their vote and moved Texas ahead of California after the final week of the season. Although California was ranked comfortably ahead of Texas in the computer poll, the change in the human polls was enough to give Texas the nod. Fans lashed out at AP voters, and the organization disbanded its poll from the BCS. “We didn’t want to put our voters in that position,” said Ralph Russo, an AP college football writer based in New York. “Essentially, they were determining who plays in bowl games and who gets big checks and bonuses. We just basically determined that it was a conflict of interest. Reporters shouldn’t be determining who plays in bowl games.” Since that season, the controversy surrounding the BCS and the constant push from fans for a playoff system has kept increasing. It reached a new level after the 2008 season, when Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff claimed the BCS violates anti-trust laws by putting smaller schools at a competitive

and financial disadvantage. This accusation came after the University of Utah went undefeated and did not earn a chance to play in the BCS National Championship over Florida and Oklahoma, who each had one loss. Shurtleff threatened to sue the BCS but has yet to file a lawsuit, and some have speculated that Shurtleff’s threat was for the purpose of gaining votes during election season. The stir-up has also caused Congress to involve itself in making sure the BCS is lawfully sound, subjecting the BCS to hearings. However, Hancock said he thinks Congress understands it has more important things to do than managing college football. According to Hancock, only three of 33 members were in attendance at the BCS’s hearing in front of the house energy and commerce committee in May of 2009. In another hearing in front of the senate judiciary committee in July of 2009, only one of 12 members showed for the entire hearing. “There’s not much interest in Congress in this matter,” Hancock said. “What happens sometimes is people have the political interest of their constituents in mind, and so they like to advance causes that they believe will benefit their

constituents. We get that. That’s the American system. When [the commissioners] set up the BCS, they went to great lengths to make sure that it complied with the law.” The current college football season looks to have the potential to bring another public outcry towards the BCS. Oregon, who is ranked No. 1 in both human polls, is No. 8 in the com-

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puter polls, and more than halfway through the season, seven teams are still undefeated. If more than two teams finish undefeated, the BCS cannot win. Whichever way the voters lean or whichever teams the formulas spit out, fans across the country would be outraged, and the debate over the BCS would once again become the focal point of college football.


8

Thursday, October 28, 2010

LIFESTYLES

The Crimson White

Party legend visits for new book By Alex Cohen Staff Reporter accohen@bama.ua.edu

People come to college to get a good education and prepare themselves for later life. Typically, the goal is to eventually find a meaningful, wellpaying job. But for many male students, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a secret dream â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to lead the life of a party animal forever. Today, students will get a chance to meet someone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s living that dream â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tucker Max, a graduate of the University of Chicago and Duke Law School and author of the best-selling book â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell.â&#x20AC;? Max will be at the Books-a-Million on Skyland Boulevard tonight at 7 to sign and promote his new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Assholes Finish First,â&#x20AC;? which was released on Sept. 28 this year.

IF YOU GO ... â&#x20AC;˘ What: Tucker Max book signing â&#x20AC;˘ Where: Books-aMillion

â&#x20AC;˘ When: Thursday, 7 p.m.

The local Books-a-Million has hosted many book signings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shaun Alexander and Bobby Bowden both recently provided their John Hancocks to eager fans. But they are two sports icons visiting a town where sports are taken quite seriously. Max brings something less familiar to the table. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be like a party at a book store,â&#x20AC;? said Amy Nix, assistant general manager of Books-a-Million.

