Page 1

Community Ed Summer Activities & Camps Pages 10-13

Spring Lawn & Garden Pages 16-18

May 2017 | Volume 24, Issue 8

Memorial Day Salute Page 22

FREE

The Courier

Polling Locations for Special May 23 Election Page 28

www.the-courier.org | news@isd15.org

Independent School District 15 Communications Department St. Francis, Minnesota Serving the communities of Andover, Athens Township, Bethel, East Bethel, Linwood Township, Nowthen, Oak Grove, St. Francis and Stanford Township

Remember to vote May 23 Lisa Rahn

ISD 15 Community Education Director

The community will decide Tuesday, May 23, on Independent School District 15’s proposed bond referendum. The goals for the referendum are to address deferred maintenance and physical facility needs throughout the district, enhance program and education spaces to better meet current educational curricular needs and objectives, improve districtwide safety and security, and improve activities and athletic amenities to better accommodate current programs and offerings. A question and answer document is on the District’s website at www.isd15.org/ bond. Will community members, staff, students and others have input in the planning and design process after the vote? Absolutely. Approval of the bond referendum by voters on May 23 will authorize the detailed planning and design process. Just as the planning to this point was driven by input, the design process will involve interested staff and community members to assist the design

team in development of final solutions for renovations and other improvements to ensure that all are appropriate for our school district. What will happen if the bond referendum fails? This plan is the direct outcome of months of planning and development. As such, there is no “Plan B” ready to be implemented. If the bond referendum were to fail, the district will need to go into planning again to determine the next course of action. What we can say is this: The needs won’t go away. Physical conditions will continue to age, or in some cases, deteriorate and the district will need to find some way to address those issues. Educational needs that are to be addressed through the referendum improvements will continue to exist. Use of numerous portable classrooms will continue throughout the district and programs with limited or inadequate space will continue to struggle The time is now to address these issues as costs will increase with time. If the district chooses to ask for support on the same issue again, costs will almost certainly be higher.

Saints Academy’s woodshop students, built three picnic tables—two for Crossroads School & Vocational Center and one for Independent School District 15 (ISD 15) Central Services. The sixteen students in class learned teamwork and elementary carpentry skills to complete the tables and other projects. Pictured with the students (back row, L-R) is ISD 15 Superintendent Troy Ferguson and woodshop instructor Dennis Sargent. THe Courier Photo

Why didn’t the district take care of the buildings in the first place so we wouldn’t need to spend this much to fix them? How does the district intend to keep them up after these improvements? The district’s yearly deferred maintenance budget is a fraction of the yearly maintenance needs. While district staff does a fantastic job of keeping buildings operational and looking great, the size and scope of long-term maintenance projects regularly exceed that amount and over time, this adds to the backlog of projects to complete. Currently, the only way to pay for large maintenance projects like these is to ask voters to support a referendum to complete these projects. The proposed bond referendum will address decades of maintenance needs that have been unable to be

completed over time based on available funding. Completion of this work will in essence “reset” the list of maintenance needs within the district, which will allow staff to become proactive in addressing needs as they arise in the future. In addition, recent legislative changes in how schools can access funding for on-going maintenance work will improve the district’s ability to keep pace with annual maintenance and facilities needs moving forward. Does this bond referendum accommodate for long-range planning and growth? Yes. The proposed renovations and improvements will be developed to provide space for future flexibility and modest enrollment growth. Portable classrooms will be replaced with permanent classrooms, existing spaces will be renovated and expanded

to better accommodate educational programming needs, both now and into the future. I own a $150,000 home. What would be my increase in taxes? It would be $52.84 per year, or $4.40 per month for Question 1. It would be an additional $49.23 per year, or $4.10 per month, for Question 2. Question 2 is dependent Continued On Page 28

Inside Schools in Action........................2 Community Education............10 Spring Lawn & Garden............16 Community & Business...........19 Memorial Day Salute................22 School Board Highlights..........27 Sports & Outdoors....................29 Meetings, Events & Benefits....31 Life...............................................32


2 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Schools in Action Superintendent’s Bulletin Troy Ferguson ISD 15 Superintendent

I hope the recent unpredictable spring weather has not dampened anyone’s spirit. As we look forward to the start of summer, there are exciting events occurring in our district just around the corner. As the school year is rapidly coming to a close; students and staff will bid farewell for another summer. Rest assured our teachers, administrators and staff will spend time this summer preparing for the start of school September 5.

One of the happiest and most emotional events each year is graduation. We are excited to be holding our first-ever graduation ceremony for approximately 40 Saints Academy and Saints Online students Thursday, June 1. On Friday, June 2, approximately 360 St. Francis High School seniors will receive their diplomas. These are such proud moments for students, their families, friends, teachers and staff as we celebrate this rite of passage and welcome

DO NOT prune your Oaks, Elms & Ash Trees until October! The hometown tree care service you can trust. 20+ Years Experience!

Ees! E FEsR t a tim

Certified Tree Inspector Licensed • Insured Bonded

being presented to stakeholder groups. The presentation includes goals and scopes of the work to be completed should the bond pass. In addition, there is a tax impact calculator where taxpayers can type in their property parcel number to get their tax impact for each question. Other resources include a sample ballot, polling location information and information on absentee voting. Stakeholders’ submitted questions are posted to the website along with answers. The FAQ list is updated often as more questions come in. Our school board understands this bond referendum is asking our taxpayers to make a very large commitment to our schools and facilities. We do not take for granted the support our public has shown in the past as

WE HAVE

Mack Tree —incorporated—

763-856-5432 or macktree@sherbtel.net — www.macktreeinc.com — Pruning, removals, lot clearings, stump grinding. Specializing in winter Oak and Elm pruning. Call for all your tree trimming needs and dangerous removals.

NEW! We’ve expanded

Goodrich Pharmacy

them to the next phase of their lives. In addition to the end of the school year and graduation, voters in Independent School District 15 St. Francis will have the opportunity to vote on two questions for the bond referendum. The special election is Tuesday, May 23. Goals for this bond referendum are to address critical deferred maintenance and facility needs across the district, improve districtwide safety, security and accessibility for all of our citizens, enhance educational spaces and learning environments, and expand activities/athletic opportunities. Accurate, upto-date information on the bond referendum and special election are located at www. isd15.org/bond. The website includes the slide presentation

our services to include flu and strep tests.

763-753-2660

Dawn Crosby

Graduation St. Francis High School (SFHS) commencement is on Friday, June 2, at SFHS starting at 7:00 p.m.

For all your entertaining needs:

New transcript sending process

graduation parties, weddings, reunions or special occasions.

Contact us if you are interested.

23122 St. Francis Boulevard NW St. Francis

Open

House

763-753-0222

Saturday, May 6

Andover...................... 763-434-1901 Anoka......................... 763-421-5540 Blaine......................... 763-717-0222 Elk River..................... 763-441-0764 Fridley ....................... 763-780-0222

10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Hours: M-F 9 am-8 pm; Sat 9 am-3 pm

We offer Flu, Pneumonia, Shingles and Tetanus vaccinations. Ask a pharmacist for details. Visit our website

www.goodrichpharmacy.com Follow us on TWITTER Like us on Facebook

Come and learn about these amazing animals and make one your own!

Walk-in 1:00-4:30 p.m. or call for an appointment. § Flu tests, ages 13 & up § Strep tests, ages 3 & up Get results in 15 minutes. For positive tests prescriptions are immediately available. Cost for the test is only $35.

21658 Rum River Blvd. Oak Grove

763-753-0357 Must sell all alpacas.

St. Francis High School shorts SFHS Administrative Assistant

23307 St. Francis Boulevard corner of Hwy. 47 & 233 Avenue Hours: Monday-Saturday 9:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.

Shearing Date is May 3

we look to the future. Bringing our schools up to 21st century standards in a fiscally responsible manner enhances the opportunity for growth and development for students and our community. We remain committed to sharing accurate information by honoring our commitment to reach out to stakeholders across the district and bring the information to you. Since March we have presented to over 30 groups in our school district including businesses, churches, employee groups, townships and city councils. We are scheduled for about a dozen more and continue to look for opportunities to share information with the public. I encourage all of us to study the issue, ask questions and get the information needed to make an informed decision on this vital issue. Thank you.

Find Us on Facebook

Open for appointment anytime.

www.rumriveralpacas.com

Students who need to send transcripts to colleges, NCAA, or other, go to www. parchment.com to register for your account. From there, you can release, request, and pay for your transcripts to be sent. If students are not 18 years old yet, parents need to sign the online release form. For an unofficial transcript for scholarship applications, go to the Counseling Office to obtain an unofficial copy at no charge. If requesting updated transcripts for a second time, to the same school, do not enter those in Parchment. Request those from the Counseling Office so another fee will not be incurred.


The Courier | www.the-courier.org

May 2017

A wild time at St. Francis Elementary School’s Carnival

Kindergarten registration

Julie Sweeney

Nancy Wallace

ISD 15 Early Childhood

SFES Teacher

Reminder to parents whose children will be going to kindergarten this fall: Registration began in late February. If you haven’t turned in your kindergarten registration forms, please do so in the next two weeks. Principals will begin to form classes in May and it’s best to have an accurate count of the number of kindergartners. You can find kindergarten registration information and forms online at www.isd15.org/ kregistration or at any elementary school during office hours.

Dr. Seuss often said, “The more that you read, the more things you will know. the more that you learn, The more places you’ll go.” Students and families were going many places in the spirit of Dr. Seuss during their Annual Carnival at St. Francis Elementary School on March 23. Children delighted in playing games, winning in bingo, bouncing in inflatables and socializing with friends. Wild creatures were created from face paint and adventurous attitudes. Over 115 volunteers including parents, faculty and community members helped make the day a success.

Bills on an elementary level

Sisters Vanessa and Mackenzie tuning into their “wild side” with face paint at the St. Francis Elementary School Carnival.

Submitted Photo

7

$ 00

Katrinna Dodge

Staff Writer

Cassondra Schmoll’s fifthgrade class at East Bethel Community School presented their mock bills to their peers to vote on. Students picked their own subjects to present and had to prove that their bills did not violate the United States Constitution. Two groups appealed to their fellow constituents about important issues. Josie and Gabby presented their bill to give K-12 students the right to pick their subjects and learning style in school, by requiring teachers to ask their class. This would change standardized testing and teacher-student learning to accommodate different learning styles. Passed unanimously. Bridle proposed a law required trash cans or wastebaskets every 1,000 feet at beaches to discourage littering. This would ensure clean community spaces to be enjoyed and help reduce pollution-related deaths for native animals. Passed 21-9. Schmoll’s students listened to guest speakers Julie Braastad, Anoka County Commissioner, Brian Mundle, East Bethel City Council Member, and Tom Emmer, U.S. Representative of Minnesota’s Sixth Congressional District. The fifth-graders were able to inquire on each guest’s job duties and how they dealt with different situations in their communities. “There are two sides to every story,” Braastad replied to a question about the challenges faced in government positions. Rep. Tom Emmer added, “We all work together at the end of the day.”

3

Customized

T-shirts

Buy 48 or more T-shirts for only $7.00 each, 50% off set-up charge. One color ink, front and back. Sizes Small to XL. XXL and larger $2 more. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 6/1/17.

Photo by Superintendent Troy Ferguson

Get the

Have questions?

DENTS Out!

Stop in and talk to Mark.

Free loaner car or rental cars available

23615 Hwy. 47/St. Francis Blvd. NW, St. Francis

763-753-6116 www.sfcollision.com

3220 Bridge Street #101

St. Francis Mall across from St. Francis High School

763-443-2243 ezteezmn@gmail.com

St. Francis High School Theatre Presents…

Free estimates

Book by Joe DiPietro

Free headlight aiming

A Musical inspired by and featuring the songs of Elvis Presley.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

No appointment necessary

Please call for an appointment

We work with ALL insurance companies!

Bethel Fire & Rescue 6th Annual

Numerous Raffles

Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser

Bake Photo by Katrinna Dodge Sale Door Prizes

Saturday, May 6 4:00-8:00 p.m.

Sponsored by and held at

Bethel Community Church

23850 Dewey Street NW Bethel

April 27, 28, 29 • 7:00 p.m. April 30 • 2:00 p.m. St. Francis High School Performing Arts Center 3325 Bridge Street NW, St. Francis, MN

$8 Adults, $6 Senior Citizens/Students/Children

Visit www.seatyourself.biz/stfrancishs to order tickets or for more information, call 763-213-1527. Produced by arrangement with Theatrical Rights Worldwide, 1180 Avenue of the Americas, Suite 640, New York, NY 10036


4 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

St. Francis Elementary School posts another great year with Jump Rope for Heart throughout the month of March. As online donations and collection envelopes came in, lanyards and Zoo Crew animals were handed out to the students. Briana Anderson and Darin Bourasa’s classrooms were two top classroom collectors. Dylan Zilmer was the top student

Scott Kruger

SFES Dean of Students

St. Francis Elementary School students and staff raised over $12,053 for the American Heart Association through Jump Rope for Heart. Stacey Nelson, physical education teacher, taught students about healthy eating and exercise

collector. One of the prizes was a Subway lunch with one of nine District leaders. Students who raised over $35 had their name entered into a drawing. Principal Ryan Johnson drew names and winning students and District leader enjoyed a healthy Subway lunch.

Disconnect the devices, reconnect with each other children spend over four and a half hours a day consuming screen media, while older children spend over seven hours a day. Excessive screen time is linked to a number of problems for children, including childhood obesity, poor school performance and problems with attention span. “Screen-Free Week is about recognizing and evaluating time spent on our devices and making a concerted effort to connect with our children by spending time together doing shared activities,” said

Taryn Tessneer

EBCS School Social Worker

St. Francis Elementary School students who raised more than $35 for Jump Rope for Heart had their names placed in a drawing for Subway lunch with District administration. Pictured (L-R) are: Sydney Lewicki, Superintendent Troy Ferguson, Independent School District 15 Human Resources Director Brandon Nelson and Frank Dircz.  Submitted Photo

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry www.stfrancisdentalcare.com 3715 Bridge Street St. Francis, MN 55070

763-753-1900

Dr. Kurt Huether DDS Dr. Amy Dahlgren DDS Providers for Delta Premier, Health Partners, Assurant and others. Call for details.

Ask about our

Savings Plan

Social workers in Independent School District 15 are encouraging families to participate in a national effort to turn off televisions, smart phones, tablets and gaming consoles for seven days to be more active in the world around them. Screen-Free Week, May 1-7, is a chance for children to read, think, create, be more physically active and spend more time with friends and family. On average, preschool

Living

Join us Sundays 9am & 11am

Jesu s

the HOPE

LivingHopeEFC.org 763.753.1718

of

Jessica Marsolek, Cedar Creek Community School social worker. “As screen time becomes more prevalent, we need to teach kids moderation and show them how to be active in the world and how to enjoy what’s around them,” Marsolek added. Families can participate by setting limits on screen time and planning alternative activities for the week such as reading, art projects, cooking together, playing board games or sports with friends and neighbors, going for a walk or run, trying out a new hobby, learning another culture or language, exploring local parks or attending community events. Screen-Free Week is coordinated by Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, a national advocacy organization devoted to reducing the impact of commercialism on children. Since the Week’s founding in 1994, it has been celebrated by millions of children and their families worldwide. For more information, visit www.screenfree.org.

Lifetime Guarantee – 100% Customer Satisfaction!

Collision 2000

Jason M. Semler, Realtor®

612.282.8233 Full ser vice real estate broker Seller & buyer representation Free market analysis Free home buyer consultation Licensed in MN & WI

The collision repair shop you can trust.

Find out what your home is wor th at agentsemler.com Building a home is more affordable than you might think!

3345 Viking Blvd. Oak Grove 763-753-0002 Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday by Appointment

Free es at E s t i me n ! Giv

Award Winning Custom Home Builder Since 1981! LIC#BC0003649

County Road 22 County Road 9

w w w.semlerhomes.com

Fender Bender Specialists Free Loaner Car

while we do the work on yours • Free Estimates • Collision Repair • All Insurance Companies • Paintless Dent Removal • Computerized Color Matching • Customs/Restorations

100 Off $ 50 Off

$

Any repair over $1,000

Any repair over $500 Coupon must be presented before repair is started. Not to be combined with other offers. Limit one coupon per customer. Expires: 5/31/17. Collision 2000 Oak Grove 763-753-0002

Important: Minnesota State Insurance Law states that you have a right to have your vehicle repaired in the shop of your choice.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

5

Choirs achieve excellence during the season Char Provost

SFHS Choir Boosters

Our community is proud of the long heritage of strong choral programs in our schools and this most recent school year is no exception. The St. Francis High School (SFHS) choirs, under the direction of Lukas Warren, has grown to over 350 students. Through his leadership, talent and vision, students are participating in seven different high school choirs. We are fortunate to have opportunities for all students to make connections through music. Beyond the vocal excellence, our students gain skills and experiences that last a lifetime by learning stage presence, confidence, team work and the importance of giving back to our community. The sell-out crowds this past year have energized our students, reinforced the appreciation of their hard work and continued to build our community. The seven choral programs offered to SFHS students include two freshman choruses, mixed choir, Bel Canto, concert choir, two premier showchoirs— Prima Voce and Bridge Street Singers and our Madrigal Singers.

