Issuu on Google+

LIFESTYLES

6

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

8

SPORTS Tide players win SEC awards

Moundville holds Native American Festival

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Vol. 117, Issue 38

WOMEN’S GOLF

SGA facilitates absentee voting

Tide tops national poll

By William Evans and Sydney Holtzclaw The Crimson White

To facilitate voter turnout, the Student Government Association and other student organizations on campus are encouraging students to become registered voters for upcoming elections. Most college students, however, are seeking an education in a city that is not their hometown, and even for Tuscaloosa natives, class schedules or a lack of a convenient means of transportation may render students unable to attend official polling stations to cast their votes. Grant Cochran, vice president of external affairs, said the SGA has been working to

See VOTING, page 3

FAST FACTS 1. Applications for absentee ballots must be given in person or mailed to the Absentee Election Manager, usually the Circuit Clerk.

CW | Jessica Schall Freshman Stephanie Meadow practices at UA homecourse after Alabama Women’s Golf first win at Texas A&M. The Crimson Tide is ranked No. 1 for the first time in the University’s history. By Bobby Thompson Contributing Writer

ranked No. 1 in the Golf World/ NGCA Coaches’ Poll. This is the first time in the University’s history The Crimson Tide football team the team has been ranked No. 1. “Being ranked number one is a isn’t the only team at the Capstone at the top of their game. The UA confidence booster,” junior Brooke women’s golf team was recently Pancake said. “I am proud to be a

part of the first No. 1-ranked team the University has had.” Alabama earned the top spot by winning the NCAA Fall Preview and finishing sixth at the Mason Rudolph Women’s Championship on Sept. 26. Head

coach Mic Potter, who has turned the program around since coming from Furman University in 2004, said it is gratifying to see his program rise to the nation’s

2. Once a request for an absentee ballot has been granted, the ballot must be filled out along with an affidavit that must be signed by the voter in conjunction with a signature from two witnesses age 18 or older or a notary public. 3. A copy of both voter identification and personal identification must be sent.

Source: Secretary of State Beth Chapman’s website

See GOLF, page 3

BP rep talks crisis management Professors adapt to high enrollment By Brittney Knox Staff Reporter bsknox@crimson.ua.edu

By Ethan Summers Staff Reporter summers.ethan@gmail.com With enrollment topping 30,000, some students have begun to question if the University’s growth is helping or hurting their educations. However, many professors expressed mostly positive views of campus growth. Jennifer Greer, chairwoman of the department of journalism, said the growth isn’t hurting her program because of limits on class sizes. “One thing that I would point out is that a lot of the programs like ours, professional programs, tend to have limits on our class sizes,” Greer said. “So even though we have more students, our class sizes can’t change.” Greer said “skills classes” where more teacher-student interaction is needed for a student’s success have not suffered at all. The growth has only motivated faculty to become more imaginative. “We will still keep those class sizes small because le this

By Ethan Summers Staff Reporter summers.ethan@gmail.com

p

Please ec

r

• er

IF YOU GO ... • What: Student Health

The Student Government and Wellness Fair Association and Project Health are hosting the Student Health • Where: Ferguson Stuand Wellness Fair today at the dent Center Ferguson Student Center. The fair itself is free to stu• When: 10 a.m. to 2 dents, and this year’s fair p.m. focuses on a total approach to health, said Michelle Harcrow, injury, but a proactive effort. advisor for Project Health. Harcrow said health isn’t She listed health as having just the lack of ailments or six focuses: physical, mental,

emotional, spiritual, social and environmental. “To have a balance in all six of those areas is what makes a person truly healthy,” Harcrow said. Harcrow said a financial approach to health would be included in this year’s fair, including an hour-long program about financial awareness and responsibility. “We actually address the financial area of health and we’re going to be offering the ‘Financial Peace for the

INSIDE today’s paper

er •

Plea s

yc rec

See CLASSES, page 2

See BP, page 3

CW | Jonathan Norris BP spokesman Ray Melick speaks to the Public Relations Student Society of America about his experiences with the BP oil spill.

Health and Wellness Fair teaches students

ap

e

we have to keep our accreditation in place,” Greer said. “We have to come up with creative ways of doing that.” Greer gave JN 311, reporting, as an example. More students need the class, but the college doesn’t have the resources to offer more sections, so Greer and the program restructured the class to a lecture and multiple labs. In those labs, students can receive the one-on-one interaction they need to develop their writing skills, while still learning the lecture material in the larger class section. Greer said graduate assistants play a large part in the department’s handling of the growing student body. Graduate assistants often come with real world media experience, Greer said. They bring new life and updated information to a department where some professors have been out of the media workforce, at least full time, for many years. The struggling economy is another reason Greer said

BP spokesman Ray Melick spoke to the Public Relations Student Society of America on Tuesday about his experience in crisis public relations during the oil spill response. “I wanted to make sure that we were the first people that the news media talked to,” he said. “We knew if we missed that deadline then we weren’t going to be a part of the story.” He said the news media was contacting him 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and BP tried to be very accessible to the media during that time. “We feel that BP’s reputation

will be restored as the coast is restored,” he said. Meg Watson, vice president for PRSSA, said she was very grateful that Melick agreed to speak to the students about his experiences in public relations. “I got his contact information from our state president of PRSSA, and he was gracious enough to come to talk to the students. “A lot of our members are interested in crisis public relations,” she said. Gigi Eyre, a freshman majoring in journalism, said she was very surprised to hear some of the things in the speech. “He talked about some of the

P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-4116 | Advertising: 348-7845 | Classifieds: 348-7355 Letters, op-eds: letters@cw.ua.edu Press releases, announcements: news@cw.ua.edu

Briefs ........................2

Puzzles......................7

Opinions ...................4

Classifieds .................7

Lifestyles....................5

Sports .......................8

Next Generation’ program,” Harcrow said. She said the program began Sept. 29 and continues through Nov. 19. Jackie Parks, Harcrow’s assistant and a graduate assistant with the health information and wellness, handled making arrangements with vendors for the fair. “We are having some really great vendors coming to the fair,” Parks said. “We are trying to get a good variety to be

See HEALTH, page 3

WEATHER today Clear

77º/43º

Thursday Clear

81º/50º

ycle

this pa

p


ON THE GO Page 2• Wednesday, October 6, 2010

EDITORIAL • Victor Luckerson, editor-in-chief, editor@cw.ua.edu • Jonathan Reed, managing editor, jonathanreedcw@gmail.com • Brandee Easter, print production editor • Marcus Tortorici, multimedia editor • Will Tucker, news editor, newsdesk@cw.ua.edu • Kelsey Stein, lifestyles editor • Jason Galloway, sports editor • Tray Smith, opinions editor • Adam Greene, chief copy editor • Emily Johnson, design editor • Brian Pohuski, graphics editor • Jerrod Seaton, photo editor • Brian Connell, web editor • Marion Steinberg, community manager

ADVERTISING • Dana Andrzejewski, Advertising Manager, 348-8995, cwadmanager@gmail.com • Drew Gunn, Advertising Coordinator, 348-8044

ON THE MENU LAKESIDE Lunch Buttermilk Fried Chicken Linguini with Roasted Red Peppers Mashed Potatoes Seasoned Peas Broccoli Quiche (Vegetarian) Dinner Linguini with Roasted Red Peppers Country Comforts Pot Roast Macaroni and Cheese Seasoned Carrots Eggplant Sub (Vegetarian)

BURKE Lunch Meatloaf Herb-Roasted Potatoes Seasoned Peas Seasoned Carrots Overstuffed Potato Vegan Scampi (Vegetarian)

• Jessica West, Zone 3, 348-8735 • Brittany Key, Zone 4, 348-8054 • Robert Clark, Zone 5, 348-2670 • Emily Richards, Zone 6, 3486876 • Amy Ramsey, Zone 7, 348-8742 • Elizabeth Howell, Zone 8, 3486153 • Caleb Hall, Creative Services Manager, 348-8042 The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The advertising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published four times weekly when classes are in session during Fall and Spring Semester except for the Monday after Spring Break and the Monday after Thanksgiving, and once a week when school is in session for the summer. Marked calendar provided. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 354032389. The Crimson White is entered as periodical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright Š 2010 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hireâ€? and “Periodical Publicationâ€? categories of the U.S. copyright laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

What: Brown Bag Lecture featuring Dr. Rachel Raimist - “Put Your Lens Where My Eye Can See: Feminist Media Praxis�

Where: 308 Manly Hall When: Noon – 1 p.m.