antics have aroused a healthy amount of controversy the past few years. His critics might expect him to show up drunk with a woman on each arm and a tube of Astroglide in his back pocket. His fans might expect the same thing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; though maybe only a mild drunk. Tuscaloosa police probably prefer a more docile Max. Nix said she believes Max will behave himself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had knee surgery recently; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping that will tame him,â&#x20AC;? Nix said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll let him get away with some stuff, but it is a family bookstore.â&#x20AC;? No matter Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state of sobriety, the consensus is that tuckermax.com his signing will have a kind of Author Tucker Max will be in party atmosphere. Tuscaloosa on Thursday to sign â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each signing is more like a copies of his most recent book, hang out,â&#x20AC;? said Elyse Landwehr, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Assholes Finish First,â&#x20AC;? released Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal publicistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sept. 28. assistant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He likes to personalWho really knows what ize each book tour to connect to expect? After all, Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with his fans and answer as

many questions as possible.â&#x20AC;? Fans can bring any piece of Max memorabilia to be autographed. They also can expect a few surprises. Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s readers will recall the intrepid people who accompany Max on his escapades. Some of these people have been special guests at previous book signings, and that remains a possibility tonight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Assholes Finish First,â&#x20AC;? like his first book, follows Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jaunts of alcohol and loose loving. But now that Max is famous, he does not have to constantly hunt for entertainment. It finds him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are literally writing to him and asking him out,â&#x20AC;? said Landwehr. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its kind of a flip-flopped perspective.â&#x20AC;? Deemed â&#x20AC;&#x153;fratire,â&#x20AC;? Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s genre often features protagonists trying to prove their own masculinity â&#x20AC;&#x201D; often with a misogynistic undertone. While

Max continues to enthuse college men across the country, women are not left without inspiration. Chelsea Handlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Horizontal Life: A Collection of One-Night Stands,â&#x20AC;? follows Handler â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a woman â&#x20AC;&#x201D; through her own raucous encounters and criticisms of the opposite sex. The book was published seven months before â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell.â&#x20AC;? He might not have been first to publish in the genre, but Max continues to put on his show for the world. Maybe his fans, critics and even signing hosts are being too lenient. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want anyone going to jail,â&#x20AC;? said Nix, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but unless he blows the store up, we [will] pretty much let him get away with anything he wants.â&#x20AC;? For more information, visit the Facebook event called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tuscaloosa â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Assholes Finish Firstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Book Signing.â&#x20AC;?

Local comedian to open for Steve Harvey By Carter Glascock Contributing Writer

Tuscaloosa resident Jermaine â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funnymaineâ&#x20AC;?

Johnson is no rookie to the game of standup comedy. With five years of experience under his belt playing in various venues throughout the

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Southeast, Johnson has built up a reputation as one of the most reliably funny homegrown comedians Alabama has to offer. The years of relentlessly playing comedy clubs across the state are starting to pay off for him. He is set to open for Steve Harvey this Saturday in Birmingham at the Birmingham Jefferson Convention Complex at 7 p.m. to a sold-out crowd. Johnson earned his opportunity by standing out in a few radio-sponsored comedy showcases held in Birmingham. The comedian went up against 21 other comedians in front of judges and a live audience for two shows. After a callback that cut the competition down to 12 other comedians, Johnson was named the winner. William â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skipâ&#x20AC;? Garrett,

Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager as well as the CEO and senior brand manager of Boomtown Group Inc., said Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performances in the showcases went very well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt like he had a really good stage presence and that his act was really funny,â&#x20AC;? Garrett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His overall experience as a comedian has matured, as well as his overall maturity in the game. All that came together and allowed him to deliver an excellent show.â&#x20AC;? A graduate of Stillman College in 2003 and a graduate student at the University from 2005 to 2006, Johnson started getting into comedy through his childhood friend Tre Williamson, another successful comedian who has appeared on Boost Mobile commercials, BETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comic View and FXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acclaimed cop

drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shield.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was writing for him at the time while he was doing standup,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We grew up together, and I decided to give it a shot under his advice.â&#x20AC;? Johnson is a longtime fan of standup comedy, citing Chris Rock in particular as his favorite comedian. His style is reminiscent of Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keen observations, coupled with his own signature easygoing stage presence. He describes his style as â&#x20AC;&#x153;reality that never happened.â&#x20AC;? The news that he will be opening for Steve Harvey, star of his own show and one of the comedians featured in Spike Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blockbuster â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Kings of Comedy,â&#x20AC;? has not fazed Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work ethic one bit. He plans on getting back to work as soon as he finishes the show, with upcoming