■ The freshman chorus is divided into two groups, based on gender, to develop basic skills unique to their strengths as young musicians. The girl’s chorus is under direction of Warren and the boy’s chorus is under the direction of Ben Beaupre, SFHS choir teacher. • The mixed choir is under the direction of Warren and builds talent as students are advancing on their journey as musical performers. • Bel Canto is an all-female choral group under the direction of Beaupre. Members audition in the spring for this advanced choir. • Concert Choir enjoys upwards of 100 vocalists in this select group of junior and senior students. Under the direction of Warren, students advance their vocal ability, experience, musicianship and higher levels of performance. ■ The Madrigal Singers are a premier group of choral students. Under the guidance of Warren, this year’s curriculum program developed 32 juniors and seniors as they created, produced and performed a show at

the 37th annual Madrigal Dinner in November. In addition, the Madrigal Singers represented SFHS in various performance engagements in and around the community, such as the St. Francis American Legion Veterans Day program, holiday concert, Mall of America performances, several church Christmas programs and the City of St. Francis Christmas tree lighting ceremony. By the beginning of 2017, our two extracurricular showchoir groups were ready to represent SFHS. Showchoirs are a group of auditioned singers who combine choral singing with choreographed dance within the context of a specific theme or story. The Bridge Street Singers, varsity showchoir, enjoyed an outstanding year in their five competitions as they were awarded Best Vocals three times and overall Grand Champion in Sioux Falls, South Dakota and Hastings. They took first runner-up in Onalask, Wisconsin, and second-runner up in both Ankeny, Iowa, and Ft. Atkinson, Wisconsin. Jake Hoefer received best male soloist at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Our prep showchoir, Prima Voce, performs under the direction of Beaupre and Amelia Tesdahl, a SFHS alum in her third year

at the University of Minnesota studying music education. Prima Voce competed twice receiving fourth runner-up in Hastings and sixth runner-up in Waconia. Over spring break many of the juniors and seniors represented our community in San Diego, California. They performed at Sea World and enjoyed a choir exchange concert with the North Coast Singers. As the 2016-17 school year ends, choir students will enjoy a celebration of their accomplishments at the annual choir banquet on May 22. Their spring pop concert is on May 25 and will include a special celebration for the seniors. The 2017-18 year will be met with some transitions. Warren just announced that he has accepted a position in Hastings. While he will be missed, the passion continues as the faculty, students and choir boosters are already making plans for 2017-18 choral events and opportunities. Volunteers are welcome and needed. Learn more at our website http://stfransischoirs.org about upcoming events, volunteerism and fundraising opportunities. For email notifications about SFHS choirs, subscribe to the email list from our website.

Home – it’s where life happens and dreams are brought to life. Let me help you protect what matters most with the customizable coverage you need and the support you deserve – all at an affordable rate. Let’s talk today.

Mary Dresch Agency American Star Certified Agency Excellence in Customer Experience 3747 Bridge Street NW St. Francis, Minnesota 763-753-9268 mdresc1@amfam.com

American Family Mutual Insurance Company, American Family Insurance Company, 6000 American Parkway, Madison, WI 53783 ©2016 011760 – 2/16

Evening Appointments Emergencies Cosmetic Dentistry Accept Most Insurances Payment Options

Pictured are St. Francis High School students that were named Students of the Month on March 31. Front row (L-R): Claire Blonigen, Maya Chavez, Cora Norton, Brianna Whited; back row: Annalisa Carlson, Kalee Luther, Shelby Reynolds, Kaitlyn Reynolds, Emily Drouncheck, Simon Luckow and Luke Maiers.  Steven Fetzik, SFHS Community Relations Coordinator

We offer FRIENDLY customer service and HONEST auto repairs at AFFORDABLE prices. Give us the opportunity to earn your business! 21388 Johnson Street NE, one block west of Highway 65 & Sims Road in East Bethel CedarCreekAuto.com

763-413-3445

Dental

Round Lake

Dr. Thomas Swenson, DDS

www.roundlakedentalmn.com 13841 Round Lake Blvd. NW • Andover

763-427-0285

The American Indian Education Parent Committee will meet Tuesday, May 16, 5:00 p.m. in Room C-204 at St. Francis High School. If you are a parent, guardian or foster parent of an American Indian student in ISD 15 and would like to be part of the American Indian Education Parent Committee, you are encouraged to attend the meeting.

763-421-0141 VSP Provider

13855 Round Lake Boulevard Andover

Amanda Stoltman O.D.

Jeff Smith O.D.

Mon, Thurs, Fri 8:30-5:30 Tues, Wed 8:30-8:00

If you have questions or would like to learn more about the American Indian Education Program, please contact Carline Sargent at 763-213-1575 or email carline.sargent@isd15.org.


6 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Saints Academy and Saints Online—providing individual educational paths Scott Manni

Principal Saints Academy, Saints Online

Saints Online and Saints Academy offer a wide range of alternative academic programming and a comprehensive high school experience. The staff believes that all students can and will learn. Our staff is passionate, professional and cares deeply about the success of our students. Students face many challenges. Through our

Courier Contacts Main Phone����������������������������763-753-7031 Advertising�����������������������������763-753-7032 Billing������������������������������������������763-213-1588 Fax�������������������������������������������������763-753-4693 Email�������������������������������������news@isd15.org Website�������������������� www.the-courier.org Like us on Facebook Address 4115 Ambassador Boulevard NW St. Francis, MN 55070-9368 Publisher Lisa Rahn�����������������������������������763-753-7048 lisa.rahn@isd15.org

individualized, unique delivery method of instruction and smaller class sizes, we meet their academic, social and emotional needs. Our programs are designed to give students a chance to learn strategies that work for them. Our online program is one of the only ones in the state to have licensed local district employees as staff members. If a student is struggling in a subject area, there is a teacher to help. Saints Online students are eligible to take advantage of great course offerings at St.

Francis High School along with their online programming. Students can tailor their education to fit their unique individualized needs. Independent School District 15’s online program has seen a significant increase over the past two years with 86 students currently enrolled. Saints Academy offers students a personal hands-on learning environment for the 78 students currently enrolled. Saints Academy classes provide important avenues for both education and life success.

Strong math, social studies, and language arts programs motivate students who love hands-on activities to remain interested in coming to school and learning. They also learn practical problem-solving in real life scenarios. The addition of a work experience program, including building and construction courses and sciences through our outdoor classrooms, students are able to customize their learning program. In 2017-18, Saints Academy will be offering auto technology

and agricultural education to help solidify new course offerings. Our mission is to equip all students with the knowledge and skills to empower them to achieve their dreams and full potential while becoming responsible citizens in a dynamic world. At Saints Academy and Saints Online, we realize every student learns differently and is motivated differently. It is imperative that alternative forms of education exist to meet the needs of all students.

Chess Club challenges students St. Francis High School indoor Jessica Rowles drumline finishes season strong SFMS Community Relations Coordinator

St. Francis Middle School (SFMS) has a new after school activity, Chess Club supervised by Michael Noreen, a SFMS math teacher. Chess meets a total of 12 weeks on Mondays with currently eleven sixth, seventh and eighth-graders enrolled. No experience is needed. Noreen enjoys running the club as an extension of his hobby. He previously supervised a club in Albertville.

Editor Kathleen Miller����������������������763-753-7042 kathleen.miller@isd15.org

Chad Armbruster

SFHS Band Teacher

St. Francis High School’s indoor drumline placed second out of the 11 competing groups in their class on April 1 at Minnesota Percussion Association (MPA) Preliminary Competition held at Dassel-Cokato High School. The group competed for the final time at MPA Championships on April 8 at Mayo Civic Center in Rochester, where they placed third. Congratulations to these talented and hard working students on a great season.

Production Binie Bertils Katrinna Dodge��������������������763-753-7033 katrinna.dodge@isd15.org Pat Johnson�����������������������������763-753-7025 pat.johnson@isd15.org Advertising Representative ��������������������������������������������������������763-753-7032 ads@isd15.org Billing Amy Lindfors��������������������������763-213-1588 amy.lindfors@isd15.org Deadline Information Deadline for the June issue of The Courier is May 12. Delivery For delivery inquiries call 763-753-7031

Pictured (L-R) are Chess Club members Reese Jorgenson and Raelyn Putnam. Submitted Photo

Your Real Estate Expert in Home & Land Sales since 1995!

Letter to the Editor For the complete Letter to the Editor policy, visit www.the-courier.org. Policies and Pricing Visit www.the-courier.org for policy and pricing information. News Submission Send news and photos/captions to news@isd15.org. Subscriptions The publication is delivered at no charge to all residents in Independent School District 15. The Courier can be mailed to any address for an annual (10 issues) subscription rate of $18. The Courier is a publication prepared and distributed by Independent School District 15 Community Education and paid for with revenues generated by advertising sales.

Submitted Photo

Midwest Family Counseling, P.A.

Individual – Relationship – Adolescent – Adult – Child

763-753-9459

St. Francis Forest Lake Lighthouse Building Franklin Building 23038 Rum River Blvd. NW 69 North Lake Street BHP – Preferred One – UCare – MHCP

Larry D. Anderson, GRI Realtor® 23038 Rum River Boulevard NW St. Francis, Minnesota 55070 Cell: 763-360-4551 Office: 763-323-8080 Fax: 763-753-0395 larry.anderson@results.net www.results.net/larry.anderson

Larry the Landman… Buy or Sell

Land/Property for Sale St. Francis, 78 acres, commercial������������������$500,000 7 Lots, 1 to 10 acres,�������������������� $69,900 to $84,900 St. Francis, 32 acres�����������������������������������������$299,000 St. Francis, 30 acres, wooded with creek�����$199,000 St. Francis, 20 acres, wooded with creek�����$199,000 Commercial for Sale St. Francis, Office Building, 3,700 sq. ft.������$517,000

Bruce W. Barton, M.Div., M.A., LMFT, LP

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

Homes for Sale Isanti County, 2 acres 2 BR, shed����������� $169,900 Milacs County, 120 acre farm, nice house����������� $456,900 HamPending Lake 2 BR, 2 BA����������� $224,900 St. Francis, townhome 2 BR,Sold 2 BA����������� $144,900

The Twin Cities #1 Senior Photographer

Central Studio 763-571-2265 1290 Osborne Road Fridley, MN 55432

Anoka Studio 763-421-4553 1916 2nd Avenue S Anoka, MN 55303

www.davidbankstudio.com


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

Finding a home away from home Annia Alventosa

7

Student council food drive Shari Clark

SFHS Foreign Exchange Student

I’m Annia Alventosa and I’m an exchange student from Spain. One year ago, I got a scholarship from Amancio Ortega, the owner of ZARA. He gave 250 scholarships for students to live in the United States and almost over 10,000 students applied for it. With a lot of hard work and positive attitude, I luckily got one and here I am, living my dream! My exchange year has definitely been the best year of my life. Although I miss a lot of my family and friends, I wouldn’t have changed anything about my American life. I arrived to the U.S. seven months ago. It was September 5 and it was the happiest, saddest and scariest day of my life. Giving the last hug to my mom, thinking I was not gonna be able to have fun with my dad or play with my sister for the next 10 months was hard. Good-byes are always sad but I was so ready to live the year of my life and meet my host family. Those tears went away faster than I had expected. My first day at St. Francis High School was Annia Alventosa (right) is pictured with her host amazing. It was like a dream come true. I couldn’t mom, Ann Johnson. The Courier Photo believe I was there, I mean here! In America! someone. When I started to believe in myself, Everybody was super nice to me, people asked me a bunch of questions and I didn’t struggle that I started to like my new life, new routine, new school and habits. My experience rotated 360 much with the language! The school was huge degrees and started to be 100 percent perfect. and fun, and I started to love running, thanks to It was so hard to get to that feeling; I had some cross country. tough moments. The whole experience is about Everything was going so perfect. Everything finding yourself. It’s about waiting for the best was going too perfect that, after one month, I and getting involved in a new culture, making realized I was 5,000 miles away from my family, new friends, living the life as much as you can. my town, my warm weather, my life… I started Once you reach the perfect moment of your to feel a bit lonely even though I was surrounded experience, the countdown for summer starts by people. I started missing my comfort zone and that means the countdown to go back to but never felt super homesick. I started to miss your home country. my sister more than ever, but I kept going. I kept Becoming an exchange student has made me getting up every morning ready to learn a new grow, physically and mentally. It’s an experience lesson, ready to make more friends and ready to everybody should live at least once in their lives. surprise myself. I was so happy and felt so left out My experience was something unbelievable at the same time. and amazing that I will never, ever forget. I love I’ve been so lucky that my host family, Minnesota and my host community. I’m gonna especially my host mom, kept me busy during miss them so much. I’m so excited to go back to those hard weeks. Spain, but I’ d do anything to start this year all After a couple of months my loneliness over again. All these memories will stay in my improved. I didn’t feel as left out as I used to. I heart forever and I will always have Minnesota as started to hang out with some friends, but only part of my home. if I asked them to. With my host family, I also started to feel like home but I needed something else. All St. Francis Police Department sponsored these feelings weren’t enough for me. I was still looking for Tuesday, June 6 the “year of my life” everybody 6:00-8:00 p.m. had told me about. While I was trying to figure St. Francis Police Department out my inside feelings I was 4058 St. Francis Blvd. NW, St. Francis living amazing experiences Bike riding offers fun, freedom and exercise and it’s good and making unforgettable for the environment! We want kids and families to ride their memories. During fall I ran bikes as much as possible, and it’s important to be safe while doing so. Any and all ages are welcome to come. more than I had ever done  Helmet checks for proper  Hot dogs, chips and before. I joined cross country fitting. Helmets will be refreshments and even went to Sections. available for purchase.  Allina Ambulance During the winter I joined the  Safety skills course  St. Francis Fire dance team and made one of supervised by police Department my biggest dreams come true. personnel and  First Baptist Church volunteers. In spring I just joined track and Praise Pantry – Please  Bike trail brochures from it’s nice to hang out with the bring a non-perishable DNR food donation and be 110 members of the team.  Outdoor Edge Bike Shop entered into the door I even started to like those prize drawing.  Door prizes! cold and lazy days. I realized I have friends and people Thank you volunteers… Allina Ambulance, St. Francis Police Reserves, St. Francis liked me. I was feeling part Fire Department , First Baptist Church–St. Francis, Outdoor Edge Bike Shop of something, important for

BIKE Rodeo

CCCS 4th-Grade Teacher

Cedar Creek Community School recently held a food drive sponsored by the student council. Students collected over 1,300 items and 940 pounds of food. All items were donated to the North Anoka County Emergency Foodshelf (NACE). Shari Clark’s class brought in the most items at 403. Megan Everson’s class was second with 314 items. Both classes will be going to Feed My Starving Children as their reward for bringing in the most items. Congratulations to everyone for their efforts!

Cedar Creek Community School Student Council members are Matthew Vee, vice president, Macy Patton, secretary, and Ben Magnuson, president. Submitted Photo

Crossroads School & Vocational School teacher Angela Schmid discusses how she uses Language Arts standards in her curriculum with high school teachers Joel Olson, Alicia Stoffel and Robert Held. The group met on March 22 as part of the district’s monthly late start, which enables staff from different buildings to meet and discuss curriculum alignment, state standards, and teaching methods. Steven Fetzik, SFHS Community Relations Coordinator

19th Annual Anoka

June 3 & 4, 2017 Admission is only $4.50

Saturday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Sunday 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Anoka County Fairgrounds

Anoka, MN ½ mile North of Hwy 10 on Ferry Street

Dealer Space

Available!

Metro Promotions, Inc. • Ham Lake, MN 55304 • 763-434-6664 www.metropromos.com • Email: kwel16421@aol.com


8 May 2017The Courier Currently on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, Dan Remus, a technology teacher at St. Francis Middle School, teaches an after school traditional archery class to sixth, seventh and eighth grade students. For Remus, this has been a hobby of his for many years and now he shares his knowledge with about 30 students participating in the program. Pictured are Braden Sullivan, Gavin Loso, Jacob Tupper, Nick Taff, and Krisdi Strohmayer-Knutson.

Jessica Rowles, SFMS Community Relations Coordinator

Middle school showchoir shines in South Dakota Jessica Rowles

SFMS Community Relations Coordinator

The St. Francis Middle School showchoir, Vocalocity, won the Highest Overall Score and Best in Show award at their first competition in South Dakota the weekend of March 18.

St. Patrick Catholic Church

19921 Nightingale Street, Oak Grove

Youth Plant Sale Hanging baskets and gift certificates available on May 6 and 7, Mother’s Day Weekend after each Mass.

Thursday, May 18 • 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Friday, May 19 • 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday, May 20 • 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 21 • 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Call 763-753-2011 with questions. All proceeds from this sale go directly toward youth activities in our parish. We look forward to your support.

Annuals • Herbs • Hanging Baskets

St. Patrick Catholic Church

Lunch & Bake Good Will Offering Thursday, May 18 • 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Friday, May 19 • 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday, May 20 • 8:00-10:00 a.m. (Items left are FREE)

19921 Nightingale Street, Oak Grove 763-753-2011

Becoming responsible citizens in a dynamic world Jenna Mensen

CSVC Language Arts Teacher

In the midst of all of our responsibilities as teachers, we may sometimes forget the simple but crucial mission of Independent School District 15: To equip all students with the knowledge and skills to empower them to achieve their dreams and full potential while becoming responsible citizens in a dynamic world. During the months of January and February, students and teachers at Crossroads School & Vocational Center (CSVC) devoted their time and talents to take important steps toward fulfilling the District’s mission. After studying the life of Martin Luther King Jr., students wrote essays about the positive changes that they want to see in today’s world. Students began their essays by discussing current problems that are negatively affecting their social and cultural environments. Some of the topics included gang violence, improving mental health treatment for adolescents, strategies for ending pollution and how to stop bullying in schools. Students significantly improved their writing

skills while beginning important conversations about practical ways they can make the world better. We celebrated their success with an allschool video viewing party. Members from Bar None Treatment Center and Central Services Center were also present at the celebration. The video included many students reading their essays or summarizing their essay topics with visual poster board presentations. CSVC students jumped into this essay project whole-heartedly and have much to be proud of. In addition the video party, the Language Arts Department at CSVC selected a few students’ essays as exceptionally excellent. We chose a total of three middle school winners and four high school winners. Below is the essay by one of our top winners, ninth-grade student Mozell Jones, as well as a photo. The winners were chosen based on the heart and passion they put into the content of their essays as well as the improvement of their writing skills. Congratulations again to all CSVC students for taking excellent steps toward fulfilling the District’s mission and improving their communities.

