Page 1

CP SPORTS

Tiger tennis teams split with Washburn University and the University of Arkansas-Fort Smith BY BENJAMIN DONALS Sports editor

T

Sophomore Jamie Blackim prepares to serve while teammate Natalia Medina, sophomore, waits at the net during play at Southwestern. The duo helped Cowley defeat Washburn in a exhibition match on Sept. 19 in Topeka. (photo by Chad Buttram)

20

he Cowley tennis teams split with division II opponent Washburn last week. The men fell to Ichabod’s 4-5, while the women reversed the numbers and scored a 5-4 win. The Tigers the split with University of Arkansas-Fort Smith in Tulsa, OK.. The men won 8-5 and the women lost 3-11. On the men’s side, the Tigers lost two of the three doubles matches against Washburn.. The duo of Bruce Lloyd Burgess, sophomore, and Alex Dickson, freshman, lost to their Washburn opponents 5-8. Teammates Felipe Pimenta, freshman, and Renato Mendes, sophomore, did not fair much better, falling 6-8 to Washburn’s Adam Rens and Emmanuel Laarent. The third doubles team of Roger White, sophomore, and Tom Gibaud, freshman, won their match by default. In singles play, the Tigers’ top two players, Bruce-Burgess and White, had both of their matches go to three sets. Both athletes loss their first sets before winning the next two. Mendes, Pimenta and Gibaud all fought hard but lost their matches in two sets. Dickson won his match by default. The men bounced back against Arkansas-Fort Smith. The doubles teams of Bruce-Burgess and Dickson and Gibaud and White won their matches while teammates Pimente and Mendez lost a tough match 8-9. The duo of Bates Baldwin, freshman, and Richard Lee, freshman, fell 0-8. In singles Bruce-Burgess, White, Mendes, Pimenta, Gibaud, and Evan Daniel, freshman, all won their matches. Dickson and Bates were defeated in three sets while Samir Haikel, sophomore, was defeated in two. The women pulled out a win against Washburn with some solid matches from all of their doubles teams. Number one doubles team Adrijana Pavlovic, so., and Jessica Montemayor, sophomore, and number three team Wrylie Finkle, sophomore, Shannon Franz, sophomore, both defeated their opponents 8-3. While the number two duo of Jamie Blackim, sophomore, Natalia Medina, sophomore, shutout Washburn’s Whitley Zitsch and Alyssa Castillo 8-0. The women seemed to struggle in the singles department. Pavlovic played a tough match against Trang Le Nguyen but lost in three sets. Montemayor and Blackim both had some trouble with their opponents but won their matches. Montemayor won in two sets, while Blackim played two tough sets 6-3, and 4-6 before putting the match away with a 10-1 third set. Medina and Brittany Laner, so., both played tough but lost both their matches in two sets. Finkle played strong against Annie Doale losing in three sets. The women faced some stiff competition in Tulsa. Pavlovic and Montemayor were the only doubles team to win their match, Blackim and Montemayor were the only players to win their singles match,

CP

ISSUE 3 SEPT 29

COWLEY PRESS

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

2009

The Student Newspaper of Cowley College


Hitting the snooze, hitting the road and hitting the locked door BY COLIN BAKER Staff writer

I

magine it is one of those days when you are just running late in everything. Class starts in 15 minutes and you just got out of the shower. You then rush to brush your teeth, fix your hair and get dressed. While doing that, eight minutes pass by and there are only seven minutes until your class starts. It is a race against time and you are on the short end of the stick. On your way out

of your dorm, you pick up your bag and something quick to eat for the journey on the way there and during class. You are half way to the classroom and there are two minutes until class starts. You then turn on your Usain Bolt speed and sprint towards the classroom and just when you make it right outside the room, you pull on the door and it is locked. The whole class turns and looks at you with laughs and smirks. Now, for those who have been in that situation, you are not the only one. I too have been in that situation and I did not

like it one bit. When I was locked out, I was angry towards the teacher who locked me out. However, when you look at it you should not be mad at just them but at yourself as well.. Things end up adding up if you really look at it. You were late because you woke up late; set your alarm 10 minutes earlier or take a few minutes off your shower time and you would not have been in that situation. Even if all of that adds up, you still have a right to be mad because you pay for your

I have been locked out of a few classes. It wasn’t too pleasant and I tried to talk them into letting me in, but that didn’t go too well.

QUICK QUOTES

What do you think of instructors who lock students out of class? “It’s wrong because students stay up late studying or doing homework and may not remember to set their alarm clocks.” --Katilyn Taylor Freshman “I don’t like it because everyone is late at some point. What if the teacher was late?” --Santray Sandling Freshman

“I don’t think it’s fair because everybody is late at some point in their life.” --Ashley Campbell Freshman

~ sophomore, Chase Turner

Tyler Juden’s father, Bob, is comforted outside the WS Scott Auditorium following the services for his son. The motorcade was escorted to Memorial Lawn cemetery. His sister Jacey looks on (front right). Jacey is a 2009 Cowley graduate, was a Queen Alalah finalist, October Student Athlete of the Month, and 2009 Student Athlete of the Year. (photo by Carly Budd)

THE

On the cover:

CPFORUM

Letters to the editor must be signed and contain contact information (email or phone number) in order to be printed. Letters will be edited for content only. Letters can be emailed to editor@cowleypress.com. Letters can also be hand delivered to Meg Smith or a member of the Cowley Press staff in room 104 in KTB.

2

“It teaches good work ethics, but it’s college so give us a break.” --Travis Naegele Freshman

THE

The Cowley Press is a public forum produced bi-weekly by the newspaper production class. The paper is distributed free in single copies on campus. Extra copies are $1 each. Student editors make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. Editorials, columns and letters reflect the opinions of the writers. The staff reserves the right to edit letters for taste and length. Letters must be signed by the author.

CP STAFF

For some classes, arriving late for class means standing on the outside looking in. Arrive a few minutes early and avoid the embarrassment and missing out on class work. (photo illustration by Alison Jamerson)

education and if you want to be late, then you should be able to be late, even just 30 seconds to two minutes late. I thought in college you had the freedom to be late if you wanted to be. Although, professors would argue that since you are now in college, you need to be more responsible, get to class and learn how to wake up on your own. A student that knows about the locked door policy all too well is sophomore Chase Turner. “I have been locked out of a few classes,” Turner said. “It wasn’t too pleasant and I tried to talk them into letting me in, but that didn’t go too well.” Looking on the professional side, I can understand as to why they have a policy like this. College is supposed to prepare us for the real world after we get our diploma. In doing so, the locked door policy is there to keep us from running late and being late to our jobs of being full-time students. If you are late on the job then you will get fired in the real world. Getting fired in college would be getting locked out of the classroom and then receiving an absence and a bad grade for that day of the class. There are both sides to this story as there is to almost every story that has ever been invented. You can be one side or the other or even be neutral on the subject. Either way you learn something new everyday whether it is being locked out of class and being there to attend and get your education.

THE

THE

CP OPINIONS

SEPT 29, 2009

CP SPORTS

SEPT 29, 2009

Men’s Soccer still looking for their first win BY JORDAN JOHNSTONBAUGH Sports writer

T

he men’s soccer team is still looking to get that first win of the season. Against Dodge City they had every chance to win the game but could not score. They had six more shots on goal and ten in the game. Lucas Coelho, freshman from Lavras, Brazil, made three of their shots. Their other four shots were by Joao Bacchi, sophomore and Ivenns Martinez, sophomore. Dodge City was down by one for most of the game. With sixteen minutes left in the game, Dodge City really turned up the pressure and scored three goals in that time. Dodge City only took seven shots and scored four of them as their accuracy was right on. The Tigers suffered a 4-0 loss, which dropped Cowley’s overall record to 0-3-1 and 0-1-1 in the Jayhawk Conference. On Sat. Sept. 19, Cowley hosted Barton County. The team came so close to getting their first win of the season. Barton County was a good overall team and the Tigers played really well. In the first twenty minutes, they were already

Sophomore goalkeeper Blake Anderson attempts to block a shot by a Barton County player during play at the Cowley Soccer Complex. The Tigers face Northeastern Oklahoma A&M Sept. 30. (photo by Carly Budd) down 2-0 and it was not looking good for the Tigers. The Tigers answered back with a goal of their own with eighteen minutes

left in the first half. Martinez scored in the half with his first goal of the season and the team’s first goal in almost two games.

Things were soon looking up for the Tigers. In the second half, the nets were kept empty. It was defensive for both teams and the Tigers lost again. This brought their record to 0-4-1 for the season and 0-2-1 in the Conference. The Tigers faced Garden City on Wed. Sept. 23. It was going to be tough to get their first win of the season especially since Garden City was ranked number 11 and were 6-1 overall and 2-0 in the Conference. Just like they did with Barton County, they kept the net empty for about forty minutes in the first half until Garden City’s D.J Zuniga’s goal. The scored stayed 1-0 until late in the game. The Tigers fought hard in the first half. In the second half, it was not the same. Garden City scored two goals within two minutes of each other and they took a 3-0 win over the Tigers. Goalie, Blake Anderson, sophomore, from Muskogee, Okla. stopped eight of their eleven shots and had a good night. Yet, they were still winless on the season. The Tigers will have a week off before facing Northeastern Oklahoma A&M on Sept. 30 at 4 p.m. in Miami Oklahoma.

The Tigers keep on digging; Win seventh straight BY JORDAN JOHNSTONBAUGH Sports writer The No. 7 ranked volleyball team is looking as good as ever. They were 9-3 going into last week’s game. The Tigers hosted Longview for the third time this season and beat them for the third time this season. The women only need three sets to beat Longview on Fri. Sept. 18. Longview gave them a good run but Cowley won all three games 28-26, 25-18 and 25-20. This helped improve their record to 10-3 for the season. Keshia Clark, sophomore, led the Tigers with ten kills, five blocks and three aces. Michelle O’Dell, sophomore, also played well as she finished with a teamhigh 24 digs and three aces. Their next match was at Allen County on Mon. Sept. 21. The Tigers were looking to stay unbeaten in the conference and they did not disappoint. They were now 4-0 in

the conference after beating Allen in three Community College at top of the conference straight sets 25-19, 25-13 and 25-22. standings. Roslandy Acosta, freshman, “Allen match was a made very little errors great victory for us,” in the games. She said Coach Jenifer finished with 13 kills, Bahner. “Their crowd four blocks and two forced our girls to aces. Clark also had focus in on the game another good night and zone out all the with ten kills and outside noise.” a team-high of six The Tigers won blocks. the first two games “Keshia has really easily in the third stepped up her level match. Allen pushed of play and she has the Tigers a little become a big factor harder but were in our team’s overall still no match for success,” said Bahner. the women. With Also having a good Freshman Lindsey Chandler spikes the the victory over night was O’Dell ball during play earlier this season. The Allen County, the chipping in the tigers record is currently 13-3. (photo by Tigers remain tied 24 digs and Sarah Carly Budd) with Highland Eldridge, sophomore,

Editor in Chief - Megan Berry Campus Editor - Ian Whitley Scene Editor - Eric Smith Advertising Managers- Alyssa Campbell and Mitch Hoover Layout Editor- Chelsea Weathers Online Editor- Chris Bales Photo Editor - Carly Budd Staff Members - Colin Baker, Trevor Black, Chad Buttram,, Ben Donals, Richard Gould, Mitch Hoover, Alison Jamerson, Jordan Johnstonbaugh, Kayla Moser, Anne Sanchez Faculty Advisor - Meg Smith

19 photo caption

leading the team with 21 assists. The next match for the Tigers was Wed. Sept. 23 versus Hesston. In this game, the Tigers rested some of their stars players and gave some of the others a chance to show what they could do. It was an easy match for the Tigers and they won in three sets 2518, 25-17 and 25-14. “The whole team contributes on the court,” said Bahner. Freshmen, Rebecca Dinsmore, Jordan Gilleece and Meghan Cahill, all got playing time and each of them had 12 kills combined to help out the Tigers “They all stepped up and took advantage of their time on the court,” said Bahner. Clark led the team with 14 kills, Acosta with 12 kills and freshman, Lindsey Chandler with 10 kills. O’Dell also had a great night with 18 digs, a team high. The Tigers are now 13-3 overall.


CP SPORTS

Kicking up some dirt and grass

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

Getting To Know

BY JORDAN JOHNSTONBAUGH Sports writer

T

he Tigers are having an all right season and they are looking to improve on that. On Sept. 16, the Tigers traveled to Dodge City. Goalie Katie Ybarra, sophomore, has recorded three shutouts. “I feel it was a game that was played with heart,” said Ciara Corboy, sophomore. “I also feel the team communicated and played very well. Our coach was impressed.” The Tigers had the game in their hands just five minutes into the game with a goal from Amber Hernandez, sophomore. She put two goals in the net just fourteen minutes into the game, putting her season total to an impressive twelve. Sadie Hull, freshman, put her first goal of the season in the net late in the first half and the Tigers took a 3-0 lead into the half. In the second half, Jerrika Kerin, freshman, also put her first goal in the net and the Tigers got a 4-0 win. This improved their ranking to 3-2 overall and 2-0 in the Jayhawk conference. After the win on Wednesday, they hosted their next game versus Barton County. The Tigers struggled the entire game as they could not stop freshman Shala Giardni; she was simply unstoppable. She scored two goals just nine minutes into the game and the Tigers were already down 2-0. It was not looking good for the Tigers. Barton County already had a 5-0 lead before Amber Hernandez finally put the Tigers on the board. The goal was her teamleading 13th goal of the season leading the Tigers. Going into the half, the Tigers were down 5-1. Not much changed in the second half. The Cougars added three more goals to take a big win and handed the Tigers their first loss in the conference. They are now 2-1 in the conference and 4-4 overall.

C

Sophomore goalkeeper Katie Ybarra launches the ball during play at the Cowley Soccer Complex earlier this season. Ybarra was recently named the NJCAA goalie of the week. (photo by Carly Budd) Their next match was Garden City on Wed. Sept. 23. They were looking to bounce back from the loss on Saturday and they did just that. This was their second straight road win. They scored two first half goals by Hernandez and Corboy. The Tigers had a 2-0 lead going into the half. In the second half, Hernandez added one more with twenty-five minutes left. This was Hernandez 15th goal of the season, a team high. It looked liked Ybarra was going to get her fourth shutout of the season but a late hand ball in the bow by the Tigers led

to a penalty kick goal. The Tigers still got the win and are now 3-1 in the conference and 4-3 overall. The Tigers hosted Hutchinson again for their next game on Fri. Sept. 25. They were looking for revenge after the season opener where Hutchinson had beat them 11-0. However, Hutchinson would not let that happen and they beat the Tigers 3-0. The Tigers’ next game is Wed. Sept. 30 at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M at 2 p.m.

Cross country rewrites history books at Missouri Southern Stampede BY BENJAMIN DONALS Sports editor The tigers showed up to the Missouri Southern Stampede ready to work. Work they did; The No. 2 ranked men’s team placed ninth out of 35 teams. Also ranked No. 2, the women’s team finished 17th out of 41 teams. Sophomore Dustin Mettler was the first tiger to cross the finish line in Joplin, MO. Mettler placed 32nd out of 359 runners. He set a personal record in the race with a time of 24:59.87. “We ran rally well as a team. I ran a personal best by about a minute. I’m really excited about the whole team’s performance at the meet,” said Mettler. Not only was Mettler’s time a personal record, it was also the fourth fastest time in the program’s history and the fastest by an American born runner. “Dude, it feels amazing, I’m going to

keep on trucking to make it a run for the third fastest“ said Mettler in response to his performance and its historical meaning. Josh Gracia, freshman, changed some history also. He placed 51st with a time of 25:21.26. Which is the fastest by an American born freshman for the program. Sophomores Brice Irving, Isbeck Salinas, and Phillip Banowetz were the other Cowley runners to place in the top 100. Irving (71st) ran a time of 25:44:05. Salinas (82nd) was eight seconds behind him with a time of 25:52.01. Banowetz (87th) was right on his heels though with a time of 25:54.98. Cianin Kutil, sophomore, Tyson Christensen, freshman, Thomas Kjerengtroeh, freshman, T.J. Mapp, sophomore, Colin Jokisch, freshman, Peter Onelio, freshman, Zach Reynolds, freshman, finished in order; 132nd, 151st, 187th, 193rd, 261st, and 300th respectively. The woman placed less runners in the top 100 but still had a very solid

performance. Sophomore Robin Ray placed 28th out of 359 runners. She burned the three mile course in 18:40.36. That time is the fourth fastest in the programs history also. Valerie Bland, freshman, and Cecilia Burley, sophomore, were the only other runners to finish in the top 150. Bland (82nd) finished with a time of 19:38.86, while Burley (94th) crossed the line in 19:49.66. The other tiger runners; Elly Adamson, freshman, Bailey Hawkins, freshman, Marvia Lewin, sophomore, Jessica Dyer, sophomore, and Cassy Kendrick, freshman, finished ;in order of appearance: 174th, 178th, 184th, 198th, and 220th respectively. Freshman Leigh Ann Omarkhail was forced to withdraw when she rolled her ankle during the race. The tigers will participate next in the Oklahoma State University Jamboree in Stillwater, Okla., on Oct. 3rd.

18

Austin Sacket is a 19-year-old sophomore, born and raised in Wichita. He is number five on the soccer team and his position is midfield. He is a leader on and off the field and serves as co-captain for the season. He lives with his parents Tony and Kim and has four little brothers Dylan, Chase, Grant and Gage. What is the most important thing to you? To me, family is the most important thing in life. Where else have you played soccer? I’ve played club soccer in Wichita, Topeka and Kansas City from the age of five. What are your hobbies? My hobbies include hot rodding and building classic bicycles with my dad and brothers. I also enjoy fishing, riding four wheelers and camping with my family at El Dorado Lake. Why did you choose Cowley? I chose Cowley because of the opportunity to play in a first year soccer program. Being able to set the groundwork for future players here appealed greatly to me, as well as being close to home at a reasonable price. What position do you play? I play as a center defender, but also see time elsewhere in the defense and midfield. What is your best moment as a Tiger? My greatest moment as a Tiger occurred when I was voted to be a team captain my freshman year. What is your most embraced moment of your life? My most embraced moments in life were meeting my girlfriend and when my dad pushed me to continue playing soccer for Derby my senior year. What kinds of music do you like? I like country music and rock and roll. Johnny Cash, Garth Brooks and Creedence Clearwater Revival are my favorites.