What: Student Health &

What: SGA and OfďŹ ce of

What: Lester Van Winkle: CrĂŁving exhibition

Dean of Students present Scholarship, Societies & Services for freshmen and transfer students

Where: 103 Garland Hall, Sarah Moody Gallery of Art

Where: Heritage Room in

When: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

the Ferguson Center (3rd Floor)

What: Capstone International Coffee Hour Where: 121 B. B. Comer

What: Bama Sideline Ap-

Hall

parel Sale

Plaza and SUPe Store Lobby

When: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

BRYANT

What: Performance by Trio de Llano

Where: Moody Concert Hall

When: 5:30 p.m.

FRESH FOOD

FRIDAY

When: 7:30 p.m.

Where: University Union

Lunch Baked Chicken Beef tips with Noodles Saffron Basmati Rice Mexican Corn Alfredo Tri-Pepper (Vegetarian)

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

Wellness Fair

When: 11:30 a.m. – 1

Where: Tutwiler Hall When: 6 a.m. – 4 p.m.

p.m.

What: Alabama Soccer vs. #7 Florida

What: 2nd Annual Recovering Black Women’s Voices and Lives Symposium – “Black Women as Public Intellectuals: Past, Present, and Future�

Where: Alabama Soccer Stadium

When: 7 – 9 p.m.

Where: Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library

Chipotle-Glazed Pork Lion Fresh Seasoned Collard Greens Macaroni and Cheese Overstuffed Potato Sweet and Sour Tofu (Vegetarian)

Submit your events to calendar@cw.ua.edu

When: 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

ON CAMPUS

2010-2011 housing application available The housing application for 2011-2012 is now available online. To access the application, please go to housing. ua.edu and click on Apply for Housing. In order to be eligible for campus housing for next year, students must complete this application between Oct. 1, 2010 and Feb. 1, 2011.

Homecoming T-Shirts for sale

Only the housing application can be completed at this time. The contract and deposit cannot be submitted until February 3-14, 2011. You will only be allowed to submit your $250.00 deposit if the university can guarantee that you will receive campus housing.

CLASSES

demand keeps faculty employed full time. Continued from page 1 “I see it as a real positive in this economy,â€? Greer said. “I the growth has been good for have friends at other universithe University. With more stu- ties‌ that are on furloughs. I dents, the department has to talk to colleagues; people are meet a growing demand. That just amazed at how lucky we

Anderson Society Homecoming T-Shirts are $10, payable by cash or check. T-shirts are available at a table in the Ferguson Center from Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. You may also purchase T-shirts directly from Anderson Society members. The sale ends Oct. 20. The Anderson Society is a senior leadership honorary that recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to UA.

are. I don’t think it’s luck. I think it’s some really smart planning on the part of our president and our Provost.� The growth and its challenges haven’t been limited to one side of campus or one college. David Nikles, a professor

DIRECTV SPECIAL OFFER!

• Hallett Ogburn, Territory Manager, 348-2598 • Emily Frost, National Advertising/ Classifieds, 348-8042

ON THE CALENDAR

Packages Start at

29

$

99

mo.

800-971-9041 DIRECTSTARTV An Authorized DIRECTV Dealer

With 24-month agreement. Offer ends 2/9/11. Credit card required (except in MA & PA). New approved customers only (lease required). Other conditions apply. Call for details.

Cuba study abroad registration deadline approaching Registration closes Oct. 15 for undergraduate students to study in Havana, Cuba, in spring 2011. Students can earn 12-15 semester hours. Minimal Spanish is required. The study includes field experiences, round-table discussions with Cuban citizens and historical excursions. For more information e-mail Dr. Michael Schnepf at mschnepf@bama.ua.edu.

of chemistry at the University since 1990, said while enrollment has increased, the chemistry department responded by offering more sections and scaling back class sizes. “At that time I had 250 to 300 students in my general chemistry classes,� Nikles said. “Now, the size of the lecture hall limits the class size to less than 200. This was done on purpose to limit the class size. “When classes meet their limits, the chemistry department generally offers more sections.� Nikles said increasing faculty to keep pace with the student body is an unrealistic expectation. “We have hired faculty at a lower rate than the rate of increase in the number of students,� Nikles said. “This is prudent, since it is important that we are careful about hiring high quality faculty. This is a slow task that we take very seriously.� Nikles also said the growth has brought higher quality students and needed funding to the University, allowing for a

better education. “The Provost and my dean are working with the faculty to find substantive ways to improve instruction,� Nikles said. “They have invested heavily into technology, including e-Learning, online access to library resources and putting technology into the classroom. With increased enrollment comes increased financial resources to pay for these investments.� Both Greer and Nikles said they consider the growth, overall, to be very positive and manageable. “Despite the tremendous growth in enrollment, I find I have as much time as ever to spend with my students,� Nikles said. “I have never turned away a student who has come to my office seeking help.� Greer said, “The bottom line is, I’m not going say it hasn’t presented challenges, but overall it has been a really good thing for the University and most faculty realize that. So we just work to do whatever we can to make sure we don’t sacrifice quality.�

AUCTION

PEOPLES BANK OF ALABAMA

5 Auction Events Sponsored by Peoples Bank of Alabama Â’>`]^S`bWSaW\QZcRW\UEObS`T`]\b@SaWRS\bWOZ6][Sa :]baO$ÂąOQ`SVc\bW\UbW[PS`ZO\R^`]^S`bg Q][[S`QWOZ^`]^S`bWSaÂ’;O\gASZZW\U/Pa]ZcbSÂ’DWaWb our website for more property details

WWW.JPKING.COM 800.558.5464

Come join us!

ASSET DIVISION

[October 9th, 12th, 14th]

J. P. King Auction Company, Inc. #16959; J. King #354; Bryan Knox #1587

The Children’s Hospital of Alabama is seeking stories from former patients treated during the years 1930-1990. Stories can be submitted in writing at the website www.childofchildrens.org or by letter to: Garland Stansell 1600 7th Avenue South Birmingham, AL 35233

www.alagulfcoastchamber.com


The Crimson White

NEWS

Wednesday, Octoer 6, 2010

3

Campaigns begin for homecoming queen election By William Evans Senior Staff Reporter wjevans@crimson.ua.edu

Homecoming queen candidates met Monday evening in the Ferguson Center to discuss campaigning guidelines and regulations. CadeAnn Smith, the homecoming director over halftime and reception and a senior majoring in criminal justice and political science, said the candidates must follow the guidelines set forth in the Homecoming Red Book. She said a link for the Red

VOTING Continued from page 1

bypass these hindrances to voter turnout by declaring the importance of voter registration and the use of absentee ballots. “The SGA is publicizing the importance of voting in order to get more students to vote absentee,” Cochran said. “We are also holding a registration drive from now until Oct. 23. Forms are located in the SGA office.” Cochran said Oct. 23 is the last day to register for voting, but because absentee ballots must be requested prior to the election, timing is especially important. Students can cast ballots for Tuscaloosa elections if they register to vote, Cochran added. “Because students are in

GOLF

Continued from page 1

top spot. “We are happy to have been voted No. 1 in the coaches’ poll,” he said. “It is nice to see others recognizing where we have come from and what we have done. The ranking will also help our chances at recruiting.” The Tide is determined to stay focused and continue to play well throughout the season. “Being No. 1 is just a number, but it is a good indicator for us,” senior Camilla Lennarth said. “It lets us know we are working on

HEALTH Continued from page 1

able to give our students.” Parks said the fair would address physical health by hosting the Student Health Center and offering flu shots. The shots cost $20 but are charged to a student account. Parks said T-Town PAWS is scheduled to attend. “T-Town PAWS is coming to do some overall advertising for a walk they’re doing,” Parks said. “They’re going to be bringing a couple of animals to the fair and trying to promote exercising with your animals.” Parks said the mental health focus would have counselors from the Women’s Resource