Student essay: The world’s full potential Mozell Jones

CSVC student

The world would be better if there were no guns or violence. Some of this violence is because of racism and gang violence. The real problem seems to be the African Americans killing one another, and it’s not just African Americans either but it’s also native Americans, Mexicans, Caucasians, etc. It would be very nice if there could be “real’’ world peace, no wars, no guns and most of all, no civilians getting killed. Some of the violence happens because juveniles with no parents go out and look for a father figure or a role model so they can be cared for by someone and loved. However, they’re being brainwashed by these “thugs’.’ These so called “role models’’ are scared to go out and shoot at other gang members, burglarize homes and rob people. So they kind of swindle these young children into thinking they’re family, but under all that they

Mozell Jones

Submitted Photo

just see some miserable kid who doesn’t have anyone. It’s kind of like these wolves approaching this little pig who has no one. He’s looking for a family and they manipulate him into doing these crimes and drugs and tell him they’re his family and they love him. However, under all that talk, they’re using him because he has no one and he’s desperate.

Donations accepted in good shape May 15-17, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. May 13 & 14 before Masses Cannot accept: cribs, car seats, highchairs, TVs, microwaves, air conditioners, exercise equipment, stoves, refrigerators, washers, dryers or construction materials.

Mark your calendars!

| www.the-courier.org

Remember Mom on May 14.

Cherise Foley • 763-753-9696 22001 Lake George Blvd., Anoka

Serve a graduation cake to remember!

Wedding, Bridal Shower, Birthday, Baptism cakes, bars & much more!

This horrible truth is the reality of what these gang members, thugs and criminals are doing to the youth. Sometimes I think how the world would be if there were no gangs, stereotypes or racism. It would be somewhat of a utopia. Instead of youth going out and looking for gangs or a “father figure,” they would go out and look for jobs, community centers, mentors, counselors and treatment. Instead of the gang leaders manipulating the young ones into the criminal code, they could teach children to go to school and be something instead of killing/shooting at other people, they would care for one another and look out for them. Although I’m currently in evergreen, I can still make a positive difference because children also have a voice. I can use mine right now, just like the children who marched with Martin Luther King and they were much younger than me. Positive change can happen if we the people of America and other countries come together as one and we were just called world instead of North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Asia, America, Africa, Australia, etc. We could be all as one and one for all. No more bullying, racism or sexism, we will see each other equal no more rich or poor, straight or gay—just “EQUAL.”


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

9

Multicultural Festival 2017 review Carline Sargent

ISD 15 Multicultural Education Coordinator

On April 8 the Independent School District 15 Multicultural Program hosted the districts 4th Annual Multicultural Festival. This year’s festival had many different cultures/ countries represented: Africans, American Indians (Ojibwe), Hmong, Italian, Kazakhstan, Muslim, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Thai and Ukrainians. Dennis Sargent demonstrated Native stone carving and

displayed some of his Ojibwe art work: birch bark canoe and basket, drums, moccasins, mittens, knocking sticks, beading, and snowshoes. Tina Miller from Togo, Africa, gave out samples of Rio Grande Rice and had samples of traditional Togonian clothing. Vera Vang, third-grader at Cedar Creek Community School, along with her family, gave out samples of egg rolls and shared information about the Hmong culture and

immigration to the United States. Maika Vue, eighth-grader St. Francis Middle School (SFMS) and her cousin Keinkuw Vue, tenth-grader at St. Francis High School (SFHS) performed a Hmong song called “Siab Nyob Ua Ke”. Bob Olson gave out samples of his home-made maple syrup and demonstrated Scandinavian weaving. Ranad Ghalban, a Blaine high school student; Nausheen Malik and Sabiha Khandwalla

shared information about the Muslim culture. A group of Hmong students from SFHS made delicious steamed rolls and Nab Vam (sweet drink). Donna Vlasyuk, tenthgrade SFHS students and her sister Anastasia Vlasyuk, fourth-grader at East Bethel Community School, gave out samples of a wonderful Russian

dessert. Hannah Lindl, senior at Coon Rapids High School, gave out samples of Indian Frybread. Foreign exchange students attending SFHS took part in the festival by sharing information about their countries through display boards, providing ethnic food samples and presentations.

Genuine Matthews, twelfth-grade SFHS; Glen Gbakoyah, eleventhgrade SFHS; Christbell Odumakin, eighth-grade SFMS; Amen Odumakin, sixth-grade SFMS; and Sam Odumakin, twelfth-grade SFHS demonstrated African drumming. Submitted Photo

Heidi Wold’s fourth grade class was excited to share their monthly STEM project with their peers. Each student created an unique invention that used a paper plate, with STEM components. From windmills to dream catchers, students became experts in the world of science, technology, engineering and math.  Heidi Wold, CCCS 4th-Grade Teacher

Classes will not be in session for Independent School District 15 students and staff on Memorial Day, Monday, May 29. The tentative last day of school is Friday, June 2.

Saturday, May 20

Nowthen Threshing Show

Spring Tractor Pull & Blacksmith Event Saturday, June 3

7415 Old Viking Boulevard in Nowthen Tractor Pull Registration at 10:00 a.m. • Pull starts at Noon For pull information, contact Kurt Johnson at 612-790-3554 oldgjd@comcast.net Josh Wilhelm at 763-370-1321 jwilhelm@frontiernet.net For more general information, contact Sharon Wilhelm at 763-913-1238 • wilhelm@tds.net

Food & Beverages by Princeton Meats

FREE admission to spectators for this event Don’t miss the 47th Annual Nowthen Threshing Show

August 18,19, 20, 2017

Featuring: Caterpillar & INGECO Engines Not responsible for accidents. Children must not be left unattended near operating machinery. All attendees must stay behind barriers at all operating machinery demonstrations and be alert for other moving machinery. Children 12 and under not admitted without an adult present.

Sandhill Community Fair

9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Experience a sampling of community organizations, resources and services.  ISD 15 Early Childhood (FREE Books)

 Independent School District 15 Community Education  HeartSafe CPR/ East  Bedding Plants Bethel Fire Department Available (Free will  Ruff Start Rescue donation)  Therapy Dog  Anoka County Master Gardeners (Plant  St. Francis Police Identification) Department  St. Francis Alumni Choir  North Anoka County Foodshelf (Donations performing at 1:00 p.m. welcome)  Light Refreshments AND MORE!

23820 Dewey Street NW Bethel, MN

For more information call 763-753-7048.

All ages welcome to this FREE event!


10 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

2017 Summer Community Education Girls Basketball Camp Basketball camp will focus on necessary individual skills and team development concepts required to be a successful basketball player. Camp will focus on player development and players will learn the skills of shooting, passing, catching, ball–handling as well as individual and team defense. Location: Dates: Fee:

St. Francis High School June 5–8 July 10–13 $95 (T–shirt included)

Course: SC–717003 Grades: 8–12 Time: 9:00–11:00 a.m. Course: SC–717004 Grades: 3–7 Time: 11:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Boys Basketball Camp This camp is designed for returning boy basketball players grades 9–12 and incoming freshmen planning to tryout. Daily activity descriptions, as well as other summer basketball information, will be sent to participants via email. Course: SC–717005 Grades: 9–12 Location: St. Francis High School Dates/Times: June 12–15 10:00 a.m.–Noon Dates/Times: July 17–20 8:00–10:30 a.m. Fee: $95 (T–shirt included)

Co-Ed Basketball Competition Camp This is a competitive camp designed to help players develop the skills and abilities to succeed at the game of basketball. There will be a daily routine that consists of fundamental drill work involving dribbling, shooting, scoring, defense/rebounding and transition. The camp will also consist of competitive games and a variety of shooting contests, fast break transition and defensive games. The group will be separated by grades. Grades 3–5-making up the Big Ten group and grades 6–8 forming the NBA. Course: SC–717001 Grade: Co-Ed 3–8 Dates: June 26–29 Times: 8:00 a.m.–noon Instructors: Coach Norton, Coach Waterworth, Coach Schneeberger and former SFHS varsity players Location: St. Francis High School Fee: $100 (includes T-shirt)

Shooting Stars Basketball Camp

High School Small Group Tennis Camp

This camp is for any aspiring kindergarten through grade 3 basketball players interested in learning more about the game. The camp will focus on the fundamentals of shooting, ball handling, passing, catching and team concepts. Most importantly this will be a fun introduction to basketball that will provide players with challenging drills and games they can do on their own. The camp will be outdoors, with a weather backup at the St. Francis High School gymnasium. Contact Ryan.Hauge@isd15.org with questions.

Must be signed up for large group Tennis Camp sessions. This will be an additional session. For high school players only. Must contact Coach Fredrickson prior to determine time and group. Warm-up at court 15 minutes prior to the start of session. Participants must bring your own tennis racket.

Course: SC–717006 Grades: Co-Ed K–3 Dates: July 17–20 Time: 6:00–7:00 p.m. Location: St. Francis Elementary School Outside Courts Fee: $50 (small ball included)

Online registration is now open at www.communityed15.com

High School Football Team Camp This camp is for high school football players. It will focus on position–specific techniques and scheme implementation. T–shirts handed out in July. Equipment handout for ALL high school players will take place on Monday, June 5 in the high school wrestling room: seniors at 8:00 a.m., juniors at 9:00 a.m., sophomores at 10:00 a.m. and freshmen at 11:00 a.m. Grades: 9–12 Location: St. Francis High School Time: 2:30–5:30 p.m. Fee: $50 (T–shirt included) Course: SC–717007 Dates: June 6–8 Course: SC–717025 Dates: July 24–27

Youth Girls Soccer Camp This soccer camp will focus on skills, conditioning and team development necessary to compete at the middle and high school levels. Dates: June 12–15 Location: St. Francis High School Soccer Complex Fee: $55 (T–shirt included) Course: Grades: Time:

SC–717011 3–5 9:00–10:30 a.m.

Course: Grades: Time:

SC–717012 6–8 10:30 a.m.–Noon

Tennis Camp This tennis camp is for boys and girls grades 2–12. Students are divided by skill level. Instructor reserves the right to move participants up/down levels based on skill and/or number in groups. No rain dates set. Participants must bring your own tennis racket. Location: St. Francis High School Tennis Courts Days: Wednesday/Thursday Dates: June 14, 15, 21, 22, 28, 29 July 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27 Fee: $85 (T–shirt included) Course: SC–716013 Group A: Beginners (usually grades 2–4) Time: 8:00–9:00 a.m. For students who are new to tennis or have very limited experience. Introduction to forehand, backhand, volley and serve instruction as well as scoring, rules and game play. Incorporating “Quick Start” tennis components. Course: SC–717014 Group B: Intermediate (usually grades 5–8) Time: 9:00–10:00 a.m. For students who are able to have some success with the basic strokes and are beyond the beginner stage. Scoring, rules and game play will be further explored. Incorporating “Quick Start” tennis components.

Youth Football Camp Camp is designed for getting ready to play football at the next level. Come prepared to work with varsity coaches on football fundamentals. Location: St. Francis Middle School Fee: $50 (T–shirt included) Course: SC–717008 Grades: K–4 Dates: July 24–25 Time: 5:30–7:30 p.m. Course: Grades: Dates: Time:

SC–717009 5–8 July 26–27 5:30–7:30 p.m.

Course: SC–717015 Group C: Advanced (usually Junior Varsity/ Varsity or ready to start at these levels) Time: 10:00–11:30 a.m. occasionally a Friday For students who are ready to focus more on skills and strategies of singles and doubles play. Should be able to consistently execute the basic shots and maintain a several shot rally to participate at this level. Competitive drills and games will be used. Incorporating match play.

Course: SC-717016 Day: Tuesday Possible Dates: June 13, 20, 27 July 11, 18, 25 Tentative Times: Depending on total number signed up, times could be 9:15–10:30 a.m., 10:30–11:45 a.m. –or– 9:00–10:00 a.m., 10:00–11:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m.–Noon Cost: $50

Strength & Conditioning Students undergo a 7-week strength & conditioning program designed to develop and enhance overall athletic ability. Each session will be specifically structured to the needs of the athletes participating. The course will warm-up and cool down together. Each program will continue to develop the explosive strength, agility, speed development and flexibility required to be a successful athlete and a healthy individual. ​Location: St. Francis High School Weight Room Days: Monday–Thursday Dates: June 5–July 27 (No sessions July 3–6 ) Course: SC–717017 Athletes will focus on heavy lifting, heavy conditioning and agility. Grades: 9–12 Time: 6:00-8:00 a.m. Cost: $125 Course: SC–717018 Athletes will have the opportunity to choose from a variety of lifting programs geared toward their specific needs. ​Grades: 9–12 Time: 7:30–9:00 a.m. Cost: $100 Course: SC–717019 Athletes will focus on toning muscles and burning fat through cardio circuit training.​ ​Grades: 9–12 Time: 8:30–10:00 a.m. Cost: $100 Middle school athletes will be instructed on and will practice safe lifting techniques along with various speed and agility exercises. Course: SC–717020 ​Grades: Session will be open to grades 5–8 only Time: 9:30-11:00 a.m. Cost: $100

Questions about summer rec camps and leagues? Call 763–213–1823.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

2017 Summer Rec Camps & Leagues

2017 Summer Youth Activities

Volleyball Team Camp

Summer Children’s Theatre — Mulan JR.

Volleyball players in grades 7–12 will work on game skills. Athletes will focus on playing positional volleyball and running varying offenses. There will also be game–like scrimmages included in this camp. Course: SC–717021 Location: St. Francis High School Grades: 7–12 Days: Tuesday/Thursday Dates: June 6-29 Time: 4:00–6:00 p.m. Fee: $40

Volleyball Skills Camp The purpose of this camp is to help players improve their skills and knowledge of the game. This camp is for players who wish to improve their overall level of play and to have fun. Dates: July 17-20 Location: St. Francis High School Fee: $50 (T–shirt included) Course: SC–717022 Grades: 3–6 Time: 10:30 a.m.–Noon Course: SC–717023 Grades: 7–9 Time: Noon–1:30 p.m. Course: SC–717024 Grades: 10–12 Time: 1:30–3:00 p.m.

North Metro Track & Field League This league exposes elementary age students to track & field events along with giving them the opportunity to compete against a range of athletes. The league will cover the fundamentals of track & field through training and practicing of that week’s meet events.

St. Francis High School varsity track & field coaches and athletes will be the instructors for this program. Course: SC–717002 Grades: 3–7 (2017–18 school year) Fee: $45 includes T–shirt Week 1 Practice Dates: Mon/Tues, June 12–13 Time: 3:00–5:00 p.m. Location: St. Francis High School Track Meet Date: Wednesday, June 14 Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: St. Francis High School Track Meet will include teams from Cambridge and St. Francis Week 2 Practice Dates: Mon/Tues, June 19–20 Time: 3:00–5:00 p.m. Location: St. Francis High School Track Meet Dates: Wednesday, June 21 Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Cambridge High School Track Meet will include teams from Cambridge and St. Francis Week 3 Practice Dates: Mon/Tues, June 26–27 Time: 3:00–5:00 p.m. Location: St. Francis High School Track North Metro Championship Meet Date: Wednesday, June 28 Time: 5:30 p.m. Location: Princeton High School Track This meet will include five teams: Princeton, Elk River, Cambridge, Zimmerman and St. Francis

Important information for parents and participants of Rec Department camps The ISD 15 Community Education Rec Department has coordinated with St. Francis High School coaches and community members to offer activities for the summer. • No family rate or scholarships are available for summer camps. • Register online at www.communityed15.com, click the blue register button and change the program year to 2017–18. • All registrations are due in the Community Ed office (St. Francis High School, 3325 Bridge Street in St. Francis) on Thursday prior to the start of camp. • If individual sessions do not fill, they may be combined or cancelled.

• The Rec Department will not call participants before camp starts; if you register, you are in. • Grades listed are the ones your child will enter in fall 2017. • Participants should wear appropriate clothing and footwear. Bring a water bottle and be ready to go at the start of the session! • Camps are held at St. Francis High School unless noted otherwise. • If not registered by the activity deadline, students may attend the activity but will not receive a T–shirt. Please register carefully. A $10 cancellation fee will be assessed.

Questions? Call 763–213–1823. To register, call Amy at 763–213–1588

11

Based on Disney’s Oscar-nominated film, Disney’s Mulan JR. is a heartwarming celebration of culture, honor and the fighting spirit. With hit songs and a story packed with action, humor and heart, Disney’s Mulan JR. brings ancient China to life with a modern sensibility. The Huns have invaded, and it is up to the misfit Mulan and her mischievous dragon sidekick, Mushu, to save the Emperor! Defying the village matchmaker, Mulan takes up arms and disguises herself as a boy in order to spare her father from having to serve in the army. As the great battle with the Huns approaches, Mulan must choose between revealing her true identity as a girl or saving all of China with her clever plan. Course: DWSUM1701 Grades: 2–12 (2017–18 school year) Audition: Monday, May 15, 6:00 p.m. Full cast and parent meeting, Monday, May 22, 6:30 p.m. Rehearsals: Schedule will be available at audition/sign-up Most rehearsals will be in the evening, although an occasional daytime rehearsal may be called Dates are June 5–8, 12–15, 6:00-9:00 p.m. Dress rehearsals are scheduled for June 19–22, 6:00-9:00 p.m. Director: Glenn Morehouse Olson Performances: June 23 & 24, 7:00 p.m.; June 25, 2:00 p.m. Location: St. Francis High School Performing Arts Center Fee: $150 Registration Deadline: Friday, May 12 Notes: Parents of students in fourth-grade and younger will be expected to help their child at rehearsals…with music, blocking and lines. Fee waivers are not available for summer children’s theater.