SEPT 29, 2009

Honoring fallen serviceman BY RICHARD GOULD Staff writer

AUSTIN SACKETT SOCCER

CP NEWS

riminal Justice Instructor, Elvin Hatfield knew Tyler Juden before he joined the Army and set out to make his mark on the world. “Oh, I kind of followed his career when he was in Ark City High School involved in sports, then I got to know him very well when he came to Cowley,” said Hatfield. “Juden was majoring in criminal justice and he was thinking seriously about going into, and later on, go to a four-year-school and eventually join the highway patrol,” said Hatfield. “He [Tyler] kind of respected the highway patrol training and he also knew a few of the local highway patrol men really well and had already ridden with them and had respect for them. “Serving his country was one of the ways he wanted to give back. “He [Tyler] felt he was making a difference and he felt that he was doing a service for this country,” said Hatfield. “And he was protecting his own troops. And that was the number one thing; protecting his troops.” Although college is a great experience Juden saw bigger things in store for him; the United States Army. “We [Tyler and Hatfield] had lots of conversations about that. I tried to encourage him to go ahead to finish his two-year-degree or wait till he got a fouryear-degree,” said Hatfield. “And if he was still interested in it at that time … I know he was focused on it and I thought that with a few more years he might change his mind or he might not.” Humanities Instructor, Julie Kratt said, “When I heard that he joined the Army, it just seemed right. He was such a strong, reliable guy who embodied what the Army was looking for in a soldier.” Juden made his decision to enter the Army and train as a sniper a year later. “I left it up to him and he made his decision after about a year,” said Hatfield. “His impression, [of joining the Army] I got, was something that he wanted to do, but he felt like he needed to do.” Kratt said, “I read an interview with him and he had been promoted to a leadership position. It did not surprise me at all. I could see him being a role model and a protector and teacher for those under his authority.” Natural Science Instructor, April Nittler first met Juden’s parents Bob and Reatha, instructors at the high school and middle school, when Tyler was a student in her Arkansas City High School classroom. She would meet him again when he enrolled in her course at Cowley. “I had him in a class when he was in the high school “said Nittler. “ I also had him in a class here at Cowley.” Nittler remembered Juden as a respectful young man. In the classroom, he was “quiet respectful” and “very nice … polite as well,” she said. He carried with him into the service the same reputation. Respectful was also the way many in attendance described his

service on the Cowley campus Sept. 22. “I thought he [Tyler] always exhibited great citizenship and understanding for the political process and so forth,” said Hatfield. “I had Tyler in class the first semester I taught full time at Cowley,” said Kratt. “Tyler was a hard worker with a fun sense of humor. What stood out to me the most was how respectful he was. He was an allaround good guy.” The Juden family is an Arkansas City fixture, specifically on this campus with many students having been instructed by one or both of Tyler’s parents. Jacey Juden, Tyler’s sister, is a 2009 Cowley graduate. She was named the school’s October Student-Athlete of the Month in 2008 and Athlete of the Year in 2009, she was a finalist for Queen Alalah her sophomore year and that spring she helped lead the Cowley College softball team to its sixth straight Jayhawk East title and an undefeated conference season. She signed to play softball this year at Northwest Oklahoma State, according to an April 29, 2009 Tiger Sports press release. On Sept. 12, 2009 Juden’s convoy was attacked by small arms fire and rocketpropelled grenades in Turan, Afghanistan. According to Kake.com, “Juden was on his second deployment to Afghanistan as part of Troop C, 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division. Juden’s

mother says her son volunteered for the second deployment and then planned to get out of the military and become a teacher.” The Sept. 14 Kake article stated the Juden’s had spoken with their son on Sept. 6 and he had expressed his excitement about coming home and beginning his career in education. “I have known his mom and dad for almost 30 years,” said Kratt. “His dad went to school with my sister. His parents taught two of my kids and made a huge impact on them. Needless to say, when I heard about Tyler’s death, I was so sad. English does not have the right words for this kind of sad. This loss is heartbreaking… like our hearts were made of glass and someone dropped them off the Empire State Building.” Those who knew him, heard the news over the course of the next few days. “I heard it on Sunday morning,” said Nittler. I was “very surprised. You know you just get going in life over here and you forget that things are happening around the world like that. You forget that there is a war going on.” Hatfield said, “I cried and cried and cried” when he heard the news Sunday evening. “Our athletic director, Tom Saia, had informed me about it,” said Director of Public Relations, Rama Peroo. “Even though I didn’t know the young man; him being from somewhere right here in Ark

City and a former student and knowing his family it really hit me hard right off the bat.” Memorial services for Juden were held at W.S. Scott Auditorium on Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. The Patriot Guard was on duty to escort Juden from Ponca City to Arkansas City (Sept. 21) and from W.S. Scott Auditorium to Memorial Lawn cemetery in Arkansas City. “The college as a whole our thoughts and prayers go out to that entire family,” Peroo said. ACES is going to have a sign up for troops that are personally connected to the college. The troops can be children, parents, cousins, aunt, uncles etc… serving in either Iraq or Afghanistan. Students can earn volunteer time if the plan of sending letters to troops through a flat rate box provided by the ACES club goes through. If you know anyone that is serving in the armed forces then send your information to: Michelle Knoles ACES Coordinator Cowley College 620-441-5202 1-800-593-2222 EXT. 5202

Sergeant Tyler Juden was a distinguished sniper belonging to Troop C, 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division. With the Patriot Guard saluting a fallen comrade, Sgt. Tyler Juden is transferred to his final resting place at Memorial Lawn Cemetery in Arkansas City. (left: file photo. below: photo by Carly Budd)

3


CP NEWS

Moving from summer to fall and winter BY MEGAN BERRY Editor-in-chief

T

here is a box up in the attic or hidden away in the closet that holds all your warm winter clothes. Now is the time to dig those winter clothes out from storage and put your summer clothes away. From swimsuits and flip-flops to scarves and boots, fall is fast approaching and summer is on its way out. Say goodbye to the warm days of sunshine and hello to the cold snowfalls of winter. How can you stay warm, yet still wear clothes that are fashionable, fun and trendy? Here are a few of the looks that are becoming popular and some new ways to make the most of what’s already in your closet. Plaid shirts, particularly in flannel, are a huge look for this fall. You can find them in almost every store with varying price tags, depending on the brand. They are available at Urban Outfitters, Pac Sun, JCPenneys

coat in stock. This peacoat is cropped and is designed to fit right below the waist for a more updated look. It is made from a fine wool blend and is available in bold colors such as plum, green and black. It is priced

and now even Wal-Mart is carrying them on the racks. A quick and easy way to stay warm during the fall season is with a pair of gloves and a stocking hat. Arm warmers and fingerless gloves are big for the fall. There are many different designs so you can get creative with them. A good, warm coat is a must for the colder seasons. The peacoat is very popular right now and can be found in various shades and colors. You might consider choosing black or gray for the most versatility, but if you are looking to make a fashion statement, go for a bolder color such as red or dark green. The Wool Cadet Peacoat from Old Navy is one of the most affordable and stylish peacoats offered. It features five double rows of brass buttons and a collar that folds down or can easily be worn up in a stylish straight style. This coat is available in red or navy for only $70. If that does not interest you, Old Navy also has a more traditional

at just $60. Scarves have become a big part of the winter wardrobe and can add style to an outfit instantly. Scarves are fairly cheap at many places such as Forever21 where they sell for $5-$10. Remember that fall and winter are about layering. Shrugs, vests and cardigans are easy to use for layering with other pieces. Keep your summer clothes out but just add extra clothing pieces. This gives you the opportunity for even more looks. You can mix and match separate pieces, giving you a different outfit each time you pair something new. Do not be afraid to mix crazy prints or layer a lot of different pieces for a unique and special look. This is your season. Get out there and fine-tune your wardrobe. Even though it is autumn, you do not want to be the one who falls behind! Here is a more expensive classic peacoat. It is sold at American Eagle for $119.50. (photo courtesy of ae.com)

Skatepark rolls into town for the anticipating crowd around Ark City along with thrill seekers like myself at Cowley College have been waiting for: skate park. The park is the first true skate park in Ark City for the last two years after the city removed the skate park fixtures next to the Recreation Center due to safety concerns. Some of the obstacles include a miniramp (a miniature half-pipe), a quarter pipe (half of a mini ramp), a fun box (a box with

angled sides and rails in the middle) and a massive roll-in for anyone who wants a quick burst to the other side of the park. Skaters on campus are really excited about the new park. “It is really neat to have a park this close,” said freshman Zach Johnson, a skater for eight years. “It is just a short walk down the hill.” With this addition, now is a perfect time to learn how to skate. It does not matter

THE

BY MITCH HOOVER Ad manager Students strolling through Paris Park or down the street from Kimmel dorm might have noticed a new piece of blue scenery along the horizon. Some may have looked at the tangled and enticing landscape not knowing what it is. The answer to that is two words people

CP CLUB TALK

BY ALISON JAMERSON Staff writer For 22 years, Peers Advocating Wellness for Students [PAWS] has been part of a wide array of clubs on campus. PAWS sponsors several events every year to promote physical and mental health on campus. There are no requirements for PAWS and students may join any time. Interested students may come to the next meeting at 9 p.m. on Sept 29 in the student life conference room in the Nelson Student Center. I was spoke to PAWS sponsor and Vice President of Student Activities, Sue Saia, to get an idea of what being in PAWS entails.

Q:

What events does PAWS sponsor on a traditional basis?

Some of our standard events are the Kick Ash Bash (quit smoking day in the spring) the Blood Drive, [and] Safe Spring Break.

Q:

When does PAWS meet?

We meet on Tuesday nights – usually 9 p.m. (In the Nelson Student Center)

4

how someone rolls on wheels at the park as long as you are rolling. Skateboards, roller blades, scooters and yes, even heelys are allowed. The park does have a few rules however. The park needs to be clear by dark, no alcohol is allowed, and no fighting. So be sure to leave all that at the “door”. Now get out there, learn some new tricks and go skate.

Q:

Why should a student join PAWS?

A student who enjoys having fun, talking about health issues facing college students, and wanting to get involved at Cowley should join.

Q:

What is your favorite part of being the PAWS sponsor?

My favorite part each year is meeting the new students and listening to their ideas about what events we should try out for the upcoming year. I also enjoy taking students to high schools and middle schools to do the skits about healthy choices.

Q:

Are there any new events this year?

This fall we are doing a Red Flag day where we promote healthy relationships and inform students how to spot a red flag in a relationship. We were awarded a Kansas Health Foundation Grant this year, so we are adding a new component to the club called PAWSitive Promotions. These will be evening events throughout the year which provide students with alternatives for fun times instead of going out to party and drink.

CP SPORTS Climb off the couch and be active THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

BY COLIN BAKER Staff writer

in intramurals. His co-ed beach volleyball team just kicked off their season. “I wanted to play because I thought it looked like t is early in the evening. You are being fun,” Dewey said. “I also like volleyball and lazier than ever sitting on your couch just wanted to be around it.” playing video games or watching soap Dewey will be playing in two other operas. You could be playing basketball, sports. “I am already on the volleyball soccer or even flag football. Kicking, team,” Dewey said. “I will be playing flag swinging, passing, shooting and snatching football and then when basketball starts up are all the actions that will be going on this I am going to try and play in that as well.” fall during intramural sports. Dewey was kind of hesitant and Sophomore Jason Dewey has said he contemplated as to why he joined intramurals. “To be honest, I don’t know looks forward to competing in many sports why I joined,” Dewey said. “I guess peer pressure just got to me and everybody kept asking me to join so I gave in.” Dewey does it for fun; others do it to win. “My flag football team won it all last year,” said sophomore Keegan Cornelius. “I love to win, even if it is just in intramurals.” Cornelius said he and his team are out to win. “We have the mind-set of winning because everybody on our team loves to win,” Cornelius said. “We get super competitive and even getting scored on ticks us off.” Cornelius plays football because of it being one of his favorite sports. “I love football,” Cornelius said. “I played it in high school and I watch college football as much as possible.” “I enjoy doing Freshman Rebecca Dinsmore winds back to serve the ball dureverything I can for ing an intramural game. (photo by Carly Budd) the intramurals,”

I

SEPT 29, 2009

said Doug Darst, intramurals supervisor. “It’s a good time and I enjoy being around the students.” Darst is in his second year in being the supervisor. Before handling the duties of supervisor, he worked at the Recreational Center for 15 years. “Working at the Rec Center gave me the advantage of knowing all of the rules and what not,” Darst said. The sports include co-ed softball, beach volleyball, 3v3 basketball and flag football, just to name a few. “This semester is full of things already,” Darst said. “We just move from one sport to the next and fit them all into the semester.” There are some incoming problems with Mother Nature that affect the process. “We don’t have lights on the softball field, so that’s kind of a problem,” Darst said. “When it gets dark then we would have to find some place to play Freshman Jake Fulsom is a member of one of the Cowley inwith lights. Everything tramural volleyball teams. Volleyball is one of many intramural else besides flag sports offered to students. (photo by Carly Budd). football and volleyball will be okay because competitive to a point but it is more about they are all indoors.” the fun,” Darst said. “It is there for people Darst has his hands full with the job to get out of the dorm room and get some of being supervisor. “My duties include exercise. It doesn’t matter if you’re good or scheduling, being a referee and an umpire not. It is about participating and making and score keeping,” Darst said. “We get new friends as well.” students for work study to come and do those things to where I am not the only one doing it.” Darst has a message to the students about what intramurals has to offer. “It’s

STUDENT SPECIAL Large Single Topping ONLY

$8.99

($1.80 for each additional topping)

MUST PRESENT COUPON DELIVERY/ DINE-IN CARRY-OUT 442-1900 422 N. Summit

17


Bluegrass Festival BY ERIC SMITH Scene editor

T

winner of the festival. Bryan McDowell of Canton, N.C., won the National Flat Picking Guitar, Walnut Valley Mandolin and Walnut Valley Old Time Fiddle competitions. The Pecan Grove is the most famous place to camp and is known for the saying, “Anything goes in Pecan Grove”. The Pecan Grove is the home to stage five. Although it is not an official stage, it is one of the most popular. It features artists from everywhere and is on the back of a pick-up truck. Along with stage five, the grove also

he Walnut Valley Festival is one of the longest, and probably the most famous traditions in Winfield and Cowley County. It has been going on for 37 years. In 1999, the International Bluegrass association named it the very first “Bluegrass Event of the Year”. The festival is here to highlight the best bluegrass and folk musicians in the world. Artists come from all places around the world from such as Nashville, N.Y. and even Japan and Italy. Most bands consist of acoustic string instruments such as guitars, fiddles, mandolins, cellos and banjos. Some bands have more exotic instruments such as dulcimers, accordions, autoharps, saxophones or anything else they can think of using. There is a lot of diversity in the artists at the festival. For instance, if you like classical western musicians, you would be drawn to Bill Warwick, who was the Western Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year in 2007 and 2008. If you are more into folk and storytelling music, you would probably like John McCutcheon. Bill Barwick performed during one of the shows at the Walnut Some other Valley Bluegrass Festival. Thousands of people attended the interesting bands festival. (photo by Carly Budd) include the Wiyos from Brooklyn, who have combined bluegrass with the has stage 4.75, stage six, and stage seven. jazz and blues of the 1930’s, or the David There are usually many people found Munnelly Band from County Mayo, Ireland jamming in the streets. that combine bluegrass with Celtic Folk There are other campsites on the east songs. side of the fairgrounds and on the north The fairgrounds at Winfield consist side across the highway. Most of the of the stage area in the middle, which is campsites near the main stages are where surrounded by campgrounds and parking the RVs park. spaces. It contains all of the main stages. Uptown Studio’s in Winfield ran stage Stage one is at the grandstands and is 4.75. One of the people running the studio where all the main acts play. Stage two is was Sophomore Ben Byers. the second largest and is on a hill where “[My favorite part about bluegrass is] all people are able to set up chairs. Stage three of the amazing talent and personalities in is also outside. Stage four is the only stage one place,” said Byers. inside and it is where all of the competition takes place such as the National Flat Pick Guitar competition. This year featured the very first triple

THE

CP SCENE BY CHRISTOPHER BALES Online editor It is a college student’s worst nightmare. You have been working on a major paper or project for a couple of weeks on your computer and you have finally completed it. The project is saved and everything seems to be in order when tragedy strikes. You go to the folder that the file was stored in and for some reason the files have been deleted. You begin to panic as you think that there is no hope to save your lost files. Everything in the world is crashing down around you. With the project down the drain, you will surely suffer from a major blow to your course grade. That blow to your grade is going to destroy your chances of passing the class. Soon you will realize that you will not be able to graduate. You know that there is absolutely no way you are going to be able to get all that work back so you begin to cry for hours on end while rocking back and forth in the fetal position. Well, maybe it will not be that dramatic, but you get the gist. Losing something that you have spent hours of hard work on is not only a blow to your schedule, but it is also a major blow to your emotions. All those long hours of researching countless materials and sifting around for the correct information is tedious and time consuming, so naturally you are going to be a bit miffed, frustrated and extremely depressed when it all just seemingly disappears in front of your eyes. Wipe away those tears of hopelessness and take some time to follow these steps to see if all of that doom and gloom attitude is necessary.

In Word, click File, then Open. Navigate to the folder you think the file used to be located in and make sure All Files *.* is selected. Are there any .wbk files there? Select it and see if it is what you are looking for. 5.) Still no dice? Send out a *.wbk search party. This step is the same as the first search party step, but now search for *.wbk files. You might find a few. Open them up, one by one. 6.) Search your temporary files. Again, this is like step one. But search for *.TMP files this time. You will come up with a lot, so change the When was it modified? to the last week or so. 7.) Search even more of your temporary files. Some temporary files like to be unique. Search for those with ~*.* this time. 8.) Open up C:\Documents and Settings\*USERNAME*\Local Settings\ Temp This is a hidden folder, so you’ll probably have to use Windows Explorer. Hit Start, then All Programs. Go to Accessories, then Windows Explorer. Navigate to that folder, where *USERNAME* is whatever your computer calls you. Do you see your document in that folder? If none of those steps work, there are also programs that will help you recover deleted files. Therefore, this is the ninth and final option. What is important to understand here is that if you delete something, it is not actually deleted. Rather, it sits in a pile waiting to be overwritten. Therefore, the best way to recover a deleted file would be to try to find it right away before it is overwritten. If you would like to use a program, I would recommend Restoration (http:// www.snapfiles.com/get/restoration.html) or Recuva (http://www.piriform.com/ recuva) since both are free. I personally prefer Recuva to Restoration because it provides a more user-friendly interface and it is more visually appealing. While neither program is able to recover files from a formatted drive, they can still offer some hope of basic recovery. Both programs have the potential to recover music files, video files, images, documents, and a wide variety of other file formats. Some Tips to keep in mind when using data recovery programs: As soon as you realize your data has been deleted, stop using the computer! The less activity the better to avoid dangerous disk-swap activity. 1. Find and download data recovery software on another computer. 2. Save the recovery tool to a flash drive and run it directly from there. 3. Save the extracted data back onto the flash drive for added safety. Before you begin to rock back and forth in the fetal position, see if you can recover your files, save yourself from some embarrassment, emotional stress and failing grades with these nine simple steps

CP NEWS

BY ANNE SANCHEZ Staff writer

I

n 1976, the Ark City Tumbleweeds car club got started and that same year the Last Run car show premiered. To avoid competing with other shows, the Tumbleweeds scheduled the show in September. They had 75 entries. Now there are definitely over 75 cars at the present car show. Paris Park is packed with chopped cars, motorcycles, classic roadsters, Ford, Chevy and people.

hobby; it is a family lifestyle. “My father and brother were into hot rods so I grew up with it,” said Jonathan McCoy, Woodland, Okla. “I also have a 1955 Chevy that I’m restoring.” McCoy was showing a silver 1967 Camaro. There were not just all-American cars either. There was many buffed out motorcycles. “I’ve been riding bikes since I was 12,” said Daryl Botkin. Botkin is from Wellington and showed a red 2007 Hilltop. Many people at the car show have very

What is important to understand here is that if you delete something, it is not actually deleted.

