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LIFESTYLES 6 Pretty Lights at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater

Monday, October 17, 2011

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

ALABAMA 52 | OLE MISS 7

Vol. 118, Issue 39

Internships offer chances to rebuild Placement program aims to put 25 students to work for city recovery By Melissa Brown Staff Reporter mbrown104@crimson.ua.edu

CW | Megan Smith Trent Richardson (3) shuffles his way through the Ole Miss defense. Richardson finished with four touchdowns on the day.

Running over Rebels

The University of Alabama’s Disaster Relief Internship Program (DRIP) continues providing internship opportunities for students, Joseph Cheney, the program’s coordinator, said. After placing nearly 70 students in local relief organizations during the summer months, the program is looking to have around 25 students placed in internships by the end of the year, Cheney said. Students are interning for organizations including the West Alabama Chamber of Commerce, temporary Emergency Services, the city of Tuscaloosa and Project Blessings. DRIP interns are given a broad range of responsibilities, Cheney and faculty director Norman Baldwin said. “The work students are doing ranges from administration, to

Tide continues to dominate Southeastern Conference opponents BY THE NUMBERS

By Zac Al-Khateeb Sports Reporter zialkhateeb@crimson.ua.edu

VS. OLE MISS

76

| The number of yards Trent Richardson gained on his fourth and final touchdown run. The run was Richardson’s longest of his career.

.9

| The average yards per carry Ole Miss averaged for the game. Alabama averaged 9.3 yards per carry.

7

| The number of points Ole Miss scored in the game. Alabama leads the nation in fewest points allowed at seven points per game.

6

| The number of consecutive 100-yard games Trent Richardson has. Richardson finished the game with 183 yards, a career high.

OXFORD, Miss. – The Heisman hype surrounding Alabama running back Trent Richardson got a little more intense Saturday. Richardson gashed the Rebel defense for his sixth straight 100-yard rushing game of the season. On the night, he had 183 yards and four touchdowns and averaged almost 11 yards per carry. For head coach Nick Saban, Richardson’s game was not just a great individual performance – it elevated the play of his teammates. “Trent had a great game,” Saban said. “… [He did a] fantastic job of running. Couple of big play runs, the guy’s an outstanding football player. Good person, a leader on our team that makes everybody play better around him.” Richardson’s performance was capped off by his fourth and final touchdown of the night, a 76-yard touchdown run that not only showcased Richardson’s running ability, but put the Tide up 31-7 halfway through the third quarter.

Senior wide receiver Darius Hanks called Richardson’s performance against Ole Miss “dominant,” and said it should have catapulted him to the top of the Heisman rankings. “I feel like every time he got the ball, he did what he wanted to do with it,” Hanks said. “I would definitely say Trent for Heisman. In my opinion, I do think he is the top guy for the Heisman race.” Junior offensive lineman Barrett Jones echoed his teammates’ thoughts on R i c h a r d s o n ’s p e r fo r m a n c e . “I like to think [the offensive line] are definitely a part of [Richardson’s success],” Jones said. “But there are plays where we do a lot to give him a big hole. But then there’s plays like that one tonight where he just kind of does it all on his own. It’s great to have a back like that, who can really make three-yard gains into touchdowns, so he’s awesome…. He’s a great player, and he’s on the right track [for the Heisman].” Despite his level of play, Richardson said he’s not going to pay attention to all the Heisman hype he’s received.

See FOOTBALL, page 6

15

| The number of rushing touchdowns Richardson has this season. Mark Ingram had 17 in his Heisman-winning year.

125

| The number of rushing yards Jalston Fowler had in the game. The total was a career high for Fowler.

27

| The number of first downs Alabama had in the game. Ole Miss totaled 9.

151

| The number of passes quarterback AJ McCarron has thrown without throwing an interception. McCarron’s last interception came on Sept. 3 against Kent State.

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P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036 | Advertising: 348-7845 | Classifieds: 348-7355 Letters, op-eds: letters@cw.ua.edu Press releases, announcements: news@cw.ua.edu

See INTERN, page 2

Divorce impacts families at home, students at UA With divorce rates rising in the U.S., students learn to balance family, school By Elisabeth García Contributing Writer

DIVORCE RATES

Caught between the chaotic worlds of home life and college, students with divorced parents may feel like they are the only ones without the quintessential happy family. However, 33 percent of all marriages end in divorce, according to a study by the Barna Group, a research and resource organization focused on the intersection of faith and culture. Many times, parents delay divorce until their children have grown and left home. “The thing that I would hear from people is that many parents do this to try to spare the student from problems and pain,” said John Lochman, a UA psychology professor. However, the decision to wait could have a worse impact on college students than parents imagine. “It’s very disillusioning,” he said. “They might feel like they were just living a lie.” Students may also feel guilty for causing their parents to stay in a bad relationship for their own sakes. Additionally, they may tend toward anger, feeling that their parents misguided them along the way, Lochman said. Students may also feel overwhelmed by the stress of financial consequences that

INSIDE today’s paper

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CW | Megan Smith Jalston Fowler (45) and Kevin Norwood (83) celebrate after a Fowler touchdown in the endzone against the Ole Miss Rebels.

active reconstruction work, to in one instance running a warehouse,” Cheney said. “It is truly amazing the amount and different types of work student interns are doing.” “We’re putting students in very responsible jobs – they’re not just sorting clothes and unloading trucks,” Baldwin said. “They’re directing warehouses, giving out aid to people that have lost everything.” Cheney said the nature of the work students did in the summer differs from the work they are doing now as the needs of the community change – but there is still a need. “Everyone should be aware that there is still work to be done and there will be work for some time to come,” he said. “It is my sincere hope that we will be there providing interns to agencies throughout the city until the day that Tuscaloosa is back to where we were on April 26.”

Briefs ........................2

Lifestyles....................7

Opinions ...................4

Puzzles......................9

Sports .......................5

Classifieds .................9

All Adults: 33% Evangelical Christians: 26% Associated with non-Christian faith: 38% Atheist or agnostic: 30% White: 32% Black: 36% Hispanic: 31% Asian: 20%

arise. Split into two homes, parents experience double living expenses, which impacts their ability to pay a student’s tuition. Lochman said a 2007 study by Linda Luecken at Arizona State University showed the factors that caused health problems in students of divorced parents. The study found that a peaceful divorce resolution helped students stay healthy while a divorce that was never finalized and fully resolved caused a negative long-term effect on health. Furthermore, students who kept in close contact with their father did better post-divorce than those with little or no contact. Lochman said the manner in which parents handle their emotions affects how the student will handle their own.