Tech Academy by Computer Explorers Extreme Robotics: EV3 Battlebots Combining the versatility of the Lego building system and the Mindstorms EV3(the most sophisticated microcomputer brick ever made by Lego), this camp will energize and excite students. Working each day in teams, students will construct fun Lego models, experiment with programs and compete in robotic challenges. Robot building, block programming and teamwork will be part of each day’s activities. Final challenges will be

centered around target hitting and a sumo battle. Please bring a drink & snack daily. Grades: 3–8 Dates: Monday–Wednesday, June 12–14 Time: 9:30 a.m.–Noon Location: TBA Instructor: Computer Explorers Fee: $87

Jr. Engineering: Crazy Gears & Wheels If you love Legos, making things move, building and experimenting – this class is for you. Learn about engineering and the physical science principles behind different action machines. Working in teams, students will build crazy wheeled and geared contraptions that spring into action. Have fun while you learn the principles of mechanical engineering and simple machines. Make tops, spinners, zip lines, rubber band powered cars, crimping cars,

and other crazy contraptions. Please bring a drink & snack daily. Grades: K–3 Dates: Monday–Wednesday, June 12–14 Time: 12:30–3:00 p.m. Location: TBA Instructor: Computer Explorers Fee: $72

Java Minecraft Modding: New Dimensions Dig deeper into the Minecraft with this Minecraft Modding class! Create a new custom dimension in this exciting new class! Learn to mod Minecraft using Java and Eclipse. Students should be comfortable with keyboarding, and of course playing Minecraft! At the end of class take home your Mods to share with family and friends. Bring a USB

drive, bag lunch, drink & snack to class. Grades: 3–8 Dates: Monday–Wednesday, June 26–28 Time: 9:00 a.m.–Noon Location: TBA Instructor: Computer Explorers Fee: $100


12 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

2017 Summer Youth Activities Robotic Builders: Battlebots Let the battles begin! Designed by the experts at MIT, Lego Wedo Robotics’ unique system teaches students about simple machines, engineering, programming and so much more. In this camp, students will construct a Catapult, Ninja Star, Tank, Battle Axe, Crossbow, Battering Ram, Fighter Plane and more! Please bring a drink & snack daily.

Learn About Horses Day Camp

Grades: 1–5 Dates: Monday–Wednesday, June 26–28 Time: 1:00–3:30 p.m. Location: TBA Instructor: Computer Explorers Fee: $87

Spend the day learning how to ride a horse, including balance and control in the saddle, leading and in-hand work. Braid a horse’s mane, groom, play horse tag and help feed, water and care for horses. Parent/guardian required to drop off and pick up at Boulder Pointe.

Game Coding: Platformer Create an arcade-style side scrolling platformer! Students will learn to create a webbased platformer using Construct 2, a visual coding platform that teaches students the basics and structure of programming. Create custom enemies, obstacles and challenges in this exciting class. Bring a USB drive, snacks & drink each day.

Ages: 6–17 Time: 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Location: Boulder Pointe Instructor: Boulder Pointe Equestrian and Event Center LLC Fee: $95

Grades: 3–8 Dates: Monday–Wednesday, July 31–August 2 Time: 12:30–3:00 p.m. Location: TBA Instructor: Computer Explorers Fee: $87

Star Wars Jedi Moviemaking From a galaxy, far, far away, Star Wars comes to life! Work on a stop motion animated Lego Star Wars Movie. Star Wars action figures, Legos, and backdrops will be available for filming in class. Handle all the technical details including using a digital movie camera, filming scenes, stop-motion animation, digital editing and adding finishing special effects and transitions to the movie. In this exciting hands-on learning class, our instructors will take your student through the entire digital film making steps from start to finish using Frames Software.

Horseback Riding Camp

Student groups’ final projects will be emailed to parents, or students may bring a USB jump drive the last day. Please bring a drink & snack daily.

Course: Date:

DCMPSR1 1 Session Wednesday, June 14

Course: Date:

DCMPSR2 1 Session Monday, July 24

Course: Date:

DCMPSR2 1 Session Thursday, August 3

Grades: 1–5 Dates: Monday–Wednesday, July 31–August 2 Time: 9:30 a.m.–Noon Location: TBA Instructor: Computer Explorers Fee: $87

Enjoy the excitement of horseback riding camp! Learn how to work with horses including balance and control in the saddle, leading and in-hand work. Participate in fun crafts and activities, giving baths, horse tag and helping feed, water and care for horses. Enjoy more time in the saddle with your special horse for the week! Parent/guardian required to drop off and pick up at Boulder Pointe. Ages: 6–18 Time: 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Location: Boulder Pointe Instructor: Boulder Pointe Equestrian and Event Center LLC Fee: $430 Course: Dates:

WCMPSR1 June 19–23

5 Sessions

Course: Dates:

WCMPSR2 July 17–21

5 Sessions

Course: Dates:

WCMPSR2 5 Sessions August 7–11

Boulder Pointe Equestrian and Event Center, LLC is located at 6612 189th Lane NW, Anoka, MN 55303

Watch for backpack flyers with more information on what will be offered for Summer Youth Activities!

Important information for parents and participants of Youth Activities • Kids Connection may provide care for students before or after Youth Activities, if the program is at a Kids Connection site. Please call 763-213-1616 to make arrangements. Provide a lunch from home. • Register online Visit www.communityed15.com, click the blue register button and change the program year to 2017-18.

• All registrations are due in the Community Ed office (Cedar Creek Community School, 21108 Polk Street, East Bethel) on the Thursday prior to the start of camp. • Grades listed are the ones your child will enter in fall 2017. • If sessions do not fill, they may be cancelled. • Please provide a peanut-free snack and a beverage.

Before and after school childcare Program Sites Cedar Creek Community School East Bethel Community School St. Francis Elementary School Lifelong Learning Center Kids Connection is a comprehensive childcare program for children in kindergarten through grade 5 that provides a safe, fun experience and offers families a variety of childcare options. The program is open 6:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Hours include before and after school programs and full day programs on non-school days. Questions? Call Chris at 763-213-1616 or Lori at 763-213-1641 communityed15.com/kc

• Youth Activities will not call participants before camp starts; if you register, you are in. An email will be sent if your student was placed on a “wait list.” Please check your online account a few days before class starts to see if the wait list was removed. If so, your child is then registered for the class.

Please register carefully. A $10 cancellation fee will be assessed.

Questions? Call 763–213–1616

Just 4 Kids is a childcare option for children who are 3 years of age by September 1, 2017 to kindergarten entrance. Children participate in various activities in a safe, well-supervised environment. Extended childcare options are available at: • Cedar Creek Community School, from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Preschoolers who attend Just 4 Kids will be bused to the Lifelong Learning Center (LLC) from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at no fee. • St. Francis Elementary School, from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Preschoolers who attend Just 4 Kids will remain at St. Francis Elementary School. If preschoolers are attending Preschool Place 15, they will be bused to LLC at no cost. Customize your childcare arrangements! Before and after preschool, daily and weekly rates are available for Just 4 Kids. Call 763-213-1641 for more information.

Available at two convenient locations—East Bethel Community School and St. Francis Elementary School! Summer Kids Connection provides a variety of learning activities and recreational experiences to fill each day. Fun weekly field trips and summer activities. See full ad on page 15 Registration forms available online at www.isd15.org/kc or call

763-213-1641 or 763-213-1616.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

13

2017 Summer Preschool & ECFE Classes take place at the Lifelong Learning Center, 18900 Cedar Drive NW, Oak Grove, MN 55011 unless otherwise noted.

Preschool Camps Camps for preschoolers emphasize a theme. All camps will include stories, music, art, literacy and math activities, and time for playing with others. Children should be toileting themselves. Sliding fee scale is available. Time: Fee: Ages:

9:00–11:30 a.m. $40 for each 3-meeting session children must be at least 3 years of age by 6/1/2017 and have not attended kindergarten

I Am Special Look at all I can do! Making friends, taking turns, playing with others…all parts of who I am. Course: PP 1111 Dates: Tuesdays • July 11, 18, 25

Meet Eric Carle Enjoy stories and art by Eric Carle… caterpillars, spiders, crickets, roosters and more! Course: PP 1112 Dates: Wednesdays • July 12, 19, 26

Early Childhood Family Education

2017 Summer Preschool & ECFE

Separate checks for Preschool and ECFE, please. If you charge your fees, the entire amount will be charged to your account when your child is registered.

Space is limited!

Parent’s Name ____________________________________________________________________ a division of ISD 15 Community Education

Me and My Little One

Phone (day) ___________________________ Phone (evening)______________________________

Come and enjoy time with your little one while participating in songs, games and activities. Also connect with other parents who are experiencing the joys and challenges of early parenting.

Address _________________________________________________________________________

Course: Age: Date: Time: Fee:

ECFE

EC 0701 0-18 months Wednesday, July 12, 19, 26 9:15–11:15 a.m. FREE; please register

City _____________________________________________ Zip____________________________ Preschool Camp

PP 1111 PP 1115

PP 1112 PP 1116

PP 1113 PP 1114 PP 1117 Total Preschool Fee:__________________

Child’s Name______________________________________ Date of Birth_____________________ EC 0701 No Fee

Child’s Name(s)____________________________________________________________________ Date(s) of Birth____________________________________________________________________ Attending Parent:__________________________________________________________________

Pop In and Play Tuesdays

Payment

Come with your young child and participate in fun activities. The perfect place to relax with your child and meet other families with young children. No pre-registration necessary.

Card number: _______________________________ Exp Date_________ Card Code_____________

Age: Time: Fee:

July 11: July 18: July 25:

Birth to kindergarten and their parents 9:15–11:15 a.m. $4 per child; max $12 or 3 punches per family (limit of 4 children/adult) Pour, Drip and Splash Teddy Bear Day Summer Fun

Check(s) enclosed

Charge:

Visa

MasterCard

Discover

Am Express

Print Name:___________________________ Signature:___________________________________ Any special needs of you or your child we need to plan for?___________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________

Mail your registration and payment to the Lifelong Learning Center, 18900 Cedar Drive NW, Oak Grove, MN 55011. Registrations will be processed as they are received.

Sliding Fee Scale Annual Income Preschool 0-$45,000

$20.00

$45,00-$95,000

$30.00

$95,000+

$40.00

Want to know more about Early Childhood Family Education? Visit www.isd15.org/ecfe

Bright Beginnings in ISD 15 Early Childhood 763-753-7170

Budding Picassos Explore the world of art. Painting, coloring, sculpting and more! Different materials, textures and methods. Course: PP 1114 Dates: Thursdays • July 13, 20, 27

Music and Movement

Call ECFE at for more information or to register for any of the opportunities on this page. Lifelong Learning Center • 18900 Cedar Drive NW, Oak Grove • Online at www.isd15.org/ecfe Follow ISD 15 Early Childhood on Facebook to stay in the know and connect with other parents.

Registration for 2017-18 Preschool Place 15 is going on now!

Songs, fingerplays and action! Learn new songs and get ready to move your muscles. Course: PP 1113 Dates: Thursdays • July 13, 20, 27

Classes are filling quickly!

Our Five Senses Discover how your senses help learn about the world. Explore new textures, tastes and sights! Course: PP 1115 Dates: Tuesday-Thursday • July 11-13

Classes are also available for two-yearolds and very young three-year-olds

Dr. Seuss on the Loose Enter the rhyming and funny world of Dr. Seuss. Which is your favorite character? Course: PP 1116 Dates: Tuesday-Thursday • July 18-20

Preschool Place 15

Independent School District 15 Early Childhood Family Education is offering Preschool Place 15 at the Lifelong Learning Center in Oak Grove.

Math Path

For more information on classes and to register, visit www.isd15.org or call 763-753-7170

Count, make patterns, sort, measure, put shapes together! It all adds up to learning and thinking about math in the world around us. Course: PP 1117 Dates: Tuesday-Thursday • July 25-27

The purpose of Preschool Place 15 is to provide a safe environment where young children of all abilities can grow and experience success and their parents can be partners in learning.

a division of ISD 15 Community Education

Upcoming ECFE Classes and Events

Como Zoo This family favorite trip will take us to St. Paul Como Zoo where we will find wild animals. Bring a picnic lunch or purchase food at the zoo. Shelters are available in case of rain. Course: EC 9404 Date: Wednesday, May 10 Time: Bus leaves LLC at 9:00 a.m.; returns by 2:00 p.m. Fee: $6 per person Deadline: May 3

Down on the Farm Don’t miss out on welcoming spring by learning about ducks, peacocks, llamas, chickens and much more. Bring a picnic lunch to eat after the tour. Directions to Eveland Family Farm: Hanson Boulevard south to Andover Boulevard, turn west and go to dead end. Course: EC 9405 Date: Thursday, June 1 Time: 10:30 a.m.-noon Fee: $6/person Deadline: May 24


14 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Community Education Calling all 3 & 4 year olds!

Vehicle Day Young children and parents can explore vehicles of many types, shapes and sizes. Bring a toy vehicle to compare to the real thing. Remember to dress for the weather as this event will be outdoors. Date: Saturday, May 6 Time: 10:00-11:30 a.m. Location: Lifelong Learning Center This event is FREE but please pre-register and bring a non perishable food item for the local foodshelf.

Early Childhood Screening is waiting to see you! Do you have a child who is three or four years old? Have they been through Early Childhood Screening? Early Childhood Screening should be done soon after the child’s third birthday. Screening is a free, simple check of a young child’s health and development; it does not determine kindergarten readiness. Screening includes a development assessment, vision and hearing checks, immunization and health review. Call 763-753-7187 if you currently have a 3 or 4-year-old child who has not been screened. Safety

Community Education Directory Community Education Director............................................................... 763-753-7048 Adult Basic Education (GED)...................................................................... 763-753-7190 Adult Enrichment & Rec................................................................................ 763-213-1640 Communications/The Courier.................................................................. 763-753-7031 Youth Enrichment • Grades K-5................................................................ 763-213-1616 Districtwide Youth • Grades 7-12............................................................. 763-213-1640 Driver Education/Behind the Wheel..................................................... 763-213-1640 Early Childhood Family Education.......................................................... 763-753-7170 Early Childhood Screening.......................................................................... 763-753-7187 Facility Scheduling............................................................................................ 763-213-1589 Kids Connection/Just 4 Kids Program Supervisor..................................................................................... 763-213-1616 Cedar Creek Community School Site............................................... 763-753-7160 East Bethel Community School Site.................................................. 763-213-8921 Lifelong Learning Center Site................................................................ 763-753-7199 St. Francis Elementary School Site..................................................... 763-213-8674 Preschool Place 15/School Readiness.................................................. 763-753-7170 Rec Department................................................................................................. 763-213-1823 www.isd15.org • www.the-courier.org • www.communityed15.com

Fitness for all!

Only $2 per visit & no membership fees

Relaxed nior atmosphere – seur aged to citizens are enco attend!

l Trainers +Treadmills + Elliptica + Stationary Bikes hine + Nautilus Weight Mac

Contact ISD 15 Adult on at Community Educati

763-213-1640

n.

for more informatio

Fitness 15 Sandhill Center • 23820 Dewey Street • Bethel

Monday-Thursday, 8:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:00-4:00 p.m. Friday Closed

Have a concern about your child? Are you concerned about your child’s development, speech or behavior? If your child is under three years of age, contact Kandi Danielson at kandi.danielson@isd15.org or 763-753-7172 to reach ISD 15 Help Me Grow services. If your child is at least three years of age and not yet in kindergarten, ISD 15 Early Childhood Screening is the first step in confirming any concerns you have. Call for an appointment at 763-753-7187.

Classes & Events 23820 Dewey Street Bethel, MN 55005 Strength In class you will use dumbbells/hand weights and resistance bands to strengthen muscles, improve bone density and increase your metabolism. Class is for seniors or active older adults. Days: Mondays Time: 8:00-8:45 a.m. Fee: $2 per class No registration required

Line Dancing Have fun and move to the music through a variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. This is an excellent class for those just beginning line dance as well as those more experienced line dancers. No registration necessary, come when you want. Day: Thursdays Time: 10:00–11:00 a.m. Fee: $2 per class

Interval Training This class will incorporate short periods of easy, low impact exercises done at YOUR maximum level of effort followed by a period of less intense “cool down” movements. Get stronger, increase endurance and improve overall health in less time. Day: Thursdays Time: 9:00-9:45 a.m. Fee: $2 per class or purchase a punch card for $20 This class is NOT benefit eligible for Silver & Fit or SilverSneakers.

SilverSneakers Yoga

SilverSneakers Yoga will move your whole body through a complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Chair support is offered to safely perform a variety of seated and standing postures designed to increase flexibility, balance and range of movement. Restorative breathing exercises and final relaxation will promote stress reduction and mental clarity. Days: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays Time: 9:00-10:00 a.m. Fee: Free to SilverSneakers and Silver and Fit members; $2 per class for non-members No registration required

SilverSneakers Classic Have fun and move to the music through a variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. Hand-held weights, elastic tubing with handles and a SilverSneakers ball are offered for resistance. A chair is available if needed for seated or standing support. Days: Wednesdays, Fridays Time: 8:00-8:45 a.m. Fee: Free to SilverSneakers and Silver and Fit members; $2 per class for non-members No registration required

Sandhill is a Silver & Fit qualified center. For more information on the Healthways SilverSneakers Fitness Program or the Sandhill Center, please call 763-213-1640. To see if you qualify as a Silver & Fit member or a SilverSneakers member, please contact your insurance company.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

Pi contest winner Jessica Rowles

High school student crowned Miss Pageant of Hope Mikki Hanson

SFMS Community Relations Coordinator

SFHS Teacher

The seventh-grade St. Francis Middle School team, Tar Heels, held a Pi contest for students that could remember and recite the most numbers of Pi. Dawn Nordin’s math student, Hailey Thompson, won a $15 gift card for reciting a whopping 227 digits of Pi, blowing the competition out of the water.