1.) Send out a search party. In Windows, click Start, Search, All files and folders. Type what you remember of the name or simply *.doc to get all your Word documents. Select My Computer under Look In, and then under More Advanced Options, make sure Search Hidden Files and Folders is checked. Then hit Search. 2.) Still no luck? Check your Recycle Bin. Open it up and look through whatever files you have. Did you find it? If so, right-click and choose Restore. Then if you are not sure where it actually restored to, perform a search for it. 3.) You can pray for Auto Recover. Sometimes if Word crashes or closes unexpectedly, it will still save what you had or part of it. Re-open Word. If a Document Recovery task pane comes up, double-click your document to open it and immediately click Save As. 4.) If you have Word set to automatically back-up your documents, there is still a chance here. Check the original folder for any .wbk files.

16

SEPT 29, 2009

The Last Run Car Show The Swine Flu, H1N1 Virus

Rachel Curtiss, freshman, views one of the cars from the show. There were several hundred entries. (photo by Carly Budd) “This is the second year I brought a car,” said David Tyler, Ponca City, Okla. “It’s always been a hobby of mine.” Tyler owns several cars including a 1942 Ford Coupe, a 1933 Dodge Pu and a 1946 Ford Pu. Not far from Tyler’s collection of vehicles, is a 1965 El Camino. Its owner, Gary A. Long from Ark City, sits near-by. Many people come not just to show off cars but also to shop for cars. “[When] I bought it back in 2001, it was in a field,” said Long. “It was junk. I paid $50 dollars for it. We spent three years rebuilding it.” Working on cars is not just a small time

fond memories of their vehicles. “I’ve had it for about thirty years,” said Maleah Right of Ark City. “I bought it from a college girl in Winfield.” Right showed her silver 1975 MG Midget. “I restored it for her three years ago,” said Chuck Right. Sitting in the driver’s seat was a gray monkey puppet. “Willy is our mascot and we’ve had him for twenty years at least,” said Right. The Last Run car show is a special event for many avid car fans. For more information, the Ark City Tumbleweeds have a website at http://www.actumbleweeds.com/.

From 10 a.m. to noon, the Crafter’s Corner will be held in the East meeting room of the Public Library for no charge. Beverages will be provided.

Allied Health Center in Winfield. There is no cost to attend the event. The Medical Careers Day will consist of information regarding the programs and degrees offered by Cowley as well as a tour of the facilities. The event will run from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. with registration beginning at 1:45 p.m. To register online, go to www.cowley.edu/ allied/careers.

Free Adult Movie Night will take place at the Public Library’s Basement viewing room, featuring the 1931 version of Dracula, starring Bela Lugosi. It will be held at 6:30 p.m. and popcorn will be provided. Gaming for Grown-Ups will be held from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the East meeting room of the Public Library for free. There is a Wii, Playstation 2 and several games to try out. If a student is wanting to learn more about medical programs and degrees offered by Cowley College, then register to attend the school’s Medical Careers Day Oct. 21 at the

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

BY CHRISTOPHER BALES Online editor

to the spring of this year, no one has ever been exposed to. Therefore, no one is automatically immune. Who would have ever thought that poor 5. If you have the normal flu, your Porky Pig or the innocent Miss Piggy would symptoms usually last a few days at most. have ever been responsible for something In the case of swine flu, however, the as horrible as the Swine Flu (H1N1 Virus) symptoms may last seven days or longer. pandemic? How could these two lovable 6. Almost everyone has heard of it and characters from the past have created such they are beginning to panic. a horrifyingly destructive plague that will 7. The reason that there is so much hype surely destroy the entire world? behind the swine flu is because it is a new Well, it is not their fault. All of the strain of influenza that happened to make gloom and doom talk that the mass media a successful jump from an animal host to a is perpetuating human host. From there, is blowing the it proceeded to spread facts widely out instead of dying off like of proportion and most other viruses that destroying the attempt the same feat. reputations of these If you are worried two plump patriots. about the virus, the The truth is that Center for Disease swine flu is no more Control (CDC) offers dangerous than the some advice and tips: normal flu. There -To help fight the are also no major spread of this flu, cover differences between your nose and mouth the two aside from a (photo courtesy of ready2beat.com) with a tissue when you few key factors: cough or sneeze, then 1. The H1N1 Virus, unlike the flu throw the tissue away. viruses that have spread in the past, -Wash your hands often with soap mainly targets people who have a stronger and water, especially after coughing or immune system rather than those who sneezing. have a weaker one. Globally, of the 300,000 -Check with your local leaders, schools, laboratory confirmed and more than employers and other community groups 450,000 probable cases of swine flu, the about their plans in the event of an average age of infected people is 15; two outbreak in your community. thirds are younger than 18. This preference -You may want to contact your health of infecting youths is behavior of a flu care provider particularly if you are pandemic rather than a seasonal flu. worried about your symptoms. Your health 2. Unlike seasonal flu, those over age 65 care provider will determine whether are not at high risk of catching and having influenza testing or treatment is needed. serious complications with Novel Swine - If you have flu-like symptoms, stay flu A-H1N1/09. This may be the result of home, recover, and keep others well. This residual immunity from some similar flu might mean postponing your travel plans. in the past to which those in this age group -Do not travel for seven days after your were exposed. symptoms begin or until you have been 3. Swine flu symptoms for most people symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is are milder than seasonal flu in the first longer. wave of the pandemic. According to current -Think about those around you. statistics, more people die each year of Remember that you would want sick seasonal flu, than have with swine flu. people to stay home to protect your health. 4. It is an entirely new strain that, prior If you want to learn more about the H1N1 Virus, visit http://www.cdc.gov/ h1n1flu.

CP BITES

Cowley gains accreditation to offer full online degrees. Thanks to the efforts of numerous individuals and departments, Cowley College has become one of only a few community colleges in the state of Kansas to gain accreditation to offer full online degrees. The college gained online degree accreditation through the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The

college will continue to develop additional online degrees and will look into entering into the online technical education field as well. Cowley will also begin advertising the opportunity to earn online degrees both nationally and internationally. For more information about the online degree programs that Cowley College has to offer, contact Tiffany Sowa at (316) 683-6013 or e-mail her at sowat@cowley.edu. Any Cowley student may receive free online tutoring. There is no cost to the student or the college. Students simply need to connect to the following web site: www.homeworkkansas.org. This is not limited to online students. Any Cowley student may use the service. Students can connect to tutors from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., seven days a week. Most

5

sessions last twenty minutes, though there is no specified time limit per session and no limit to the number of sessions a student may have. This is not intended to replace the face-to-face tutors available on campus. However, if a student needs assistance at a time when the face-to-face tutors are not available, then this is an option open to them. If the student is connecting from a location outside the state of Kansas, then they might need a Kansas Library Card to access the system. These cards are free and may be requested from our library by contacting Rhoda MacLaughlin, Cowley Library Director, in person at Renn Memorial Library, by telephone at (620) 441-5280, or by email at maclaughlin@ cowley.edu. Students contacting her by email should include their Cowley ID, full name and birth date.


CP NEWS

BY MITCH HOOVER Ad manager

Which clubs are you involved in at Cowley? 
First off, I am the Secretary of SGA but I am also a Student Ambassador as well as a Cowley Captain. Some other clubs that I am in are the Math and Science Club and Phi Theta Kappa. I am also a Cowley Tutor.

 What is your major?
 Last year, my major was Pre-Pharmacy. However, I decided that I wanted to work more with numbers, so I decided to change it to Business Administration with accounting as well.

What do you do for fun?
 Usually, I am at the school because my only free time is on the weekends. However, on the weekends, I am usually doing something outdoors with my boyfriend or spending time with my family.

If you were to be any kind of food, what would you be?
 Something that everyone wants, that tastes good no matter what. How about a warm, gooey chocolate chip cookie fresh out of the oven.

If you were stuck on a desert island what three things would you need? 
My cell phone with service because what good would it do without service and an everlasting battery, Pepsi and a comfortable mattress (none of those rock hard beds, I cannot sleep on those).



Is your glass half empty or half full?
 Depends on the day. Most of the time it’s half full, but we all have those days where it’s just ugh. So then, it’s half empty.



Do you have any weird phobias? 
I really don’t like feet, probably because I hate my feet. They are just weird things that help us move around.

Pencils or pens? Pens, they are prettier.



How does it feel to be student of the month? 
I was really excited to get student of the

Phi Theta Kappa attends regional conference BY MEGAN BERRY Editor-in-chief n Sept. 11-12, seven Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) officers and two sponsors attended the 2009 Kansas Region Leadership Conference in Manhattan. “I got a chance to meet many people from different community colleges and learned more experiences from their chapters about how to get more people involved in the club activities,” said sophomore Phuong Huynh, co-president of PTK. The conference theme had to deal with environment. Students from all over Kansas gathered in the student union to listen to speakers. They were welcomed by Dr. Pat Boscoe, KSU vice president of student life and dean of students. The KSU director of environmental sustainability, Ben Champion talked about what KSU was doing at their campus to keep the environment healthy such as recycling and greening their buildings. Dr. Eva Horne, assistant director of the Konza Prairie biological station, talked to the members about the biological research station that KSU has and showed them how the ranchers in that area take care of the land. There were many breakout sessions for the members to attend where they learned about how to run for a regional officer, officer training, civic reflection, and definitions of leadership. Members attended a fellowship on Friday night, did shopping in Aggieville and had the chance to tour the KSU campus. They also went to the KSU Union to participate in cosmic bowling and visit with the other groups. “It’s always fun just to get with all of the advisers from the other campuses,” said Melinda Neal, co-advisor and natural science instructor.  Towards the end, they were given trash bags and they went around the KSU campus picking up trash. PTK will attend the Honor’s Institute held at Pittsburg State in November. In March, they will travel to Salina to the Regional Conference where they will receive awards.  “We also have the International Conference if we choose to go to that and that’s in April,” said Neal. PTK stays very involved on the campus. “We are starting our recycling with ACES and that should be happening in the next week or so,” said Neal. They are planning to put receptacles in the dorms for the students to put their recycling materials in such as paper, newspaper, magazines, aluminum cans, plastics and bottles. “At this workshop I learned how other chapters start their recycling plan at their community colleges and their experiences in the recycling program,” said Huynh. “They also gave me a lot of advice [about] how to begin the recycling project within the campus and the dorms.”

O month because it helped show that all the things that I do are recognized and aren’t just taken for granted.

 How does it feel to be the FIRST student of the month?
 This makes the honor even greater because it shows that I made that much more of an impact on people that much sooner.

 Sandals or shoes?
 Shoes or heels, sandals show my feet too much and I just don’t like that. Where are you going after Cowley?
 Right now, I am looking at WSU or OSU to further my business administration major. It is going to depend on money unfortunately.

6

CP SCENE

Sharing creative talent there,” said Cervantes. “We’re looking everyone of the event. “We’re still in the BY MEGAN BERRY forward to that again.” early stages, but we encourage everyone to Editor-in-chief Cash prizes will be given for first check it out,” said Carson. howcasing creative talent with and second place in each category. The show is very informal and students original skits and works is what The categories vary from year to year; should not feel pressured or scared to get the Creative Claws annual talent sometimes they have more singing and up in front of the crowd. “Take the dive,” show is all about. “Cowley just has really other at times more dancing. “It’s a fun said Carson. “People always have a great good writers and singers,” said Marlys night,” said Cervantes. “There’s good talent time. The audience will love you.” Cervantes, “For someone humanities who is skeptical, I instructor. “I think they should think people a give it a try,” lot of times don’t said Jessica Dyer, have enough freshman and opportunity to vice president of get their work creative claws. out there.” “College is about It will take new experiences, place Tues. Oct. whether that may 13 at 7 p.m. in be getting out Brown Center of your room to and costs $2 watch or trying or $1 and a out to be in the nonperishable show.” food item. Cervantes This is the said that third year for students can find the annual show Creative Claws and it has been on Facebook for very successful more information. in the past. “The “We’re just getting whole thing was TMU, a percussion ensemble made up of student, staff and faculty, performed at the 2008 that site built so fantastic,” said it may not have a talent show. The union took first place in the orginal works category. (file photo) Joanna Carson, whole lot there yet sophomore and president of creative claws. and there’s funny things happening.” but it’ll keep having more,” said Cervantes. “Lots of laughs and great performances.” The show usually has twelve acts lasting All students interested in the talent Cervantes said that they are open for a from three to four minutes each. Acts do not show need to turn in their entry forms to number of different talents such as singing, have to be single; there can be duet acting Cervantes in the humanities department dancing, skits, poetry and more. Anyone and small group acting as well. by Oct. 8. If anyone has a question or who attends the college can participate, As of now, the club is putting up needs information, contact Cervantes at including faculty members. “We generally fliers and Carson is planning to do cervantes@cowley.edu or one can e-mail have a good responsive crowd that is some sidewalk chalk drawing to remind Carson at carsonj439282@mail.cowley.edu.

S

Halo 3: ODST hits the mark BY IAN WHITLEY Campus editor

From destroying the flood army in story mode, to destroying the enemy team in matchmaking, many gamers have fond memories of playing Halo 3. That feeling

Student Discount-15% off

DINE IN CARRY OUT DELIVERY

that one gets when they zoom in with a sniper scope and pull the trigger right on the enemies’ head, or when they jump over someone and deftly assassinate them, is one of a kind. For many, those memories have not ended yet and they continue to play Halo 3. Now gamers can create more memories with a new game, Halo 3: ODST. ODST stands for Orbital Drop Shock Trooper, which is exactly the role you take on in the game. In this game, you do not play as the super soldier Master Chief or

Arbiter. You play as a normal soldier. While still highly trained, these soldiers cannot jump as high, take as many bullets or aim with two weapons like Master Chief and Arbiter could. The story takes place on the planet of New Mombasa, where the Rookie (the player) prepares to land with the squad of ODST’s he is in. The player gets separated from the team at the beginning of the game and must venture through the large city they landed in and find them. The story unfolds as the player finds different clues in the destroyed city and fights through Covenant forces. Overall it looks to be a good addition to the Halo franchise. The story mode is completely new and different, playing as a normal human instead of the super powered Master Chief. However, it also has a multiplayer mode that is the exact same as Halo 3, and players can play with people who have Halo 3. It looks like Bungie has brought us yet another great first person shooter game to enjoy for hours on end.

442-9999

(photo found on Google Image Search)

15

SEPT 29, 2009

CP

THE C O M I N G A T T R A C T I O N S

Student of the Month Allison Nittler

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

Teen Book Club Sept. 30, the Teen Book Club will be meeting in the Teen Room at the Ark City Public Library at 4 p.m. The House on the Cliff Oct. 8-10

The theater department will be performing The House on the Cliff at the Brown

Center at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.  

Creative Claws Talent Show Oct. 13

Signup sheets are in the

humanities office and must be turned in the by Oct. 8. The Talent show will be in

the Brown Center at 7 p.m. Karaoke sponsored by

‘PAWS’itive promotions Oct. 15

Students are welcome to come and sing karaoke between 10 p.m. and

midnight at the Alumni Bar and Grill.

The Cowley County Writers’ Guild Oct. 15 A new group for interested writers will be held in the west room of the Pubic Library at 7 p.m. starting Oct. 15, and continuing tentatively on every third Thursday of the month.

NEW RELEASES

Kiss: Sonic Boom (CD) Oct. 6 Kiss will release their new album at only Wal-Mart and Sam’s club.  The album will only feature two original members, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley.   Transformers 2 (DVD) Oct. 20 Shia LaBeouf and Megan Fox star in one of the summer’s biggest blockbusters


CPSCENE

CP NEWS

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

Murder mystery in time for Halloween BY ERIC SMITH Scene editor

W

ith a week left until opening night, the theater department is putting the finishing touches on their performance of “The House on the Cliff”. Tickets are $8 for general-admission, $5 for students and free for Golden Tiger Card members. Tickets are currently on sale at the box-office from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Students can also call in at 441-5570. “[Rehearsals] are going well,” said Scott MacLaughlin, theater director. “We are in a

scary. I saw the title and it said it was a mystery comedy. I thought this might be neat and it works great in the fall with Halloween coming up.” The play is set in the early the 1950’s. All of the scenes will be in the same room which is, as the title suggests, a house on a cliff. The set is being designed by Jamison Rhoads. “The set is the home of a rich family, so I want to convey a sense of wealth and a sense of scale,” said Rhoads. “I want it to be grandiose. I also want to convey a sense

of isolation. One of the main characters, Ellen, is in a wheelchair. She came off as bird-like. The idea was to present the stage as a birdcage, because she is caged in by her chair and by her family.” There are also many students coming together and helping with the set as the show gets closer. “It is fun watching [the set] being developed and watching it grow,” said sophomore Clinton Haas. “We make the set for the family, not for the show.”

That would be memorizing lines and choreography at the same time. Why did you decide to come to Cowley? My cousin, Josh Cobble, persuaded me. They told me to come and I liked it What is your favorite part about theater? Being able to perform. It is my passion to be on stage. What is your major? Music Education. “House on the Cliff” will take place on Oct. 8-10. It will begin at 7:30 p.m. on all three nights. (photo by Carly Budd)

The motive behind automotives

Staff writer

Two thousand dollars is not something that college students would give up easily, but for freshman Kyle Tatro and his dad, it is money well spent. Tatro and his father enjoy fixing up vehicles. Together they work on an ’81 Silverado and, in his spare time, Tatro fixes up a ’57 Chevy Pickup into a daily driver. Tatro has been working on vehicles ever since he was young.

Where are you from?

What is the hardest part about being in a play and CC Singers?

~ Jamison Rhoads

BY TREVOR BLACK

Amy Dunlap Wylie, Texas.

I want it to be grandiose. I also want to convey a sense of isolation.

difficult period. The lines are learned and we are trying to get it put all together. It is a creative and stressful time.” The play is a murder mystery written by George Batson in 1957. It is a very small play featuring only six roles. “[The hardest part is] for the actors to act believable in an unbelievable situation,” said MacLaughlin, “I have always wanted to do [a mystery]. I was a big Hardy Boys fan and a fan of Encyclopedia Brown. I love the feeling of suspense and I was looking for a good play to do that is borderline

Behind The Scenes

“I was kind of born into it,” said Tatro. “My whole family does it.” Tatro loves fixing up his trucks. He just got his 350 engine running, but he plans on tearing it down, cleaning it up and putting it back in his truck. His dad has taught him a lot

Tatro said. “I recommend that class.” Cowley offers several classes for people who are interested in automotives. “Two of my favorite classes are Electrical/Electronics and Engine Performance,” said Jim Ailey, automotive instructor. “Electrical/Electronic is a great place to start to learn about vehicles because every system has something to do with electronics.” Engine performance deals with fuel, exhaust, ignition timing, emissions, intake and other subjects. “I’ve always wanted to design a system on a vehicle like suspension or drive train and be able to Tatro looked under the hood of his truck. Between him and his work with it and dad, they have spent nearly $2000 on improvements. (photo by have it produced,” Trevor Black) Tatro said. He plans on majoring in about what he knows, but a few classes engineering, but he has decided to move his have also been helpful. focus to Aerospace Engineering because of “I have earned my [Automotive Service his location with the surrounding aerospace Technology] certificate here at Cowley,” companies.