See DIVORCE, page 2

WEATHER today Clear

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GO ON THE

ONLINE

ON THE CALENDAR TODAY

TOMORROW

What: Constructing Shake-

What: Memory Techniques Where: Osband Hall When: 4 to 5 p.m.

speare

Where: Room 503, Gorgas Library

Library

When: 1 to 2 p.m. ing Brittany Hendricks, trumpet

What: “Il Buono Il Bruto Il

SOCIAL MEDIA WEEK IN REVIEW

Where: Moody Music Building

Cativo,” Italian movie with English subtitles

When: 5:30 p.m.

When: 7 p.m.

Track the popular campus hashtags #uachat and #uatweet on Twitter from throughout last week.

Where: Room 300, Ferguson Student Center When: 8:15 to 9:15 p.m.

Submit your events to

Kyle Carey design editor Evan Szczepanski graphics editor

Daniel Roth multimedia editor

ADVERTISING Emily Richards 348-8995 Advertising Manager cwadmanager@gmail.com Brittany Key 348-2598 Territory Manager Amy Ramsey 348-7355 National Representative Classifieds Coordinator Lauren Aylworth 348-8042 Creative Services Manager Nikki Amthor 348-8742 Greg Woods 348-8054 Tori Hall 348-6153 Rob Clark 348-4367 Will DeShazo 348-8041 Jessica West 348-8054 Ben Gordon 348-8042 Lauren Gallas 348-8042 Coleman Richards Special Projects Account Rep The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The advertising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published four times weekly when classes are in session during Fall and Spring Semester except for the Monday after Spring Break and the Monday after Thanksgiving, and once a week when school is in session for the summer. Marked calendar provided. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White is entered as periodical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright © 2011 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical Publication” categories of the U.S. copyright laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

wood Film Festival Halloween Series presents “Nagin” (1976) Where: Riverside Media Room in the Community Center When: 8 to 11 p.m.

ON THE MENU LAKESIDE LUNCH Fried Chicken Steak with Smokey Red Pepper Sauce Baked Potato Fresh Steamed Green Beans Vegetable Medley Shrimp Macaroni & Cheese Vegetable Enchilada with Red Sauce (Vegetarian)

DINNER Beef Brisket Rice Pilaf Cauliflower Au Gratin Steamed Spinach with Lemon Pepper Strawberry Smoothies Vegan Chicken Marsala (Vegetarian)

BURKE

BRYANT

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LUNCH

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Chicken Pot Pie Seasoned Corn Steamed Broccoli Shrimp Teriyaki Confetti Rice Baked Polenta with Marinara Sauce (Vegetarian)

Chicken and Vegetable Teriyaki with Rice Salisbury Steak Chicken and Bean Burrito Double Chicken Noodle Soup Grilled Seasoned Zucchini Mushroom Tortellini Rustica

Parmesan Chicken Corn on the Cob Steamed Broccoli Fettuccini Alfredo Mushroom & Wild Rice Soup Texas Toast Grilled Cheese (Vegetarian)

ON CAMPUS University establishes hotline for discrimination The University of Alabama has established a 24-hour HALT hotline to allow students, parents or others to report incidents of discrimination, harassment, hazing or any kind of unhealthy behavior. An individual calling the hot-

line can leave a confidential message with the Office of the Dean of Students. Callers to the hotline are anonymous. Callers should include as much detailed information as possible. The hotline number is (205) 348-4258 (HALT).

Drew Hoover photo editor Tyler Crompton web editor

What: The Fall 2011 Bolly-

calendar@cw.ua.edu

Tony Tsoukalas sports editor

Adam Greene chief copy editor

When: 7 p.m.

“The Greatest Movie Ever Sold” Where: Room 216, Reese Phifer Hall When: 8 to 10 p.m.

ing

Jonathan Reed managing editor jonathanreedcw@gmail.com

Tray Smith opinions editor

Deacon’s Seat Lecture

What: AD MOVIE NIGHT:

Victor Luckerson editor-in-chief editor@cw.ua.edu

Stephanie Brumfield lifestyles editor

What: Fred Stonehouse: The Where: Room 205, Gorgas Library

Where: Ferguson Theater

EDITORIAL

Malcolm Cammeron community manager outreach@cw.ua.edu

shop: Facebook Privacy

Where: Room 205, Gorgas

What: Student Recital featur-

Page 2• Monday, October 17, 2011

Amanda Sams news editor newsdesk@cw.ua.edu

What: Lunch ‘n Learn Work-

When: Noon to 1 p.m.

What: Circle K General Meet-

Will Tucker assistant managing editor wjtucker1@gmail.com

WEDNESDAY

Sororities to host Trick-or-Treat Monday for children University of Alabama Junior Panhellenic delegates will host the Sorority Row Trick-or-Treat Monday on Oct. 24, 6 to 8 p.m. Children of the Tuscaloosa area are invited to visit the

lawns of sorority houses on Magnolia and Colonial drives in costume to trick or treat. UA students will also wear costumes.

ON THE RADAR EU to make banks take bigger hit on Greece, France confirms From MCT Campus Banks will be asked to take a hit on Greece bigger than the 21 percent haircut that was offered to them in July, French Finance Minister Francois Baroin said Saturday. “We will have an agreement on that issue. To tell you today the figure that we will arrive at would go against the schedule of the negotiations,” Baroin said after chairing a two-day Group of 20 (G20) major economies meeting in Paris. Further debt relief for Greece, along with bank recapitalizations, bolstering euro bailout facilities and strengthening eurozone discipline rules, is part

DIVORCE Continued from page 1

If parents continually left conflicts unresolved, students may follow the pattern and find it harder to automatically use good conflict resolving skills. They may also become depressed or get angry about issues that in the past might not have bothered them. Despite negative effects, there are healthy ways of coping. Lochman suggested controlled breathing or exercise. Also, students should change their state of mind by focusing on a pleasant aspect of life for 10 minutes. “We tell kids to tell themselves self-statements like ‘I’m not going to let this event

of the eurozone crisis resolution plan expected to be endorsed by a European Union summit on October 23. The G20 looks to that meeting “to decisively address the current challenges through a comprehensive plan,” a final communique to the Paris talks said. Baroin dismissed criticism from bankers that imposing a bigger haircut on Greece would drive investors away from other tottering eurozone economies. “We will refuse all solutions that lead to a credit event,” he said, referring to an outcome that would trigger a default-like outcome and likely fuel market panic.

the bad end. Still, she said she feels her success at the University despite family frustrations has demonstrated an ability to overcome future obstacles. “It’s really difficult,” she said. “It takes a strong person.” She copes by talking about the issue with close friends who have had the same experiences. She said focusing on college has helped her distract herself from thinking about the divorce. Caroline Hicks, a sophomore majoring in biology, said her church supported her through her parents’ divorce at the end of her senior year in high school. “It was a long process,” she said.