On March 25, Leah Hutar, a junior at St. Francis High School, participated in the Pageant of Hope at the Earle Brown Heritage Center at Brooklyn Center. Hutar is the daughter of Brad and Roxie Hutar of Wyoming. This is a National Pageant for girls with special needs and challenges that is held yearly in Minnesota, this was the eighth year for the pageant. Hutar was crowned Teen Miss Hope for 2017. Hutar has participated in the pageant six times. The Pageant of Hope provides opportunities for participants to take part in inspiring workshops and other events that build self-esteem. The girls are encouraged to dream big and know that anything is possible. Through confidence-building workshops, the girls learn to not let their disability get in the way of their goals. Candidates are judged at the workshops on their personal growth and at the pageant in the following categories: an interview; casual wear; formal wear; and an onstage question. Hutar’s favorite memory from the Pageant of Hope was hearing that she was crowned Miss Teen Hope. “It was amazing.”

Submitted Photo

March Madness tournament bracket sweeps EBCS Jamie Studnicka

EBCS Community Relations Coordinator

March is filled with eager anticipation throughout the county. Many are ready for spring and warmer weather. It is also a time when people frantically fill out those NCAA tournament brackets in hopes of scoring one more point than their neighbor or colleague. East Bethel Community School (EBCS) had a bracket like no other in firstgrade. EBCS first-grade teachers Chris Carrigan, Nicole Hehir, Sara Keding and Suzie Olson made the first ever Tournament of Books to help students in their classes learn reading is exciting. Each of the four first grade classes represented one of the regions in a typical college basketball bracket. Instead of college basketball teams the regions where filled with their favorite books. Each week teachers would read the books to their class that where matched up in the bracket and the class would vote on their favorite. The winner would move to the next round and face a new challenge. The Final Four in the Tournament of Books where, Scaredy Squirrel by Melanie Watt, Mother Bruce by Ryan Higgins, This Book Just Ate My Dog by Richard Byrne and Max at Night by Ed Vere. We enjoyed many of the college basketball games this year just like the first grade students enjoyed many of the books. There can only be won champion. North Carolina may have one the less popular NCAA bracket, but Mother Bruce by Ryan Higgins won the coveted Tournament of Books at East Bethel Community School. Now the question arises. Will Mother Bruce repeat as champion?

15

For the formal-wear competition, Leah wore a beautiful dress that she said was special because, “It was pink and sparkled.” Hutar’s on stage question centered on her favorite musical group and she was able to tell the interviewer about her favorite band, Journey. Hutar’s parents commented that, “It was a day we will never forget; we are

Leah Hutar

so proud.” During the pageant each of the princesses has a Hope Buddy who helps the princesses in getting dressed, coordinated location and provides help as needed. It is a special way for each of the girls to make a new friend. Hutar’s teacher, Tera Kostreba, described her as a young lady who is “kind, funny, full of life and beautiful inside and out. Leah is the type of student who is everyone’s friend, both students and staff.” During this school year she has participated in employment opportunities at the Lifelong Learning Center and St. Francis Elementary School and has made many special friends at both settings. She has received many notes and wishes of congratulations from staff and students throughout the district. Mate Precision Tooling in Anoka has graciously sponsored Hutar for several years. If you have a daughter or know a girl with a disability who may be interested in this event, please contact Lisa or Lynn by email at Pageantofhope@ gmail.com or find more information on the website www.Pageantofhope.com.

Submitted Photo

ogram at The Voc Ed/Work Pr Vocational Crossroads School & ademy Center and Saints Ac students are…

Spring 2017

Basket & Planter Sale Thursday, May 11 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Just in time for Mother’s Day, it’s the annual basket and planter sale.

ALL Plant Sale Thursday, May 18 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

A variety of flowers, vegetables and accent plants plus the remaining baskets and planters will be on sale.

making your garden beautiful! to Proceeds will be used ts. ec oj support future pr

Garden Furniture and Decorations

Thursday, May 11 & 18 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Cedar Benches........................... $50 ea Picnic Tables............................... $50 ea Planters......................................... $5 ea Rolling Planters.......................... $50 ea Wood Duck Houses................... $12 ea Bird Houses.................................. $5 ea

Crossroads School & Vocational Center and Saints Academy 4111 Ambassador Drive NW • St. Francis

CSVC Voc Ed/Work Program is taught by Glenda Kimpling. Saints Academy portion is taught by Scott Olson and Denny Sargent.

For more information, email to glenda.kimpling@isd15.org

Available at two convenient locations—East Bethel Community School and St. Francis Elementary School! Summer Kids Connection childcare offers a safe, nurturing atmosphere for children that brings summer fun to a whole new level. Flexible options for parents. Grades: Age 4 through completion of grade 5 Hours: 6:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Dates: June 5–August 29 (closed July 4) Summer Kids Connection provides a variety of learning activities and recreational experiences to fill each day. Fun weekly field trips and summer activities. Registration forms available online at www.isd15.org/kc or call

763-213-1641 or 763-213-1616.


16 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Spring Lawn & Garden St. Francis Community Garden season begins May 6 elevated beds will be given to those with mobility needs. Join us Saturday, April 29 for St. Francis Community Garden Volunteer Day, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. We need the community’s help to get this garden growing! We are looking for help constructing a perimeter fence, shed, picnic table, benches, and spreading mulch, marking garden plots and more. Please bring your own tools to help build. Lunch is provided. Special recognition to our community supporters for

Renee Barlau

St. Francis Community Garden

St. Francis Community Garden’s season opens Saturday, May 6. The garden is located next to St. Francis United Methodist Church on 229th Avenue and features 42 plots and raised garden boxes. There is no cost for the use of the garden plots. You can choose from ground plots (10' x 10'), raised beds (4' x 8' x 18") and elevated beds (3' x 4' x 24"). Registration priority is on first come, first served basis. Priority for

committing to our dream of providing a safe and healthy environment for first-time or experienced gardeners alike: Allina Health, St. Francis Area Women of Today, Dollar General, Schroeder’s Creekside Stables, Lone Wolf Nursery, King’s County Market and St. Francis True Value Hardware. Want to help the dream grow? Contact us at st.franciscommunitygarden@ gmail.com or follow us on Facebook at sfcommunitygarden.

15% Off

Baggers, Mulch Kits & Home Maintenance Kits for Riding Mowers*

Check out our additional specials at MinnesotaEquipment.com

Gravely ZT-X 52 • 52” deck • 25 HP Kohler $2,999 (915174) • 23 HP Kawasaki $3,199 (915230)

0% for 60 mo. & $500 Off with purchase of 2 or more implements

Gravely ZT-HD 52 $5,099 (991164) • 52” deck • 23 HP Kawasaki engine * Expires 5-31-17

1025R Tractor Starting at $12,999 • Auto-Connect drive-over deck • 2-speed hydrostatic transmission • 4WD, power steering

(763) 444-8873 (763) 755-2347 (763) 428-4107 (952) 473-5634 (952) 890-9242

Basic Lawn Tractor Service Plan

Blade Sharpening Plan

Sharpening Plan Plus

nnnnnnnnnnn

sssssssssss

nnnnnnnnnnn

000000000000000000

$59

999999999999999999 99999999999999999999999 9999999999999999999999999

00000000000000000000000 00000000000000000000 000000000000000000000000000 00000000000000000000 00n 0 00n00 00000 0 nnnnnnn nn $49 00n 0000n00 00000; 0nnnnnn nn $59 00n 3 00n00 00000

Maggie Yauk

Anoka County Recycling & Resource Solutions

It’s time to start thinking about backyard gardening for green thumb enthusiasts and now is a great time to get a compost bin. Jump-start waste reduction and gardening efforts by setting up a compost bin at your home. This spring, Anoka County, the City of Anoka and the Green Expo are partnering with the Recycling Association of Minnesota (RAM) to bring residents affordable compost bins to Anoka County residents at a greatly reduced cost. Limited quantities available. There are many economic and environmental benefits to using compost bins. By using a compost bin, the average home can reduce more than 25 percent of waste from going into the trash, which can save money by reducing disposal costs. These compost bins come with a 10-year warranty, are made from recycled content

$80

000000000000000000

0000000000000000000 00000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000 00nn00n 0 0n0nn00 00000000000000000000 0 0000n0nn00 00n000 0n 0000 0 L0000 0000n 0000 0 nnnnnnn nn $89 00n 0000n00 00000nn0 $999 00n 3000n00

and are extremely affordable. Compost bins are only $44 when Anoka County residents use the discount code ‘Anoka.’ “Providing compost bins to residents at a reduced cost helps residents manage food and vegetable scraps and some yard waste in their own backyard, which reduces the impact of transporting it to a compost site and helps create compost—a usable product that greatly benefits sandy soils in Anoka County,” stated Sue Doll, Solid Waste Specialist with Anoka County. Compost bins and rain barrels are available for preorder to pick up at either distribution event in Anoka County. For specific dates, locations, placing a pre-order and additional information, go to RecycleMinnesota.org.

Visit our greenhouse for all your yard & garden needs. Green Barn Grown

ISANTI HAM LAKE ROGERS LONG LAKE SAVAGE

$40

Jump start your spring gardening efforts with a compost bin

Annual Flowers Vegetable Plants Hanging Baskets Herbs • Perennials Patio Planters

Nursery Stock

Fruit & Shade Trees Shrubs • Evergreens Vines • Blueberry, strawberry, rhubarb, raspberry plants

Great Gifts for Mom! Miniature & Fairy Garden Accessories Yard Ornaments: Western • Gnomes Angels • Chickens Frogs • Cats & Dogs Tractors • Greeting Cards

For the Birds

Feeders, bird seed, bird houses, poles, and suet

Landscape rock, decorative bark, mulch, potting soil, manure and peat moss.

Green Barn Garden Center

& Farm Market

3 miles south of Isanti on Hwy. 65 & 265th Call or check website for current hours.

greenbarngardencenter.com 763-444-5725


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

17

Master Gardener

Joan R. Watson Isanti county master gardener

Host plants for butterflies and other pollinators Now that spring has arrived with some enjoyable weather, many are cleaning up their lawns and gardens. Mosquitoes are back, birds are returning and some perennials are shooting up. As we wait for the butterflies to appear, it’s a great time to think about adding some host and nectar plants for them. Host plants are needed for butterflies to lay their eggs. When the caterpillar hatches from the egg, it can start eating right away. If you don’t like the appearance of chewed up plants, place them somewhere less visible. You will see more butterflies if you can entice them to lay their eggs. Host plants need to be organic and can attract aphids. You cannot use pesticides as they will kill the caterpillars. The following host plants will attract different species: Monarch - common or swamp milkweed, bloodflower and butterfly weed Eastern Black Swallowtail dill, fennel and Queen Anne’s lace Tiger Swallowtail - ash, poplar, cottonwood, willow and magnolia trees Variegated Fritillary passion vine and violets Question Mark and Eastern Comma - false nettle and elm trees

Common Buckeye - plantain and snapdragons Painted Lady - thistle and hollyhocks Cabbage White - cabbage and nasturtiums Pearl Crescent - asters Red Admiral - thistle Viceroy (Monarch look-alike) - willow tree Clouded Sulphur - white clover Nectar plants are needed to feed butterflies and are best placed in the same vicinity of the hosts. It’s important to provide a variety as some butterflies have a shorter proboscis (tubular mouth). One nectar plant may feed many different species. The following are some examples: all varieties of milkweed, coneflower, tall verbena, lantana, butterfly bush and butterfly weed. Other great options are: phlox, Mexican sunflower, cosmos, zinnia, sweet William, sunflower, petunia, dandelion and liatris. Something to consider when placing nectar plants is that they will attract bees­. Bees are excellent pollinators but best kept at a distance if they bother you. Nectar plants should be selected so blooms are constant from the spring dandelion to the fall liatris. No pesticides should be used. $250 OFF any project $2,500 or more — or —18 months interest free financing!* Our look has changed but our services have not.

LIC #BC637881

Now is the time to do your remodeling project! Phone 763-434-1500 www.myproexteriors.com

* Non-insurance projects only. Call for details.

– Roofing – Siding – Gutters – Windows & Doors – Residential – Garage Doors – Decks – Soffits & Fascia

Coneflower

For more information, visit the Isanti County Master Gardeners website at www. isanticountymastergardeners. com, University of Minnesota Extension website at www.

NEW ! ION LOCAT 400 West Dual Boulevard on the north side of the Isanti Liquor Store

Looking for more vendors to join our market!

Submitted Photo

extension.umn.edu or call the Isanti County Master Gardeners at 763-689-8254. Visit us on Facebook, Isanti County Master Gardeners.

SAVE Great Gifts for Mom!

Hydrangeas • Roses • Hanging Baskets • Garden Accessories

5

$

When you spend $25.

– Fire & Flood Restorations – Interior Remodeling – Commercial – Snow Removal & Ice Dams – Bathrooms – Kitchens

Every Friday 2:00-6:00 p.m. May 26 through September 29!

Contact Katie Everett • 763-444-5512 isantiparks@cityofisanti.us isantifamilyfarmersmarket.org

When your gardens are established, add a tray of clean pebble rock with fresh water just below the surface so butterflies have a place to drink. If you’ve seen butterflies around a mud puddle after the rain, it’s because they are absorbing minerals from the muddy water. Your efforts will be rewarded as the beautiful butterflies flit around. If you can get a closer look, you may find a few moths or skippers, too. Identifying the difference between butterflies, moths and skippers is by the tip of their antennas. Butterflies have an oval/round ball, moths have a feather and skippers have a hook. Skippers are generally very small and tend to skip around.

Expires: 5/31/17. Not valid with any other offers. One coupon per customer, per time. Must present coupon at time of purchase.

Nowthen Nursery

and Great Northern Landscapes

Get Ready to Grow! Herbs • Veggies • Fruits • Annual Bedding Plants

Nowthen Nursery

 and Great Northern Landscapes 763-274-2678www.gnlandscapes.com County Road 22 in Nowthen

763-274-2678 www.gnlandscapes.com County Road 22 in Nowthen


18 May 2017The Courier

Victory Garden attracts additional funding Plants Ferguson has signed a contract no maintenance from district available with Prairie Restorations to staff. prepare and seed about 8,000 Bids have been received and new grants have at Sandhill beenTwoawarded square feet of land for our new lumber has been ordered for to Crossroads pollinator prairie this summer. students in our wood shop School & Vocational Center Our prairie will be a home and classes to build eight new Community (CSVC) Victory Garden. source of food for pollinators. garden beds. This will enable us The Monarch Lab from the Once established it will need to double the food production of Minnesota has Fair, May 20 University contributed $1,000 supporting David Berger

CSVC Teacher

June Gossler Anderson

Sandhill Center Advisory Council

Have you visited the courtyard garden at Sandhill Center in Bethel? On Saturday, May 20, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., it will be blooming with plants from the Crossroads School & Vocational Center plant sale. These plants will be available to visitors attending the Sandhill Community Fair with funds going to help support the event. Come check it out. Free admission.

our efforts to teach the connection between food and pollinators. The Monarch Lab is also sending two of our staff to the North American Monarch Institute this summer for intensive training on Monarch butterflies and other pollinators. Our garden project was also awarded a Lowe’s grant for $5,000. These funds will enable us to expand our initial idea for a pollinator garden. Independent School District 15 Superintendent Troy

Photo by David Berger, CSVC Teacher

3-4 Foot Evergreen Blowout Save! 3 Trees for

12500

$

5 Trees for

| www.the-courier.org

this summer and fall. CSVC math students have calculated the volume of soil needed for the new beds. Plans are in place to begin planting lettuce, radishes mesclun, beets and carrots in the existing hoop house, several weeks before the last frost. CSVC staff along with ISD 15 Nutrition Services and Lisa Wong, Extension Nutrition Educator from the University of Minnesota, are working on a Farm-to-School grant in order to provide healthy snacks for students using fresh produce from the Victory Garden. Extension Master Gardener volunteers are professionals from the community spending 18 hours a week with each student. The Victory Garden project has been created and funded independent of school district funds.

Did you know? Hiring a landscape architect may be a smart move for homeowners who are planning major overhauls of their properties. The Operational Outlook Handbook defines a landscape architect as “a person who designs parks, outdoor spaces of campuses, recreational facilities, private homes and other open areas.” Landscape architects typically must be licensed and many hold degrees in landscape architecture from accredited schools. Architects who work on residential spaces often work with homeowners to design gardens, plantings, stormwater management and pools. Landscape architects design spaces to do more than merely look good. Designs also are about functionality and meeting the needs of the homeowner. Outdoor spaces are designed after considering what the homeowner wants to experience and how homeowners want to use a given space. Landscape architects often do not plant and maintain these spaces. Rather, architects collaborate with other landscaping professionals to produce the final results. Source: MetroCreative Graphics Editorial

Memorial Day

18500

$

May Sale

Regularly $49.95 each Offer expires: Wednesday, May 31.

Order ! W O N

20% Off your purchase of

any American Flag during the month of May. Offer good for May 2017. Not valid with any other promotions.

A Chair for Mom

20% off all chairs on Mother’s Day Weekend only

Remember the

BAIT

Opening Fishing May 13

Installation and Delivery Available! 21050 Lake George Blvd. NW Anoka, MN 763-753-4595 www.rumrivertreefarm.com

3645 Bridge Street St. Francis, MN 763-753-1265 www.stfrancishardware.com Like us on Facebook to find current in-store specials!