14

What do you do in your spare time? I hang with my friends. We chill and do nothing and I study lines. What are your plans after Cowley? No idea. I am planning a trip to Europe. I will do that right after I graduate.

SEPT 29, 2009

Making a big change, one micro loan at a time BY RICHARD GOULD Staff writer

M

ost college students are familiar with loans from the borrowing end of the exchange. Social science instructor, Kathy Hendricks has a group of students who are getting a feel for the lending side of the deal. The idea came to Hendricks via an episode of 60 Minutes featuring KIVA, a person-to-person micro-lending website. “It was on 60 Minutes and they showed, I think it was actually one of the guys on 60 Minutes that had gotten involved in it, and they were showing it there. It was the first time I have ever heard of it,” she said. “When you browse entrepreneurs’ profiles on the site, choose someone to lend to, and then make a loan, you are helping a real person make great strides towards economic independence and improve life for themselves, their family, and their community,” said the kiva.org site. “Throughout the course of the loan (usually 6-12 months), you can receive email journal updates and track repayments. Then, when you get your loan money back, you can relend to someone else in need.” KIVA began in 2004 when Matt Flannery and Jessica Jackley visited East Africa and “discovered the power of micro finance firsthand.” According to kiva.org the total value of all loans made through KIVA amounts to $93,012,885 with a repayment rate of 98.46 percent. Hendricks’ classes are doing their part to help entrepreneurs across the globe. The social science instructor said she is “letting the students vote. I pull [the options] up online and you can see them. “It tells [the students] their story and then we have just been picking in class.” Those who contribute to the cause are recognized on the site. “Anybody looking at their

webpage can see that Cowley College gave money and when you click on the Cowley College [logo] you can see where it is located.” Hendricks’ class raises money by selling candy bars and asking for donations. “For the last two semesters, social science students have been donating money (some in exchange for candy), although one student gave $400 anonymously.” Thus far Cowley College students have contributed “$1025 and that is 12 loans total,” said Hendricks. “Our first loan was made to Rehema Ikoyi in Tanzania for clothing sales,”

Countries all over the world have been helped thanks to KIVA. The countries shaded in the right demonstrate just how far reaching KIVA has been with their microloan program started by Matt Flannery and Jessica Jackley. (illustration by Alison Jamerson)

Library undergoes brand new renovations BY TREVOR BLACK Staff writer

If you have walked past the library lately, you may have noticed the smell of unsettled dust in the air and the loud sounds of hammering and destruction going on within the building. But all of this noise and construction was part of a plan to help the students and staff. The construction has been part of a plan that Rhoda MacLaughlin, library director, has been expecting for several years. Many extra resources have been brought to the library. Twenty-five extra computers are now accessible to the campus along with two more printers giving it a total of four. Any prints relating to college classes will be free, but all non-college related material will need permission and will cost 10 cents. “Through grant monies from the South Central Kansas Library System, the college library was able to afford the purchase of a

said Hendricks. “The money was used to increase her inventory and she has now repaid 100 percent of her loan.” Another loan helped a woman who needed $125. “She does rice farming in the Philippines and we loaned her the whole amount,” said Hendricks . “She’ll use that to do you know expand her business grow more rice and buy fertilizer.” With all the work done, Hendricks says “Thank you for all that have helped.” For the cost of a Sonic drink, students can make a contribution that could make all the difference to a person across the world.

new circulation desk,” MacLaughlin said. Along with the printers, computers, and the circulation desk, the library also received new seating. With this new seating, the bookshelves had to be rearranged and the storage room downstairs was cleaned out. Because of all of the new technology the library had to expand on its electricity, which is the current goal of construction. Several other improvements were made. The tutors were brought to a back room where they would be alone to help their students. During the summer “CREDOreference” and “American History in Video”, which are two new databases, were added to the library’s online collection. The library is always adding new print titles to its collection and the end result of construction will be for students to have a more spacious area for studying and more available computers.

In the Korean American culture there is a similar system built into the community. Members of a kye contribution to a fund which will in turn be given to a member as a loan to offset the expenses of starting a business or expanding an existing one. Kyes are “rotating credit associations,” according to qcpages.qc.edu, [Queens College]. “A Kye consists of a group who pool their funds on a regular basis,” according to the April 1991 article by Ruby Danta, an anthropologist and the translation program coordinator at the Asian/American Center. “By taking turns, each member is entitled to the entire pot until all members have had their chance.” The kye was developed to give immigrants an opportunity to live “the American Dream”. In the mid-1970s new immigrants from Korea had to rely on relatives to provide shelter, room, and employment. “In 1978 the Korean government lifted the $1,000 limit that Korean immigrants could bring to the U.S., and in 1979, it was raised to $3,000,” according to Danta’s article. It would not be until the 1980s that the limit would increase to $100,000 then to $200,000 in the 1990s. Danta compiled the information for the article above in part from “The Korean American Dream: Ideology and Small Business in Queens, New York” by Kyeyoung Park. Park is a visiting assistant professor of anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Kye has a long history in Korea, where it is used as a means of meeting any financial need,” according to “Korean Small Businesses in New York City,” by Danta.

Offers and savings at the cosmetology department BY ANNE-MARIE SANCHEZ Staff writer

Ireland Hall is the large castle-like building made of Silverdale Stone catty corner from the police station. It chimes pretty melodies at noon and 4:45 for fifteen minutes. Apart from that, it chimes every hour and every half hour. Ireland Hall is beautiful on the outside and on the inside there is a basement that holds the secret cosmetology department. “We used to be located on Kansas and 8th street but that’s Hawk’s Funeral Home now,” said Pat Mauzey, cosmetology instructor and director. “We moved into Ireland Hall in 1981. I’ve been teaching cosmetology since March 1975. My mom and dad owned a private beauty college for 20 years called Vernon Beauty College so I grew up around it.” “The students this year are showing real talent early,” said Val Roderick, cosmetology instructor. The students will be avail-

7

able to give haircuts, coloring and other such services on Oct. 13. “In November, students will learn how to apply artificial nails so that service will be available then,” said Mauzey. “If Cowley students show me their ID, I will take 15 percent off of all services and hair products.” The cosmetology department offers a very large range of services including facials, haircuts, coloring, highlighting, pedicures and manicures, just to name a few. “We’d like to invite students to come and use our services,” said Mauzey. “Students are taught how to provide services before giving them and they are supervised.” For students who are interested in becoming cosmetologists, Mauzey said that their program allows students to train here so they are eligible for the exam. Prices are available in brochures offered in the cosmetology department. Walk-ins are welcomed or students can call for an appointment at 620-441-5284.


CP SPORTS

Tumbling, jumping, stunting and tossing

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

CP SPORTS

SEPT 29, 2009

Great coreography and kickin’ music: Danceline has it all BY CHELSEA WEATHERS Layout editor

T

he 2009 Tigerette Danceline will dazzle the audience at the Tuesday Night Madness with a hip-hop routine, dancing to Party People. The danceline features seven returning

sophomores, led by Captain Addie Gray, and fourteen freshmen. “I’m very excited for the upcoming season,” said Head Coach, Lindsay Sanderholm. “I have a bunch of very talented women this year and I was pleased to see so many freshman interested.” Cowley has two teams to accommodate

a range of talent. The danceline performs more advanced technical skills that require prior dance experience. The Pom Squad performs a variety of dances from hip-hop to novelty and experience is not required. Both squads perform at halftime and timeouts for all men and women’s home basketball games.

Sanderholm took ten girls to a NDA (National Dance Alliance) camp this summer at Kansas University in Lawrence. The team did well, earning a bid to the NCA/NDA Collegiate Nationals. Select dancers will also participate in spring competitions.

Members of the Tigerette Danceline and Pom Squad practiced a routiine that they will perform this evening at Tuesday Night Madness. They will be dancing to a hip hop routine to Party People. (photo by Kayla Moser)

TNT exploding with dyn-o-mite spirit The Cowley Spirit Squad posed for a quick team picture. First Row: Jasmin Peters, Le’Breon Jackson(manager), Krista Cross, Megan Smith, Rachel Hiwrade, Chelsi Smades, Angela Bennet, Carissa Speck, Cassidy Jordan, and Erin Drosselmeyer. Middle Row: Kelsey Zeltwanger, Mariah Fishel(Tiger Mascot), Aysia Garza, Tricia Cook, Sharell Jones, Jasmine Brown, Crystal Unger (Tiger Mascot), Jordon Williams, Whitney Thompson, Callie Case, and Katie Lewis. Back Row: Coach Hettenbach, Jaminson Lorg, Cody Perkins, Somsavanh Phouthavong, Titus Massey, Joshua Crenshaw, Cooper Brazee, Cody Kahrs, Justin Kirchoff, and Morgan Johnson. (file photo) BY RICHARD GOULD Staff writer

C

heerleading may not be cut out for everyone and there is good reason. “It’s not like any other sport,” said Cheer Coach Rikki Hettenbach. “We combine tumbling, stunting, basket tosses, jumps, pyramids and dance all together.

You have to be very talented to be able to do them all and do them well.”
 Rikki has been cheerleading since middle school and has been helping the cheerleaders with their routines. “Sometimes I will hire someone to come in but usually the cheerleaders help me come up with all the routines,” said Hettenbach.

“For the Tuesday Night Madness, my squad made up the entire routine themselves and I am very proud of them for doing it.”
 Practices for cheerleading consist of two hours of practice every day, Monday through Friday. “Then we [cheerleaders, yell leaders and Hettenbach] have work outs two days 305 South Summit Arkansas City

a week for an hour,” said Hettenbach. “I also make them attend a study hall one to two times a week.”
With time being of the essence, the team is already working on their national routine. “We are getting ready to start working on our nationals routine,” said Hettenbach. “I’m hoping to be able to take them to Texas this year for competition.”

Need Help?

(620) 442-1688 1-800-922-7874

Family Life Services and Healthy Beginnings have positive solutions to life’s problems... Maritial & individual help Free pregnancy screening ❑ Free maternity and infant clothes and supplies ❑ Healthy Beginnings prenatal program ❑ Licensed adoption services ❑ Limited Obstetric Ultrasound

BB

BY MITCH HOOVER Ad manager Two minutes left in the game, the basketball team is down by one and the crowd vibe is definitely down. Crowd enthusiasm is important when a team is down and from the looks of it, there are not many active fans. Do not fret because there is a student force ready to blow the roof off the court. This group of students is known as Totally into Tigers, otherwise known as TNT. TNT students show up at Cowley sporting events and are there to boost the morale of both the crowd and team using signs, chants, face paint and cheering. These are just some of the many ways they pump up the places they go to help the team they all love. They do not only help out on game day though. Many students around the campus help with promotion of all the athletic activities on campus. Kristi Shaw, student life director and the club’s sponsor said that TNT members are, “Kids that are helping promote events on campus tailored more towards athletics.” The TNT group is a great way to stay involved and help the athletes. “It’s a fun and exciting experience that helps pump up the rest of the crowd,” said sophomore Samantha Thieme.

TNT members hang around the gym, waiting a basketball game to begin. This year’s TNT will rock the stands with support for Cowley’s athletes. (file photo)

BB


THE

22 Chelsa Anderson 5-5 Freshman Glen Elder, Kan. Helped Beloit High School qualify for the state tournament. Will compete for playing time at the point guard position.

12 Crystal Allen 6-0 Sophomore Houston, Tex. Transfer from Panola Junior College that will help the team’s inside game.

20 Richelle Farley 5-9 Freshman Bridgetown, Barbados Solid athlete that has good leaping ability and quickness. Her sister, Karessa, is a member of the University of Iowa track and field team.

24 Maylisa Johnson 5-10 Freshman Okmulgee, Okla. She helped Preston High School win two state titles in four years. Was named the Tulsa World All-Metro Girls Basketball Player of the Year as a senior.

33 Lisa Angell 6-0 Freshman Medicine Lodge, Kan. Will provide the team with another inside presence. Will battle for playing time in the post.

14 Porsche Gavin 5-5 Freshman Rochester, N.Y. Quick player that helped lead her team to a state championship while at Nazareth Academy High School in Rochester, N.Y.

23 Brianna Gonzalez 5-9 Sophomore Andover, Kan. Working hard to come back from a second ACL injury, in which she suffered in the middle of last season. Shot 38 percent from threepoint range as a freshman.

11 Kaneesha Lee 6-2 Sophomore Phoenix, Ariz. Returning sophomore that is a good athlete and shot blocker. Came off the bench to average 2.7 points and 3.0 rebounds as a freshman.

4 Ariani Silva 5-9 Freshman Franca, Brazil Talented point guard that played on the Brazilian national team. Skilled ball handler that will make an immediate impact on the squad.

Tigers ready to pounce on the competition

35 Yahoska Legall 6-0 Freshman Brooklyn, N.Y. Raw athlete that will be in the mix for playing time at the forward position. Played for Boy’s and Girl’s High School in Brooklyn, N.Y.

41 Anna Sonka 6-0 Freshman Riga, Latvia Highly skilled wing player that is a good mid-range shooter. Will be a valuable addition to the team.

10 Maggie Vieyra 5-10 Freshman Hutchinson, Kan. Has the ability to score inside or outside. She had shoulder surgery between her junior and senior seasons at Hutchinson Trinity High School, so staying healthy will be key.

BY ANNE-MARIE SANCHEZ Staff writer The start of a new season is always exciting no matter what sport. Players look forward to winning while fans look forward to supporting their team. “It’s going to be a brand new adventure,” said Todd Clark, head women’s basketball coach. “[There are] a lot of things we need to improve on.” Clark has coached for at least 20 seasons. “We had a good team last year and

we can have a good team this year with a positive attitude,” said So. Kaneesha Lee. Last season the womens’ basketball team brought home an overall record of 24 -8. “24 to 8 was OK. It was a little disappointing at the end. I thought we could’ve done better,” said Clark, “[We need] to develop leadership and overall understanding of what we need to do to play.” “We have a lot of good girls,” said Annalisa Javregui, so. “We’re young but we have to start somewhere.”

BB

13 Melissa Easter 5-5 Freshman Andale, Kan. Solid ball handler and shooter that is working to be at full strength following an ACL injury.

CP BASKETBALL PREVIEW MEN’S BASKETBALL ROSTER 14 AJ Barber
5-10 Freshman Topeka, Kan.
 Strong guard that does lots of things well on the court. Will provide leadership to the team and be in the mix for playing time at the point

42 Gianna Woods 6-0 Sophomore Compton, Calif. Transfer from NCAA Division I Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh, Pa.. Will be looked upon to provide leadership.

Only three basketball players returned this season; Javregui, Brianna Gonzalez, sophomore, and Lee. “I think this is a new group that has a lot of work to do and over time we’ll figure out what they can and cannot do,” said Clark. “We have a good team and we’re looking forward to this season,” said Gonzalez. The tiger’s first game will be Nov. 2 against Southwestern College. The game will be in the W.S. Scott Auditorium at 5 p.m.

35 Raymond Chambers 6-6 Sophomore Clillicothe, Mo. Physical player that came of the bench to average 3.4 points and 2.6 rebounds as a freshman at Cowley.

20 Marcus Damas 
6-6 Freshman Long Island, N.Y.
 Hybrid player that can play guard or forward positions. Has a good feel for the game and good court vision

34 Annalisa Jauregui 5-3 Sophomore Winfield, Kan. Returning player that saw action in 10 games as a freshman. Will provide the team with leadership.

3 Jasamyne Saunders 5-9 Freshman Kansas City, Kan. Athletic wing player that helped lead Olathe Christian High School to a Kansas Christian Athletic Association state championship.

SEPT 29, 2009

THE

CP BASKETBALL PREVIEW WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ROSTER

SEPT 29, 2009

12 Kalub Long
5-10 Freshman Kansas City, Kan.
 Energetic player that has the ability to get to the rim. Solid on ball defender that has good mental toughness.

40 Michael Copeland
6-5 Freshman Topeka, Kan. 
Another player from threetime state champion Topeka-Highland Park. Long, athletic left-hander that is still growing. He will be vying for playing time.

30 Elijah Jones
6-7 Sophomore North Palm Beach, Fla. 
Shot 56 percent from the floor while averaging 3.6 points and 2.9
rebounds as a role player for the Tigers during the 08-09 season.

10 Canon Fields
5-10 Freshman 
Topeka, Kan.
Good facilitator of the basketball. Athletic player that is a good 
defender. Won three straight state championships at Topeka-Highland Park.



25 Tyrus McGee
6-2 Freshman
 Stringtowntown, Okla.
Averaged 36 points per game as a senior at Stringtown High School.
 Helped lead his team to four state appearances with two titles. 



33 Kelton Marshall
6-7 Freshman Wichita, Kan.
 Red shirted last season. Long, athletic player that can run the court. Solid three-point shooter that has worked hard to develop his inside game.

22 Julio Rosario
6-2 Freshman Perth Amboy, N.J. 
Quick guard that has a chance to be one of the better defensive players in the conference. Good player that will be in the mix for playing time at a wing position.



Tigers look for a fresh start under new coach

32 Dominick Cornelius
6-4 Freshman Tulsa, Okla. Helped lead Tulsa Memorial High School to the state title during the
07-08 season. Solid rebounder that will be in contention for one of the foward spots.



21 Lance Russell
6-4 Sophomore Wichita, Kan.
 Tope returning scorer from a year ago as he averaged 5.9 points. Led the team in three point baskets (36) made and free-throw percentage (80.5 percent).

BY ERIC SMITH Scene editor Last year, the Men’s basketball team had one of their most successful seasons in Cowley’s history. The team went 295, finished on top of the KJCCC and Jack Crowder was named All-American Honorable Mention. At the end of the season last year, Head Coach Steve Eck was replaced by the Head Coach of Independence, Tommy DeSalme. DeSalme brought in two assistant coaches

11 Caprest Rhone
6-0 Sophomore Leavenworth, Kan.
 Returning starter for the Tigers that averaged 5.0 points, 3.0 rebounds 
and 2.4 assists as a freshman.

15 Brent Schuck
6-7 Freshman Manhattan, Kan.
 Skilled player that shoots the ball well. Athletic player that is working on getting stronger.



from Independence, Donnie Jackson, and Anthony Shavies. The team returns four sophomores; Caprest Rhone, Lance Russell, Elijah Jones and Raymond Chambers. “I think every coach does things differently. The hardest part is for the four returning sophomores. They don’t have the consistency anymore, its like all the players are freshmen.” said DeSalme. New recruits include Freshman Julio Rosario, who was a second team all state selection in his home state of N.J. Also Brent

BB

42 Jordan Lankster
6-3 Freshman Tulsa, Okla. 
One of the most athletic players on the team that can play above the rim. Really came on towards the end of his final two years at Tulsa Central High School.

24 Joseph Wakefield
6-2 Freshman Topeka, Kan.
 Left-hander that played out of position in high school. Working on being a guard at Cowley. Has tremendous upside.



Schuck,, freshman, from Manhattan, Kan., who was on the USA Junior National Team. Cowley is the pre-season favorite to win the KJCCC conference. “Defensively we will pressure hard and play man to man 90 percent of the time. Offensively we will be structured and share the ball, we try to score points off of our defense,” said DeSalme. “We play a tough schedule. We play a tough non-conference schedule on purpose to prepare us for conference. It will be a dogfight every night.” said DeSalme.