“We tell kids to tell themselves self-statements like ‘I’m not going to let this event control my life.” — John Lochman, UA psychology professor control my life,’” he said. Riley Kraus, a freshman majoring in biology, recently found out that her mother was getting divorced again. She said she feels stressed knowing her stepdad will continue paying for much of her school expenses after the divorce. “He’s financially burdened by something he’s not legally supposed to do,” she said. “Without my scholarship I would feel absolutely guilty.” Though she saw the divorce coming, it didn’t make the reality any easier to deal with, she said. Seeing other friends whose parents had never been through a divorce, she felt as if she had gotten

Hicks said she was shocked about her parents’ decision but accepted that they knew what was best for them. She coped by making sure she never kept anything in, relying on friends for support and advice. Eventually, she was able to get to the point where she saw the positive things that came from the divorce. Though leaving for college might have caused additional stress, Hicks said she appreciated the coinciding transitions. “I have so many great friends here,” she said. “If anything, being at college has almost helped.”

Meanwhile, a major write-off of Greek sovereign debt would be a cheaper option for Germany than continuing eurozone bailouts for Athens, according to economists quoted by a German weekly newspaper Saturday. The experts for the German Institute of Economic Research DIW calculated that it would cost Germany 45.9 billion euros ($63 billion) up to 2020 if Greece were let off 60 percent of its debt, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung reported. The forecast included the cost of supporting European Union banks needing a bailout after a partial Greek default. The report said the overall cost of continuing without any default would

INTERN Continued from page 1

Baldwin said this summer that while students work on a volunteer basis, most are able to receive academic credit by finishing their experience with an academic exercise like a term paper. While the opportunity to receive credit for this semester has lapsed, there are still internships available for interested students this fall, Cheney said. New internships in the spring will be available for credit as well. “There will be opportunities for internships in the spring,” Cheney said. “I am working actively to expand the number of our partner agencies such that our interns have more options to chose from and to ensure that every single student interested in aiding in the recovery is placed in an internship.” Cheney encourages any students to apply, regardless of their field of study. The program is designed to match the student to the internship to best utilize their specific skill sets, he said.

be 3 billion euros more, or 49 billion euros, up to 2020. In a story to appear in print on Sunday, the newspaper said it had commissioned DIW to do the calculations. The economists assumed that Germany would have to spend 10 billion euros on bailing out banks if Greece defaulted. Berlin has pushed hard since the summer to put bailout mechanisms into place. However, Chancellor Angela Merkel suggested this month that some kind of default by Greece may have to be considered as a future option, provided banks take a haircut along with state creditors.

“Hearing their stories gave me a new perspective on the important things in life and reaffirmed my belief that the people of this state are some of the toughest in the world.” — Henry Joe, senior, international studies In addition, he said he believes it is an opportunity to get involved with the Tuscaloosa community and rebuilding process rather than just a resume builder. “It directly links students to the goal of rebuilding the city and the lives of those affected by the storm,” he said. “This interaction not only helps those in need, it helps build valuable resume experience for the interns. Further, it reflects well on the character of the University of Alabama that students have a continuing and active interest in rebuilding Tuscaloosa.” For Henry Joe, an international studies major, his summer internship provided much more than academic credit and work experience. “The people who came to the warehouse to receive supplies had every reason to be dejected and filled with a sense of hopelessness, yet they remained steadfastly upbeat about their

plight,” Joe said. “Hearing their stories gave me a new perspective on the important things in life and reaffirmed my belief that the people of this state are some of the toughest in the world.” Cheney said the work done by DRIP can part of the healing process for the student interns – not just the people they are helping. “Though I am a political scientist and not a psychologist, I have noticed in myself that participating in an internship is in a way therapeutic,” Cheney said. “For me, it has been an opportunity to work off some of the shock, loss, and grief of living through the storm.” Applications are available by emailing drip@gmail.com. For questions, you can also reach Joseph Cheney at 205-348-4966 or at cheney002@crimson. ua.edu. Current students can apply now for scholarships in the spring and summer of next year.

FAST FACTS • To apply email drip@gmail.com, or contact Joseph Cheney directly at 205-348-4966 or cheney002@crimson.ua.edu. • Most of the volunteers are able to receive academic credit for their experience. • Volunteers are placed at locations such as the City of Tuscaloosa, Temporary Emergency Services and Project Blessings.


The Crimson White

SPORTS

Thursday, July 1, 2011

3

Former SGA president brings art to campus By Stephen Nathaniel Dethrage Special Projects Reporter sndethrage@crimson.ua.edu Fo r m e r Student Government Association President Cleo Thomas and his wife Carla Thomas spoke in the Ferguson Center Saturday to address the 60 works of their collected art on display in the Ferguson Center Art Gallery. Thomas earned his undergraduate degree when he was 20 years old, and in 1976 became the only black SGA president at the University

“Being launched into truly American art history resulted from the experience of being a student here at the University of Alabama in American Studies.” — Cleo Thomas, former SGA president of Alabama. Thomas was also elected to the Board of Trustees at age 27, the youngest trustee in history. “Cleo made history here on campus in 1976,” said Robert Olin, dean of the College of

Arts and Sciences, during his introduction. The gallery and event commemorate the 50th anniversary of Department of American Studies at the University, which Thomas credits for his interest in art and the creation of his collection. He said their collection now includes more than 300 pieces of art. “Being launched into truly American art history resulted from the experience of being a student here at the University of Alabama in American Studies,” Thomas said. The primary focus of their

art displayed on campus is people, especially those who were involved in the American Civil Rights Movement. Abraham Lincoln and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. are recurring figures, and images from the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963 are also featured. Thomas said his gallery was centered on people who faced and conquered adversity, people who were unwilling to run away from the problems their society presented them. “The camera really peels

away all of the unnatural social restraints,” Thomas said. “They look like the people that they are.” Thomas said the art is about people who are trying to simply live where they are. “My secretary thinks they’re kind of gloomy,” Thomas said. “I guess they kind of are, although I’m generally an upbeat person. “A lot of this art looks crazy. But there’s a strain of that in my line, and I think trying to stay, that can make you crazy. So you have to do the best you can.”

Others are glad that Thomas continues to leave behind a legacy. “We are very grateful that you have found a way to stay,” said Lynne Adrian, chair of the Department of American Studies. “And Cleo, you have really contributed to making this a place where others want to and are able to stay.” The gallery has been on display in the Ferguson Center Art Gallery since Oct. 6, and will remain there until Oct. 26, where interested students and faculty can see it free of charge.

Robinson named Bama’s first endowed chair of sports medicine By Elizabeth Manning Contributing Wrtier

CW | Margo Smith

Karen Waldrup and Ashlee K. Thomas performed last Wednesday to benefit tornado relief.