Book can be found at homecoming.ua.edu. Kelli Knox-Hall, convener of the elections board, said the campaign guidelines follow the same rules as the ones set forth during the spring election of Student Government Association executives. Knox-Hall said no University emblems or logos, including depictions of Big Al, can be used for campaign materials. “Just keep it simple,” KnoxHall said. Knox-Hall said candidates cannot chalk within 25 feet of the entrance to buildings, and

no one can campaign inside of a building. “All campaigning has to be done outside,” she said. “You’re not allowed to solicit votes inside of a building.” She said the candidates have to submit a financial disclosure form that tracks all campaign spending and contributions. The campaign-spending limit for each candidate is $250, and receipts for any expenditure must be attached to the bottom of the form, Knox-Hall said. Knox-Hall said the candidates must meet some minimum requirements before

Tuscaloosa over half of the year, they can help vote for candidates and decisions that will affect their immediate community,” Cochran said. “The more students involved, the better.” CadeAnn Smith, president of College Republicans, said absentee voting helps to repair the disconnect that may develop between out-of-town students and Tuscaloosa politics. “It’s important to absentee vote because most students are more interested and familiar with their hometown candidates rather than those of Tuscaloosa,” Smith said. “I think some students see Tuscaloosa as a city that they’re visiting and they have trouble connecting to local candidates.” Smith said students should contact their hometown courthouse to learn how to become

registered for absentee voting. “It does take some time to get your request processed and then send you the ballot, so it would need to be done soon,” Smith said. “I know from personal experience when voting in the primary this summer, it took quite a bit longer than I expected.” Michael Patrick, president of College Democrats, said absentee voting will impact local elections. “I’m not sure if absentee voting will play a large role in the gubernatorial election, but in local elections, it may be more important,” Patrick said. Patrick said students can stop by the SGA office to have a representative help them fill out the requisite voter registration forms, and the SGA will also turn in those forms to the appropriate office.

the right things and moving in the right direction.” “Nothing really matters until the national championships and SEC championships at the end of May. What we can do now is continue to work hard and improve our game,” Potter said. One way the Tide can continue to play well and hold its’ ranking is discipline during practice. “We have worked individually to improve our game, and everyone wants to play better at each event,” Pancake said. At practice, the Tide has been working on a number of aspects in order to ensure the players are performing to the best of

their ability. “As a team we have been working on our putting and short game,” Lennarth said. “We have also been playing scrimmages a lot lately, which is good. When you are playing on the course is when you really learn.” Putting is an important aspect of the game that they are looking to improve. “We shot better at our first tournament than we did at our second, but we scored worse at the first tournament because of our putting,” Potter said. The Tide shot 15-under in the first tournament and only 5-under in the second.

Center and the counseling center present for students to speak with. A large focus of the fair is substance abuse, Parks said. As a health threat, it’s common among college students. “The West Alabama Narcotics Task Force has a lot of really awesome pictures of people that have done meth or who has a meth house,” Parks said. “It’s a really big awareness for drug and alcohol abuse.” LessThanUThink, a campusbased alcohol awareness program, will also be present. Griffith Waller, one of the founders of the LTUT campaign, stressed the program’s focus on awareness, not prohibition. “Instead of using scare

tactics, the LTUT campaign focuses on here-and-now effects of binge-drinking, like calling an ex or forgetting to close one’s credit card at a bar,” Waller said. “It should not be confused with an anti-drinking campaign.” For students looking for a few minutes of relaxation, Parks said massage therapists would be giving free five-minute massages. Both Parks and Harcrow said the focus of the fair is really on making healthy choices. “It’s about making healthy decisions,” Parks said. “It’s a really great fair, and it’s fun. People are giving away free stuff. The booths have awesome and fun ways to make you learn.”

5 SUNBED TANS

20

$

00

ENJOY 5 SILVER LEVEL TANNING SESSIONS FOR JUST $20 OR GET $20 OFF ANY FIRST MONTH OF PALM BEACH TAN PREMIER P.. REWARDS UNLIMITED TANNING MEMBERSHIP.

UNIVERSITY

205-345-8912

1 T-02331 10-P

1130 UNIVERSITY BLVD., STE B-7. B (NEXT TO PUBLIX)

campaigning for homecoming queen. Candidates, for instance, must be enrolled full-time as students at the University, have a minimum of a 2.5 GPA, have 64 credit hours earned at the University and have a sponsorship from a recognized student organization. She said candidates will be held responsible for any violations of campaign rules, such as having members chalk in the Ferguson Plaza or campaigning on their behalf inside of any building. Knox-Hall said, the

BP

Continued from page 1

things that the media took out of context in some instances,” she said. “It really made me think about the power that the media has to shape the public’s perceptions. “I am from Baldwin County that is about 30 minutes away from the Gulf where the oil spill took place and the affects were not as significant to my family, but probably affected people closer to the shore,” Eyre said. She said her family became more cautious with the seafood that they ate, but she feels some of the things regarding the oil spill were blown out of proportion. “This made me think more about what I automatically “It has all come down to putting, so we have to get more consistent around the greens as the season goes on,” Potter said. The team’s greatest strength this season is their collective work ethic. “Our work ethic is unprecedented,” Potter said. “It is better than any other team I have ever been around. I have to make the players leave practice because they work so hard.” A strong determination to succeed will be necessary this season. The Tide has a tough schedule ahead of them.

candidates have to submit any campaign materials, such as stickers, that will be passed out to students so that the Elections Board can keep those materials on file. Smith said the top five candidates after the election will be invited to a party at the President’s Mansion that precedes the homecoming football game against Ole Miss. The parents of the top five candidates will have free seats at the game, Smith said. She said the top five candidates will meet Oct. 14, on Butler Field to rehearse for the

crowning of the homecoming queen at halftime, and each one must bring what they plan to wear Saturday to ensure that the clothing is conservative. The queen is crowned at halftime of the homecoming football game. Sydney Page, a freshman majoring in history and political science, said she believes the homecoming queen election is done for the sake of tradition. “I don’t think there’s a set purpose,” Page said. “It’s just done to continue a tradition.”

believe when I hear it on television, and that it may not be the full truth,” she said. Melick spoke to students about what it was like to be a public relations officer during this time, and how he was brought in after the disaster had occurred. “We wanted to give the news media accessibility and bring some of the news local and not just focus solely on national news outlets such as CNN,” he said. The beaches are now supposedly clean, but tar marts are expected to wash up during storms. Melick also addressed the role social networking websites played in this crisis. “Social media is a huge impact on what we are doing,” he said. “We are really into Facebook chat to stay in tune with what is

being said.” He also addressed the fake Twitter account, BPGlobalPR, that was being run by a man that was not affiliated with the company during the time of the oil spill. “We did see the account and really there was nothing we could do about it,” he said. “We did not address it directly, but we did try to counter it and get people to understand certain issues.” Amanda Coppock, president of PRSSA said, “I was really excited to hear the speech and the efforts of BP as a whole to bring in a spokesperson to be more local. “Our organization tries to bring in speakers that are very interesting to talk about a variety of things so there are so many different facets of public relations,” she said.

“All the tournaments we play ue to succeed for the remainder in are big tournaments,” Potter of the season,” Pancake said. said. “These tournaments all have the best teams in the country. We need to be competitive in every one. If you want to win the national championship, you need to be in tough competitions time after time in order to get accustomed to winning in those situations.” The Tide hopes to continue playing well in the Tar Heel Invitational this weekend. “We hope to play well in all our upcoming tournaments, and we are confident we will contin-


OPINIONS

Elections need more regulation

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 Editor • Tray Smith letters@cw.ua.edu Page 4

{ YOUR VIEW } DO YOU THINK PARKING HAS IMPROVED?

“It hasnʼt really improved, and you have to walk a ridiculously long way because the buses take forever.” - Laura Allen, freshman, journalism

“It hasnʼt really changed. The commuter lots are far away, but I havenʼt even tried to use the buses because itʼs more of a hassle than anything else.” - Steven Skavdahl, senior, political science

EDITORIAL BOARD Victor Luckerson Editor Jonathan Reed Managing Editor Tray Smith Opinions Editor Adam Greene Chief Copy Editor

WE WELCOME YOUR OPINIONS Letters to the editor must be less than 300 words and guest columns less than 800. Send submissions to letters@ cw.ua.edu. Submissions must include the author’s name, year, major and daytime phone number. Phone numbers are for verification and will not be published. Students should also include their year in school and major. For more information, call 348-6144. The CW reserves the right to edit all submissions.