THE

22 Chelsa Anderson 5-5 Freshman Glen Elder, Kan. Helped Beloit High School qualify for the state tournament. Will compete for playing time at the point guard position.

12 Crystal Allen 6-0 Sophomore Houston, Tex. Transfer from Panola Junior College that will help the team’s inside game.

20 Richelle Farley 5-9 Freshman Bridgetown, Barbados Solid athlete that has good leaping ability and quickness. Her sister, Karessa, is a member of the University of Iowa track and field team.

24 Maylisa Johnson 5-10 Freshman Okmulgee, Okla. She helped Preston High School win two state titles in four years. Was named the Tulsa World All-Metro Girls Basketball Player of the Year as a senior.

33 Lisa Angell 6-0 Freshman Medicine Lodge, Kan. Will provide the team with another inside presence. Will battle for playing time in the post.

14 Porsche Gavin 5-5 Freshman Rochester, N.Y. Quick player that helped lead her team to a state championship while at Nazareth Academy High School in Rochester, N.Y.

23 Brianna Gonzalez 5-9 Sophomore Andover, Kan. Working hard to come back from a second ACL injury, in which she suffered in the middle of last season. Shot 38 percent from threepoint range as a freshman.

11 Kaneesha Lee 6-2 Sophomore Phoenix, Ariz. Returning sophomore that is a good athlete and shot blocker. Came off the bench to average 2.7 points and 3.0 rebounds as a freshman.

4 Ariani Silva 5-9 Freshman Franca, Brazil Talented point guard that played on the Brazilian national team. Skilled ball handler that will make an immediate impact on the squad.

Tigers ready to pounce on the competition

35 Yahoska Legall 6-0 Freshman Brooklyn, N.Y. Raw athlete that will be in the mix for playing time at the forward position. Played for Boy’s and Girl’s High School in Brooklyn, N.Y.

41 Anna Sonka 6-0 Freshman Riga, Latvia Highly skilled wing player that is a good mid-range shooter. Will be a valuable addition to the team.

10 Maggie Vieyra 5-10 Freshman Hutchinson, Kan. Has the ability to score inside or outside. She had shoulder surgery between her junior and senior seasons at Hutchinson Trinity High School, so staying healthy will be key.

BY ANNE-MARIE SANCHEZ Staff writer The start of a new season is always exciting no matter what sport. Players look forward to winning while fans look forward to supporting their team. “It’s going to be a brand new adventure,” said Todd Clark, head women’s basketball coach. “[There are] a lot of things we need to improve on.” Clark has coached for at least 20 seasons. “We had a good team last year and

we can have a good team this year with a positive attitude,” said So. Kaneesha Lee. Last season the womens’ basketball team brought home an overall record of 24 -8. “24 to 8 was OK. It was a little disappointing at the end. I thought we could’ve done better,” said Clark, “[We need] to develop leadership and overall understanding of what we need to do to play.” “We have a lot of good girls,” said Annalisa Javregui, so. “We’re young but we have to start somewhere.”

BB

13 Melissa Easter 5-5 Freshman Andale, Kan. Solid ball handler and shooter that is working to be at full strength following an ACL injury.

CP BASKETBALL PREVIEW MEN’S BASKETBALL ROSTER 14 AJ Barber
5-10 Freshman Topeka, Kan.
 Strong guard that does lots of things well on the court. Will provide leadership to the team and be in the mix for playing time at the point

42 Gianna Woods 6-0 Sophomore Compton, Calif. Transfer from NCAA Division I Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh, Pa.. Will be looked upon to provide leadership.

Only three basketball players returned this season; Javregui, Brianna Gonzalez, sophomore, and Lee. “I think this is a new group that has a lot of work to do and over time we’ll figure out what they can and cannot do,” said Clark. “We have a good team and we’re looking forward to this season,” said Gonzalez. The tiger’s first game will be Nov. 2 against Southwestern College. The game will be in the W.S. Scott Auditorium at 5 p.m.

35 Raymond Chambers 6-6 Sophomore Clillicothe, Mo. Physical player that came of the bench to average 3.4 points and 2.6 rebounds as a freshman at Cowley.

20 Marcus Damas 
6-6 Freshman Long Island, N.Y.
 Hybrid player that can play guard or forward positions. Has a good feel for the game and good court vision

34 Annalisa Jauregui 5-3 Sophomore Winfield, Kan. Returning player that saw action in 10 games as a freshman. Will provide the team with leadership.

3 Jasamyne Saunders 5-9 Freshman Kansas City, Kan. Athletic wing player that helped lead Olathe Christian High School to a Kansas Christian Athletic Association state championship.

SEPT 29, 2009

THE

CP BASKETBALL PREVIEW WOMEN’S BASKETBALL ROSTER

SEPT 29, 2009

12 Kalub Long
5-10 Freshman Kansas City, Kan.
 Energetic player that has the ability to get to the rim. Solid on ball defender that has good mental toughness.

40 Michael Copeland
6-5 Freshman Topeka, Kan. 
Another player from threetime state champion Topeka-Highland Park. Long, athletic left-hander that is still growing. He will be vying for playing time.

30 Elijah Jones
6-7 Sophomore North Palm Beach, Fla. 
Shot 56 percent from the floor while averaging 3.6 points and 2.9
rebounds as a role player for the Tigers during the 08-09 season.

10 Canon Fields
5-10 Freshman 
Topeka, Kan.
Good facilitator of the basketball. Athletic player that is a good 
defender. Won three straight state championships at Topeka-Highland Park.



25 Tyrus McGee
6-2 Freshman
 Stringtowntown, Okla.
Averaged 36 points per game as a senior at Stringtown High School.
 Helped lead his team to four state appearances with two titles. 



33 Kelton Marshall
6-7 Freshman Wichita, Kan.
 Red shirted last season. Long, athletic player that can run the court. Solid three-point shooter that has worked hard to develop his inside game.

22 Julio Rosario
6-2 Freshman Perth Amboy, N.J. 
Quick guard that has a chance to be one of the better defensive players in the conference. Good player that will be in the mix for playing time at a wing position.



Tigers look for a fresh start under new coach

32 Dominick Cornelius
6-4 Freshman Tulsa, Okla. Helped lead Tulsa Memorial High School to the state title during the
07-08 season. Solid rebounder that will be in contention for one of the foward spots.



21 Lance Russell
6-4 Sophomore Wichita, Kan.
 Tope returning scorer from a year ago as he averaged 5.9 points. Led the team in three point baskets (36) made and free-throw percentage (80.5 percent).

BY ERIC SMITH Scene editor Last year, the Men’s basketball team had one of their most successful seasons in Cowley’s history. The team went 295, finished on top of the KJCCC and Jack Crowder was named All-American Honorable Mention. At the end of the season last year, Head Coach Steve Eck was replaced by the Head Coach of Independence, Tommy DeSalme. DeSalme brought in two assistant coaches

11 Caprest Rhone
6-0 Sophomore Leavenworth, Kan.
 Returning starter for the Tigers that averaged 5.0 points, 3.0 rebounds 
and 2.4 assists as a freshman.

15 Brent Schuck
6-7 Freshman Manhattan, Kan.
 Skilled player that shoots the ball well. Athletic player that is working on getting stronger.



from Independence, Donnie Jackson, and Anthony Shavies. The team returns four sophomores; Caprest Rhone, Lance Russell, Elijah Jones and Raymond Chambers. “I think every coach does things differently. The hardest part is for the four returning sophomores. They don’t have the consistency anymore, its like all the players are freshmen.” said DeSalme. New recruits include Freshman Julio Rosario, who was a second team all state selection in his home state of N.J. Also Brent

BB

42 Jordan Lankster
6-3 Freshman Tulsa, Okla. 
One of the most athletic players on the team that can play above the rim. Really came on towards the end of his final two years at Tulsa Central High School.

24 Joseph Wakefield
6-2 Freshman Topeka, Kan.
 Left-hander that played out of position in high school. Working on being a guard at Cowley. Has tremendous upside.



Schuck,, freshman, from Manhattan, Kan., who was on the USA Junior National Team. Cowley is the pre-season favorite to win the KJCCC conference. “Defensively we will pressure hard and play man to man 90 percent of the time. Offensively we will be structured and share the ball, we try to score points off of our defense,” said DeSalme. “We play a tough schedule. We play a tough non-conference schedule on purpose to prepare us for conference. It will be a dogfight every night.” said DeSalme.


CP SPORTS

Tumbling, jumping, stunting and tossing

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

CP SPORTS

SEPT 29, 2009

Great coreography and kickin’ music: Danceline has it all BY CHELSEA WEATHERS Layout editor

T

he 2009 Tigerette Danceline will dazzle the audience at the Tuesday Night Madness with a hip-hop routine, dancing to Party People. The danceline features seven returning

sophomores, led by Captain Addie Gray, and fourteen freshmen. “I’m very excited for the upcoming season,” said Head Coach, Lindsay Sanderholm. “I have a bunch of very talented women this year and I was pleased to see so many freshman interested.” Cowley has two teams to accommodate

a range of talent. The danceline performs more advanced technical skills that require prior dance experience. The Pom Squad performs a variety of dances from hip-hop to novelty and experience is not required. Both squads perform at halftime and timeouts for all men and women’s home basketball games.

Sanderholm took ten girls to a NDA (National Dance Alliance) camp this summer at Kansas University in Lawrence. The team did well, earning a bid to the NCA/NDA Collegiate Nationals. Select dancers will also participate in spring competitions.

Members of the Tigerette Danceline and Pom Squad practiced a routiine that they will perform this evening at Tuesday Night Madness. They will be dancing to a hip hop routine to Party People. (photo by Kayla Moser)

TNT exploding with dyn-o-mite spirit The Cowley Spirit Squad posed for a quick team picture. First Row: Jasmin Peters, Le’Breon Jackson(manager), Krista Cross, Megan Smith, Rachel Hiwrade, Chelsi Smades, Angela Bennet, Carissa Speck, Cassidy Jordan, and Erin Drosselmeyer. Middle Row: Kelsey Zeltwanger, Mariah Fishel(Tiger Mascot), Aysia Garza, Tricia Cook, Sharell Jones, Jasmine Brown, Crystal Unger (Tiger Mascot), Jordon Williams, Whitney Thompson, Callie Case, and Katie Lewis. Back Row: Coach Hettenbach, Jaminson Lorg, Cody Perkins, Somsavanh Phouthavong, Titus Massey, Joshua Crenshaw, Cooper Brazee, Cody Kahrs, Justin Kirchoff, and Morgan Johnson. (file photo) BY RICHARD GOULD Staff writer

C

heerleading may not be cut out for everyone and there is good reason. “It’s not like any other sport,” said Cheer Coach Rikki Hettenbach. “We combine tumbling, stunting, basket tosses, jumps, pyramids and dance all together.

You have to be very talented to be able to do them all and do them well.”
 Rikki has been cheerleading since middle school and has been helping the cheerleaders with their routines. “Sometimes I will hire someone to come in but usually the cheerleaders help me come up with all the routines,” said Hettenbach.

“For the Tuesday Night Madness, my squad made up the entire routine themselves and I am very proud of them for doing it.”
 Practices for cheerleading consist of two hours of practice every day, Monday through Friday. “Then we [cheerleaders, yell leaders and Hettenbach] have work outs two days 305 South Summit Arkansas City

a week for an hour,” said Hettenbach. “I also make them attend a study hall one to two times a week.”
With time being of the essence, the team is already working on their national routine. “We are getting ready to start working on our nationals routine,” said Hettenbach. “I’m hoping to be able to take them to Texas this year for competition.”

Need Help?

(620) 442-1688 1-800-922-7874

Family Life Services and Healthy Beginnings have positive solutions to life’s problems... Maritial & individual help Free pregnancy screening ❑ Free maternity and infant clothes and supplies ❑ Healthy Beginnings prenatal program ❑ Licensed adoption services ❑ Limited Obstetric Ultrasound

BB

BY MITCH HOOVER Ad manager Two minutes left in the game, the basketball team is down by one and the crowd vibe is definitely down. Crowd enthusiasm is important when a team is down and from the looks of it, there are not many active fans. Do not fret because there is a student force ready to blow the roof off the court. This group of students is known as Totally into Tigers, otherwise known as TNT. TNT students show up at Cowley sporting events and are there to boost the morale of both the crowd and team using signs, chants, face paint and cheering. These are just some of the many ways they pump up the places they go to help the team they all love. They do not only help out on game day though. Many students around the campus help with promotion of all the athletic activities on campus. Kristi Shaw, student life director and the club’s sponsor said that TNT members are, “Kids that are helping promote events on campus tailored more towards athletics.” The TNT group is a great way to stay involved and help the athletes. “It’s a fun and exciting experience that helps pump up the rest of the crowd,” said sophomore Samantha Thieme.

TNT members hang around the gym, waiting a basketball game to begin. This year’s TNT will rock the stands with support for Cowley’s athletes. (file photo)

BB


CPSCENE

CP NEWS

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

Murder mystery in time for Halloween BY ERIC SMITH Scene editor

W

ith a week left until opening night, the theater department is putting the finishing touches on their performance of “The House on the Cliff”. Tickets are $8 for general-admission, $5 for students and free for Golden Tiger Card members. Tickets are currently on sale at the box-office from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Students can also call in at 441-5570. “[Rehearsals] are going well,” said Scott MacLaughlin, theater director. “We are in a

scary. I saw the title and it said it was a mystery comedy. I thought this might be neat and it works great in the fall with Halloween coming up.” The play is set in the early the 1950’s. All of the scenes will be in the same room which is, as the title suggests, a house on a cliff. The set is being designed by Jamison Rhoads. “The set is the home of a rich family, so I want to convey a sense of wealth and a sense of scale,” said Rhoads. “I want it to be grandiose. I also want to convey a sense

of isolation. One of the main characters, Ellen, is in a wheelchair. She came off as bird-like. The idea was to present the stage as a birdcage, because she is caged in by her chair and by her family.” There are also many students coming together and helping with the set as the show gets closer. “It is fun watching [the set] being developed and watching it grow,” said sophomore Clinton Haas. “We make the set for the family, not for the show.”

That would be memorizing lines and choreography at the same time. Why did you decide to come to Cowley? My cousin, Josh Cobble, persuaded me. They told me to come and I liked it What is your favorite part about theater? Being able to perform. It is my passion to be on stage. What is your major? Music Education. “House on the Cliff” will take place on Oct. 8-10. It will begin at 7:30 p.m. on all three nights. (photo by Carly Budd)

The motive behind automotives

Staff writer

Two thousand dollars is not something that college students would give up easily, but for freshman Kyle Tatro and his dad, it is money well spent. Tatro and his father enjoy fixing up vehicles. Together they work on an ’81 Silverado and, in his spare time, Tatro fixes up a ’57 Chevy Pickup into a daily driver. Tatro has been working on vehicles ever since he was young.

Where are you from?

What is the hardest part about being in a play and CC Singers?

~ Jamison Rhoads

BY TREVOR BLACK

Amy Dunlap Wylie, Texas.

I want it to be grandiose. I also want to convey a sense of isolation.

difficult period. The lines are learned and we are trying to get it put all together. It is a creative and stressful time.” The play is a murder mystery written by George Batson in 1957. It is a very small play featuring only six roles. “[The hardest part is] for the actors to act believable in an unbelievable situation,” said MacLaughlin, “I have always wanted to do [a mystery]. I was a big Hardy Boys fan and a fan of Encyclopedia Brown. I love the feeling of suspense and I was looking for a good play to do that is borderline

Behind The Scenes

“I was kind of born into it,” said Tatro. “My whole family does it.” Tatro loves fixing up his trucks. He just got his 350 engine running, but he plans on tearing it down, cleaning it up and putting it back in his truck. His dad has taught him a lot

Tatro said. “I recommend that class.” Cowley offers several classes for people who are interested in automotives. “Two of my favorite classes are Electrical/Electronics and Engine Performance,” said Jim Ailey, automotive instructor. “Electrical/Electronic is a great place to start to learn about vehicles because every system has something to do with electronics.” Engine performance deals with fuel, exhaust, ignition timing, emissions, intake and other subjects. “I’ve always wanted to design a system on a vehicle like suspension or drive train and be able to Tatro looked under the hood of his truck. Between him and his work with it and dad, they have spent nearly $2000 on improvements. (photo by have it produced,” Trevor Black) Tatro said. He plans on majoring in about what he knows, but a few classes engineering, but he has decided to move his have also been helpful. focus to Aerospace Engineering because of “I have earned my [Automotive Service his location with the surrounding aerospace Technology] certificate here at Cowley,” companies.

14

What do you do in your spare time? I hang with my friends. We chill and do nothing and I study lines. What are your plans after Cowley? No idea. I am planning a trip to Europe. I will do that right after I graduate.

SEPT 29, 2009

Making a big change, one micro loan at a time BY RICHARD GOULD Staff writer

M

ost college students are familiar with loans from the borrowing end of the exchange. Social science instructor, Kathy Hendricks has a group of students who are getting a feel for the lending side of the deal. The idea came to Hendricks via an episode of 60 Minutes featuring KIVA, a person-to-person micro-lending website. “It was on 60 Minutes and they showed, I think it was actually one of the guys on 60 Minutes that had gotten involved in it, and they were showing it there. It was the first time I have ever heard of it,” she said. “When you browse entrepreneurs’ profiles on the site, choose someone to lend to, and then make a loan, you are helping a real person make great strides towards economic independence and improve life for themselves, their family, and their community,” said the kiva.org site. “Throughout the course of the loan (usually 6-12 months), you can receive email journal updates and track repayments. Then, when you get your loan money back, you can relend to someone else in need.” KIVA began in 2004 when Matt Flannery and Jessica Jackley visited East Africa and “discovered the power of micro finance firsthand.” According to kiva.org the total value of all loans made through KIVA amounts to $93,012,885 with a repayment rate of 98.46 percent. Hendricks’ classes are doing their part to help entrepreneurs across the globe. The social science instructor said she is “letting the students vote. I pull [the options] up online and you can see them. “It tells [the students] their story and then we have just been picking in class.” Those who contribute to the cause are recognized on the site. “Anybody looking at their

webpage can see that Cowley College gave money and when you click on the Cowley College [logo] you can see where it is located.” Hendricks’ class raises money by selling candy bars and asking for donations. “For the last two semesters, social science students have been donating money (some in exchange for candy), although one student gave $400 anonymously.” Thus far Cowley College students have contributed “$1025 and that is 12 loans total,” said Hendricks. “Our first loan was made to Rehema Ikoyi in Tanzania for clothing sales,”

Countries all over the world have been helped thanks to KIVA. The countries shaded in the right demonstrate just how far reaching KIVA has been with their microloan program started by Matt Flannery and Jessica Jackley. (illustration by Alison Jamerson)

Library undergoes brand new renovations BY TREVOR BLACK Staff writer

If you have walked past the library lately, you may have noticed the smell of unsettled dust in the air and the loud sounds of hammering and destruction going on within the building. But all of this noise and construction was part of a plan to help the students and staff. The construction has been part of a plan that Rhoda MacLaughlin, library director, has been expecting for several years. Many extra resources have been brought to the library. Twenty-five extra computers are now accessible to the campus along with two more printers giving it a total of four. Any prints relating to college classes will be free, but all non-college related material will need permission and will cost 10 cents. “Through grant monies from the South Central Kansas Library System, the college library was able to afford the purchase of a

said Hendricks. “The money was used to increase her inventory and she has now repaid 100 percent of her loan.” Another loan helped a woman who needed $125. “She does rice farming in the Philippines and we loaned her the whole amount,” said Hendricks . “She’ll use that to do you know expand her business grow more rice and buy fertilizer.” With all the work done, Hendricks says “Thank you for all that have helped.” For the cost of a Sonic drink, students can make a contribution that could make all the difference to a person across the world.

new circulation desk,” MacLaughlin said. Along with the printers, computers, and the circulation desk, the library also received new seating. With this new seating, the bookshelves had to be rearranged and the storage room downstairs was cleaned out. Because of all of the new technology the library had to expand on its electricity, which is the current goal of construction. Several other improvements were made. The tutors were brought to a back room where they would be alone to help their students. During the summer “CREDOreference” and “American History in Video”, which are two new databases, were added to the library’s online collection. The library is always adding new print titles to its collection and the end result of construction will be for students to have a more spacious area for studying and more available computers.