Emerging Scholars series comes to UA By Jordan Cissell Contributing Wrtier While most University of Alabama students no longer subscribe to the elementary school belief that their teacher lives at school, many still hold misconceptions regarding the role instructors play in the campus academic community. “When I tell people that I do research, they always say, ‘But you’re in English!’” said Rob Dixon, an English instructor at the University. “Most people don’t realize that we do research, too.” The English Department’s new Emerging Scholars Series plans to promote better understanding of University instructors, specifically their participation in academic endeavors, by facilitating the exchange of ideas between students and instructors in an informal setting. “This is a cool opportunity for students to see what instructors are doing and learn from them outside of the classroom setting, especially about stuff that the instructors have a passion for,” said Dixon, who will present his work at the program’s first rendition on Tuesday, Oct. 18, in Morgan room 301 from 2 to 2:30 p.m. Dixon’s presentation, titled “The Education of Henry Adams and the Death of Benjamin Franklin,” will combine a study of the influence of Franklin’s autobiographical story arc on the creation of

the ideal American storyline with an examination of how Adams’s autobiography flipped Franklin’s “rags to riches” stereotype on its head. “It should be a fun talk,” Dixon said. “Adams is a really funny guy, and Franklin is a funny guy, too. He’s winking at us as he says a lot of these things.” Carl Miller, an English instructor at the University, created the Emerging Scholars Series to give students a clearer picture of instructors’ responsibilities. “The idea behind this program was the difference between the roles of instructor and professor,” he said. “As an instructor, the focus is primarily on teaching. With professors, it is innately built into their job expectations that they do scholarly work, but a lot of instructors participate in research as well. There seems to be a disconnect between students, especially undergraduates, and instructors about what kind of scholarly research instructors actually do.” Dixon said instructors are expected to teach four classes each semester, while tenured and tenure-track professors usually assume a two-class workload. As well as teaching classes, many instructors participate in research. Miller said he hopes the Emerging Scholars Series, in addition to informing students, will provide a forum for

instructors to present their work in a low-pressure environment. “The lectures are designed to be in the same vein as a conference presentation or job talk,” he said. “This is not only an opportunity for instructors to showcase their work, but also to hopefully receive constructive criticisms and suggestions for improvement from senior faculty.” Dixon likened the presentation to a practice run for future dissertations and job interviews, but the program might also be considered a taste test of sorts for student attendees who are new to the world of academia. Miller formatted the series with student accessibility in mind. In an effort to accommodate busy schedules, each presentation will last a total of 30 minutes, including a 20-minute lecture period followed by a 10-minute opportunity for questions. “The presentations will be only 30 minutes long, because we’re hoping to give people a minimum commitment with maximum exposure,” he said. Miller plans for the series to host a presentation each month, and hopes to eventually extend the scope of presenters beyond the English Department and showcase instructors from across the campus community. “This program can only enhance the quality of academia at the University of Alabama,” he said.

The University’s head team physician, Dr. James Robinson, has been appointed the first Endowed Chair of Sports Medicine for Family Physicians at the University’s College of Community Health Sciences. Lori Upton, the administrative secretary for the College of Community Health Sciences at the University, has worked with Robinson for two years. “[Robinson] has a very dynamic personality,” said Upton, who is heavily involved in the selection process for new fellows coming in to the program. “He will be the one person who can make this program the best in the country.” Since moving back to Tuscaloosa in 1999, Robinson opened a private practice, West Alabama Family Practice and Sports Medicine, and became the director of the college’s sports medicine center. “We work very closely with the Student Health Center, and we encourage anyone that has any kind of athletic injury to come by any time,” Robinson said. Robinson’s newest title as the first endowed chair is an addition to his accomplishments. The chair is sponsored by various alumni and other organizations, and helps to provide salaries for the fellows in the program Robinson leads. Robinson said UA athletics is a high-pressure environment and takes time to become comfortable. “My days tend to be a bit long,” Robinson said. “I would suggest finding a high school or college

to work with first, for medical students looking to follow a similar path.” Robinson has worked with many different sports teams throughout his career, including the New Orleans Saints and U.S. soccer teams during the 2000 Summer Olympics. He comJAMES pleted his residency ROBINSON in Tuscaloosa, with Dr. Bill deShazo, the former head team physician, and the namesake of the college’s sports medicine center. When deShazo retired, Robinson was offered a position as a team physician. From there, Robinson made a name for himself as a prominent figure in the UA community, as well as helped to pass a bill that helps protect athletes from concussions. “With the new position, we have a sports medicine fellowship and my job is to recruit the fellows for the program,” Upton said. The program has been approved for three fellows, one more than most programs around the country, but at present only one fellow is involved at one time. Robinson said he is looking to add another fellow to the program in the near future, but will most likely not go to three, because it “takes away from the experience level.”


OPINIONS

SGA represents the students, not the administrators By John Davis @JohnMcLeodDavis

MCT Campus

Encourage others to join the change By SoRelle Wyckoff @sorellew

Monday, October 17, 2011 Editor • Tray Smith letters@cw.ua.edu Page 4

{ YOUR VIEW } WEB POLL

CW Poll Do you believe the SGA can regain the trust of the student body in the aftermath of Grant Cochran’s resignation?

NO 63% 291 Votes

YES 37% 174 Votes

Total Voters: 461

This Week’s Question: This week’s poll question: How do you feel about Robert Witt’s performance as president of The University of Alabama? 1.) Approve 2.) Disapprove EDITORIAL BOARD Victor Luckerson Editor Jonathan Reed Managing Editor Will Tucker Assistant Managing Editor Tray Smith Opinions Editor Adam Greene Chief Copy Editor Drew Hoover Photo Editor

WE WELCOME YOUR OPINIONS Letters to the editor must be less than 300 words and guest columns less than 800. Send submissions to letters@ cw.ua.edu. Submissions must include the author’s name, year, major and daytime phone number. Phone numbers are for verification and will not be published. Students should also include their year in school and major. For more information, call 348-6144. The CW reserves the right to edit all submissions.