By Wesley Vaughn

MCT Campus

Campus shouldn’t be burnt by smoking debate By Danielle Beach Smoking is no private affair on The University of Alabama’s campus; a stroll around the Quad or down The Strip is proof enough. A swell of opinions have surfaced, with some for and some against a total smoke-free campus policy. Instead of completely banning smoking on campus, other measures should be taken to protect the rights of smokers while keeping the lungs of non-smokers pink and free of second-hand smoke. Although smoking is inevitably harmful to smokers and victims of second-hand smoking alike, a complete ban of smoking on campus interferes with an individual’s right to the pursuit of happiness. While it may be difficult to find happiness when your body becomes more susceptible to otherwise rare diseases or can no longer fight off the common cold, the euphoric buzz and alleviation of anxiety may be all the happiness one can muster during a stressful day. Currently, 22.1 percent of the adult population in Alabama smokes, which is above the national average. The University simply cannot completely ban a stress-reducer on a college campus (where stress is just as prevalent as Nike Tempo shorts) and not expect a little turbulence. Instead, measures must be taken to educate and encourage, as well as protect the rights of all persons affiliated with the institution; rumor has it that those are the objectives of education administration, anyway. To protect the rights of

individuals to breathe healthy air if they so choose, the University could develop a fair and balanced policy that benefits as many people as possible. However, providing a policy that is easy to abide by, as well as to regulate, may pose problems that outweigh the benefits. One such policy may be, in short, to prohibit smoking in heavily populated areas, inside or within proximity of buildings, residential areas, and outdoor eating areas (e.g. the Ferguson Center). UA is said to already have a policy that discourages smoking within 30 feet of buildings, but a walk to and from class on any given day suggests a lack of enforcement. Anyway, this policy eliminates the opportunity to smoke in the majority of areas on campus. Setting boundaries and providing areas that are properly ventilated, yet convenient and easily accessible, is a more controversial, if not impossible, task of its own. As a non-smoker, I can honestly say that when I walk past a person smoking on my way to class or to work, I have to hold my breath because the smoke makes me sick to my stomach. I can understand the allure of cigarettes (who doesn’t want a quick fix for stress?), but I’m already addicted to clean air. Though the withdrawal symptoms of clean air greatly surpass those of carcinogen-filled air, I’m still not in favor of the negative effects of second-hand smoking. The peaceful coexistence of smokers and non-smokers will not occur unless both parties make an effort to understand the other person’s point of view.

With proper research and distribution of data, the administration can provide both students and faculty with appropriate information regarding smoking and its effects. Emphasis should be placed on effective methods to quit smoking, stress and anxiety management and the effects of secondhand smoking. People who earnestly want to quit smoking should be provided with the support, information and resources to do so. Those who do not wish to quit smoking should be considerate and mindful of those who do not smoke, and they should consequently only smoke in well-ventilated, less-populated areas. Likewise, non-smokers need to respect the rights of smokers while maintaining their own; if a person is smoking in a public area near someone who does not smoke, the non-smoker can politely ask the smoker to refrain from doing so. Even if they continue smoking out of spite of your request, know that they are of the minority and that most people who smoke will kindly oblige. Ultimately, instead of relying on the administration to enforce a policy, it’s up to each student, educator, staff member, Tuscaloosa resident, and anyone else on campus to consider his or her fellow Capstonian’s health and rights before acting. No matter what your stance is on the smoke-free campus debate, don’t allow it to pollute the positive atmosphere we strive for at UA — or the air itself. Danielle Beach is a freshman majoring in education.

Admit or fix inefficient internet By John Anselmo To whom it may concern: please let UA students and faculty know if we are going to have access to somewhat dependable public wireless Internet. If we can have access to dependable wireless Internet, that would be great. That is what most students were told they would have when they first enrolled. If not, just tell us through the UA news e-mail, the monitors speckled across campus, or even send a press release in this newspaper. This way students won’t have to play library hopscotch trying to find a place where they can access their coursework. Just let us know; we will adjust when forced to do so. Sure, adjusting to the parking quagmire we came back to this semester was tough. But after all of the sweat and dust, the walk from the gravel lot behind Publix can be very apt cardio exercise. If no changes are made to the UA Public Wireless Network and we will not be informed that we cannot depend on the network, then please change the name. Guess Connect, Luck Net and Tortoise Web would be appropriate. I will feel a lot more comfortable when I browse through available networks and see that their names reflect functionality.

Given the speed and functionality of the jokingly called “highspeed wireless network” we have here at the University, how are we supposed to be competent students in the 21st century? Now that the classroom and the web are in more than a marriage, we need to have access to the Internet that is actually capable of delivering. So should we stay in our rooms to do work until this is resolved? Sure, unless you live on campus. ResNet, which we all know is the residential wireless Internet access on campus, makes UA Public Wireless Internet look like the Daytona 500. I have no offers for changes in nomenclature for ResNet. Well, maybe McFarland-on-Gameday Net?? Last year, when I served as an SGA Senator, some colleagues and I authored a resolution calling for a student audit of the ResNet network. This survey would be a place where students could voice concerns about the wireless Internet across campus and in residential halls. Upon unanimous passage of the legislation, my colleagues and I went to work. Skeptically, we were forced to board the Bureaucratic Express, a roller coaster that would supposedly take us to the promised land, where student’s voices could be heard. But like all roller coasters, we arrived back were

we started with a case of nausea. Luckily, with the help of others in the SGA, we finally got a survey rolling. Did anyone that could do anything about it take heed to the replies of students? You take a guess. We have countless great resources here at Alabama, and so many great people were willing to help us. With all of the great resources and people, why can’t we have Internet that actually works for students and faculty? We need to just stop asking and start demanding that we have access to Internet that is applicable to our needs as students. If we want to go back to the 1980s pen and paper days, then fine. Just start the process to moving our coursework offline and back to loose-leaf paper and typewriters. We all know that is not the direction we want to. The Capstone has moved at light year speed towards becoming one of the nation’s finest higher learning institutions. However, students and faculty need dependable wireless Internet infrastructure to do their everyday jobs. The Capstone just needs to focus on this issue and formulate a resolution. And form it at a highspeed pace. John Anselmo is a senior majoring in economics.

Structure determines properties. Two years of high school chemistry will drill that scientific fact into you, along with the formula PV=nRT. It is as true in science as it is in government. Electing different government officials temporarily improves the quality of government, but changing its structure can be permanent. On Monday, federal officials arrested 11 Alabama casino owners, state legislators and lobbyists stemming from an investigation of gambling-related vote buying. This state’s susceptible political structure opened the door to such corrupt officials and behavior. The state government has failed to target ethics reform in the past, and it paid the price this week. Even innocently outdated and seemingly harmless structural problems can cause major headaches. Searching for these sorts of lapses and fixing them before a monumental collapse is prudent and worthwhile. As with all large organizations, this university’s structure contains snags as well. Not to the extent as those faced in Montgomery, but they need fixing just the same. The particular area I would like to address here involves SGA elections. Currently, the regulatory body is the Elections Board, which is made up of recommended students, a political science professor and administrative directors and representatives. It is basically the Federal Election Commission for the SGA. My qualm is with its puzzling placement within the Student Affairs division of the University. The head administrative directors of the board primarily serve as directors of the Ferguson Center, which falls under the Housing and Residential Communities branch of Student Affairs. The other administrator represents Student and Campus Life, which also falls under the housing branch. Moving the Elections Board to the Student Involvement and Leadership branch of Student Affairs makes much more sense. Elections are no longer held at the Ferg since they are now held online; thus, restructuring is necessary. Ferg directors have other responsibilities that do not directly relate with students anyway. Bringing in directors that are already involved with students in SGA will allow for better communication and will lessen the Ferg’s burden. Since the SGA Constitution and Code of Laws do not outline specific election procedures, the Elections Board is tasked with handling the yearly election guidelines. Unless the board has contact with the student body, proactive changes cannot be made. Also, directors from a more student-oriented branch can set their priorities to manage election season more effectively. If a candidate for office does not feel as though reporting a campaign dispute or potential violation will amount to any action, the board loses its purpose. Having directors who already have a relationship with students works to alleviate that disconnect. This may resemble a small point of contention, and it is. However, the small issues add up after enough of them are dismissed for their supposed unimportance. Bigger issues are more visible and carry more weight, but the smallest strains can hamstring large reforms. Waiting until something is broken to fix it does not apply when that something may be broken but has gone unnoticed or forgotten. Contested SGA elections have occurred in past years, and reforms such as reducing voting time were implemented after the fact. More can be done though to prevent misconduct and the subsequent distrust in the election process. The structure of election regulation determines the properties of elections, which determine the quality of elected officials. The Elections Board may only matter a few times a year, but the effects of elections last the entire year. We should not wait until it is too late to demand reform.