In the Korean American culture there is a similar system built into the community. Members of a kye contribution to a fund which will in turn be given to a member as a loan to offset the expenses of starting a business or expanding an existing one. Kyes are “rotating credit associations,” according to qcpages.qc.edu, [Queens College]. “A Kye consists of a group who pool their funds on a regular basis,” according to the April 1991 article by Ruby Danta, an anthropologist and the translation program coordinator at the Asian/American Center. “By taking turns, each member is entitled to the entire pot until all members have had their chance.” The kye was developed to give immigrants an opportunity to live “the American Dream”. In the mid-1970s new immigrants from Korea had to rely on relatives to provide shelter, room, and employment. “In 1978 the Korean government lifted the $1,000 limit that Korean immigrants could bring to the U.S., and in 1979, it was raised to $3,000,” according to Danta’s article. It would not be until the 1980s that the limit would increase to $100,000 then to $200,000 in the 1990s. Danta compiled the information for the article above in part from “The Korean American Dream: Ideology and Small Business in Queens, New York” by Kyeyoung Park. Park is a visiting assistant professor of anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Kye has a long history in Korea, where it is used as a means of meeting any financial need,” according to “Korean Small Businesses in New York City,” by Danta.

Offers and savings at the cosmetology department BY ANNE-MARIE SANCHEZ Staff writer

Ireland Hall is the large castle-like building made of Silverdale Stone catty corner from the police station. It chimes pretty melodies at noon and 4:45 for fifteen minutes. Apart from that, it chimes every hour and every half hour. Ireland Hall is beautiful on the outside and on the inside there is a basement that holds the secret cosmetology department. “We used to be located on Kansas and 8th street but that’s Hawk’s Funeral Home now,” said Pat Mauzey, cosmetology instructor and director. “We moved into Ireland Hall in 1981. I’ve been teaching cosmetology since March 1975. My mom and dad owned a private beauty college for 20 years called Vernon Beauty College so I grew up around it.” “The students this year are showing real talent early,” said Val Roderick, cosmetology instructor. The students will be avail-

7

able to give haircuts, coloring and other such services on Oct. 13. “In November, students will learn how to apply artificial nails so that service will be available then,” said Mauzey. “If Cowley students show me their ID, I will take 15 percent off of all services and hair products.” The cosmetology department offers a very large range of services including facials, haircuts, coloring, highlighting, pedicures and manicures, just to name a few. “We’d like to invite students to come and use our services,” said Mauzey. “Students are taught how to provide services before giving them and they are supervised.” For students who are interested in becoming cosmetologists, Mauzey said that their program allows students to train here so they are eligible for the exam. Prices are available in brochures offered in the cosmetology department. Walk-ins are welcomed or students can call for an appointment at 620-441-5284.


CP NEWS

BY MITCH HOOVER Ad manager

Which clubs are you involved in at Cowley? 
First off, I am the Secretary of SGA but I am also a Student Ambassador as well as a Cowley Captain. Some other clubs that I am in are the Math and Science Club and Phi Theta Kappa. I am also a Cowley Tutor.

 What is your major?
 Last year, my major was Pre-Pharmacy. However, I decided that I wanted to work more with numbers, so I decided to change it to Business Administration with accounting as well.

What do you do for fun?
 Usually, I am at the school because my only free time is on the weekends. However, on the weekends, I am usually doing something outdoors with my boyfriend or spending time with my family.

If you were to be any kind of food, what would you be?
 Something that everyone wants, that tastes good no matter what. How about a warm, gooey chocolate chip cookie fresh out of the oven.

If you were stuck on a desert island what three things would you need? 
My cell phone with service because what good would it do without service and an everlasting battery, Pepsi and a comfortable mattress (none of those rock hard beds, I cannot sleep on those).



Is your glass half empty or half full?
 Depends on the day. Most of the time it’s half full, but we all have those days where it’s just ugh. So then, it’s half empty.



Do you have any weird phobias? 
I really don’t like feet, probably because I hate my feet. They are just weird things that help us move around.

Pencils or pens? Pens, they are prettier.



How does it feel to be student of the month? 
I was really excited to get student of the

Phi Theta Kappa attends regional conference BY MEGAN BERRY Editor-in-chief n Sept. 11-12, seven Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) officers and two sponsors attended the 2009 Kansas Region Leadership Conference in Manhattan. “I got a chance to meet many people from different community colleges and learned more experiences from their chapters about how to get more people involved in the club activities,” said sophomore Phuong Huynh, co-president of PTK. The conference theme had to deal with environment. Students from all over Kansas gathered in the student union to listen to speakers. They were welcomed by Dr. Pat Boscoe, KSU vice president of student life and dean of students. The KSU director of environmental sustainability, Ben Champion talked about what KSU was doing at their campus to keep the environment healthy such as recycling and greening their buildings. Dr. Eva Horne, assistant director of the Konza Prairie biological station, talked to the members about the biological research station that KSU has and showed them how the ranchers in that area take care of the land. There were many breakout sessions for the members to attend where they learned about how to run for a regional officer, officer training, civic reflection, and definitions of leadership. Members attended a fellowship on Friday night, did shopping in Aggieville and had the chance to tour the KSU campus. They also went to the KSU Union to participate in cosmic bowling and visit with the other groups. “It’s always fun just to get with all of the advisers from the other campuses,” said Melinda Neal, co-advisor and natural science instructor.  Towards the end, they were given trash bags and they went around the KSU campus picking up trash. PTK will attend the Honor’s Institute held at Pittsburg State in November. In March, they will travel to Salina to the Regional Conference where they will receive awards.  “We also have the International Conference if we choose to go to that and that’s in April,” said Neal. PTK stays very involved on the campus. “We are starting our recycling with ACES and that should be happening in the next week or so,” said Neal. They are planning to put receptacles in the dorms for the students to put their recycling materials in such as paper, newspaper, magazines, aluminum cans, plastics and bottles. “At this workshop I learned how other chapters start their recycling plan at their community colleges and their experiences in the recycling program,” said Huynh. “They also gave me a lot of advice [about] how to begin the recycling project within the campus and the dorms.”

O month because it helped show that all the things that I do are recognized and aren’t just taken for granted.

 How does it feel to be the FIRST student of the month?
 This makes the honor even greater because it shows that I made that much more of an impact on people that much sooner.

 Sandals or shoes?
 Shoes or heels, sandals show my feet too much and I just don’t like that. Where are you going after Cowley?
 Right now, I am looking at WSU or OSU to further my business administration major. It is going to depend on money unfortunately.

6

CP SCENE

Sharing creative talent there,” said Cervantes. “We’re looking everyone of the event. “We’re still in the BY MEGAN BERRY forward to that again.” early stages, but we encourage everyone to Editor-in-chief Cash prizes will be given for first check it out,” said Carson. howcasing creative talent with and second place in each category. The show is very informal and students original skits and works is what The categories vary from year to year; should not feel pressured or scared to get the Creative Claws annual talent sometimes they have more singing and up in front of the crowd. “Take the dive,” show is all about. “Cowley just has really other at times more dancing. “It’s a fun said Carson. “People always have a great good writers and singers,” said Marlys night,” said Cervantes. “There’s good talent time. The audience will love you.” Cervantes, “For someone humanities who is skeptical, I instructor. “I think they should think people a give it a try,” lot of times don’t said Jessica Dyer, have enough freshman and opportunity to vice president of get their work creative claws. out there.” “College is about It will take new experiences, place Tues. Oct. whether that may 13 at 7 p.m. in be getting out Brown Center of your room to and costs $2 watch or trying or $1 and a out to be in the nonperishable show.” food item. Cervantes This is the said that third year for students can find the annual show Creative Claws and it has been on Facebook for very successful more information. in the past. “The “We’re just getting whole thing was TMU, a percussion ensemble made up of student, staff and faculty, performed at the 2008 that site built so fantastic,” said it may not have a talent show. The union took first place in the orginal works category. (file photo) Joanna Carson, whole lot there yet sophomore and president of creative claws. and there’s funny things happening.” but it’ll keep having more,” said Cervantes. “Lots of laughs and great performances.” The show usually has twelve acts lasting All students interested in the talent Cervantes said that they are open for a from three to four minutes each. Acts do not show need to turn in their entry forms to number of different talents such as singing, have to be single; there can be duet acting Cervantes in the humanities department dancing, skits, poetry and more. Anyone and small group acting as well. by Oct. 8. If anyone has a question or who attends the college can participate, As of now, the club is putting up needs information, contact Cervantes at including faculty members. “We generally fliers and Carson is planning to do cervantes@cowley.edu or one can e-mail have a good responsive crowd that is some sidewalk chalk drawing to remind Carson at carsonj439282@mail.cowley.edu.

S

Halo 3: ODST hits the mark BY IAN WHITLEY Campus editor

From destroying the flood army in story mode, to destroying the enemy team in matchmaking, many gamers have fond memories of playing Halo 3. That feeling

Student Discount-15% off

DINE IN CARRY OUT DELIVERY

that one gets when they zoom in with a sniper scope and pull the trigger right on the enemies’ head, or when they jump over someone and deftly assassinate them, is one of a kind. For many, those memories have not ended yet and they continue to play Halo 3. Now gamers can create more memories with a new game, Halo 3: ODST. ODST stands for Orbital Drop Shock Trooper, which is exactly the role you take on in the game. In this game, you do not play as the super soldier Master Chief or

Arbiter. You play as a normal soldier. While still highly trained, these soldiers cannot jump as high, take as many bullets or aim with two weapons like Master Chief and Arbiter could. The story takes place on the planet of New Mombasa, where the Rookie (the player) prepares to land with the squad of ODST’s he is in. The player gets separated from the team at the beginning of the game and must venture through the large city they landed in and find them. The story unfolds as the player finds different clues in the destroyed city and fights through Covenant forces. Overall it looks to be a good addition to the Halo franchise. The story mode is completely new and different, playing as a normal human instead of the super powered Master Chief. However, it also has a multiplayer mode that is the exact same as Halo 3, and players can play with people who have Halo 3. It looks like Bungie has brought us yet another great first person shooter game to enjoy for hours on end.

442-9999

(photo found on Google Image Search)

15

SEPT 29, 2009

CP

THE C O M I N G A T T R A C T I O N S

Student of the Month Allison Nittler

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

Teen Book Club Sept. 30, the Teen Book Club will be meeting in the Teen Room at the Ark City Public Library at 4 p.m. The House on the Cliff Oct. 8-10

The theater department will be performing The House on the Cliff at the Brown

Center at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.  

Creative Claws Talent Show Oct. 13

Signup sheets are in the

humanities office and must be turned in the by Oct. 8. The Talent show will be in

the Brown Center at 7 p.m. Karaoke sponsored by

‘PAWS’itive promotions Oct. 15

Students are welcome to come and sing karaoke between 10 p.m. and

midnight at the Alumni Bar and Grill.

The Cowley County Writers’ Guild Oct. 15 A new group for interested writers will be held in the west room of the Pubic Library at 7 p.m. starting Oct. 15, and continuing tentatively on every third Thursday of the month.

NEW RELEASES

Kiss: Sonic Boom (CD) Oct. 6 Kiss will release their new album at only Wal-Mart and Sam’s club.  The album will only feature two original members, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley.   Transformers 2 (DVD) Oct. 20 Shia LaBeouf and Megan Fox star in one of the summer’s biggest blockbusters


Bluegrass Festival BY ERIC SMITH Scene editor

T

winner of the festival. Bryan McDowell of Canton, N.C., won the National Flat Picking Guitar, Walnut Valley Mandolin and Walnut Valley Old Time Fiddle competitions. The Pecan Grove is the most famous place to camp and is known for the saying, “Anything goes in Pecan Grove”. The Pecan Grove is the home to stage five. Although it is not an official stage, it is one of the most popular. It features artists from everywhere and is on the back of a pick-up truck. Along with stage five, the grove also

he Walnut Valley Festival is one of the longest, and probably the most famous traditions in Winfield and Cowley County. It has been going on for 37 years. In 1999, the International Bluegrass association named it the very first “Bluegrass Event of the Year”. The festival is here to highlight the best bluegrass and folk musicians in the world. Artists come from all places around the world from such as Nashville, N.Y. and even Japan and Italy. Most bands consist of acoustic string instruments such as guitars, fiddles, mandolins, cellos and banjos. Some bands have more exotic instruments such as dulcimers, accordions, autoharps, saxophones or anything else they can think of using. There is a lot of diversity in the artists at the festival. For instance, if you like classical western musicians, you would be drawn to Bill Warwick, who was the Western Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year in 2007 and 2008. If you are more into folk and storytelling music, you would probably like John McCutcheon. Bill Barwick performed during one of the shows at the Walnut Some other Valley Bluegrass Festival. Thousands of people attended the interesting bands festival. (photo by Carly Budd) include the Wiyos from Brooklyn, who have combined bluegrass with the has stage 4.75, stage six, and stage seven. jazz and blues of the 1930’s, or the David There are usually many people found Munnelly Band from County Mayo, Ireland jamming in the streets. that combine bluegrass with Celtic Folk There are other campsites on the east songs. side of the fairgrounds and on the north The fairgrounds at Winfield consist side across the highway. Most of the of the stage area in the middle, which is campsites near the main stages are where surrounded by campgrounds and parking the RVs park. spaces. It contains all of the main stages. Uptown Studio’s in Winfield ran stage Stage one is at the grandstands and is 4.75. One of the people running the studio where all the main acts play. Stage two is was Sophomore Ben Byers. the second largest and is on a hill where “[My favorite part about bluegrass is] all people are able to set up chairs. Stage three of the amazing talent and personalities in is also outside. Stage four is the only stage one place,” said Byers. inside and it is where all of the competition takes place such as the National Flat Pick Guitar competition. This year featured the very first triple

THE

CP SCENE BY CHRISTOPHER BALES Online editor It is a college student’s worst nightmare. You have been working on a major paper or project for a couple of weeks on your computer and you have finally completed it. The project is saved and everything seems to be in order when tragedy strikes. You go to the folder that the file was stored in and for some reason the files have been deleted. You begin to panic as you think that there is no hope to save your lost files. Everything in the world is crashing down around you. With the project down the drain, you will surely suffer from a major blow to your course grade. That blow to your grade is going to destroy your chances of passing the class. Soon you will realize that you will not be able to graduate. You know that there is absolutely no way you are going to be able to get all that work back so you begin to cry for hours on end while rocking back and forth in the fetal position. Well, maybe it will not be that dramatic, but you get the gist. Losing something that you have spent hours of hard work on is not only a blow to your schedule, but it is also a major blow to your emotions. All those long hours of researching countless materials and sifting around for the correct information is tedious and time consuming, so naturally you are going to be a bit miffed, frustrated and extremely depressed when it all just seemingly disappears in front of your eyes. Wipe away those tears of hopelessness and take some time to follow these steps to see if all of that doom and gloom attitude is necessary.

In Word, click File, then Open. Navigate to the folder you think the file used to be located in and make sure All Files *.* is selected. Are there any .wbk files there? Select it and see if it is what you are looking for. 5.) Still no dice? Send out a *.wbk search party. This step is the same as the first search party step, but now search for *.wbk files. You might find a few. Open them up, one by one. 6.) Search your temporary files. Again, this is like step one. But search for *.TMP files this time. You will come up with a lot, so change the When was it modified? to the last week or so. 7.) Search even more of your temporary files. Some temporary files like to be unique. Search for those with ~*.* this time. 8.) Open up C:\Documents and Settings\*USERNAME*\Local Settings\ Temp This is a hidden folder, so you’ll probably have to use Windows Explorer. Hit Start, then All Programs. Go to Accessories, then Windows Explorer. Navigate to that folder, where *USERNAME* is whatever your computer calls you. Do you see your document in that folder? If none of those steps work, there are also programs that will help you recover deleted files. Therefore, this is the ninth and final option. What is important to understand here is that if you delete something, it is not actually deleted. Rather, it sits in a pile waiting to be overwritten. Therefore, the best way to recover a deleted file would be to try to find it right away before it is overwritten. If you would like to use a program, I would recommend Restoration (http:// www.snapfiles.com/get/restoration.html) or Recuva (http://www.piriform.com/ recuva) since both are free. I personally prefer Recuva to Restoration because it provides a more user-friendly interface and it is more visually appealing. While neither program is able to recover files from a formatted drive, they can still offer some hope of basic recovery. Both programs have the potential to recover music files, video files, images, documents, and a wide variety of other file formats. Some Tips to keep in mind when using data recovery programs: As soon as you realize your data has been deleted, stop using the computer! The less activity the better to avoid dangerous disk-swap activity. 1. Find and download data recovery software on another computer. 2. Save the recovery tool to a flash drive and run it directly from there. 3. Save the extracted data back onto the flash drive for added safety. Before you begin to rock back and forth in the fetal position, see if you can recover your files, save yourself from some embarrassment, emotional stress and failing grades with these nine simple steps

CP NEWS

BY ANNE SANCHEZ Staff writer

I

n 1976, the Ark City Tumbleweeds car club got started and that same year the Last Run car show premiered. To avoid competing with other shows, the Tumbleweeds scheduled the show in September. They had 75 entries. Now there are definitely over 75 cars at the present car show. Paris Park is packed with chopped cars, motorcycles, classic roadsters, Ford, Chevy and people.

hobby; it is a family lifestyle. “My father and brother were into hot rods so I grew up with it,” said Jonathan McCoy, Woodland, Okla. “I also have a 1955 Chevy that I’m restoring.” McCoy was showing a silver 1967 Camaro. There were not just all-American cars either. There was many buffed out motorcycles. “I’ve been riding bikes since I was 12,” said Daryl Botkin. Botkin is from Wellington and showed a red 2007 Hilltop. Many people at the car show have very

What is important to understand here is that if you delete something, it is not actually deleted.

1.) Send out a search party. In Windows, click Start, Search, All files and folders. Type what you remember of the name or simply *.doc to get all your Word documents. Select My Computer under Look In, and then under More Advanced Options, make sure Search Hidden Files and Folders is checked. Then hit Search. 2.) Still no luck? Check your Recycle Bin. Open it up and look through whatever files you have. Did you find it? If so, right-click and choose Restore. Then if you are not sure where it actually restored to, perform a search for it. 3.) You can pray for Auto Recover. Sometimes if Word crashes or closes unexpectedly, it will still save what you had or part of it. Re-open Word. If a Document Recovery task pane comes up, double-click your document to open it and immediately click Save As. 4.) If you have Word set to automatically back-up your documents, there is still a chance here. Check the original folder for any .wbk files.