Change is in the air. It’s an indescribable sensation. The core of our cultural institutions is being challenged. The United States is undergoing a change. Today marks one month since Occupy Wall Street started. We have heard from a slew of presidential hopefuls on a solution to our economic crisis, and our current president has tried out differing game plans of his own. There are movements for equal rights, better public education and the list goes on. And we aren’t alone, there are revolutions going on around the world. On a smaller scale, The University of Alabama is also evolving. These past months we have seen an increase in student population, student-administration relations tested, traditions like block seating and the power of the greek system questioned, and most recently, the first resignation of an SGA president since 1950. Yet in my Spanish class, when Moammar Gadhafi’s picture came on the screen, the room was silent. The classroom did not know who he was or why he was famous. But when Justin Bieber’s face popped up, not only did they know who he was, but they also knew he was from Canada, how old he was and his girlfriend’s name. This isn’t unheard of – we know that celebrities and entertainment gets more clout and attention from adolescents and young adults than political leaders and movements do. But this should no longer be an excuse. Not only are we amidst one of the most exciting and fascinat-

And if our University is the academic prowess it claims it is, we sure as hell should be paying attention to what’s around us, and that doesn’t mean Kim Kardashian’s wedding. ing times in our world, nation and school’s history, more importantly, we are college students. The reason we pursued a higher education is so we can understand the world around us, how things work the way they do, and why things have happened in the past and what is happening now. And if our University is the academic prowess it claims it is, we sure as hell should be paying attention to what’s around us, and that doesn’t mean Kim Kardashian’s wedding. But instead of preaching to the choir, I am going to challenge you. Obviously you have already shown interest in the shifting world around you – you have a newspaper in your hands. Now what I’m asking is that you pass on the knowledge and interest you have and have shown by picking up this newspaper, and initiate dialogue with the people around you. Ask them what they think about the economic crisis of this country. Ask them what they think about the presidential hopefuls. Ask them what they think about relief efforts in Tuscaloosa. Ask what they think about block seating, about our new SGA president, about racism on our campus or about our morphing relationship with our administration. You could start anywhere and with anything, just get them thinking. We are on the cusp of great things, and we are in the perfect

position to have a voice and make a difference in how these great things play out. Being students in an institution like the University of Alabama gives us the education we need to understand what’s going on around us, and provides us with the skills to effectively communicate our desires and goals. I’m not asking you or your friends to pick up your sign and start picketing, I’m only asking the bar of awareness and education to be raised. Our country was created on ideals that allow us to question. People have died for that right, and if we let it go to waste, we are only hurting our country and ourselves. So encourage questioning the things you hear and the movements around you. Encourage opening your eyes, looking up from your Twitter feed of reality TV-created celebrities and turning your head around. If we want to turn the page and start new chapters both on this campus and outside of it, we all need to be reading. So to you, newspaper reader, thank you. Pass on your interest to the person next to you, and maybe they can look up from their Facebook photos just long enough to realize there is some serious change going on, and we have an opportunity to become a part of it. SoRelle Wyckoff is a junior majoring in history and English. Her column runs weekly on Mondays.

The world, and our campus, is in reverse By Whitney A. Jones Our generation is in danger. Just look at current events like the incomplete facts and unsettling conclusion of the Troy Davis story, the questionable reasons behind Alabama’s very own immigration bill, and all the way down to the University of Alabama’s most recent racially offensive incident (if you had not heard, watch your Crimson account for one of those deeply heartfelt electronic notices of non-endorsing). As Americans, we pride ourselves on the notion that we hold the blueprint for what it means to be innovative in all things, including cultural inclusion and race relations. You know, “We hold these truths to be self- evident, that all men are created equal …” and all that. Those words have been intrinsically bound to American culture and credited by every history textbook we have ever been given to be the backbone of what we, as a nation of “free and equal” individuals should stand for. Those words have been written for over two hundred years and yet discrimination and racism are re-emerging topics in our society. This is the way it has always been, but today I feel something more than passing distain. I am a first generation student in my fourth year here. I have been at the University long enough to witness the 2009 SGA Presidential Campaign when Kendra Key was miraculously beaten; I was here when the religious slurs began to cover the grounds of the campus just as the atheists and agonists showed up and accusations were flying from all sides; I was at work when the news broke that a gradu-

ate student walking past a fraternity house was called a derogatory name; and I was here when our LGBTQ student group walked in the Homecoming parade for the first time and witnessed tremendous scrutiny from onlookers and participants. Each of these incidents brought its own small waves of anger and consent, mostly indifference. But eventually we lost interest. We stopped talking about them and chose to ignore how each event added to the already tainted image this University has with the subject of diversity. This is why we are in danger. How is it that in a place where education, knowledge and exploration of self and community is supposed to be the focus, we, as young Americans, can choose to shy away from in-depth conversation and meaningful action? We have been afforded the opportunity to attend an accredited institution in the hopes that we better ourselves to better the world, and yet we are scared of the consequences that come with going against the grain. We are complacent, lazy and too concerned with the perspective of others. The generations before us fought for their beliefs, challenged collectivism, rejected government influence, and backed up their sentiments with profound thoughts. I feel so sorry for our elders, having to watch the reversal of our society. Now it is only a question of time. How long will it take us to revert back to the times of black and white with the absence of grey? How long before minority students at the University fear walking across campus, attend-

ing social events, or even applying? How long before the implied hatred and rumored happenings become tangible daily experiences and violent realities? (By the way, the terms “black” and “African American” are not synonyms for the word “minority”; it encompasses so much more). I am not asking you to be angry, nor am I attempting to cause disorder within the Capstone community. What I am hoping is that as you read this, you begin to question my words and the incidents that inspired them. I want to invoke in you the initiative to implement change and the courage to voice your opinion. I want you to realize the power of the young scholar and to recognize that when you made the decision to come here to further your academic pursuits, you inherited a responsibility to those who were unable to do the same. You must use the resources afforded you to shape the future we approach. To those of you who believe that indifference is the best answer to my questions, I offer this: I was once told that silence implies consent. Well, speak up. Say something other than “Idk” or “oh well”. Challenge yourself and ask more of those with whom you choose to surround yourself. We must collectively will change to happen. It will not come on its own. Start now, while you are here at the University of Alabama. This would be the point where someone says, “It’s never too late to start”. Today, at this school, in this state, at this time, they would be wrong. Whitney A. Jones is senior majoring in public relations and psychology.

Some weeks I like to think these columns write themselves. What I mean is that occasionally an event occurs or a story is reported on and everyone more or less comes to the same conclusion. Case in point: On Oct. 6, a resolution was introduced in the Student Government Association Senate “requesting University of Alabama administrators to allow the release of documents relating to the resignation of former SGA President Grant Cochran.” On Monday, it was then reported that the resolution had been tabled by the Senate Ethics Committee, meaning it would not be brought to the floor for a vote. By itself, this action (or inaction, as the case may be) was immensely frustrating. It seemed for a fleeting instant that there were members of the SGA who actually understood their role as representatives of the student body to the UA administration. Frustration soon turned to disappointment with a tinge of anger upon reading some of the quotes members of the ethics committee provided. Senate Communications Director Austin Gaddis stated, “This kind of resolution, basically going directly against the administration, from a PR standpoint, is not what we want at this point.” Senator Alex Ash stated, “I don’t think undermining the administration and also the judicial branch is a great idea.”

Reading these quotes, one gets the impression that the members of the SGA feel that their relationship with the administration is one of a child yearning for the approval of a distant father.