Wesley Vaughn is a junior majoring in public relations and political science. His column runs on Wednesdays.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Students must show proper etiquette at football games By Erika Goodman

The Alabama vs. Florida game was the most stressful game I have been to in nearly four football seasons. This was not because of the score or the teams, but because of some people in the student section not understanding proper football etiquette. Since my freshman year, I have known that during the game everyone stands and shifts forward. I am not sure why people began standing in the seat they sit in during this game. This caused quite a bit of chaos. Some people were left without seats and having to stand in the aisles. It is common knowledge that everyone stands in the seat directly in front of them. If everyone would follow the same shifting pattern, it would make it much easier for everyone to watch the game. This has been the norm since I began school in 2007, and I am unsure of why it changed Saturday. Also, it is just rude to light a cigarette while waiting in line to enter the stadium, as well as smoking during the game. Students are packed in like sardines, which means smokers are literally smoking in other’s faces. There are smoking sections just for that purpose. It shows poor manners when having such a disregard for the people around you. Some people do not want their game ruined by your bad habit. I want this football season to be a memorable one, and I am sure that if everyone follows the same system, it will be for the rest of the students as well.

Erika Goodman is a senior majoring in journalism and political science.


By Stephanie Brumfield Staff Reporter snbrumfield@crimson.ua.edu After months of research, McNair scholar and art major Patricia Davis will show a series of mixed-media prints in the Ferguson Center Art Gallery. The exhibit, titled “INVASION — Representations of Cancer: Combining Medical and Military Metaphors,” runs from Oct. 5 through Oct. 29 and is one of several components of Davis’s required research as a McNair Scholar. Davis was one of 12 students selected to join the McNair Scholars Program last fall. The program, designed for firstgeneration or disadvantaged college students interested in going to graduate school, awards students a $2,800 research stipend, a $1,100 fellowship, fee waivers for graduate school admissions tests, a trip to California for the McNair research symposium and more. “Students have so many opportunities with the McNair Scholars Program,” Davis said. “We work closely with faculty and graduate student mentors to come up with a research proposal, and we work closely with them to complete it. We’re offered advice about graduate school, and we’re more competitive applicants because we already understand academic research.” Davis’s project examines the way we view cancer and the metaphors we use to describe it. “The way we talk about cancer is very militaristic,” she said. “We’re afraid of it, but we romanticize it, too. We did it with tuberculosis before we found a cure for it. Susan Sontag’s essay ‘Illness is Metaphor’ discusses these metaphors.”

{

}

“Watchmen” is an absurdly faithful adaptation of a dark graphic novel, with strong performances and top-notch direction. — Patricia Davis

Just as people use conflicting metaphors for disease in our speech, so do Davis’s prints. By overlaying the prints with drawing and painting techniques, she admits that each one is colorful and beautiful in its own way, but the prints also represent different body systems with different cancers. Military planes, tanks and missiles, with all insignia removed, interrupt the superficial beauty. They represent the invasive aspect of cancer, she said. Each print is a monotype print, meaning they cannot be reproduced, and each print has two numbers on it. The first represents the number of new cases of cancer that will develop by the end of the year; the second represents the number of people who will die of cancer by the end of the year. Pointing to the print representing the respiratory system, located on the wall farthest from the entrance to the gallery, Davis said, “I see this one as the sort of focal piece for the entire collection. It was the hardest for me to make. My mom died of lung cancer in 2007.” In this print, planes emerge out of the darkest spot of the lung, spilling out of the print and onto the wall. When her mom was diagnosed with cancer, Davis said she kept asking herself, “What is this thing that everyone is so terrified of?” and she started researching cancer to understand what was happening to her mom. “I’ve always been interested

in medicine. My mom was a phlebotomist, and I actually came to Alabama thinking I would go into the medical field. Then I started taking art classes and fell in love with printmaking,” she said. “I first started researching cancer as a coping mechanism, but with this project it’s grown to be so much more than that. I’ve turned my research and my art into something that’s not just personal to me. Other people can relate to it, too. Everyone knows someone who has cancer or who has died of cancer.” With cancer prevalent in her family, Davis said her research has been a learning process and a way for her to conquer the disease. “I don’t want to be afraid of this disease,” she said. “People don’t want to go to the doctor when they think something might be wrong, and they wait until it’s too late. Technology has come so far in recent years for that.” At the exhibit’s opening reception on Thursday night, which starts at 7 and lasts until 8:30, Davis said she will be giving people cards so they can e-mail her and give her feedback about her artwork. After the exhibit, Davis’ focus Photo courtesy of Rachel Dobson will be on writing the profes- McNair Scholar Patricia Davis, a junior majoring in printmaking, sional research article that will works on one of her prints for her exhibit, currently displayed in accompany her artwork. She the Ferguson Center Art Gallery. hopes to have it published in the McNair Scholars Journal. By fall of 2011, Davis hopes to be working on her MFA in printmaking and continue the art that she has begun.

Get all your campus news at

Page 5 • Wednesday, October 6, 2010 Editor • Kelsey Stein kmstein@crimson.ua.edu

LIFESTYLES this weekend WEDNESDAY • “An Enemy of the People:” 7:30 p.m., Rowand-Johnson Hall

Avanti Team 2011 Why will you choose to

C W. U A. E D U

LIFESTYLES

McNair scholar displays artwork



%

?

If you’re into the Game, Get into the Shirt

Available now at the Ferguson Center, Tutwiler Hall, and Bryant Museum locations. Also available online:

ZZZ VXSHVWRUH XD HGX ZZZVXSHVWRUHXDHGX

Applications Due 10-11-2010 www.orientation.ua.edu/ Avanti


6

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

LIFESTYLES

The Crimson White

Moundville Festival, a jewel in your backyard By Alex Cohen Staff Reporter accohen@crimson.ua.edu

Should Alabamians be jealous of Egyptians? Archaeology buffs might say yes. After all, the Great Pyramid of Giza, the only one of the seven wonders of the ancient world still standing, is in their backyard. What about Alabama’s backyard? What about the University’s backyard? If students are willing to explore, they’ll find the answer 15 miles down Highway 69. The Moundville Archaeological Park preserves what was once the apex of Mississippian culture. From Wednesday, Oct. 6 to Saturday, Oct. 9 the park will host its 22nd annual Moundville Native American Festival. On Wednesday and Thursday, the festivities will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday’s festivities will last until 5 p.m. Students who attend can

expect to learn specifically about Southeastern Native American culture. “We started the festival in 1989 because we wanted to dispel the stereotypes people had about Native Americans,” said Betsy Irwin, the park’s education outreach coordinator and festival director. “Most perceptions of Native Americans are products of powwows – a lot of different customs merged together. The Southeast has a distinctly different culture.” The goal of the festival is to accurately and comprehensively portray an 800-year-old Mississippian culture. This week, students can see this goal achieved through living historians, musical performances, arts and crafts demonstrations, and storytellers. “In our living history camp, the tents are very close to how they were at that time,” Irwin said. “We’ll have many reproductions from the time period.