shows planned at homecoming events for Tuskegee University, Stillman College, Troy University and Claflin University in South Carolina. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big step in his career, but he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count this as truly â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;arrivingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; yetâ&#x20AC;?, Garrett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening for Steve Harvey so one day he can have some up-andcoming comedian open a soldout show for him.â&#x20AC;? Johnson said persistence is crucial for aspiring comedians in Tuscaloosa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keep writing, keep performing and be as funny as you can all the time,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get better with time.â&#x20AC;? For those who wish to see Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s act in Tuscaloosa, he has performed at the local comedy showcase ComicKaze every other Tuesday at Little Willieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, along with various other Alabama comedians.

                

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Today's birthday (10/28/10). Broaden your personal mission in life this year. To achieve this, deepen your spiritual connections. First develop a contemplative practice that relaxes your mind. Then acknowledge insights that come to you in that peaceful state. To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 7 -- While sitting in a meeting, your mind's ponders the dinner menu. Ask someone to pick up key ingredients on the way home, and get back to the issue at hand. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 7 -- Your partner brings a fresh sense of purpose to a difficult situation. Listen to the logic. It overcomes any fears concerning the future. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 7 -- To maintain emotional flow, first you have to get practical projects moving. Adjust your direction after that. Use the strengths of co-workers. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 6 -- You prefer a smooth course over high drama today. Others challenge your emotional base. Remove feelings from your argument by taking time to breathe. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Take time for yourself first thing in the morning. A good breakfast is key. Then go meditate, exercise or get out

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in nature. Tackle today's business. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Take the group to a restaurant that serves a variety of cuisines. Be sure to Mankl]Zr satisfy the youngest person's palate. H\mh[^k+1 Then everyone's happy. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 5 -- You feel like you've been put on the spot by a sibling or friend. Work it out MhieZ\^rhnkZ]3 by using your imagination and intel,-1&0,.. ligence. Humor helps. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a \p\eZllf`k 5 -- Your mind may be on food all day. You want to sample several cuisines. 9`fZbe'\hf This may make dinner preparations complex. You could always eat out. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today ppp'\p'nZ'^]n is a 7 -- Your recipe for today includes extra rations of compassion. Others feel the bittersweet taste of the moment as Lmn]^gmkZm^3 you celebrate the past. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a ',.(i^kphk]( 6 -- Devote maximum attention to your i^k]Zr favorite person's desire-of-the-moment. It could be great fun to discover !Fbg'*/phk]l%-kngl" how to accomplish the improbable. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 6 -- Spend time today providing for *The Crimson the needs of others. Nurturing includes White places food and emotional support. One perthese ads in son goes home early. It's okay. good faith. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a We are not 6 -- If you split your attention now, you responsible for seem to get a lot more done. However, fraudulent part of what you do will need to be readvertising.* done. Do one thing at a time.

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THE UPS STORE 1130 University Blvd.

248-0290


Scene

the

LIFESTYLES Page 10 • Thursday, October 28, 2010 Editor • Kelsey Stein kmstein@crimson.ua.edu

Flicks

to catch

COBB HOLLYWOOD 16 • Paranormal Activity 2 (R) • Saw 3D: The Final Chapter (R) • RiffTrax LIVE: House on Haunted Hill (NR) • Hereafter (PG-13) • Jackass 3 (R) • N-Secure (R) • Red (PG-13) • Life As We Know It (PG13) • My Soul to Take 3D (R) • Secretariat (PG) • Case 39 (R) • The Social Network (PG13) • You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (R) • Easy A (PG-13) • The Town (R)

T-Town Terrors By Stephanie Brumfield Staff Reporter snbrumfield@crimson.ua.edu

Do you believe in ghosts? People say Tuscaloosa is full of them because of its rich history of violence, eccentrics and Civil War lore. Whether visiting old plantation homes or sites of untimely and gruesome deaths, ghost seekers are sure to be spooked by odd noises and visions at these historically haunted locations, where reports of ghost sightings abound.