Senator Lauren Hardison, chair of the ethics committee said, “At this point in time and until the investigation has concluded I feel that the SGA as a whole should remain united in support of the administration and the confidentiality of the individuals involved.” Reading these quotes, one gets the impression that the members of the SGA feel that their relationship with the administration is one of a child yearning for the approval of a distant father. The mere existence of this resolution, though, at least seemed to prove that there were SGA senators who didn’t believe the administration to be the fourth branch of government. That is, until Tuesday’s paper printed. You see, not only did members of the ethics committee determine that standing up for the students’ right to hold its elected officials accountable is somehow counterproductive, but the author of the resolution didn’t even expect it to make it past the committee. Brad Tipper, the senator who penned the resolution, said he “wrote the resolution to make it known that that’s not what the SGA or the Senate is about…the resolution is about regaining confidence.” Yet in the same story, he and another co-sponsor of the bill both stated that they didn’t expect it to go anywhere. There is nothing confidence inspiring about a lack of belief in one’s own product. The co-sponsor, Daniel Bruno, did disagree with Gaddis’ ridiculous remark that the resolution is somehow “bad PR,” and said that he firmly believed the student body wanted to see the SGA act on the matter. What I’m having trouble getting past is the notion that somehow by just writing the resolution the Senate is 1) taking productive action 2) building a strong relationship with the student body. What essentially happened was the equivalent of me writing this column and then refusing to submit it; or better yet, going to a bar with my friends and talking about an awesome column idea and then never actually writing it. The students want to see action, they really do, but they’re also not stupid. They can tell the difference between an earnest attempt and an empty gesture, and this resolution has every appearance of being the latter.

John Davis is a senior majoring in telecommunication and film. His column runs on Monday.

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The Crimson White

SPORTS

Monday, October 17, 2011

5

FOOTBALL | COLUMN

CW File

Alabama fans enjoy their tailgating experience on The Quad.

Alabama: The Quad

CW|Megan Smith

Tailgating tents on the Grove at Ole Miss in Oxford.

vs.

Ole Miss: The Grove

If football is a religion in the Southeastern Conference, the tailgates serve as the chapels on game day By Tony Tsoukalas Sports Editor crimsonwhitesports@gmail.com On my first gameday experience on the Quad as a freshman, I was floored by what I saw. It was by far the greatest and most intense football experience I had ever been a part of. Surely nothing could match its excellence and beauty. As I prepared for my trip to Oxford last week, I was told the Grove at Ole Miss would blow me away, that it was in fact better than any tailgating experience I had ever been a part of – even the Quad. This seemed impossible, so, in order to find out myself I decided to put it to a test. I separated the challenge into three categories: atmosphere, tailgating essentials and, of course, girls. Here are the results.

Atmosphere

Upon walking into the Grove I was shocked by how crowded it was. The volume of people vastly surpassed that of the Quad. “It is pretty similar, except at the Grove it is way closer,” Alabama student Allie Sequeira said. “I feel at Alabama we have more space, but I feel like Ole Miss has way more decorations and stuff.” The close and comfy setting led to more of a community atmosphere. Everywhere I went tailgaters were offering me food, a place to sit, a drink, all for the secret password – Hotty Toddy. “All the people here are very nice,” Alabama student Jared Helton said. “People I just met were like, ‘bring a chair over.’ I went and got food and everything.”

However, not everybody shared my enthusiasm of the Grove. Alabama student Tripp Shields pointed out that Alabama fans share more pride in their team at the Quad. “I feel like at the Quad there is a lot more energy,” Shields said. “People are really excited to watch their team. Here people are kind of walking around with their heads down. At Alabama a lot more people are excited about their team.” My verdict: Advantage Grove. The Grove was full of energy. Not only were the people very friendly, there was a sense of togetherness everywhere I went. The Grove is a place where you can come in knowing no one and leave knowing everyone.

all done by individuals, not companies; this allowed for a more fan-oriented experience, where fans provided everything. “Alabama has the tools to be great,” Waddell said. “But they commercialize it too much. If they did it like this and didn’t allow in commercial tailgates, they could have the Grove, or close too it.” My verdict: Advantage Grove. You can find everything you need on game day inside the Grove. If that doesn’t cut it for you, double-decker busses will take you, for free, inside the city where you can explore even more of what Ole Miss has to offer.

Tailgating essentials

This was probably the toughest part of the competition of the challenge to judge. Both schools are known for having the prettiest girls in the SEC, and Ole Miss did not disappoint. “They are really nice over here,” Helton said. “I don’t know, it is a close tie. I’ve seen some pretty girls from Alabama and I’ve seen some really pretty girls from Ole Miss.” My verdict: Advantage Quad. This was hard, as both the Grove and the Quad are home to some of the south’s finest and classiest women. However, there is something about a beautiful Bama belle on game day that just cannot be beat.

the Grove proved to be a little more intense. The mixture of hospitality and creativeness eventually proved to be enough to put the Grove over the top. In the end people were right, the

Grove did blow my mind. “There is no comparison,” Waddell said. “Honestly the Grove, there is a reason this is called the holy grail of tailgating. There is no where like this.”

Delivers.

Girls

One thing I found out pretty soon on my trip was that nobody – nobody – partied like Ole Miss. One of the most creative tents I found was owned by long-time Ole Miss tailgater Jan Waddell. The tent featured beautiful white columns that doubled as dispensers of various mixed drinks. If there is one thing you can say about Ole Miss fans, they are creative. “We may not win all the football games, but we have never lost a party,” Waddell said. “We love our football team and we get really excited for them.” The pure number of drinks and food that each tent had was truly amazing. That, mixed with the hospitality of Ole Miss fans, Final decision: created an awesome gameday experience. Advantage Grove “I love the Quad more because it is Alabama,” Helton said. “But the Grove is Overall, this was a close call. Both tailreally nice, I enjoy it.” The Grove was also unique in that it was gates are college football classics, however,

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6

Monday, October 17, 2011

SPORTS

The Crimson White

SOCCER

VOLLEYBALL

Bama falls to No. 13 Florida at home By Morgan Upton Contributing Writer

CW | John Michael Simpson K.K. Duffy (4) goes up for a header against LSU on Sunday.

Tide splits wins over weekend By Miranda Murphy Sports Reporter

The Alabama Crimson Tide women’s soccer team split the weekend against Southeastern Conference rivals Arkansas and LSU. The Tide (7-7-2, 2-5-1 SEC) shut out the Arkansas Razorbacks (4-10-0, 2-5-0 SEC) 3-1 on Friday. “I think it was a good team performance,” head coach Todd Bramble said. “We were really good defensively and were really dynamic offensively. We created good goal-scoring chances and executed extremely well.” Sophomore Molly Atherton recorded two of the three goals in the win against Arkansas. “I was pretty excited,” Atherton said. “I had this weird gut feeling that I was going to score in the game. Pia gave me a great slip ball with the first goal. I saw the keeper out and I just went for the second goal. It felt good.” Freshman Pia Rijsdijk also scored for the Tide, totaling three goals for the season so far. Senior goalkeeper Justine Bernier tallied for fifth shutout of the season with the win. The Tide lost 2-0 at the “Power of Pink” game against No. 18 LSU (11-5-1) on Sunday.