16

SEPT 29, 2009

The Last Run Car Show The Swine Flu, H1N1 Virus

Rachel Curtiss, freshman, views one of the cars from the show. There were several hundred entries. (photo by Carly Budd) “This is the second year I brought a car,” said David Tyler, Ponca City, Okla. “It’s always been a hobby of mine.” Tyler owns several cars including a 1942 Ford Coupe, a 1933 Dodge Pu and a 1946 Ford Pu. Not far from Tyler’s collection of vehicles, is a 1965 El Camino. Its owner, Gary A. Long from Ark City, sits near-by. Many people come not just to show off cars but also to shop for cars. “[When] I bought it back in 2001, it was in a field,” said Long. “It was junk. I paid $50 dollars for it. We spent three years rebuilding it.” Working on cars is not just a small time

fond memories of their vehicles. “I’ve had it for about thirty years,” said Maleah Right of Ark City. “I bought it from a college girl in Winfield.” Right showed her silver 1975 MG Midget. “I restored it for her three years ago,” said Chuck Right. Sitting in the driver’s seat was a gray monkey puppet. “Willy is our mascot and we’ve had him for twenty years at least,” said Right. The Last Run car show is a special event for many avid car fans. For more information, the Ark City Tumbleweeds have a website at http://www.actumbleweeds.com/.

From 10 a.m. to noon, the Crafter’s Corner will be held in the East meeting room of the Public Library for no charge. Beverages will be provided.

Allied Health Center in Winfield. There is no cost to attend the event. The Medical Careers Day will consist of information regarding the programs and degrees offered by Cowley as well as a tour of the facilities. The event will run from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. with registration beginning at 1:45 p.m. To register online, go to www.cowley.edu/ allied/careers.

Free Adult Movie Night will take place at the Public Library’s Basement viewing room, featuring the 1931 version of Dracula, starring Bela Lugosi. It will be held at 6:30 p.m. and popcorn will be provided. Gaming for Grown-Ups will be held from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the East meeting room of the Public Library for free. There is a Wii, Playstation 2 and several games to try out. If a student is wanting to learn more about medical programs and degrees offered by Cowley College, then register to attend the school’s Medical Careers Day Oct. 21 at the

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

BY CHRISTOPHER BALES Online editor

to the spring of this year, no one has ever been exposed to. Therefore, no one is automatically immune. Who would have ever thought that poor 5. If you have the normal flu, your Porky Pig or the innocent Miss Piggy would symptoms usually last a few days at most. have ever been responsible for something In the case of swine flu, however, the as horrible as the Swine Flu (H1N1 Virus) symptoms may last seven days or longer. pandemic? How could these two lovable 6. Almost everyone has heard of it and characters from the past have created such they are beginning to panic. a horrifyingly destructive plague that will 7. The reason that there is so much hype surely destroy the entire world? behind the swine flu is because it is a new Well, it is not their fault. All of the strain of influenza that happened to make gloom and doom talk that the mass media a successful jump from an animal host to a is perpetuating human host. From there, is blowing the it proceeded to spread facts widely out instead of dying off like of proportion and most other viruses that destroying the attempt the same feat. reputations of these If you are worried two plump patriots. about the virus, the The truth is that Center for Disease swine flu is no more Control (CDC) offers dangerous than the some advice and tips: normal flu. There -To help fight the are also no major spread of this flu, cover differences between your nose and mouth the two aside from a (photo courtesy of ready2beat.com) with a tissue when you few key factors: cough or sneeze, then 1. The H1N1 Virus, unlike the flu throw the tissue away. viruses that have spread in the past, -Wash your hands often with soap mainly targets people who have a stronger and water, especially after coughing or immune system rather than those who sneezing. have a weaker one. Globally, of the 300,000 -Check with your local leaders, schools, laboratory confirmed and more than employers and other community groups 450,000 probable cases of swine flu, the about their plans in the event of an average age of infected people is 15; two outbreak in your community. thirds are younger than 18. This preference -You may want to contact your health of infecting youths is behavior of a flu care provider particularly if you are pandemic rather than a seasonal flu. worried about your symptoms. Your health 2. Unlike seasonal flu, those over age 65 care provider will determine whether are not at high risk of catching and having influenza testing or treatment is needed. serious complications with Novel Swine - If you have flu-like symptoms, stay flu A-H1N1/09. This may be the result of home, recover, and keep others well. This residual immunity from some similar flu might mean postponing your travel plans. in the past to which those in this age group -Do not travel for seven days after your were exposed. symptoms begin or until you have been 3. Swine flu symptoms for most people symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is are milder than seasonal flu in the first longer. wave of the pandemic. According to current -Think about those around you. statistics, more people die each year of Remember that you would want sick seasonal flu, than have with swine flu. people to stay home to protect your health. 4. It is an entirely new strain that, prior If you want to learn more about the H1N1 Virus, visit http://www.cdc.gov/ h1n1flu.

CP BITES

Cowley gains accreditation to offer full online degrees. Thanks to the efforts of numerous individuals and departments, Cowley College has become one of only a few community colleges in the state of Kansas to gain accreditation to offer full online degrees. The college gained online degree accreditation through the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The

college will continue to develop additional online degrees and will look into entering into the online technical education field as well. Cowley will also begin advertising the opportunity to earn online degrees both nationally and internationally. For more information about the online degree programs that Cowley College has to offer, contact Tiffany Sowa at (316) 683-6013 or e-mail her at sowat@cowley.edu. Any Cowley student may receive free online tutoring. There is no cost to the student or the college. Students simply need to connect to the following web site: www.homeworkkansas.org. This is not limited to online students. Any Cowley student may use the service. Students can connect to tutors from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., seven days a week. Most

5

sessions last twenty minutes, though there is no specified time limit per session and no limit to the number of sessions a student may have. This is not intended to replace the face-to-face tutors available on campus. However, if a student needs assistance at a time when the face-to-face tutors are not available, then this is an option open to them. If the student is connecting from a location outside the state of Kansas, then they might need a Kansas Library Card to access the system. These cards are free and may be requested from our library by contacting Rhoda MacLaughlin, Cowley Library Director, in person at Renn Memorial Library, by telephone at (620) 441-5280, or by email at maclaughlin@ cowley.edu. Students contacting her by email should include their Cowley ID, full name and birth date.


CP NEWS

Moving from summer to fall and winter BY MEGAN BERRY Editor-in-chief

T

here is a box up in the attic or hidden away in the closet that holds all your warm winter clothes. Now is the time to dig those winter clothes out from storage and put your summer clothes away. From swimsuits and flip-flops to scarves and boots, fall is fast approaching and summer is on its way out. Say goodbye to the warm days of sunshine and hello to the cold snowfalls of winter. How can you stay warm, yet still wear clothes that are fashionable, fun and trendy? Here are a few of the looks that are becoming popular and some new ways to make the most of what’s already in your closet. Plaid shirts, particularly in flannel, are a huge look for this fall. You can find them in almost every store with varying price tags, depending on the brand. They are available at Urban Outfitters, Pac Sun, JCPenneys

coat in stock. This peacoat is cropped and is designed to fit right below the waist for a more updated look. It is made from a fine wool blend and is available in bold colors such as plum, green and black. It is priced

and now even Wal-Mart is carrying them on the racks. A quick and easy way to stay warm during the fall season is with a pair of gloves and a stocking hat. Arm warmers and fingerless gloves are big for the fall. There are many different designs so you can get creative with them. A good, warm coat is a must for the colder seasons. The peacoat is very popular right now and can be found in various shades and colors. You might consider choosing black or gray for the most versatility, but if you are looking to make a fashion statement, go for a bolder color such as red or dark green. The Wool Cadet Peacoat from Old Navy is one of the most affordable and stylish peacoats offered. It features five double rows of brass buttons and a collar that folds down or can easily be worn up in a stylish straight style. This coat is available in red or navy for only $70. If that does not interest you, Old Navy also has a more traditional

at just $60. Scarves have become a big part of the winter wardrobe and can add style to an outfit instantly. Scarves are fairly cheap at many places such as Forever21 where they sell for $5-$10. Remember that fall and winter are about layering. Shrugs, vests and cardigans are easy to use for layering with other pieces. Keep your summer clothes out but just add extra clothing pieces. This gives you the opportunity for even more looks. You can mix and match separate pieces, giving you a different outfit each time you pair something new. Do not be afraid to mix crazy prints or layer a lot of different pieces for a unique and special look. This is your season. Get out there and fine-tune your wardrobe. Even though it is autumn, you do not want to be the one who falls behind! Here is a more expensive classic peacoat. It is sold at American Eagle for $119.50. (photo courtesy of ae.com)

Skatepark rolls into town for the anticipating crowd around Ark City along with thrill seekers like myself at Cowley College have been waiting for: skate park. The park is the first true skate park in Ark City for the last two years after the city removed the skate park fixtures next to the Recreation Center due to safety concerns. Some of the obstacles include a miniramp (a miniature half-pipe), a quarter pipe (half of a mini ramp), a fun box (a box with

angled sides and rails in the middle) and a massive roll-in for anyone who wants a quick burst to the other side of the park. Skaters on campus are really excited about the new park. “It is really neat to have a park this close,” said freshman Zach Johnson, a skater for eight years. “It is just a short walk down the hill.” With this addition, now is a perfect time to learn how to skate. It does not matter

THE

BY MITCH HOOVER Ad manager Students strolling through Paris Park or down the street from Kimmel dorm might have noticed a new piece of blue scenery along the horizon. Some may have looked at the tangled and enticing landscape not knowing what it is. The answer to that is two words people

CP CLUB TALK

BY ALISON JAMERSON Staff writer For 22 years, Peers Advocating Wellness for Students [PAWS] has been part of a wide array of clubs on campus. PAWS sponsors several events every year to promote physical and mental health on campus. There are no requirements for PAWS and students may join any time. Interested students may come to the next meeting at 9 p.m. on Sept 29 in the student life conference room in the Nelson Student Center. I was spoke to PAWS sponsor and Vice President of Student Activities, Sue Saia, to get an idea of what being in PAWS entails.

Q:

What events does PAWS sponsor on a traditional basis?

Some of our standard events are the Kick Ash Bash (quit smoking day in the spring) the Blood Drive, [and] Safe Spring Break.

Q:

When does PAWS meet?

We meet on Tuesday nights – usually 9 p.m. (In the Nelson Student Center)

4

how someone rolls on wheels at the park as long as you are rolling. Skateboards, roller blades, scooters and yes, even heelys are allowed. The park does have a few rules however. The park needs to be clear by dark, no alcohol is allowed, and no fighting. So be sure to leave all that at the “door”. Now get out there, learn some new tricks and go skate.

Q:

Why should a student join PAWS?

A student who enjoys having fun, talking about health issues facing college students, and wanting to get involved at Cowley should join.

Q:

What is your favorite part of being the PAWS sponsor?

My favorite part each year is meeting the new students and listening to their ideas about what events we should try out for the upcoming year. I also enjoy taking students to high schools and middle schools to do the skits about healthy choices.

Q:

Are there any new events this year?

This fall we are doing a Red Flag day where we promote healthy relationships and inform students how to spot a red flag in a relationship. We were awarded a Kansas Health Foundation Grant this year, so we are adding a new component to the club called PAWSitive Promotions. These will be evening events throughout the year which provide students with alternatives for fun times instead of going out to party and drink.

CP SPORTS Climb off the couch and be active THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

BY COLIN BAKER Staff writer

in intramurals. His co-ed beach volleyball team just kicked off their season. “I wanted to play because I thought it looked like t is early in the evening. You are being fun,” Dewey said. “I also like volleyball and lazier than ever sitting on your couch just wanted to be around it.” playing video games or watching soap Dewey will be playing in two other operas. You could be playing basketball, sports. “I am already on the volleyball soccer or even flag football. Kicking, team,” Dewey said. “I will be playing flag swinging, passing, shooting and snatching football and then when basketball starts up are all the actions that will be going on this I am going to try and play in that as well.” fall during intramural sports. Dewey was kind of hesitant and Sophomore Jason Dewey has said he contemplated as to why he joined intramurals. “To be honest, I don’t know looks forward to competing in many sports why I joined,” Dewey said. “I guess peer pressure just got to me and everybody kept asking me to join so I gave in.” Dewey does it for fun; others do it to win. “My flag football team won it all last year,” said sophomore Keegan Cornelius. “I love to win, even if it is just in intramurals.” Cornelius said he and his team are out to win. “We have the mind-set of winning because everybody on our team loves to win,” Cornelius said. “We get super competitive and even getting scored on ticks us off.” Cornelius plays football because of it being one of his favorite sports. “I love football,” Cornelius said. “I played it in high school and I watch college football as much as possible.” “I enjoy doing Freshman Rebecca Dinsmore winds back to serve the ball dureverything I can for ing an intramural game. (photo by Carly Budd) the intramurals,”

I

SEPT 29, 2009

said Doug Darst, intramurals supervisor. “It’s a good time and I enjoy being around the students.” Darst is in his second year in being the supervisor. Before handling the duties of supervisor, he worked at the Recreational Center for 15 years. “Working at the Rec Center gave me the advantage of knowing all of the rules and what not,” Darst said. The sports include co-ed softball, beach volleyball, 3v3 basketball and flag football, just to name a few. “This semester is full of things already,” Darst said. “We just move from one sport to the next and fit them all into the semester.” There are some incoming problems with Mother Nature that affect the process. “We don’t have lights on the softball field, so that’s kind of a problem,” Darst said. “When it gets dark then we would have to find some place to play Freshman Jake Fulsom is a member of one of the Cowley inwith lights. Everything tramural volleyball teams. Volleyball is one of many intramural else besides flag sports offered to students. (photo by Carly Budd). football and volleyball will be okay because competitive to a point but it is more about they are all indoors.” the fun,” Darst said. “It is there for people Darst has his hands full with the job to get out of the dorm room and get some of being supervisor. “My duties include exercise. It doesn’t matter if you’re good or scheduling, being a referee and an umpire not. It is about participating and making and score keeping,” Darst said. “We get new friends as well.” students for work study to come and do those things to where I am not the only one doing it.” Darst has a message to the students about what intramurals has to offer. “It’s

STUDENT SPECIAL Large Single Topping ONLY

$8.99

($1.80 for each additional topping)

MUST PRESENT COUPON DELIVERY/ DINE-IN CARRY-OUT 442-1900 422 N. Summit

17


CP SPORTS

Kicking up some dirt and grass

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

Getting To Know

BY JORDAN JOHNSTONBAUGH Sports writer

T

he Tigers are having an all right season and they are looking to improve on that. On Sept. 16, the Tigers traveled to Dodge City. Goalie Katie Ybarra, sophomore, has recorded three shutouts. “I feel it was a game that was played with heart,” said Ciara Corboy, sophomore. “I also feel the team communicated and played very well. Our coach was impressed.” The Tigers had the game in their hands just five minutes into the game with a goal from Amber Hernandez, sophomore. She put two goals in the net just fourteen minutes into the game, putting her season total to an impressive twelve. Sadie Hull, freshman, put her first goal of the season in the net late in the first half and the Tigers took a 3-0 lead into the half. In the second half, Jerrika Kerin, freshman, also put her first goal in the net and the Tigers got a 4-0 win. This improved their ranking to 3-2 overall and 2-0 in the Jayhawk conference. After the win on Wednesday, they hosted their next game versus Barton County. The Tigers struggled the entire game as they could not stop freshman Shala Giardni; she was simply unstoppable. She scored two goals just nine minutes into the game and the Tigers were already down 2-0. It was not looking good for the Tigers. Barton County already had a 5-0 lead before Amber Hernandez finally put the Tigers on the board. The goal was her teamleading 13th goal of the season leading the Tigers. Going into the half, the Tigers were down 5-1. Not much changed in the second half. The Cougars added three more goals to take a big win and handed the Tigers their first loss in the conference. They are now 2-1 in the conference and 4-4 overall.

C

Sophomore goalkeeper Katie Ybarra launches the ball during play at the Cowley Soccer Complex earlier this season. Ybarra was recently named the NJCAA goalie of the week. (photo by Carly Budd) Their next match was Garden City on Wed. Sept. 23. They were looking to bounce back from the loss on Saturday and they did just that. This was their second straight road win. They scored two first half goals by Hernandez and Corboy. The Tigers had a 2-0 lead going into the half. In the second half, Hernandez added one more with twenty-five minutes left. This was Hernandez 15th goal of the season, a team high. It looked liked Ybarra was going to get her fourth shutout of the season but a late hand ball in the bow by the Tigers led

to a penalty kick goal. The Tigers still got the win and are now 3-1 in the conference and 4-3 overall. The Tigers hosted Hutchinson again for their next game on Fri. Sept. 25. They were looking for revenge after the season opener where Hutchinson had beat them 11-0. However, Hutchinson would not let that happen and they beat the Tigers 3-0. The Tigers’ next game is Wed. Sept. 30 at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M at 2 p.m.

Cross country rewrites history books at Missouri Southern Stampede BY BENJAMIN DONALS Sports editor The tigers showed up to the Missouri Southern Stampede ready to work. Work they did; The No. 2 ranked men’s team placed ninth out of 35 teams. Also ranked No. 2, the women’s team finished 17th out of 41 teams. Sophomore Dustin Mettler was the first tiger to cross the finish line in Joplin, MO. Mettler placed 32nd out of 359 runners. He set a personal record in the race with a time of 24:59.87. “We ran rally well as a team. I ran a personal best by about a minute. I’m really excited about the whole team’s performance at the meet,” said Mettler. Not only was Mettler’s time a personal record, it was also the fourth fastest time in the program’s history and the fastest by an American born runner. “Dude, it feels amazing, I’m going to

keep on trucking to make it a run for the third fastest“ said Mettler in response to his performance and its historical meaning. Josh Gracia, freshman, changed some history also. He placed 51st with a time of 25:21.26. Which is the fastest by an American born freshman for the program. Sophomores Brice Irving, Isbeck Salinas, and Phillip Banowetz were the other Cowley runners to place in the top 100. Irving (71st) ran a time of 25:44:05. Salinas (82nd) was eight seconds behind him with a time of 25:52.01. Banowetz (87th) was right on his heels though with a time of 25:54.98. Cianin Kutil, sophomore, Tyson Christensen, freshman, Thomas Kjerengtroeh, freshman, T.J. Mapp, sophomore, Colin Jokisch, freshman, Peter Onelio, freshman, Zach Reynolds, freshman, finished in order; 132nd, 151st, 187th, 193rd, 261st, and 300th respectively. The woman placed less runners in the top 100 but still had a very solid

performance. Sophomore Robin Ray placed 28th out of 359 runners. She burned the three mile course in 18:40.36. That time is the fourth fastest in the programs history also. Valerie Bland, freshman, and Cecilia Burley, sophomore, were the only other runners to finish in the top 150. Bland (82nd) finished with a time of 19:38.86, while Burley (94th) crossed the line in 19:49.66. The other tiger runners; Elly Adamson, freshman, Bailey Hawkins, freshman, Marvia Lewin, sophomore, Jessica Dyer, sophomore, and Cassy Kendrick, freshman, finished ;in order of appearance: 174th, 178th, 184th, 198th, and 220th respectively. Freshman Leigh Ann Omarkhail was forced to withdraw when she rolled her ankle during the race. The tigers will participate next in the Oklahoma State University Jamboree in Stillwater, Okla., on Oct. 3rd.