Around town

The Kilgore House The Kilgore House, also known as the blue Victorianstyle home on the corner of Hackberry and Campus Drive, was built in 1890 for Charles C. Kilgore, who worked for the Alabama Hospital for the Insane at the time of the house’s construction. The Alabama Paranormal Society decided to investigate the house in 2009 after hearing that a lot of activity had been occurring at the house, said founder and investigator for the group Leilani Catalan. She said their cameras captured spirits of dogs, sounds of footsteps in empty rooms and a transparent hand moving up the staircase. On one video, the team captured a bright light that quickly appeared and disappeared as it moved across the room. Viewing the video in slow motion reveals the face of a young girl within the orb, Catalan said. The reason ghosts appear in the Kilgore House is up for debate, but the ghosts are most likely related to the

CW | Drew Hoover deaths of Kilgore’s youngest the Tuscaloosa Paranormal daughter and niece at the Research Group, which has ages of 16 and 20, respectively, also investigated the house. After the two girls’ deaths, said David Higdon, founder of

• Deontay Wilder Celebrity Birthday Bash: 9 p.m., Hawks Place Sports Bar & Grill

FRIDAY

CW | Jerrod Seaton

Gorgas Library

life

• Tucker Max book signing: 7 p.m., Books-A-Million

the Kilgores no longer opened the house to Bryce employees their home to University and eventual decay. students, and they moved shortly thereafter, leaving

Campus Haunts

The Drish House

Night

THURSDAY

Ghosts haunt local historic sites

CW | Drew Hoover Perhaps the most famous haunted place in Tuscaloosa is the Drish House, located downtown on 17th Street. Built in 1837, the house is haunted by Dr. John R. Drish’s wife Sarah, Higdon said. Records show John Drish was an alcoholic, and he died after having one too many and falling down the stairs. His wake was held in the tower

• Sparrow & The Ghost: Gnemi’s Top Shelf Tavern • Oz Live Kickoff Party: 4 p.m., Oz Music

room of the house, and a ring of candles surrounded Drish’s body and burned throughout the ceremony. Sarah made it known to her friends and relatives that she wanted those same candles to be used at her wake, too, but when she died, the candles could not be found. Now, at night, the tower room of the Drish House often looks like it is on fire, and fire departments have often been called to the house only to find the room untouched. Legend has it that Sarah comes back at night to light the candles that were never lit at her wake.

The Gorgas Library is said to be haunted by its namesake, Amelia Gayle Gorgas, who worked tirelessly as the campus librarian for more than 20 years. In “Haunted Halls of Ivy: Ghosts of Southern Colleges and Universities,” written

by Daniel W. Barefoot, the library’s elevators are said to be haunted by Gorgas’s spirit. Although programmed to bypass the fourth floor, librarians have often witnessed the elevators open on the fourth floor, completely empty. “No other explanation

Little Round House

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being readily available,” Barefoot writes, “the bizarre occurrences are attributed to the wraith of Amelia Gorgas, who continues to keep the place in order after all these years.”

The Little Round House is one of only four buildings that survived the fires set by Union soldiers that destroyed most buildings on the Alabama campus in 1865. Originally a guardhouse, the Little Round House is said to be haunted by Union soldiers who were killed by Confederate soldiers at the time of the campus burning. Rumor has it that you

can hear the soldiers’ voices if you put your ear against the door of the house. Sometimes, the soldiers’ spirits can be seen roaming the Quad at night.

Condoleezza Rice Book Signing Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family

Thursday, November 4th 1:00pm-2:30pm Foster Auditorium Open to the public. See supestore.ua.edu for author signing details.

1031 13th Street E.

Behind Big Lots


10.28.10