Bramble said he felt there had to be a change in the mentality of the team in the second half. “I was proud of the fight our team showed, particularly in the second half,” Bramble said. “I’m not disappointed with our performance in the first, but I felt we were a little too conservative. We gave ourselves a chance to tie it up in the second.” LSU took the lead in the first half when Kaley Blades scored in the 40th minute. LSU’s Taryne Boudreau scored an unassisted goal in the second half. LSU outshot the Tide 21-5. Rijsdijk led the Tide with four shots in the game. Bernier recorded four saves in the game, while LSU’s goalkeeper Mo Isom recorded one save. “I think this is one of the best games we’ve seen Justine play in a while,” Bramble said. “She really did her job and did everything she could to keep us in the game.” The Tide will play Tennessee on Thursday, Oct. 20 at home, and then the Tide will travel to Athens, Ga., on Sunday, Oct. 23 to compete against the Georgia Bulldogs.

The University of Alabama’s volleyball team fell in three sets to the No. 13 Florida Gators on Sunday at Foster Auditorium. “We’re real pleased with how we approached the match,” head coach Ed Allen said. “We had a solid effort in the first set, and I thought our side out offense was very effective. We were able to give ourselves some chances and I thought we had a chance to win the first set.” The Crimson Tide held tough in the first set, but would fall 21-25. Down 10-16, Allen called timeout to get his team refocused. Down by four with the score 15-19, sophomore Cortney Warren spiked the ball into the Florida defense giving a spark to the Alabama offense. The Tide would pull within two, but that was as close as they would get in the first set. Warren, the outside hitter, had a big day for the Tide, posting 10 kills in the match and had a hitting percentage of .346 for the day. With junior Kayla Fitterer still out, Tide players have had to step up to make up for her loss on the court. Sophomore Shelbi Goode led Alabama for the third straight match in digs, with 10 for the day. As the second set started, Alabama fought Above: Andrea its way back to have an 11-10 lead on the McQuaid (3) Gators. Florida’s coach Mary Wise called a and katherine timeout and they subsequently went on a White (14) 4-0 run. Tied at 14-14, the Gator’s went on block at the a 6-0 run before Alabama was able to score net during the again. The Tide would get only one more Tide’s game point before Florida ended the game on a against Florida 4-0 run. on Sunday “We saw things begin to break down for afternoon. us from a passing perspective in the second Left: Sophoset and obviously into the third set and that more setter Ancertainly put more pressure on us,” Allen drea McQuaid said. sets the ball for It was in the third set that the physiLeigh Moyer. cal play of the Gators truly overpowered Alabama. Florida was too strong and too big for the Tide. Florida took over the third set, winning 25-13. The Gators were hitting at .355, with a 78 percent hitting percentage coupled with seven team blocks in the set. The Gators were also 11-14 in side-outs for the match. The Tide was held to hitting at -.48 and only 41 percent. “This is a good defensive team,” Allen CW | Megan Smith said. “They’re ability transition attack and side-out were extremely high, and they those matchups at the net.” Alabama will continue conference play physically had a great matchup on us in The Tide is now 10-11 overall on the sea- on the road for the next two matches, playall six rotations. We didn’t have the defen- son and 3-7 in conference play while Florida ing at LSU on Friday and at Arkansas on sive effort that would allow us to overcome improves to 15-3 overall and 8-1 in the SEC. Sunday.

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FOOTBALL Continued from page 1

“I don’t really pay attention to all that stuff,” Richardson said. “It’s been so long since I’ve even watched SportsCenter. I don’t even look at stuff like that, for real.”

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Still, Richardson said he may take a peek to catch his 76-yard touchdown run. “Yeah, I might have to watch that tonight,” Richardson said. Richardson gave a lot of credit to his team’s plan of attack on offense. And concerning his 76-yard touchdown run,

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Richardson said he didn’t even think it was the best play he’s had at Alabama. “There’s a lot of runs I’ve had,” Richardson said. “Probably from a personal view, it’s a good run. I don’t think it’s probably the best one. There’s more to come, too.”

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The Crimson White

LIFESTYLES

Monday, October 17, 2011

7

REVIEW | MUSIC

It was the lights, Pretty Lights By Ashley Chaffin

Pretty Lights performed at Tuscaloosa Amphitheater on Oct. 13, 2011, as a part of a tornado benefit show.

CW | Harish Rao

CW | Harish Rao Featuring a variety of different visuals using lights, Pretty Lights performed with Sound Tribe Sector 9 and Big Gigantic.

I can’t think of one song on my iPod or one band that I claim to like that doesn’t have lyrics to go along with the music. Bands that can put words together beautifully just strike my fancy more than bands who are great at other things. Living in Tuscaloosa and having a general interest in music, I had heard one or two Pretty Lights songs before I saw them at the amphitheater on Thursday, but I never considered myself a fan of the band. Leaving the amphitheater after the show, the general consensus of everyone around me was “That was awesome!” and I have to agree with the rest of the crowd, the only word I could think of to describe the show was “awesome.” I got to the show a little bit of the way through Big Gigantic’s set. I’m not sure if it’s because of how thin the crowd was or if it was because the sun hadn’t gone down and I couldn’t enjoy the light show, but Big Gigantic didn’t impress as much as the other two acts did. They did, however, have my head bopping along with the music, and that’s something in my world. When STS9 took the stage, the people in front of me stood up, which meant I had to stand up in order to see the show at all. After about three songs, I was dancing along, quite badly if I am being honest, to the show just like the loyal STS9 fans around me. The highlight of the night for me, however, was Pretty Lights. After I enjoyed STS9 so much, my expectations for Pretty

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Lights had gone from not too excited to anticipation I would have never thought possible for a band I didn’t really like, and I wasn’t let down. They opened the show with the one song I know and like a lot, “Hot Like Sauce.” Starting out with a song that the entire crowd knew was probably the most genius thing to do because, as I found out, once you start dancing to Pretty Lights you don’t stop dancing until Pretty Lights stops playing. I was completely memorized by the lights and so into the music that I had very little idea what was going on around me until someone tapped me on the shoulder to ask what I was on – I was apparently dancing like a crazy person but considering my dance skills, that doesn’t surprise me. During the show I got a chance to watch from the pit and from seats. I enjoyed the show more from the seats because you can see the lights show, which was the best I’ve ever seen, hence the name “Pretty Lights,” and you have more room to move around. After the show, I probably still won’t drive around blasting Pretty Lights from my speakers (I’m not sure listening to them is worth it without the lights show) but I will go see them again the next time I have the chance. The show really was just plain awesome.