IF YOU GO ... • What: Moundville Native American Festival • Where: The Moundville Archaeological Park

• When: Oct 6. - Oct. 9 • Cost: $10 for adults, $8 for students [There’s a] fisherman who shows what fishing was like in the 1400s. Or you could visit Knapper’s corner where they make arrows and spear points, basically things guys like to play with.” People seeking theatrics on a larger scale can check out the Warriors of AniKituwah perform the Cherokee War Dance and Eagle Tail Dance. The dance group highlights Cherokee culture and

clothing, as well as the significance of the dances themselves. The warriors have performed in many places including the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Colonial Williamsburg and abroad in Berlin and Montreal. Some people prefer to learn about new cultures at their own pace. Attendees can also visit the park’s museum, the Jones Archaeological Museum. After a five million dollar renovation, many of the park’s employees contend Jones offers a unique museum experience. “At a lot of archaeological museums you see artifacts, think they’re really nice, but don’t really understand that much about the people,” Irwin said. “Our museum is about the people,” said Morgan Parsons, a museum docent and New College graduate. “You can truly immerse yourself in the culture.” The museum seeks to accurately depict a typical Mississippian of the time. Inside stand many life-sized figures of Native Americans. The figures cost $20,000 apiece and are not only life-like in size but also in appearance and form. “They look so real,” Irwin said. “They are staring at you.” The museum also tells the

Above: The Warriors of AniKituwah perform their traditional dances during a previous festival. Left: The museum at Moundville Archaeological Park exhibits many life-sized figures of Native Americans and other artifacts. Submitted photos

Mississippians’ story through their artifacts. The Moundville Duck Bowl, considered by some to be the most important prehistoric artifact in the country, is on loan from the Smithsonian. The Rattlesnake Disk, Alabama’s official state artifact, is another relic on display. The historical demonstrations and state-of-the-art museum are all attractive to the inexperienced tourist. Moundville frequenters agree that the reasons to visit the festival are more profound than arrowheads, wicker baskets, gift shops and cafes. “It was a spiritual mecca, and

it still is today,” Parsons said. Dan Townsend, a historical demonstrator of shell carving from Mississippian culture, has participated in the festival for the past 20 years. He hopes Alabama students attend the festival and take advantage of the park. “People just don’t realize the jewel they have in their backyard,” Townsend said. Admission to the festival is $10 for adults, $8 for students, and free for children under five. Volunteers are always needed. For more information visit moundville.ua.edu.


1, 2, & 3

SPORTS

Bedrooms NEWS

0LQXWHVIURP&DPSXV DQGWKH0DOOV 0RQLWRUHG6HFXULW\ 6\VWHP3URYLGHG  *DV/RJ)LUHSODFHV *DV)XUQLVKHG 3RROV )LWQHVV5RRP 7DQQLQJ%HGV palisadesapthomes.com 3201 Hargrove Road East Tuscaloosa, AL 35405 205-554-1977

Student Special: We will pay your mover up to $1,000 towards moving assistance. CAMPUS- Behind the University Strip. Small (IÂżFLHQF\ $SDUWPHQWV $300-350/ mo. Utilities LQFOXGHG/HDVHDQGGHSRVLW UHTXLUHG 1R SHWV Call 752-1277. MORRISON APARTMENTS 1 BDRM $495/ PRQWKDQG6WXGLR month half-way downWRZQDQG8$&DOO  WILLOW WYCK 2 bedURRP  EDWK SHUIHFW IRU URRPPDWHV ÂżYH PLQXWHV IURP &DPSXV 0RYH,Q 6SHFLDO 3UH OHDVLQJ $YDLODEOH   CAMPUS- EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS CamSXV (IÂżFLHQF\ $SDUWPHQWVQH[WGRRUWR3XEOL[ 6XSHUPDUNHW  PRQWK :DWHU LQFOXGHG &REEOHVWRQH &RXUW $SDUWPHQWV /HDVH  'HSRVLW UHTXLUHG QR pets. 205-752-1277 CAMPUS AREA APARTMENT 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, all new DSSOLDQFHV LQFOXGLQJ ZDVKHU  GU\HU 5HFHQWO\ UHQRYDWHG  a month with no deposit. $YDLODEOHQRZ&DOO   470-7512. BEAUTIFUL APARTMENT in University VilODJH3RROVWDQQLQJHWF $450/month. First month free! 251-370-7502 NEW 1&2BR APTS! *DWHG &RPPXQLW\ 1RZ 6LJQLQJ /HDVHV IRU -DQXDU\  6WDUWLQJ DW PR $IIRUGDEOH 6WXGHQW /LYLQJ $W ,WV %HVW

Mobile Homes & RV Lots for Rent Homes for Sale Low Down Payment! In House Financing Available

205-758-9553 3611 Rice Mine Road www.woodvillagemhp.com

!BARTENDING! $300/ DAY potential, no expeULHQFH QHFHVVDU\ 7UDLQLQJ SURYLGHG   ([W ATTENTION! DRIVER 7UDLQHHV QHHGHG QRZ    D ZHHN SOXV EHQH¿WV  +RPH ZHHNO\  GD\ &'/ WUDLQLQJ  $7'7   ATTN: DRIVERS! 7RS  SD\ ([FHOOHQW EHQH¿WV ODWHVW WHFKQRORJ\ 1HHG&'/$ PRQWKV UHFHQW 275   ZZZPHOWRQWUXFN FRP BOYD BROS. will treat \RX ULJKW )ULHQGO\ UHFUXLWHUV FDULQJ ÀHHW PDQDJHUV RSHQ FRPPXQLFDWLRQ3OXVWRSSD\ DQG HTXLSPHQW VLJQRQ ERQXV 7UDLQLQJ /3 DYDLODEOH   CDL-A DRIVERS: /RWV RI H[WUDV +LJK PLOHV  JUHDW SD\ 1HZ  )UHLJKWOLQHU &DVFDGLDV 3HUIRUPDQFH ERQXV

 VLJQRQ IRU Ă&#x20AC;DWEHG&'/$PR275 :HVWHUQ([SUHVV  5  DRIVERGREAT MILES! 1RWRXFKIUHLJKW 1R IRUFHG 1(1<&  PRQWKV 275 H[SHULHQFH1RIHORQ\'8,ODVW 5 years. Solos wanted. 1HZ WHDP SD\ SDFNDJHV  ZZZSWOLQFFRP 5  D R I V E R / C O M PA N Y / OWNER OPERATOR. 5HJLRQDO FRPSDQ\ GULYHUV VWDUW XS WR  FSP %HQHÂżWV 275 22ÂśV $1.17 loaded $0.90 empW\&'/$ZPRH[S  ZZZ WDQJRUWUDQVSRUWFRP DRIVERS CDL/A  VLJQRQ ERQXV 6WDUW XS WR  &30 Good home time and EHQHÂżWV 275 H[SHULHQFH UHTXLUHG 1R IHORQLHV /HDVH SXUFKDVH DYDLODEOH  [$/ 5  DRIVERS FOOD 7DQNHU 'ULYHUV QHHGHG 275 SRVLWLRQV DYDLODEOH 12:&'/$ZLWKWDQNHU UHTXLUHG 2XWVWDQGLQJ SD\  EHQHÂżWV &DOO D UHFUXLWHU 72'$<   ZZZRDNOH\WUDQVSRUWFRP DRIVERS EARN UP to PL +RPH ZHHNHQGV  \HDU 275 Ă&#x20AC;DWEHG H[S &DOO   3DP H[W  6XVDQ H[W  6XQEHOW 7UDQVSRUW//& 5  EARN $1000-$3200 A PRQWK WR GULYH RXU EUDQGQHZFDUVZLWKDGV SODFHG RQ WKHP ZZZ $G&DU'ULYHUFRP FLATBED DRIVERS! +RPHHYHU\ZHHN0RGHUQ HTXLSPHQW $YHUDJH ZHHNO\ SD\  3DLG YDFDWLRQ DQG KROLGD\V &'/$ ZLWK \U 77H[SHULHQFHUHTXLUHG       : 2 5 .    8 6  ZZZDYHULWWFDUHHUVFRP (2( HELP WANTED: +(/3 :$17('6WXGHQW(YHQW