18

Austin Sacket is a 19-year-old sophomore, born and raised in Wichita. He is number five on the soccer team and his position is midfield. He is a leader on and off the field and serves as co-captain for the season. He lives with his parents Tony and Kim and has four little brothers Dylan, Chase, Grant and Gage. What is the most important thing to you? To me, family is the most important thing in life. Where else have you played soccer? I’ve played club soccer in Wichita, Topeka and Kansas City from the age of five. What are your hobbies? My hobbies include hot rodding and building classic bicycles with my dad and brothers. I also enjoy fishing, riding four wheelers and camping with my family at El Dorado Lake. Why did you choose Cowley? I chose Cowley because of the opportunity to play in a first year soccer program. Being able to set the groundwork for future players here appealed greatly to me, as well as being close to home at a reasonable price. What position do you play? I play as a center defender, but also see time elsewhere in the defense and midfield. What is your best moment as a Tiger? My greatest moment as a Tiger occurred when I was voted to be a team captain my freshman year. What is your most embraced moment of your life? My most embraced moments in life were meeting my girlfriend and when my dad pushed me to continue playing soccer for Derby my senior year. What kinds of music do you like? I like country music and rock and roll. Johnny Cash, Garth Brooks and Creedence Clearwater Revival are my favorites.

SEPT 29, 2009

Honoring fallen serviceman BY RICHARD GOULD Staff writer

AUSTIN SACKETT SOCCER

CP NEWS

riminal Justice Instructor, Elvin Hatfield knew Tyler Juden before he joined the Army and set out to make his mark on the world. “Oh, I kind of followed his career when he was in Ark City High School involved in sports, then I got to know him very well when he came to Cowley,” said Hatfield. “Juden was majoring in criminal justice and he was thinking seriously about going into, and later on, go to a four-year-school and eventually join the highway patrol,” said Hatfield. “He [Tyler] kind of respected the highway patrol training and he also knew a few of the local highway patrol men really well and had already ridden with them and had respect for them. “Serving his country was one of the ways he wanted to give back. “He [Tyler] felt he was making a difference and he felt that he was doing a service for this country,” said Hatfield. “And he was protecting his own troops. And that was the number one thing; protecting his troops.” Although college is a great experience Juden saw bigger things in store for him; the United States Army. “We [Tyler and Hatfield] had lots of conversations about that. I tried to encourage him to go ahead to finish his two-year-degree or wait till he got a fouryear-degree,” said Hatfield. “And if he was still interested in it at that time … I know he was focused on it and I thought that with a few more years he might change his mind or he might not.” Humanities Instructor, Julie Kratt said, “When I heard that he joined the Army, it just seemed right. He was such a strong, reliable guy who embodied what the Army was looking for in a soldier.” Juden made his decision to enter the Army and train as a sniper a year later. “I left it up to him and he made his decision after about a year,” said Hatfield. “His impression, [of joining the Army] I got, was something that he wanted to do, but he felt like he needed to do.” Kratt said, “I read an interview with him and he had been promoted to a leadership position. It did not surprise me at all. I could see him being a role model and a protector and teacher for those under his authority.” Natural Science Instructor, April Nittler first met Juden’s parents Bob and Reatha, instructors at the high school and middle school, when Tyler was a student in her Arkansas City High School classroom. She would meet him again when he enrolled in her course at Cowley. “I had him in a class when he was in the high school “said Nittler. “ I also had him in a class here at Cowley.” Nittler remembered Juden as a respectful young man. In the classroom, he was “quiet respectful” and “very nice … polite as well,” she said. He carried with him into the service the same reputation. Respectful was also the way many in attendance described his

service on the Cowley campus Sept. 22. “I thought he [Tyler] always exhibited great citizenship and understanding for the political process and so forth,” said Hatfield. “I had Tyler in class the first semester I taught full time at Cowley,” said Kratt. “Tyler was a hard worker with a fun sense of humor. What stood out to me the most was how respectful he was. He was an allaround good guy.” The Juden family is an Arkansas City fixture, specifically on this campus with many students having been instructed by one or both of Tyler’s parents. Jacey Juden, Tyler’s sister, is a 2009 Cowley graduate. She was named the school’s October Student-Athlete of the Month in 2008 and Athlete of the Year in 2009, she was a finalist for Queen Alalah her sophomore year and that spring she helped lead the Cowley College softball team to its sixth straight Jayhawk East title and an undefeated conference season. She signed to play softball this year at Northwest Oklahoma State, according to an April 29, 2009 Tiger Sports press release. On Sept. 12, 2009 Juden’s convoy was attacked by small arms fire and rocketpropelled grenades in Turan, Afghanistan. According to Kake.com, “Juden was on his second deployment to Afghanistan as part of Troop C, 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division. Juden’s

mother says her son volunteered for the second deployment and then planned to get out of the military and become a teacher.” The Sept. 14 Kake article stated the Juden’s had spoken with their son on Sept. 6 and he had expressed his excitement about coming home and beginning his career in education. “I have known his mom and dad for almost 30 years,” said Kratt. “His dad went to school with my sister. His parents taught two of my kids and made a huge impact on them. Needless to say, when I heard about Tyler’s death, I was so sad. English does not have the right words for this kind of sad. This loss is heartbreaking… like our hearts were made of glass and someone dropped them off the Empire State Building.” Those who knew him, heard the news over the course of the next few days. “I heard it on Sunday morning,” said Nittler. I was “very surprised. You know you just get going in life over here and you forget that things are happening around the world like that. You forget that there is a war going on.” Hatfield said, “I cried and cried and cried” when he heard the news Sunday evening. “Our athletic director, Tom Saia, had informed me about it,” said Director of Public Relations, Rama Peroo. “Even though I didn’t know the young man; him being from somewhere right here in Ark

City and a former student and knowing his family it really hit me hard right off the bat.” Memorial services for Juden were held at W.S. Scott Auditorium on Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. The Patriot Guard was on duty to escort Juden from Ponca City to Arkansas City (Sept. 21) and from W.S. Scott Auditorium to Memorial Lawn cemetery in Arkansas City. “The college as a whole our thoughts and prayers go out to that entire family,” Peroo said. ACES is going to have a sign up for troops that are personally connected to the college. The troops can be children, parents, cousins, aunt, uncles etc… serving in either Iraq or Afghanistan. Students can earn volunteer time if the plan of sending letters to troops through a flat rate box provided by the ACES club goes through. If you know anyone that is serving in the armed forces then send your information to: Michelle Knoles ACES Coordinator Cowley College 620-441-5202 1-800-593-2222 EXT. 5202

Sergeant Tyler Juden was a distinguished sniper belonging to Troop C, 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division. With the Patriot Guard saluting a fallen comrade, Sgt. Tyler Juden is transferred to his final resting place at Memorial Lawn Cemetery in Arkansas City. (left: file photo. below: photo by Carly Budd)

3


Hitting the snooze, hitting the road and hitting the locked door BY COLIN BAKER Staff writer

I

magine it is one of those days when you are just running late in everything. Class starts in 15 minutes and you just got out of the shower. You then rush to brush your teeth, fix your hair and get dressed. While doing that, eight minutes pass by and there are only seven minutes until your class starts. It is a race against time and you are on the short end of the stick. On your way out

of your dorm, you pick up your bag and something quick to eat for the journey on the way there and during class. You are half way to the classroom and there are two minutes until class starts. You then turn on your Usain Bolt speed and sprint towards the classroom and just when you make it right outside the room, you pull on the door and it is locked. The whole class turns and looks at you with laughs and smirks. Now, for those who have been in that situation, you are not the only one. I too have been in that situation and I did not

like it one bit. When I was locked out, I was angry towards the teacher who locked me out. However, when you look at it you should not be mad at just them but at yourself as well.. Things end up adding up if you really look at it. You were late because you woke up late; set your alarm 10 minutes earlier or take a few minutes off your shower time and you would not have been in that situation. Even if all of that adds up, you still have a right to be mad because you pay for your

I have been locked out of a few classes. It wasn’t too pleasant and I tried to talk them into letting me in, but that didn’t go too well.

QUICK QUOTES

What do you think of instructors who lock students out of class? “It’s wrong because students stay up late studying or doing homework and may not remember to set their alarm clocks.” --Katilyn Taylor Freshman “I don’t like it because everyone is late at some point. What if the teacher was late?” --Santray Sandling Freshman

“I don’t think it’s fair because everybody is late at some point in their life.” --Ashley Campbell Freshman

~ sophomore, Chase Turner

Tyler Juden’s father, Bob, is comforted outside the WS Scott Auditorium following the services for his son. The motorcade was escorted to Memorial Lawn cemetery. His sister Jacey looks on (front right). Jacey is a 2009 Cowley graduate, was a Queen Alalah finalist, October Student Athlete of the Month, and 2009 Student Athlete of the Year. (photo by Carly Budd)

THE

On the cover:

CPFORUM

Letters to the editor must be signed and contain contact information (email or phone number) in order to be printed. Letters will be edited for content only. Letters can be emailed to editor@cowleypress.com. Letters can also be hand delivered to Meg Smith or a member of the Cowley Press staff in room 104 in KTB.

2

“It teaches good work ethics, but it’s college so give us a break.” --Travis Naegele Freshman

THE

The Cowley Press is a public forum produced bi-weekly by the newspaper production class. The paper is distributed free in single copies on campus. Extra copies are $1 each. Student editors make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. Editorials, columns and letters reflect the opinions of the writers. The staff reserves the right to edit letters for taste and length. Letters must be signed by the author.

CP STAFF

For some classes, arriving late for class means standing on the outside looking in. Arrive a few minutes early and avoid the embarrassment and missing out on class work. (photo illustration by Alison Jamerson)

education and if you want to be late, then you should be able to be late, even just 30 seconds to two minutes late. I thought in college you had the freedom to be late if you wanted to be. Although, professors would argue that since you are now in college, you need to be more responsible, get to class and learn how to wake up on your own. A student that knows about the locked door policy all too well is sophomore Chase Turner. “I have been locked out of a few classes,” Turner said. “It wasn’t too pleasant and I tried to talk them into letting me in, but that didn’t go too well.” Looking on the professional side, I can understand as to why they have a policy like this. College is supposed to prepare us for the real world after we get our diploma. In doing so, the locked door policy is there to keep us from running late and being late to our jobs of being full-time students. If you are late on the job then you will get fired in the real world. Getting fired in college would be getting locked out of the classroom and then receiving an absence and a bad grade for that day of the class. There are both sides to this story as there is to almost every story that has ever been invented. You can be one side or the other or even be neutral on the subject. Either way you learn something new everyday whether it is being locked out of class and being there to attend and get your education.

THE

THE

CP OPINIONS

SEPT 29, 2009

CP SPORTS

SEPT 29, 2009

Men’s Soccer still looking for their first win BY JORDAN JOHNSTONBAUGH Sports writer

T

he men’s soccer team is still looking to get that first win of the season. Against Dodge City they had every chance to win the game but could not score. They had six more shots on goal and ten in the game. Lucas Coelho, freshman from Lavras, Brazil, made three of their shots. Their other four shots were by Joao Bacchi, sophomore and Ivenns Martinez, sophomore. Dodge City was down by one for most of the game. With sixteen minutes left in the game, Dodge City really turned up the pressure and scored three goals in that time. Dodge City only took seven shots and scored four of them as their accuracy was right on. The Tigers suffered a 4-0 loss, which dropped Cowley’s overall record to 0-3-1 and 0-1-1 in the Jayhawk Conference. On Sat. Sept. 19, Cowley hosted Barton County. The team came so close to getting their first win of the season. Barton County was a good overall team and the Tigers played really well. In the first twenty minutes, they were already

Sophomore goalkeeper Blake Anderson attempts to block a shot by a Barton County player during play at the Cowley Soccer Complex. The Tigers face Northeastern Oklahoma A&M Sept. 30. (photo by Carly Budd) down 2-0 and it was not looking good for the Tigers. The Tigers answered back with a goal of their own with eighteen minutes

left in the first half. Martinez scored in the half with his first goal of the season and the team’s first goal in almost two games.

Things were soon looking up for the Tigers. In the second half, the nets were kept empty. It was defensive for both teams and the Tigers lost again. This brought their record to 0-4-1 for the season and 0-2-1 in the Conference. The Tigers faced Garden City on Wed. Sept. 23. It was going to be tough to get their first win of the season especially since Garden City was ranked number 11 and were 6-1 overall and 2-0 in the Conference. Just like they did with Barton County, they kept the net empty for about forty minutes in the first half until Garden City’s D.J Zuniga’s goal. The scored stayed 1-0 until late in the game. The Tigers fought hard in the first half. In the second half, it was not the same. Garden City scored two goals within two minutes of each other and they took a 3-0 win over the Tigers. Goalie, Blake Anderson, sophomore, from Muskogee, Okla. stopped eight of their eleven shots and had a good night. Yet, they were still winless on the season. The Tigers will have a week off before facing Northeastern Oklahoma A&M on Sept. 30 at 4 p.m. in Miami Oklahoma.

The Tigers keep on digging; Win seventh straight BY JORDAN JOHNSTONBAUGH Sports writer The No. 7 ranked volleyball team is looking as good as ever. They were 9-3 going into last week’s game. The Tigers hosted Longview for the third time this season and beat them for the third time this season. The women only need three sets to beat Longview on Fri. Sept. 18. Longview gave them a good run but Cowley won all three games 28-26, 25-18 and 25-20. This helped improve their record to 10-3 for the season. Keshia Clark, sophomore, led the Tigers with ten kills, five blocks and three aces. Michelle O’Dell, sophomore, also played well as she finished with a teamhigh 24 digs and three aces. Their next match was at Allen County on Mon. Sept. 21. The Tigers were looking to stay unbeaten in the conference and they did not disappoint. They were now 4-0 in

the conference after beating Allen in three Community College at top of the conference straight sets 25-19, 25-13 and 25-22. standings. Roslandy Acosta, freshman, “Allen match was a made very little errors great victory for us,” in the games. She said Coach Jenifer finished with 13 kills, Bahner. “Their crowd four blocks and two forced our girls to aces. Clark also had focus in on the game another good night and zone out all the with ten kills and outside noise.” a team-high of six The Tigers won blocks. the first two games “Keshia has really easily in the third stepped up her level match. Allen pushed of play and she has the Tigers a little become a big factor harder but were in our team’s overall still no match for success,” said Bahner. the women. With Also having a good Freshman Lindsey Chandler spikes the the victory over night was O’Dell ball during play earlier this season. The Allen County, the chipping in the tigers record is currently 13-3. (photo by Tigers remain tied 24 digs and Sarah Carly Budd) with Highland Eldridge, sophomore,

Editor in Chief - Megan Berry Campus Editor - Ian Whitley Scene Editor - Eric Smith Advertising Managers- Alyssa Campbell and Mitch Hoover Layout Editor- Chelsea Weathers Online Editor- Chris Bales Photo Editor - Carly Budd Staff Members - Colin Baker, Trevor Black, Chad Buttram,, Ben Donals, Richard Gould, Mitch Hoover, Alison Jamerson, Jordan Johnstonbaugh, Kayla Moser, Anne Sanchez Faculty Advisor - Meg Smith

19 photo caption

leading the team with 21 assists. The next match for the Tigers was Wed. Sept. 23 versus Hesston. In this game, the Tigers rested some of their stars players and gave some of the others a chance to show what they could do. It was an easy match for the Tigers and they won in three sets 2518, 25-17 and 25-14. “The whole team contributes on the court,” said Bahner. Freshmen, Rebecca Dinsmore, Jordan Gilleece and Meghan Cahill, all got playing time and each of them had 12 kills combined to help out the Tigers “They all stepped up and took advantage of their time on the court,” said Bahner. Clark led the team with 14 kills, Acosta with 12 kills and freshman, Lindsey Chandler with 10 kills. O’Dell also had a great night with 18 digs, a team high. The Tigers are now 13-3 overall.


CP SPORTS

Tiger tennis teams split with Washburn University and the University of Arkansas-Fort Smith BY BENJAMIN DONALS Sports editor

T

Sophomore Jamie Blackim prepares to serve while teammate Natalia Medina, sophomore, waits at the net during play at Southwestern. The duo helped Cowley defeat Washburn in a exhibition match on Sept. 19 in Topeka. (photo by Chad Buttram)

20

he Cowley tennis teams split with division II opponent Washburn last week. The men fell to Ichabod’s 4-5, while the women reversed the numbers and scored a 5-4 win. The Tigers the split with University of Arkansas-Fort Smith in Tulsa, OK.. The men won 8-5 and the women lost 3-11. On the men’s side, the Tigers lost two of the three doubles matches against Washburn.. The duo of Bruce Lloyd Burgess, sophomore, and Alex Dickson, freshman, lost to their Washburn opponents 5-8. Teammates Felipe Pimenta, freshman, and Renato Mendes, sophomore, did not fair much better, falling 6-8 to Washburn’s Adam Rens and Emmanuel Laarent. The third doubles team of Roger White, sophomore, and Tom Gibaud, freshman, won their match by default. In singles play, the Tigers’ top two players, Bruce-Burgess and White, had both of their matches go to three sets. Both athletes loss their first sets before winning the next two. Mendes, Pimenta and Gibaud all fought hard but lost their matches in two sets. Dickson won his match by default. The men bounced back against Arkansas-Fort Smith. The doubles teams of Bruce-Burgess and Dickson and Gibaud and White won their matches while teammates Pimente and Mendez lost a tough match 8-9. The duo of Bates Baldwin, freshman, and Richard Lee, freshman, fell 0-8. In singles Bruce-Burgess, White, Mendes, Pimenta, Gibaud, and Evan Daniel, freshman, all won their matches. Dickson and Bates were defeated in three sets while Samir Haikel, sophomore, was defeated in two. The women pulled out a win against Washburn with some solid matches from all of their doubles teams. Number one doubles team Adrijana Pavlovic, so., and Jessica Montemayor, sophomore, and number three team Wrylie Finkle, sophomore, Shannon Franz, sophomore, both defeated their opponents 8-3. While the number two duo of Jamie Blackim, sophomore, Natalia Medina, sophomore, shutout Washburn’s Whitley Zitsch and Alyssa Castillo 8-0. The women seemed to struggle in the singles department. Pavlovic played a tough match against Trang Le Nguyen but lost in three sets. Montemayor and Blackim both had some trouble with their opponents but won their matches. Montemayor won in two sets, while Blackim played two tough sets 6-3, and 4-6 before putting the match away with a 10-1 third set. Medina and Brittany Laner, so., both played tough but lost both their matches in two sets. Finkle played strong against Annie Doale losing in three sets. The women faced some stiff competition in Tulsa. Pavlovic and Montemayor were the only doubles team to win their match, Blackim and Montemayor were the only players to win their singles match,

CP

ISSUE 3 SEPT 29

COWLEY PRESS

THE

THE

SEPT 29, 2009

2009

The Student Newspaper of Cowley College

Issue 3 2009  

Online edition of The Cowley Press

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you