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8 Monday, October 17, 2011

LIFESTYLES

The Crimson White

COLUMN | FILM

The battle with cancer in ‘50/50’: Life or death is just a coin toss By Erich Hilkert In the new movie “50/50,” Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays a 27-year-old named Adam who receives a big shock one day: he has a cancerous tumor on his spinal column. After doing some research, he discovers the survival rate is 50/50. Hence the title. The reactions are fairly predictable. Adam’s girlfriend is seemingly okay with it, his mom is scandalized, his co-workers all try to offer advice and his best friend Kyle tries to downplay it with humor that backfires. He notes all the celebrity cases of surviving cancer and mistakenly includes Patrick Swayze. Instead of making Adam feel better, he only makes Adam worry more. Seth Rogen is unfortunately typecast as the more immature sidekick Kyle, but he at least adds some maturity and sensitivity to this character. Kyle is one of the few sources of encouragement Adam has. He does test Adam’s patience when

he tries to win women over by manipulating Adam’s situation to his own advantage. As usual, Rogen offers some light-hearted comedic moments, such as the scene where he talks to a man from Wales and asks, “So, does that make you Welsh or Whale-ish?” Philip Baker Hall is one of the best things about this movie. Hall has been a character actor for years, bringing depth to small bit roles largely unnoticed. At this stage in his career, he’s carving out a niche playing variations on cranky, old men. In “50/50,” he is a fellow cancer patient at the hospital with Adam, and they bond, along with their adopted friend Mitch. When an unforeseen event occurs, Adam is shocked and is unable to wrap his head around it. Hall, with his decades more of life experience, says to Adam, “What does it matter?” Hall is able to convey a man who is no longer surprised by the cruel endeavors he encounters, seeing

through the facades that Adam can’t. Hall was also strong in a guest appearance on “Modern Family” as the elderly neighbor who strikes up a friendship with Luke Dunphey. Hall was able to perfectly capture an elderly man dealing with poor health but wise in the ways of the world. He’s good enough here, but you wish he had a larger role somehow. The major issue in this movie is the difficult melding into one whole of comedy and drama. The movie doesn’t always succeed in this, most notably in the intense dramatic scenes between Adam and his mom. Drama must build slowly and while there is successful drama in the scenes with Hall and in confrontations between Adam and Kyle, the scenes involving him and his mother just feel forced. Some of the issue has to do with Anjelica Huston. She is trying to play a nagging mother, but I was never convinced. Annette Bening recently did a good

Finding your fine art A guide to making the most of your required credit By Nathan Proctor Contributing Writer

degree. Courses with a fine arts designation tend to be a bit outside of the ordinary and let UA students explore their artistic side, discover Most University of Alabama students, except culture around campus or find out what “aesengineering majors, are required to take at least thetic” really is. Some of the lesser-known selecthree hours of fine arts courses to receive their tions available to students are as follows:

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‘50-50’ Runtime: 100 minutes MPAA rating: R Release date: Sept. 30 CW critic’s rating:

Bottom line: “50/50 may deal with dying of cancer, but it doesn’t get too serious and features good comedic performances.” job with this kind of role in “The Kids Are All Right.” She wasn’t nagging, but she was overbearing and protective. Huston simply isn’t convincing with the heavy emotions that great actresses like Bening are able to convey more subtly and build slowly over time.

Rotten Tomatoes Joesph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogan play best friends who encourage each other through Gordon-Levitt’s cancer. Ultimately, though, as someone told me, the movie’s greatest strength is making us care for Adam. The poor guy has cancer, he’s had a string of bad relationships and he has a strained relationship with his parents. Credit Gordon-Levitt, who manages to carry most of

Aesthetics (PHL 217)

What it is: An introduction to the philosophy of art, how it’s experienced, what it is and how it should be interpreted. An informed critical understanding is formed through exposure to the arts and its history. What it’s like: “We all listen to music, watch movies and videos, go to plays and dance performances, read poems and visit art museums.

the heavy drama and shows a flair for the comedic parts too. “50/50” does take a look at death, but never too seriously. It is more about the resilience of a young man to keep struggling and realizing, along with the audience, maybe that struggle is worthwhile.

And many of us make music, dance, film, draw and paint. But only occasionally do we think about what we are doing when we do these things.” – Professor Richard A. Richards “It opened my eyes as to how to view the arts — how to ‘see’ and not just ‘look at’ art. It was a little more thought-based than hands-on work.” – Freshman Megan White

Reboot/Remix (ART 251) What it is: An examination of contemporary art through its relationship to three familiar popular culture phenomena: gaming and simulated environments, popular music and graphic novels and comics. What it’s like: “Popular culture has had an enormous influence on contemporary art, especially over the past few decades. My idea

is that people know far more about art than they realize, if they approach it from a different point of view.” – Professor Sarah Marshall “We started from talking about classic art and contemporary art and then talked about comics, video games and music and how that’s art. The course was really engaging.” – Junior Lakeshia Doctor

Creativity (NEW 212) What it is: A seminar exploring human culture and consciousness through reading, writing, the arts, projects, studios and discussion. What it’s like: “Many of the NEW 212 Creativity sections offer hands-on, arts-related experiences that are not possible in large lecture courses. Because of its smaller size, NEW

212 is taught as a discussion and activity based seminar.” – Professor Jennifer L. Caputo “You really get close to the people in your class and you learn how to define creativity and understand how creative people think.” – Junior Mary Helen Tomlinson

Arts of Tuscaloosa (UH 210 003-009) What it is: An exploration of the architecture, painting, sculpture, music, theater, dance and literature of the University and its community. Students attend both lectures and local exhibitions of the arts. What’s it like: “In the course, I’ve had

the opportunity to see productions that the University puts on that I otherwise would have missed. Going to the arts events for the class is a great way to discover the culture of Tuscaloosa.” – Freshman Kelsey Higbee

Intro to the Theatre (TH 114) What it is : A course teaching production techniques, the history of western theater and the viewing and reading of theater to produce a student capable of critically assessing the theatrical experience. What it’s like: “By focusing on the elements of theater, by reading scripts, by attending shows and reviewing them, by dis-

cussing textbook readings and current viewings of movies and TV shows, we hope that the student at the end of the semester will be better able to identify what they’ve seen and how they were used to create meanings that may extend beyond the classroom and screen [or on] stage.”– Professor Steven D. Burch

Phil Wickham @ CIRCLEWOOD BAPTIST

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9 Thursday, July 1, 2011

The Crimson White

DOWNTIME

MONDAY OCTOBER 17, 2011

PAGE 9

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The Crimson White

10

Monday, October 17, 2011


The Crimson White  

The Crimson White is a student-created publication that aims to inform, entertain the University of Alabama and surrounding Tuscaloosa areas

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