Rentals | Hardware | Small Engine & Equipment Repair | Bird Seed & Houses


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

19

Community & Business Commissioners sign resolution celebrating 100 years of extension in Anoka County Juanita Reed-Boniface

University of Minnesota Extension, Anoka County

The celebration of “100 years” events kicked-off with the Board of County Commissioners signing Resolution #2017-21 commemorating the 100th anniversary of University of Minnesota Extension Anoka County. “The extension service has made so many invaluable contributions to Anoka County in the past 100 years,” said Anoka County Commissioner Julie Braastad, who serves on the county’s Minnesota Extension Committee. “From 4-H to Master Gardening and much more, this organization has been a rich and rewarding source of information and inspiration for county residents.” Commissioner Braastad introduced Juanita ReedBoniface, chair of the County Extension Committee. Reed-Boniface addressed the board by reviewing the early history of extension, beginning with the passage of the Morrill Act in 1862, which designated the University of Minnesota as a land grant university— with the three functions being research, teaching and extension. By 1913, University officials realized that in order for extension work to prosper, a local county organization was needed. In 1915, the Anoka County Farm Bureau was chartered to sponsor county agent work, and two

Representing Anoka County Extension at the Resolution signing were (L-R) Ann Rantanen Lee, member Extension Committee, Lynne Hagan, program coordinator Master Gardener Program, Juanita Reed-Boniface, Extension Committee chair, Jill Eck, Extension Regional Director and Betsy Olson, Extension Educator Youth Development. Submitted Photo

years later, in 1917, L. O. Jacob was hired as the first Anoka County agent. Anoka County Farm Bureau was designated as the sponsoring organization with financial support from the county board of commissioners.

CELEB

In the beginning the overriding purpose of extension was the development of agriculture in the county, but soon 4-H youth programs, home and family living programs were initiated and continue today. In more recent

Home Improvement & Services

Merchandise, food and crafters are all welcome Saturday, July 15. General information, email to ebboosterday@gmail.com. Parade information, contact EBBoosterParade@gmail.com.

We service ALL BRANDS of garage doors and openers.

Fixed right Give your door the first time! a spring tune-up!

763-753-2032

Notice to the residents of Oak Grove For project updates, please visit the project website at

Reserve your booth space

St. Francis Family Owned & Operated Serving the area since 1989

the state. Support from the Anoka County Board has played a vital role in the long time success of extension in the county. The strong financial support for county programs has resulted in numerous innovative programs, a high retention of professional staff and up-to-date facilities. Two county commissioners are appointed to the extension committee and provide critical two–way communication between the committee and the county board.

The consulting firm MSA Professional Services Inc. is working with the City of Oak Grove to complete all aspects of a comprehensive plan update. MSA will be facilitating a Public Workshop at City Hall, 19900 Nightingale Street NW, on Tuesday, May 9, 6:30 p.m. Please join us to give your input and insight regarding the City of Oak Grove’s future.

RATIO N

Eagle Garage Door Co.

years, extension has expanded to meet a variety of critical community needs to include specialized programs across University of Minnesota Extension Centers for Youth Development, Community Vitality, Family Development and Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. In addition to program expansion, extension has undergone numerous organizational changes including regional centers and changes in county staffing. Andover is the site of one of the twelve regional centers in

www.oakgrove2040plan.com Community survey is located at

www.surveymonkey.com/r/ oakgrove2040survey Roofing Siding Windows Painting Storm Damage

New Construction Services, LLC.

MN Lic# BC631894

Your home Exterior Experts serving the community for over 15 Years

612-298-7501 St. Francis, MN

Now accepting major credit cards.

New Construction • Remodel Commercial • Residential Service

Dave Feders

centralheatcool@gmail.com

All Major Brands FREE ESTIMATES

612.369.7906

www.CentralHVACmn.com


20 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Life-changing opportunity offered to local girls Tori Larson

East Bethel Scholarship Program

The East Bethel Scholarship Program offers a unique and exciting opportunity for local girls to participate by becoming candidates for East Bethel Royal Ambassadors. Candidacy has been designed to provide personal and professional growth to participants. Throughout the seven-week candidacy, activities and educational experiences occur which promote positive character development, along with having a truly fun and memorable time. Some of the topics covered in candidacy include public speaking, volunteerism, interview skills and building confidence. The

Miss East Bethel/Princess age division has extra opportunities

for self-development. A highly-regarded guest speaker

Pictured are 2016-17 East Bethel Royalty, Miss East Bethel Sarah Farrier, Little Miss Mackenzie Norling, Little Miss Cindy Jane Tembreull and East Bethel Princess Britany Cich.  Submitted Photo

St. Francis Area Chamber of Commerce presents

June 9-11, 2017

St. Francis Pioneer Days Get Involved ´ Personal and business donations are being accepted to make this Pioneer Days the best ever. If you would like to make a monetary donation or help sponsor an event, go to stfrancischamber.org/pioneer-days. Volunteers needed all weekend—it’s a great way to fulfill service hours and give back to your community!

Medallion Hunt ´ The Medallion Hunt begins Monday, June 5 with clues posted on the Chamber’s website and Facebook page. For rules and more information, visit stfrancischamber.org. St. Francis Area Chamber of Commerce sponsors the Medallion Hunt.

14th Annual Amateur Photo Contest

Center Show

´ Plan to come to Community Park for the Minnesota Raptor Center show at 3:30 p.m. Stop by the meet-and-greet booth 4:30-8:30 p.m.

Business Expo in the Park ´ Held Friday, Saturday, Sunday, June 9-11 in Community Park. ´ Businesses, crafters, food vendors, nonprofits will have exposure to thousands of people attending St. Francis Pioneer Days!

´ Photos can be dropped off at Village Bank no later than Friday, June 2, 5:00 p.m. Photos should be no larger than 4 x 6 inches. For rules and more information, visit stfrancischamber. org. Village Bank sponsors the photo contest.

New: Raptor

´ LIVE entertainment all three days!

PARADE

Pioneer Days buttons will be on sale at local merchants soon.

´ Enter your business or group to march in the Pioneer Days Parade on Saturday, June 10!

How to get involved and for more information, visit stfrancischamber.org/pioneer-days or call 763-438-5163.

has been booked to talk with candidates about leadership and having a positive selfimage. Candidates also participate in an image clinic covering etiquette, poise and public/virtual image awareness, along with a make-up clinic with a cosmetic professional. All candidates and their families learn life-saving bystander CPR through the program’s dedication to keeping East Bethel a HeartSafe community. Candidacy leads to the selection of new royalty during East Bethel Booster Day, including a Miss East Bethel, East Bethel Princess and Little Miss East Bethel. The new royalty will serve a one-year term as goodwill ambassadors participating in local volunteer events and attending other Minnesota community festivals. Education scholarships are awarded at the end of their royal year. Miss East Bethel also completes her reign by becoming a candidate in the Minneapolis Aquatennial Queen of the Lakes program. Miranda Justad Ness is a former queen and an active program volunteer. She states, “Being Miss East Bethel was one of the best years in my life—a year of personal growth, networking, traveling around Minnesota, meeting amazing and inspiring people, some with which I’m still friends 10 years later! Now I get to see other young women experience the same thing as a volunteer on the board. It’s truly incredible watching the growth that happens to these

young ladies, even in just the two months of candidacy!” East Bethel royal candidates must meet certain criteria in order to be eligible. Miss East Bethel/Princess candidates need to be female, 16-22 years of age (must be at least 17 years old to be crowned queen) by July 1, 2017, cannot currently live with a significant other and never have been married or pregnant. Little Miss East Bethel candidates need to be a female, six to eight years of age by July 1, 2017. All candidates need to live in East Bethel or attend school in Independent School District 15, AnokaHennepin or Forest Lake school districts, and be willing to attend candidate events. The 2017 candidate orientation will be on Thursday, June 1 at 7:00 p.m., East Bethel City Hall, located at 2241 221st Avenue NE, East Bethel. This orientation will provide information on participating in the scholarship program. Visit the program’s website for additional information at www.eastbethelroyalty.org/ home.html or contact the candidacy coordinators at EBSPcandidacy@gmail.com.

Are you receiving The Courier at home? Keep up to date on local news and views. Receive 10 issues yearly on the last Wednesday of each month. Call us at 763-753-7031.

g n i r p S s ’ n e m Wo tique Bou 7th Annual

Hosted by the Isanti Women’s Team “Treasured Chests”

A celebration for all women, supporting the Avon 39, The Walk to End Breast Cancer

Basket Raffle Lunch On-Site

Saturday, May 13 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Long Lake Lutheran Church 3921 277 Avenue NW, Isanti

MANY NEW

Vendors

Spend the day with us… pamper yourself. Shop for Mother’s Day or any special occasion.

More information email ronda60@msn.com


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

21

Sharing Chinese culture in Minnesota Xia Li

ISD 15 ABE Student

In March, Concordia Language Village hosted a Chinese program at XinXing Academy for grades 3-6 to share Chinese culture and arts with local students. In this program, Xia Li introduced the Beijing Opera to students and then students painted the masks of Beijing Opera characters. Beijing Opera (Simplified Chinese: 京剧; Pinyin: JĪngjù) is a kind of Chinese opera which arose in the mid-19th

century and was popular in the Qing Dynasty. It is widely thought of as one of the cultural treasures of China. With its wonderful and artistic music, singing and costumes, the Beijing Opera is China’s national opera. The opera presents the audience with a host of Chinese culture, as well as attractive stories, beautiful paintings, exquisite costumes, grace and martial arts. Beijing Opera masks originated from tattoos and other fascinating patterns developed during the Song and Yuan Dynasties. The pattern of

Concordia Language Camp students painted Beijing opera masks.  Submitted Photo 

Serving the Twin Cities Area

 

Catering Service

Private | Corporate | Weddings | Family Reunions | Grad Parties

Jay & Bill  612-716-3648

3722 227th Avenue NW  St. Francis, MN 55070 Like us on Facebook

Core Value We believe that responsibility and accountability are essential for personal growth, organizational improvement and community engagement. Independent School District 15 • St. Francis, MN

Supporting Extracurricular Activities at St. Francis High School

facial make-up for opera actors and actresses in the roles of “painted face” and clown. Colors on the masks represented different meanings. Generally speaking, red is an important color because it represents good luck, utter devotion, loyalty, righteousness and bravery. Purple symbolizes wisdom and justice. Black represents loyalty and honesty. Watery white suggests trickery and malevolence. Oily white expresses self-conceit and a domineering character. Blue implies unyielding and intrepid personality. Green stands for a chivalrous nature. Yellow brings out cruelty and ferocity. Colors of gold and silver are applied to gods, Buddha, ghosts and monsters, to give a sense of fantasy from gold faces and bodies.

The St. Francis Area Chamber of Commerce announces the winner of the 2017 Pioneer Days Button Design Contest. Brittney Hemsworth is this year’s contest winner. David Johnson of Highland Money Management Inc. presented her with a $100 VISA gift card. Congratulations, Brittany!

Eric Schmoll, St. Francis Area Chamber of Commerce President


22 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Celebrate all military this May Memorial Day is celebrated each May to commemorate the people who died in service of the United States of America. Even though barbecues and visions of the upcoming summer weather may command much of the attention come Memorial Day

weekend, the holiday really serves as a remembrance for those military members who paid the ultimate sacrifice for their country, as well as the personnel who continue to protect and serve today. Memorial Day origins Memorial Day was first

known as Decoration Day and was borne out of the Civil War, on May 30, 1868. General John Logan, a national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, decreed General Order No. 11, which designated the day for the “purpose of strewing with flowers, or

otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land.” May 30 was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any

Home of the Free, Because of the Brave. In times of war and peace, the men and women of our military dedicate themselves to serving our country. Their commitment, patriotism, sacrifice and courage keep our country safe and strong. On Memorial Day, we honor those who have lost their lives in the line of duty and salute those who serve today. Absolute Portable Restrooms

Advanced Automotive Care, Inc.

Allstate Insurance Jolynn Erikson

American Legion Post 622

Cambridge • 763-444-9887

St. Francis • 763-753-8282

East Bethel • 763-434-2343

St. Francis • 763-753-4234

Blake A Cheeley, CRPC®, AAMS®

Blue Star Kettle Corn

Central Heating & Cooling, LLC

St. Francis • 763-753-2988

Oak Grove • 763-300-9110

Isanti • 763-753-3628

City of East Bethel

City of Nowthen

City of Oak Grove

City of St. Francis

King’s County Market

763-441-1347

763-404-7000

763-753-2630

St. Francis • 763-753-2630

Lakeside Cabinets & Woodworking

Norgren’s Napa Auto Care

North Anoka Plumbing, Inc.

Northland Screw Products, Inc.

Nowthen • 763-753-2628

Nowthen • 763-753-9227

St. Francis • 763-753-3373

St. Francis • 763-753-3628

Rum River Auto Sales

Tasty Pizza

Temperature Specialists, Inc.

St. Francis • 763-452-0246

St. Francis • 763-753-4988

St. Francis • 763-753-2974

763-367-7840

Village Bank St. Francis • 763-753-3007

particular battle. It took several years for the first state to recognize the holiday, which New York adopted in 1873. By 1890, all northern states recognized Decoration Day. When the holiday changed from commemorating those who died fighting the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war after World War I, the South began to recognize it as well. Honoring the military Although Memorial Day pays homage to the brave people who perished fighting for their country, it also is an opportunity to recognize the military men and women and their families who continue to work to ensure the freedom of Americans. The United States Armed Forces is renowned for its size and strength. Various sources suggest the size of the United States military is somewhere between 1.4 and 1.6 million active service people. The military is comprised of the Army, Army National Guard, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. Each of these military branches also has its own reserves. There are many ways to honor active, reserve and former veterans, as well as those who died in service of their country. ■ Help Veterans of Foreign Wars distribute red poppies as a visual reminder of the military’s efforts. ■ Volunteer at a veterans’ hospital or visit a wounded veteran at home. ■ Offer financial, legal or career expertise through the Corporation for National & Community Service (serve. gov). ■ Help to maintain the veteran area of a nearby cemetery. Place flags on all of the graves. ■ Befriend military families who frequently relocate, making a concerted effort to welcome them into your community. ■ Educate children about past wars and the services the military provides. ■ Visit a military museum or historic site. ■ Observe the National Moment of Remembrance at 3:00 p.m. local time for one minute. ■ Post a message to the troops at the USO website (uso.org). Source: MetroCreative Graphics Editorial


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

Providing food and clothing to those in need through the generosity of our community

Financial Focus

Blake Cheeley Edward Jones Financial Advisor

On 529 day, think about college savings plans You probably won’t see it on your calendar, but May 29 (5/29) is 529 College Savings Day, or 529 Day for short. This day, named after the 529 plan, a popular college-savings vehicle, is designed to promote awareness of the need to save and invest for the high costs of higher education. And that need has never been greater. Consider the following: College prices keep moving up. College costs just keep rising. For the 2016-17 school year, the average cost (tuition, fees, room and board) was about $20,000 for in-state students at public universities and more than $45,000 for private schools, according to the College Board. These costs are likely to continue climbing. Student debt is at record levels. Of the Class of 2016 graduates who received loans—about 70 percent of the total student population— the average individual debt was $37,172, a record high, according to a study cited by CBS News. What can you do to help your children graduate from college without having to provide a big “IOU” in exchange for a diploma? In the spirit of 529 Day, you might want to consider investing in a 529 plan. It’s certainly not the only means of saving for college, but it does offer some attractive benefits. For starters, contribution limits are quite high—you can accumulate more than $200,000 per beneficiary in many state plans. And you can typically invest in the 529 plan offered by any state, even if you don’t reside there. If you do invest in your own state’s plan, you may be eligible for state income tax incentives. Also, all withdrawals from 529 plans will be free from federal income taxes as long as the money is used for a qualified college or graduate school expense of the beneficiary you’ve named — typically, your child or grandchild. (Withdrawals for expenses other than qualified education expenditures may be subject to federal and state taxes and a 10 percent penalty on the earnings portion of the distribution.)

Furthermore, you have complete control of your 529 plan assets. You decide who will get the money and when he or she will get it. You can even change the beneficiary to another family member. Keep in mind, though, that your 529 plan will be counted on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), although schools typically only consider up to 5.6 percent of parental assets when calculating financial aid. And distributions from a parentowned 529 account used for one year’s college expenses will not usually reduce next year’s financial aid eligibility. (For more information on how a 529 plan might affect your child’s financial assistance, you may want to consult with a college’s financial aid office.) If you can find a 529 Day event in your area, you may want to attend so that you can learn more about the many aspects of saving for college. But even if you can’t personally take part in 529 Day, give some thought to a 529 plan—it might be part of the solution for helping your children earn a relatively debt-free degree. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Letter to the Editor Do you live in the City of Oak Grove? Do you live in the City of Oak Grove? If YES—your input is needed! The future is being planned now! Visit the city’s website at www.ci.oak-grove.mn.us and go to City Updates and then 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update. Follow the Blog via email to get updates and know when the online survey is available and when public meetings will be held! Be INFORMED and have some input into the future of your city and community. Thank you for participating—it makes a difference!

The North Anoka County Emergency Foodshelf (NACE) and clothing closet’s mission statement definitely rang true on March 16, when NACE held its annual Empty Bowls fundraiser at St. Patrick’s Church Barb Anderson in Oak Grove. The community’s support was outstanding for their City of Oak Grove Resident neighbors in need. With a record breaking year, NACE raised $19,509.67. NACE would like to thank all who attended the event, See The Courier’s Letter to the numerous businesses that contributed to the silent and live Editor policy on our webpage auctions, and St. Patrick’s Church for hosting the event! A special at www.the-courier.org. thank you to the Lions and Lioness clubs, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and community members who helped organize the event. Because of everyone’s generosity, NACE will be able to continue its many programs Blake A Cheeley, CRPC®, AAMS® such as Weekend Packs for Financial Advisor kids, CAN Home Delivery 23306 Cree Street NW Suite 102 for homebound seniors and St. Francis, MN 55070 providing food to the many 763-753-2988 families in need in northern Anoka County. If you would like Member SIPC more information about NACE www.edwardjones.com Foodshelf and Clothing Closet, call 763-434-7685 or visit www.nacefoodshelf.org.

You talk. We listen. In person.

Submitted by Katie Ritschel, NACE Foodshelf Director of Community Development

Pioneer Days

Live Music No Cover Charge

23

Friday, June 9

The Naked Cowboys

FREE

ept S 9 1

e m ber 8

Car Show y Ma

St. Francis

Friday Nite Rally

9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.