$VVLVWDQW )ULHQGO\ DQG KHOSIXO VWXGHQWV QHHGHG to provide information DQGGLUHFWLRQVIRU*DPHGD\YLVWRUV0XVWEHDEOH WRZRUNIURPHDUO\PRUQLQJ XQWLO JDPH WLPH RQ football Gamedays for the rest of the season.  SHU KRXU 0XVW EH available for interview 2FW WK RU WK 9LVLW KWWSMREVXDHGX FOLFN u6WXGHQW $VVLVWDQWv IRU more information and to apply IT/DATA RESOURCES ANALYST 2IÂżFH RI WKH University Registrar. 7KLV SRVLWLRQ ZLOO VHUYH DV D EXVLQHVV LQWHOOLJHQFH %, DQDO\VWXVLQJ DQDO\VLV WRROV WR TXHU\ data repositories and JHQHUDWH UHSRUWV LQ VXSSRUW RI EXVLQHVV GHFLVLRQV 7KLV SRVLWLRQ ZLOO provide internal training RQ UHSRUWLQJ WRROV 64/ DQG RWKHU  ZLWKLQ WKH RIÂżFH 3URYLGH VHUYHU DQG VRIWZDUH VXSSRUW IRU YDULRXV V\VWHPV VXFK DV $675$ DQG 'HJUHH:RUNVDVZHOODVDVVLVW ZLWK PDLQWHQDQFH RI RIÂżFH ZHE SDJHV 0RQLWRU DQG SURFHVV VHFXULW\ UHTXHVWV IRU DFFHVV WR VWXGHQW GDWD &DQGLGDWH PXVW EH DEOH WR XQGHUVWDQG FRPSOH[ GDWD VWUXFWXUHV RQ GLVSDUDWH systems with the ability to perform data analyVLVUHSRUWLQJDQGTXDOLW\ FRQWURO $ PLQLPXP RI IRXU\HDUVRIH[SHULHQFH LQ WKLV DUHD LV UHTXLUHG &DQGLGDWH PXVW DOVR SRVVHVV D %DFKHORUÂśV GHJUHH LQ FRPSXWHU VFLHQFH PDQDJHPHQW information systems, RU FORVHO\ UHODWHG ÂżHOG $ 0DVWHUÂśV GHJUHH DQG NQRZOHGJH RI %DQQHU 6WXGHQW LV GHVLUHG 9LVLW HPSOR\PHQW RSSRUWXQLWLHV DW MREVXDHGX IRU more information and to DSSO\ 3RVLWLRQ FORVHV 2FWREHU(2( $$

text

TIDE

ERQXV RULHQWDWLRQ SD\ health/dental/vision/life/ GLVDELOLW\   N  &DOO  [  Shannon Swope, Royal 7UXFNLQJ &RPSDQ\  :HVW 3RLQW 06 ((2 employer.

Auctions

ACCEPTING ITEMS FOR RSHQ FRQVLJQPHQW DXFWLRQ WR EH 6DWXUGD\ 1RYHPEHU   9:00am. Many diversiÂżHG LWHPV DQG RQOLQH ELGGLQJIRUFHUWDLQLWHPV )RZOHU $XFWLRQ 7RQH\ $/ 0LFNH\ )RZOHU $/6/   ZZZIRZOHUDXFWLRQFRP AUCTION COMMERCIAL  5HVLGHQWLDO 3URSHUWLHV 2FWREHU  7KXUVGD\  DP +XH\WRZQ $ODEDPD Red Farmer Drive, adIKRAEJPK@=U MDFHQW WR DQG LQ IURQW RI L=UJKNAJPQJPEH the Wal-Mart Shopping &HQWHU *XDUDQWHHG ÂżJKRAI>AN3 QDQFLQJDIWHUGRZQ Call Today-Limited Time Offer payment on 20 year pay #  SHUFHQW $35 year balloon - 33   w/5 SOXVDFUHVWREHRIIHUHG   LQ SDUFHOV ZLWK  SDUFHO  VHOOLQJ DEVROXWH =RQHG   B3, sewer, great invest   ment. For more informa FREE Private Shuttle WLRQ DQG SDFNDJH FDOO Service to UA Fall 2010!!  5HGwww.LindseyManagement.com PRQW $XFWLRQ  /DQG Standard Text â&#x20AC;&#x153;greentuscâ&#x20AC;? to 47464 for more info! Rates Apply &R,QF(GGLH3URSVW$O  *Applies to New Leases Only *Call for Details. ESTATE AUCTION. Sat Professionally Managed by Lindsey Mgmt.Co.,Inc. NEW CAREER - &'/ 2FWDP)DUP7UDLQLQJ -REV DYDLODEOH LQJGDOH 7UDFH +DUSHUVLI TXDOLÂżHG &DOO WRGD\ YLOOH $/  0RYH VWDUW WRPRUURZ :,$ LQUHDG\EGEDEULFN 9$  5HKDE (6' 7'6 KRPH 0LONJODVV FDUQL//&  YDOJODVVMHZHOU\JXQV more! DFarmer 793, ZZZHVGVFKRROFRP NEW NORWOOD SAW- +HULWDJH 5HDOW\  $XFMILLS/XPEHU0DWH tion, www.heritagesales. 3UR KDQGOHV ORJV ´ GL- FRP

to

50501

205-342-3339

DPHWHU PLOOV ERDUGV ´ ZLGH $XWRPDWHG TXLFN F\FOHVDZLQJ LQFUHDVHV HIÂżFLHQF\ XS WR  www.norwoodsawmills. FRP1  ([W1 5  PERSONAL ASSISTANT 7KHUHLVDYDFDQF\ for a personal assistant LQ RXU FRPSDQ\ SOHDVH FRQWDFW VODPGHFRUKU# DROFRPIRUPRUHGHWDLOV S TU D E N TPAYOU TS. COM  3DLG 6XUYH\ 7DNHUV QHHGHG LQ 7XVFDORRsa. 100% FREE to join! &OLFNRQ6XUYH\V WANTED! EXPERIENCED 275 GULYHUV Ă&#x20AC;DWYDQRZQHURSHUDWRUV ZHOFRPH  \HDU YHULÂżDEOH 275 H[SHULHQFH OLNH WR ZRUN LQ D WHDP oriented environment, WUDYHO  VWDWHV  &DQada, home time - no +D]0DW)ODWVHDUQXSWR

=HPGMBF>

 SPYDQ HDUQV XS

NEED TO ADVERTISE WR  SP LQFOXGLQJ FOR VWDWHZLGH"  $/$6&$1 assessorial pay-tarp/layFDQ SODFH \RXU ZRUG HWF  &HOO breaking RYHUGHWHQWLRQ ad in 121 newspapers UHLPEXUVHPHQW VLJQ RQ

DFURVV$ODEDPDIRURQO\  DGGLWLRQDO ZRUGV    0DNH RQH FDOO 9<N9F;=LA;C=LKGFK9D=2)9Eafml]DAN=Kmhhgjlaf_ WR WKLV QHZVSDSHU D SDUWLFLSDWLQJ $/$6&$1 KmkYf?&Cge]f>gjL`];mj]$DY\a]k?]fld]e]f2L`]Jgddaf_Klgf]k PHPEHU WRÂżQGRXWKRZ >dYk`ZY[clg)1/*$:]Ymlql`]:]YklKaf_%9dgf_=n]fl$L`]Kgmf\ g^Emka[Kaf_%9dgf_=n]fl$L`]=pgj[akl<aj][lgjk;ml=n]fl$L`]E=L easy it is to advertise Gh]jYK]ja]k VWDWHZLGH 5  D]_]f\kg^l`] 9dh`YGe]_Y% H?! PUBLIC AUCTION 150+ ))2+-)2-(,2)(/2(-12+( WUDYHO WUDLOHUV  FDPS ?mYj\aYfk%+< H?! J]ka\]fl=nad29^l]jda^] KRXVHV 2QOLQH ELGGLQJ ))2-(*2+--2(-/2+-)(2(%+< J! DYDLODEOH  1R PLQLPXP D]_]f\kg^l`] )*2)(*2---2+(02)()(2+SULFH 6DW 2FWREHU  ?mYj\aYfk H?! L`]Lgof J! DP3KLODGHOSKLD06 )2)(+2-(.2,(12()2*(,2+(/2+()(2*Z Z Z K H Q G H U V R Q D X F - OYddKlj]]l2Egf]q WLRQVFRP  F]n]j H?%)+! LYc]jk H?%)+! 06/LF)LUP )*2+()2--+2,(-2*-/2)( )*2((*2,--2*(/2--)(2+( /LF) 02+-)(2)( <]nad H?%)+!