Saturday, June 10

My Famous Friends 9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.

Weather Permitting

Sunday, June 11 Guaranteed

BINGO

$1,000 payout

Join us for all the fun!

Patriot Lanes Bar and Grill

Check us out at patriotlanesbarandgrill.com 3085 Bridge Street, St. Francis • 763-753-4011 Hours 11:00 am-1:00 am

Every Friday Night 5:00 p.m.–Dusk St. Francis City Centre Mall Hwy 47 & Pederson Dr. NW St. Francis, Minnesota

Reserved Parking for 1980 & Older

Street Rods, Customs, Classics, Trucks, Motorcycles

Music andes Special Priz Trophies th n n O ce a Mo

For rally information, call Dick Henz at 763-753-1092. Sponsored by St. Francis Collision/Joe’s Hot Rod Shop, St. Francis McDonald’s, King’s County Market and other area merchants.


24 May 2017The Courier

Seeking St. Francis Ambassador candidates

I Hate When That Happens

Jacquie Goedel

Last week we had one of our regular clients drop off his late model pick-up truck. He said his main concern was that the vehicle started okay in the morning when the engine was cold, but started really hard after the engine was warmed up. Of course our brain starts thinking of the possibilities. Is it fuel pressure? Is the truck losing spark when the engine is warm? Is the computer failing to operate the injectors properly when warmed up? All these are possibilities for this symptom. Then as he is walking out the door he said, “I almost forgot. Can you please check out why the temperature gauge is not reading?” Trying to not jump to any conclusion, we wrote the repair order: hard starting after engine is warmed up and inspect the temperature gauge, not working. The next day we began work on the truck. We verified that it started fine when cold, we test drove about 10 miles. We shut off the truck and had to crank and crank the engine numerous times before it would restart. We also verified that the temperature gauge was not working. The technician started checking fuel pressure, spark, etc. and all the basics were there. We then hooked up our factory scanner. We found that the computer sensor was relaying only 70 degrees. Clearly the engine was hot, around 200 degrees. So further circuit testing found that the engine coolant temperature sensor was defective and was sending inaccurate info to the computer, and the computer was not providing the proper amount of fuel to the engine. In fact it was over fueling the engine. This was also the cause of the engine temperature gauge not reading properly. This system uses the same sensor that informs the computer of the engine temperature. The computer sends the signal to the dash gauge as well as uses the temperature info to calculate the fuel and timing needed to run the engine (and sometimes the transmission) at various temperatures. We often see a vehicle come in with the check engine light on and the customer’s concern is that in the winter they have poor heat coming out of the heater. Often we find that the engine coolant temperature is too low, causing poor heat, and the

Program Coordinator, Miss St. Francis Ambassador Program

The Miss St. Francis Ambassador Program would like to take this opportunity to congratulate the 2016-17 Ambassadors for representing the city of St. Francis with such grace and elegance! This year the Ambassadors traveled north to Cambridge, south to Northfield and east to North Hudson, Wisconsin, taking the float to other community parades. During Pioneer Days we will be debuting a brand new float. It has taken a lot of time to raise the money and we would like to thank the community for their support. We could not have done the float rebuild without the continuous support from the St. Francis Lions Club, the city of St. Francis and the businesses throughout our wonderful city. We look forward to showing off our new float at Pioneer Days and community festivals in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. The 2017 coronation will be held Saturday, June 10 at St. Francis Elementary School at 3:00 p.m. Admission is $5 for 18 and over, $3 for ages 5-17 and children under 4 are free. All are welcome. Come and support all our candidates and see who is going to be representing the city of Pictured (L-R): Little Misses Audrina and Lilliana. St. Francis during the Misses Lily and Marian. Submitted Photo 2017-18 year!

Lynn Karasch, MBA, CPA

Specializing in Individual & Small Business Returns By appointment • Accounting & Bookkeeping Phone 763-413-3090 Services Fax 763-434-4739 • Consulting

www.ldkaccounting.com

Open year round for all of your accounting needs.

Buy with confidence. Sell with success!

• Payroll Services • Business Startup Services

Cassie Clem Realtor®

612-213-9403 clemhomes@gmail.com www.cassandraclemhomes.com 23624 St. Francis Blvd. NW, Suite 5 St. Francis, MN 55070

Our Saviour’s

Offering 2, 3 & 4 extended day and kindergarten readiness class options.

Preschool

Now registering for 2017-18 school year.

d Top rate n Christia l! o prescho

For registration information, please contact Michelle Bauer, Preschool Director mbauer@oursaviourslc.org, by phone 763-434-6117 ext. 123 or visit www.oursaviourslc.org under Preschool.

Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church • 19001 Jackson Street NE • East Bethel

| www.the-courier.org

Randy Gerdin ASE certified technician, Gerdin Auto & Tire Owner

Info, info, Info! engine computer monitors the engine temperature continuously to make the proper fuel and timing adjustments. In many of these cases we find the engine thermostat is not controlling properly or is stuck open, not letting the engine reach its normal operating temperature. The point is, one thing affects another. You may think you have two problems, but perhaps you only have one issue. We see vehicles come in, running poorly and have five to six diagnostic codes stored in the memory. Often there is only one issue that may trigger all of these additional codes.

As with many things, information is power. We would rather have more information than we actually need. In many cases we end up having to contact the driver to ask a question that may seem unrelated to their original concern. We have some clients who will write or type a list of their concerns along with the symptoms. This can save so much diagnostic time for us and in turn will cost you less. After years of working with vehicles, we have gotten pretty good at asking the right questions, but sometimes we still need more info. I cannot count the number of times that I have thought, “I wish the driver would have told me that at the beginning.” In our fast paced world, I know that folks sometimes just forget to mention symptoms or concern. It seems that people are always in a hurry. From the shop’s viewpoint, we would rather spend a bit more time up front and get the complete story. This way we do not have to contact the owner for more info. It is important that on the day your vehicle is in for service, you are available to be contacted. We use the telephone as well as email and texting in order to communicate with our clients. The worst thing is needing to know something and being stuck until you reach the client. I hate when that happens.

Kraig Domogalla

“Your Real Estate Specialist” 612-366-3925 Email: kraigdomogalla@aol.com

Results

Each office Independently Owned and Operated


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

25

City of Oak Grove (The Ponds) 2016 Drinking Water Report The City of Oak Grove is issuing the results of monitoring done on its drinking water for the period from January 1 to December 31, 2016. The purpose of this report is to advance consumers’ understanding of drinking water and heighten awareness of the need to protect precious water resources. Source of Water The City of Oak Grove provides drinking water to its residents from a groundwater source: purchased treated water from the City of St. Francis which obtains its water from wells in the Mt. Simon and Quaternary Buried Artesian aquifers. The Minnesota Department of Health has made a determination as to how vulnerable our systems’ source(s) of water may be to future contamination incidents. If you wish to obtain the entire source water assessment regarding your drinking water, please call 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 (and press 5) during normal business hours. Also, you can view it online at www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/water/ swp/swa. Call 763-404-7000 if you have questions about the City of Oak Grove drinking water or would like information about opportunities for public participation in decisions that may affect the quality of the water. Results of Monitoring No contaminants were detected at levels that violated federal drinking water standards. However, some contaminants were detected in trace amounts that were below legal limits. The follows shows the contaminants that were detected in trace amounts last year. (Some contaminants are sampled less frequently than once a year; as a result, not all contaminants were sampled for in 2016. If any of these contaminants were detected the last time they were sampled for, they are included in the table along with the date that the detection occurred.) Key to abbreviations: MCLG—Maximum Contaminant Level Goal. The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. MCL—Maximum Contaminant Level. The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. MRDL—Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level. MRDLG—Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal. AL—Action Level. The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirement which a water system must follow.

Contaminant (units)

MCLG

MCL

4

4

0

60

N/A

8.2

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

10.4

10.4

N/A

.7

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

0

80

N/A

23.3

Fluoride (ppm) Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (ppb) Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm) TTHM (Total trihalomethanes) (ppb)

Level Found Range Average/ (2015) Result* Typical Source of Contaminant State of Minnesota requires all municipal water systems to add fluoride to the drinking water to promote strong .57-.74 .8 teeth; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

* This is the value used to determine compliance with federal standards. It sometimes is the highest value detected and sometimes is an average of all the detected values. If it is an average, it may contain sampling results from the previous year. Contaminant (units) Chlorine (ppm)

MRDLG 4

MRDL 4

****Highest and Lowest Monthly Average.

**** .35-.51

***** .44

*****Highest Quarterly Average.

Contaminant (units) MCLG

AL

90% Level

# sites over AL

Copper (ppm)

1.3

1.3

.88

0 out of 10

0

15

.5

0 out of 10

Lead (ppb)

Typical Source of Contaminant Water additive used to control microbes. Typical Source of Contaminant Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. City of Oak Grove is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Monitoring may have been done for additional contaminants that do not have MCLs established for them and are not required to be monitored under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Results may be available by calling 651- 201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 during normal business hours. 90th Percentile Level—This is the value obtained after disregarding 10 percent of the samples taken that had the highest levels. (For example, in a situation in which 10 samples were taken, the 90th percentile level is determined by disregarding the highest result, which represents 10 percent of the samples.) Note: In situations in which only five (5) samples are taken, the average of the two with the highest levels is taken to determine the 90th percentile level. ppm—Parts per million, which can also be expressed as milligrams per liter (mg/l). ppb—Parts per billion, which can also be expressed as micrograms per liter (μg/l). nd—No Detection. N/A—Not Applicable (does not apply). Compliance with National Primary Drinking Water Regulations The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff and septic systems. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug

Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.


26 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

City of St. Francis 2016 Drinking Water Report The City of St. Francis is issuing the results of monitoring done on its drinking water for the period from January 1 to December 31, 2016. The purpose of this report is to advance consumers’ understanding of drinking water and heighten awareness of the need to protect precious water resources. Source of Water The City of St. Francis provides drinking water to its residents from a groundwater source: three wells ranging from 229 to 417 feet deep, that draw water from the Mt. Simon and Quaternary Buried Artesian aquifers. The Minnesota Department of Health has made a determination as to how vulnerable our systems’ source(s) of water may be to future contamination incidents. If you wish to obtain the entire source water assessment regarding your drinking water, please call 651-201-4700 or 1-800-818-9318 (and press 5) during normal business hours. Also, you can view it online at www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/water/ swp/swa. Call 763-233-5200 if you have questions about the City of St. Francis drinking water or would like information about opportunities for public participation in decisions that may affect the quality of the water. Results of Monitoring No contaminants were detected at levels that violated federal drinking water standards. However, some contaminants were detected in trace amounts that were below legal limits. The table shows the contaminants that were detected in trace amounts last year. (Some contaminants are sampled less frequently than once a year; as a result, not all contaminants were sampled for in 2016. If any of these contaminants were detected the last time they were sampled for, they are included in the table along with the date that the detection occurred.) Key to abbreviations: MCLG—Maximum Contaminant Level Goal. The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. MCL—Maximum Contaminant Level. The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. MRDL—Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level. MRDLG—Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal. AL—Action Level. The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirement which a water system must follow.

Contaminant (units)

MCLG

MCL

4

4

0

60

N/A

10.8

10.4

10.4

N/A

.7

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

0

80

N/A

29

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Fluoride (ppm) Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (ppb) Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm) TTHM (Total trihalomethanes) (ppb)

Level Found Range Average/ (2016) Result* Typical Source of Contaminant State of Minnesota requires all municipal water systems to add fluoride to the drinking water to promote strong .57-.74 .8 teeth; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories. By-product of drinking water disinfection.

* This is the value used to determine compliance with federal standards. It sometimes is the highest value detected and sometimes is an average of all the detected values. If it is an average, it may contain sampling results from the previous year. Contaminant (units) Chlorine (ppm)

MRDLG 4

MRDL 4

****Highest and Lowest Monthly Average.

**** .5-.9

***** .68

*****Highest Quarterly Average.

Contaminant (units) MCLG

AL

90% Level

# sites over AL

Copper (ppm)

1.3

1.3

.17

0 out of 20

0

15

nd

0 out of 20

Lead (ppb)

Typical Source of Contaminant Water additive used to control microbes. Typical Source of Contaminant Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. City of St. Francis is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Monitoring may have been done for additional contaminants that do not have MCLs established for them and are not required to be monitored under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Results may be available by calling 651-201-4700 or 1-800-8189318 during normal business hours. 90th Percentile Level—This is the value obtained after disregarding 10 percent of the samples taken that had the highest levels. (For example, in a situation in which 10 samples were taken, the 90th percentile level is determined by disregarding the highest result, which represents 10 percent of the samples.) Note: In situations in which only 5 samples are taken, the average of the two with the highest levels is taken to determine the 90th percentile level. ppm—Parts per million, which can also be expressed as milligrams per liter (mg/l). ppb—Parts per billion, which can also be expressed as micrograms per liter (μg/l). nd—No Detection. N/A—Not Applicable (does not apply). Compliance with National Primary Drinking Water Regulations The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals

or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided

by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

27

School Board Highlights School Board Perspective

Mike Starr ISD 15 School Board Chairman

Pride In our schools The two questions I hear about the most regarding the upcoming bond referendum special election are, “Why do we need a bond?” and “How much is this going to cost me?” Independent School District 15 (ISD 15) is asking voters two questions on the ballot. The first question is for a bond not to exceed $92,280,000 to improve our aging schools by replacing/upgrading windows,

floors, ceiling tiles, walls, restrooms, removing 25 year old portables and replacing them with new classrooms (ten for St. Francis Elementary School, four for East Bethel Community School), improving security front doors for all of our school buildings, meeting ADA standards, enhance classrooms to meet educational standards, and more. Our schools were built as

School Board Highlights Kathleen Miller

Staff writer

March 27, 2017 All board members were present Saints Academy/Saints Online Site Report Principal Scott Manni reported on programs offered at Saints Academy, which is in its first year, and Saints Online, in its second year. Enrollment for both programs has increased since the start of the school year. The focus is to provide distance learning with a personal touch for online students, keep students in the District and have flexibility and shared resources with St. Francis High School. Goals for the 201718 school year include expanding agriculture education, automotive technology, targeted services, online and summer work experience. 2016-17 Budget Revision Director of Business Services Scott Nelson presented revisions for the 2016-17 general and community education funds. General budget revisions for revenue are $51,630,223 and expenditures are $51,777,075. The District’s unassigned general fund balance is 5.86 percent, which is above the District’s minimum policy of 5 percent. The 2016-17 community education budget revisions for revenue are $2,176,724 and general expenditures are $2,284,577. The resolution to approve the budget revision for 2016-17 passed, 7-0. Oak Land Cooperative Property Update A resolution was introduced relating to the agreement under Minnesota Statutes §471.59 with Independent School District 15 (St. Francis), Independent School District 911 (Cambridge-Isanti) and Independent School District 477 (Princeton) for participation in the Oak Land Cooperative. The Joint Powers Agreement has been terminated and the Cooperative dissolved. The property shall be sold and the proceeds from the sale distributed among the parties as set forth in the Agreement. The property has been appraised at $649,000 and ISD 15 St. Francis is interested in purchasing the property. The School Board of Independent School District 15 resolved:

far back as 1953, 1954, 1961, 1965 and 1974. School districts across the state and nation do not receive enough funding from our elected officials to make major improvements within their schools. We receive just enough funding to maintain our facilities to keep them open, clean and operational. Like our highway and public roads, cities, county and state roads are maintained just enough for us to drive on

1. The Superintendent is authorized to enter into negotiations with the parties to the Joint Powers Agreement for purchase of the Oak Land Cooperative property located at 22970 Butterfield Drive in St. Francis. 2. The Superintendent is authorized to offer the Appraised Value for the purchase of the Property, subject to agreement by the parties on all other terms and conditions of a Sale and Purchase Agreement. The resolution was declared duly passed and adopted, 7-0. Personnel Item Superintendent Troy Ferguson recognized and thanked Director of Business Services Scott Nelson for the work he has done in the District during his five years of employment. Nelson will retire at the end of March. Kathy Miller, School Management Services, will be serving as interim business director. Applications for the Business Services director position will be reviewed and interviews will be scheduled.

School Board Highlights

them yet to make major repairs or replace bridges, it takes years of planning. Our District has been planning and discussing a bond referendum since 2013. On February 27, the ISD 15 School Board authorized the referendum bond. The second question on the ballot is asking for a $15,520,000 bond to build a four-station community activity center addition to the high school. This addition will improve and open up gym space at the middle school, will enhance gym classroom space at the high school to improve programs and activities for our students and the public, will have restrooms, ticket windows for football games, and a concession room for field activities. On the District’s website at www.isd15.org/bond, you

will find a tax calculator to get the tax impact for your home. Below I have costs for four homes in our school district if both questions were to pass: A. My home in Oak Grove, value $239,000, annual cost, $180.46, monthly, $15.04. B. East Bethel home, value $204,000, annual cost, $149.59, monthly, $12.47. C. St. Francis home, value $154,400, annual cost, $105.95, monthly, $8.83. D. East Bethel home, value $403,500, annual cost, $325.36, monthly, $27.11. Any questions you may have, please call 763-753-7040, email to bond.questions@isd15. org, attend your school board meeting or contact a school board member.

School Board Members

School Board Meeting Schedule

Mike Starr Chairman 

School board meetings are held in the Community Room at Central Services Center, located at 4115 Ambassador Blvd. NW, St. Francis.