Â&#x2122;Ă´*Âą*Â&#x2122;Ă´* M Ă´Â&#x2122;Ă˝Â&#x152; UÂ&#x2020;w CÂ&#x201D;xxÂ&#x2039;Â&#x2014;uÂ?Â&#x201D;Â? ZÂ?tw

CHERRY BEDROOM SET- Solid wood, never XVHG QHZ LQ IDFWRU\ boxes. English Dovetail. 2ULJLQDOFRVW6HOO  &DQ GHOLYHU 7RP  5  FREE HD FOR OLIH2QO\ RQ'LVK1HWZRUN/RZHVW SULFHLQ$PHULFD PR IRU RYHU  FKDQQHOVERQXV  5  IF YOUR CHURCH is ORRNLQJ IRU SHZ FKDLUV SXOSLW IXUQLWXUH VWHHSOH RU EDSWLVWU\ FDOO )LEHUJODVV8QOLPLWHGDW  RU YLVLW RXU ZHEVLWH ZZZFKXUFKVWHHSOHVFRP ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S YOUR MONEY! /XPS VXPV SDLG IRU VWUXFWXUHG VHWWOHPHQW RU Âż[HG DQQXLW\ SD\PHQWV 5DSLG KLJK SD\RXWV Call J.G. Wentworth.  $ %HWWHU %XVLQHVV %XUHDX rating. LEATHER LIVING ROOM Set- in original SODVWLFEUDQGQHZ2ULJLQDOSULFHVDFULÂżFH $975. Can deliver. Bill  5 

Qgm9_Yaf H?! ))2,(*2)(,2-(/2*()(2(( L`]Kg[aYdF]logjc H?%)+! ))2+()2((*2*(,2((-2)(/2(( 02((12-()(2-( D]lE]Af J! )2+(,2,(/2-()(2,( =Ykq9 H?%)+! )*2*()2,(+2(-,2)--2,-.2-( 02*(12*()(2,-

)*2,-+2)--2,(02)-)(2*( ;Yk]+1 J! ))2+(*2(--2((/2,()(2)-

9dkg;geaf_Mh2

G[lgZ]j*%:]YmlqYf\ l`]:]YklKaf_%Y%Dgf_ Yl)*2((heYf\Kf]Yc Hj]na]okg^K][j]lYjaYl Yl/2*(he

6WXGHQW'LVFRXQWVZLWK9DOLG,' Advance Tickets available at 7,&.(766+2:7,0(675$,/(56 FREEWKHDWHUVFRP

Notices IF YOU USED type 2 'LDEHWHV GUXJ $YDQGLD between 1999 - present DQG VXIIHUHG D VWURNH KHDUW DWWDFN RU FRQJHVWLYH KHDUW IDLOXUH \RX PD\ EH HQWLWOHG WR FRPSHQVDWLRQ $WWRUQH\ &KDUOHV-RKQVRQ 535-5727.

P^]g^l]Zr H\mh[^k/ MhieZ\^rhnkZ]3

HISTORY TUTOR 7Xtor wanted immediately IRU$PHULFDQ+LVWRU\+<  $PHULFDQ &LYLOL]DWLRQ WR  ([FHOOHQW FRPSHQVDWLRQ &RQWDFW 6H\PRXU DW    0922

,-1&0,.. \p\eZllf`k 9`fZbe'\hf

ppp'\p'nZ'^]n Lmn]^gmkZm^3 ',.(i^kphk]( i^k]Zr !Fbg'*/phk]l%-kngl"

Advertise with CW Classifieds cw.ua.edu

*The Crimson White places these ads in good faith. We are not responsible for fraudulent advertising.*

6$/21/9( **Student Special: 20% OFF any service and 40% OFF any TIGI product & makeup w/ Student ID! Call to make your reservations today! Our Services Include: ; 6..%,3%3) ; %',%.4 ; %0,'63)4 ; 7)05"5:.,0* ; !)(,'63)4 ; 7)05%-)62 ; $%9,0* In shopping center behind Applebeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 80 McFarland Blvd., Northport, AL (205) 409-2770 www.salonlivenow.com

FULL COLOR Business Cards

50 - $5.95 100 - $7.95 * Basic Design Included

THE UPS STORE 1130 University Blvd.

248-0290


SPORTS Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ Wednesday, October 6, 2010 Editor â&#x20AC;˘ Jason Galloway crimsonwhitesports@ gmail.com

FOOTBALL

Tide players win SEC honors By Britton Lynn Senior Sports Reporter bmlynn@crimson.ua.edu Sophomore guard Chance Warmack was recognized as SEC offensive lineman of the week for his performance in the Florida game. Warmack had key blocks on both of Mark Ingramâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s touchdown runs that gave Alabama the lead in the first half. Junior linebacker Courtney Upshaw was also recognized as SEC Defensive Player of the Week for his seven tackles, four tackles for loss, two pass break-ups and one fumble recovery. The Alabama coaching staff also recognized junior wide receiver Darius Hanks, junior safety Mark Barron, freshman cornerback John Fulton and sophomore running back Trent Richardson for their performances Saturday.

Barron led all the tacklers with 11 stops against the Gators and had the Crimson Tideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only sack of the game. Barron is Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading tackler this season with 31 through the past five games. Richardson was recognized for his performance on special teams and is the only player to be listed by the coaches as a player of the week following all five games this season. This was Fultonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first time recognized by the coaching staff as a player of the week for his work on special teams. He had one tackle in the game on punt coverage and a key block on Julio Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 41-yard punt return in the second quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really think our team is progressing,â&#x20AC;? said head coach Nick Saban. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each week you have a new challenge and learn more about your team. Like how are we going to respond

CW | Drew Hoover Trent Richardson returns a kickoff during the Florida game Saturday in Bryant-Denny Stadium. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only player to be listed by the coaches as a player of the week following all ďŹ ve games this season. sophomore Dontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;a Hightower said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is probably one of those guys who wants to shake-and-bake. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a north and south runner. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really good back.â&#x20AC;? The Alabama defense, which hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allowed a touchdown from a running back yet this season, continues to work on the fundamentals to keep the Gamecocks from being the first. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We pride ourselves on just going out there and doing our job, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the red zone or anywhere on the field,â&#x20AC;? Warmack said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As long as you try to dominate on every play that is all you can ask for. But Preparing for one thing you have to pride yourself on is not giving up South Carolina down there. It is about going While the Tide prepares for out there and tackling guys in South Carolina, one player the red zone. You have your they are particularly focusing back against the wall because on is freshman running back you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that far from the Marcus Lattimore. Lattimore end zone, but you just have to is averaging 91.5 yards per dig down deep inside of you. game and has six touchdowns We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to give up any points down there.â&#x20AC;? this year. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game will be the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great SEC back,â&#x20AC;? this week? We play another very good team on the road in a difficult place to play. Are we going to be able to challenge ourselves to continue to do the things we need to do to play at a high standard? Are we going to be relieved with what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done up to this point? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t answer those questions. They have to come from within, with what people accomplish and what they want to do. So far weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve responded fairly well, but not consistently all the time and that is something we have to continue to work on.â&#x20AC;?

Tideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third consecutive top25 ranked opponent and third straight SEC opponent.

Injuries

As Alabama prepares for South Carolina in Columbia there have been a few roadblocks along the way in terms of injuries. Junior linebacker Chris Jordan pulled his hamstring in the Florida game and is day to day. Saban said they will be seeing how Jordan responds this week in practice. Jones also bruised his knee in the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Again, you never know how these things are,â&#x20AC;? Saban said about Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; injury. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did an MRI, checked it out to make sure things are OK, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be day-to-day at least for the first part of the week to see how he progresses.â&#x20AC;? Neither Jones nor Jordan were wearing black jerseys in practice Monday or Tuesday, but they were not participating at full speed.

3LZZ;OHU<;OPUR

7OV[V

:JH]LUNLY

/\U[

;HRLHWPJ[\YL^P[O3;<;NLHY 7VZ[P[[V3LZZ;OHU<;OPURMHUWHNL

Health & Wellness Info

Flu Shots

>PUHUP7HK 6J[

FREE STUFF & MORE!

-VYTVYLPUMVYTH[PVUJOLJRV\[ ^^^MHJLIVVRJVT3LZZ;OHU<;OPUR

project STUDENT HEALTH PEER EDUCATORS

sponsored by: Project Health, GAMMA, & SGA


10.06.10