763-300-9110

Marsha Van Denburgh Vice-Chairwoman  763-753-6653 Barbara Jahnke Clerk763-753-6846 Rob Schoenrock Treasurer763-232-7902

Katrinna Dodge

Jill Anderson Director

April 10, 2017

Amy Kelly Director763-744-8458

Staff writer

All board members were present. Anoka Hennepin Credit Union Report Todd Barduson, marketing director for Anoka Hennepin Credit Union (AHCU), presented on the Spirit Checking Program that would create additional revenue streams for Independent School District 15 (ISD 15). Spirit Checks and Spirit VISA from AHCU will have the ISD 15 logo. Those that use the ISD 15 Spirit Checking Program/Spirit Program VISA will contribute to funding their local schools. This partnership between ISD 15 and the credit union also has enrolls the option for St. Francis High School students to participate in the Spirit Walk, which directly funds extracurricular programs to assist lowering activity fees to encourage student participation. The Spirit Walk is a non-exclusive agreement that garners on student participation to raise money by pledging online for their extracurricular programs. Motion passed unanimously. Continued On Page 28

612-270-0415

Sean Sullivan Director763-807-0010 Email: schoolboard@isd15.org

Monday, May 8 Dialogue with School Board 6:30 p.m. Regular Meeting 7:00 p.m. Monday, May 22 Retiree Recognition Program 6:00 p.m. Regular Meeting 7:00 p.m. Monday, June 12 & 26 Dialogue with School Board 6:30 p.m. Regular Meeting 7:00 p.m. Live streaming and video archives of school board meetings are available at www.isd15.org/sbvideo

Call Michelle 763-586-0038

Results

Michelle Anderson Michelle.Anderson@Results.net


28 May 2017The Courier

Student Updates

Continued From Page 1

Morningside College student Ashley Stone, daughter of Dawn Stone of Cedar, performed in a Morningside College theatre production of Juanito and His April 7-8 in Klinger-Neal Theatre. Stone is a 2016 graduate of St. Francis High School. Cody Wald, son of Jasen and Melissa Wald of Nowthen, Minnesota, is studying in Australia during spring semester 2017 through the Center for Global Education at the College of Saint Benedict in St. Joseph, Minnesota, and Saint John’s University in Collegeville. Wald is a junior accounting major at SJU. The Australia program is located in Fremantle in Western Australia, approximately 30 miles from the capital city of Perth. Students enroll at the University of Notre Dame Australia. Heidi Wold’s fourth grade class was excited to learn about Robyn Smith’s, Due Process Facilitator, hobby of dog sledding. Students also connected this new knowledge to what they were learning in class about Antarctica and the Alaska Iditarod. This great race happens each March in Alaska. Alexander Weiner was able to try on some of Smith’s gear and get a taste of the hobby of dog sledding.

Heidi Wold, CCCS 4th Grade Teacher

Sannerud, Savarese & Associates, p.a. Certified Public Accountants

Specializing in accounting and taxes for closely-held and family-owned businesses since 1974. Office hours Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. or by appointment

763-434-5929

• www.sannerudsavarese.com

1207 Constance Boulevard NE • Ham Lake, MN 55304

1/12

Child Care Center Now Taking Enrollment Both Locations, All Ages

East Bethel

763-434-1980 Isanti

763-444-3774

Drop-ins welcome. We offer great before & after school program rates. Call for Employment Opportunities

Remember to vote on Question 1 passing. Additional information regarding the tax impact on your property can be found on our website at www.isd15.org/bond. How will the new debt be structured in relation to the debt service that is scheduled to expire? A large portion of the district’s current bonded debt is set to expire after 2018. The proposed new debt service payments will be structured to “wrap” around the current debt service as shown in the graph on page 1. Existing debt service set to decrease after 2018 is shown in red on the graph. The new debt associated with Question 1 and Question 2 of the proposed bond referendum is shown in green and blue, respectively on the graph. This is a very typical financing structure for many school districts as they look to minimize large swings in annual tax impacts for the property owners of the district. Where can I get an absentee ballot? All absentee voters must first complete an absentee ballot application. Contact Anoka County Elections for the form or contact Ann Johnson, ISD 15 Central Services Center, at 763-753-7044 or ann.johnson@isd15.org. A sample ballot is also available for review at www.isd15.org/bond. Do you have questions not answered here? Email to bond.questions@isd15.org or call ISD 15 Central Services Center at 763-753-7040. Question 1 Shall the School Board of Independent School District No. 15 (St. Francis), Minnesota, be authorized to issue general obligation school building bonds in an amount not to exceed $92,280,000, for acquisition and betterment of school facilities? Question 2 If Question 1 is approved, shall the School Board of Independent School District No. 15 (St. Francis), Minnesota, be authorized to issue general obligation school building bonds in an amount not to exceed $15,520,000, for acquisition and betterment of school facilities, including a four-station community activities center addition to St. Francis High School? Continued From Page 27

School Board Highlights 2017-2018 Insurance Rates Update Human Resources Director Brandon Nelson presented the upcoming insurance plans offered through ISD 15 for public employees. The district was recommended

| www.the-courier.org

ISD 15 Bond Referendum Special Election polling places Tuesday, May 23, 2017 7:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Polling places and precincts for all Independent School District 15 (ISD 15) voters for the May 23 Special Election will be as follows: Precinct 1 Central Services Center (District Office) 4115 Ambassador Blvd. NW St. Francis, Minnesota Precinct 1 includes all territory in ISD 15 located in the Cities of Bethel, Nowthen and St. Francis and Stanford, Athens and Spencerbrook Townships. Precinct 2 Lifelong Learning Center 18900 Cedar Drive NW Oak Grove, Minnesota Precinct 2 includes all territory in ISD 15 located in the Cities of Andover and Oak Grove (Cedar). Precinct 3 East Bethel Senior Center 2241 – 221st Avenue NE East Bethel, Minnesota Precinct 3 includes all territory in ISD 15 located in the City of East Bethel and Linwood Township. All qualified electors residing in the School District may cast their ballots at the polling places designated above during the polling hours specified above. A voter must be registered to vote to be eligible to vote in the special election. Unregistered individuals may register to vote at their polling place on Election Day. Absentee Voting For information regarding absentee voting, contact Ann Johnson, ISD 15 Central Services Center, at 763-753-7044 or ann.johnson@isd15.org or Anoka County Elections at 763-323-5275 or visit www.anokacounty.us/224/AbsenteeVoting.

by third-party consultants to stay with PreferredOne which increased 17 percent from 2016 to 2017. Public Employees Insurance Program (PEIP) rates decreased with some tweaks to coverage. There were no rate increases for dental, life and disability insurance. Open enrollment for insurance is May 1-15. For more information on insurance, visit Open Enrollment 2017-18

Fast affordable printing including FREE DELIVERY to the St. Francis Area

612-588-8885 skylinegra@aol.com

under Human Resources on the district webpage. St. Francis High School Graduation Troy Ferguson asked for permission from the School Board to research accessibility and set-up for the possibility to move SFHS graduation outside, weather permitting. Moving SFHS outside would provide more people to share in celebration of our students’ success. Students would receive four tickets to allow family to sit on the field, additional guests can sit in the bleachers or on the hill overlooking the stadium. Ferguson will research and a vote will commence to move graduation location to the football stadium at the next School Board meeting, April 24, 7:00 p.m., at Central Services Center.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

29

Sports & Outdoors Anderson qualifies for nationals Brittney Moffat

SFHS Track & Field Head Coach

It was a successful day for St. Francis High School (SFHS) senior Amanda Anderson as she competed at the Saints Invite on April 13. She placed first in shot put and discus, with a new personal record in discus of 165-06, third best throw of all time in the state of Minnesota, just behind Anderson’s previous teammate and Minnesota state record holder, Maggie Ewen. Anderson qualified for the Junior National meet in Sacramento, California that will take place in late June. Anderson’s throwing coach Mark Hanson said, “All her accomplishments are due to her hard work and dedication in and out of season. She has attended many off season

camps and meets. She is a great role model for our program, school, and community.” Anderson took first place in discus at the 2016 Minnesota AA State meet. Overall that day, the SFHS girls’ team finished second and the boys’ team took fifth. Below is an overview of other top performances that day: Girls results ■ Alexis Lusthoff finished third in the 100M dash ■ Taylor Karasch finished third in the 200M dash ■ Sydney Hauck finished fourth in the 1600M run ■ Maria Laudenbach finished second in the 3200M run, and she also earned the fifth fastest SFHS time in the 3200M run. ■ Girls’ 4x200M relay placed third overall (Lusthoff, Street, O’Brien, Karasch)

■ Sara Zoccheddu tied for third place in high jump and third in triple jump ■ Abbie Rockstad placed fifth in pole vault ■ Daelyn O’Brien placed fifth in triple jump Boys results ■ Genuine Matthews placed first in the 200M dash and second in the 100M dash ■ Dylan Bigelbach placed fourth in 300M hurdles and fifth in 110M hurdles ■ Boys 4x200M relay placed fourth (Burgress, Tarr, Brunn, Benson) ■ Boys 4x400M relay placed third (Maiers, McAllister, Brunn, Enfield) ■ Boys 4x800M relay placed fifth (Miller, Maiers, Hoosline, Fingal) ■ Eli Hylen placed second in high jump ■ Tommy Schwieger placed first in long jump and triple jump The Fighting Saints varsity team competes next in Mahtomedi on Tuesday, April 18. The St. Francis coaching staff and team members would like to express our appreciation for the help and support we received at Thursday’s meet. Special recognition to the event workers, photographers, press box workers, coaches, junior varsity athletes, Scott Robinette and everyone else who helped make the Saint Invite another successful meet. Amanda Anderson Photo by Al Angell

Eli Hylen breaks high jump record from 1983 Brittney Moffat

SFHS Track & Field Head Coach

April 5 was quite an exciting day as the Saints competed at an indoor meet at St. MichaelAlbertville. St. Francis High school sophomore Eli Hylen broke a 34-year-old record school record. Hylen cleared 6' 5.25" in high jump, taking first place. Hylen competed in the Minnesota AA State meet last season, and was the only freshman in the state to compete in high jump at such a prestigious meet in 2016. ■ Senior Amanda Anderson also led the way for the Saints, earning a first place finish in shot put and breaking her own personal record with a throw of 40' 9.5". Anderson won the Minnesota AA State meet in discus last season. ■ Senior Genuine Matthews won the 55M dash with a time of 6.65. Matthews took second

place in the 400M dash at the Minnesota AA State meet last season. ■ Senior Tommy Schwieger took second place in long jump with a distance of 21-00 and in triple jump with a distance of 42-09. Schwieger placed ninth in triple jump at the Minnesota AA State meet in 2016. ■ Newcomer Sara Zoccheddu won triple jump with a distance of 33-06.00. Zoccheddu is a foreign exchange student from Italy, and she is a great addition to the team this season. ■ Senior Abbie Rockstad took second place in pole vault and set a new personal record of 9-00. Senior Taylor Karasch placed second in long jump with a distance of 16-08. The girls’ 4x200M team (Alexis Lusthoff, Taylor Karasch, Daelyn O’Brien, Emma Street) placed first with an overall time of 1:55.05.

Competing in the Irondale Invite on April 17 at the TPC Twin Cities in Blaine, St. Francis High School senior Ashlin Peterson started her round with a hole in one! Peterson won the “Hole in One” plaque with her name featured in the TPC Clubhouse for a par three on the 17th hole.

Brent Swaggert, SFHS Golf Coach

Heat Mizer Glass, Inc. HOME & BUSINESS

Free Estimates!

763-444-9234 30678 Hwy 47 NW Isanti, MN

H E A T

M I Z E R

s “Give U ” A Break

New Construction • Remodeling and Repair • Commercial Residential Windows & Doors Glass of All Types • Plastics Shower Doors • Mirrors

AUTO Glass

MN Glass Association

Auto Glass Repaired & Replaced Boat • RV • Tractor & Heavy Equipment • Insurance Specialists

SAVE $$$

Auto • Home • Business • Risk • Recreation Call Gary today for a free policy review and quote!

St. Francis Insurance Agency Gary Zimmerman • 763-753-3595 Across from St. Francis High School

Students & Staff

Drop your car off for service at our convenient facility across from St. Francis High School while you are at school.

763-753-4993 • www.gerdinauto.com 3128 Bridge Street, St. Francis Serving this community since 1977

24-Hour Towing & Recovery 763-434-1686


30 May 2017The Courier

St. Francis Area Special Olympics Deb Humann

St. Francis Area Special Olympics

Winter and spring have been busy for the St. Francis Area Special Olympics. We participated in two Polar Plunges, raising more than $3,000 for Minnesota Special Olympics and our local delegation. Our athletes finished the area and state basketball skills competitions with a first place in the team skills event. We welcomed three new athletes to our team: Adam Mitzuk, Joe Peterson and Alex Cardona. Several of our team members have actively supported the St. Francis Lions organization and helped out by selling merchandise at the 15th annual Arctic Plunge at Captain’s Lakeside Grille on Long Lake. This is the second year we have participated in fundraising for community organizations such as fire and rescue, police, and local food shelves. Thank you to the St. Francis Lions, the Arctic Plunge committee, Killebrew Root Beer, Ham Lake Lanes, MPL Specialties and everyone who sponsored our jumpers for the Polar Plunges. The team will be starting practice for their athletics season midMay to get ready for the state Special Olympics competition in June.

St. Francis Special Olympics arctic plunge banquet. Submitted Photo

Oakridge Auto Body Inc.

23428 Hwy. 65 NE 2 Blks. S of CR 24 on Hwy. 65

763-434-4772 763-434-7373 Collision Specialists

Recommended by insurance companies Ask about a free loaner car • Owners John and Lori Buchta Friendly and dependable service

St. Francis

Auto Parts Local one stop auto parts store with over 100,000 in stock parts and nationwide parts locating. Open 5 Days A Week — Monday–Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CLOSED ON SATURDAYS 763-753-4698 • Family Run Business 4140 St. Francis Blvd., just south of town on Hwy 47

| www.the-courier.org

Lero signs with Schwieger sweeps the Southwestern competition at Mahtomedi Brittney Moffat Minnesota The St. Francis High School Saints track & field team faced State University some chilly and windy weather at the Mahtomedi meet April 18, SFHS Track & Field Head Coach

Jen Close

SFHS Head Girls Softball Coach

April 12 marked the official spring signing date for all Division 1 and 2 student athletes for Fall 2017. St. Francis High School (SFHS) senior Emma Lero officially signed her letter of intent to attend Southwest Minnesota State University (SMSU) and play Division 2 softball. Lero signed with her family, friends, teammates and coaching staff present. She decided to attend SMSU after an official visit and prospect camp this past winter, where she visited the current SMSU softball team and coaching staff. After the prospect camp visit, Lero felt that SMSU was a perfect fit for her. The day ended when head SMSU coach, Jamie Dunn, offered her the opportunity to play for the Mustangs next fall. Lero had a very successful athletic career for the Fighting Saints as the starting varsity catcher for the past four years. She has been a leader for the varsity team both on and off the field, earning several all-conference honors in the Mississippi 8 conference and multiple team awards, while maintaining a 3.970 GPA in the classroom. “Emma is one of those student/athletes that is proud of her team, her school, and the community in St. Francis. She has given back so much to our youth players, our high school program, and our community as a stand-out varsity softball player for our team. I am very proud of her accomplishments as a softball player but more honored to witness Emma’s character, hard work, and commitment each and every day,” said Jen Close, head girls softball coach for SFHS. We wish Emma the best of luck next season in college as she gets to live her dream and play softball for the SMSU Mustangs.

but our student athletes were still able to pull off some impressive performances. Senior Tommy Schwieger swept the competition, taking first place in both the triple jump and long jump. Due to technological difficulties with the timing system, some of the results are inaccurate. To our best knowledge, here is a brief overview of top performances from the meet: ■ Alexis Lusthoff placed second in the 100M dash ■ Maria Laudenbach placed second in the 3200M run ■ Taylor Karasch placed second in long jump ■ Grace Hanson placed second in triple jump ■ Amanda Anderson placed first in shot put and first in discus ■ Shelby Reynolds placed second in discus and third in shot put ■ Rachel Miller placed fourth in discus ■ Genuine Matthews placed first in the 100M dash and first in the 200M dash ■ Tyler Fingal placed third in the 3200M run ■ Alex Fuchs placed fifth in the 3200M run ■ Dylan Bigelbach placed first in the 300M hurdles and third in the 110M hurdles ■ Eli Hylen placed third in high jump ■ Tommy Schwieger placed first in long jump and triple jump

Tommy Schwieger

Photo by Al Angell

Summer Day Camps at Wargo Nature Center Erik Thorson

Anoka County Public Information

Wargo Nature Center is ready for a summer of fun-filled day camps. A variety of day camps for ages Pre-K through grade 7 offers children the opportunity to explore nature, have fun, and get outside. New offers this year include Creative Arts Exploration, Outdoor Explorers and Build, Launch & Explore in addition to the ten other day camp options. Small group hands-on activities and great resources allow participants to explore the natural world around them. Day camps are held in various Anoka County parks. Camps are coordinated by Wargo Nature Center naturalists, who have years of experience educating and engaging kids. To view a brochure of upcoming camp offerings or to register, visit www.anokacountyparks.com or call Wargo Nature Center at 651-429-8007.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

31

Meetings, Benefits & Events Garage sale

Long Lake Lutheran Church will hold their annual garage sale on Thursday, May 4, 7:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 47 and County Road 59, 3921 277th Avenue NW, Isanti. For more information call 763-444-5315.

TOPS open house Leslie Knudson

TOPS Area Captain

TOPS Club Inc.® (Take Off Pounds Sensibly®) is hosting an open house on Monday, May 8 at 5:45 p.m. at St. Andrews Lutheran Church in East Bethel. Your first TOPS meeting is free of charge without obligation. For men, women and children 7+. Members learn about nutrition, portion control, food planning, exercise, motivation, and more. Membership is affordable at $32, plus nominal chapter fees. For details, call Leslie Knudson at 763-381-1572, visit www.tops.org.

American Red Cross blood drive Diane Grise

Chamber of Commerce

Health & Fitness

Seniors

St. Francis Area Chamber of Commerce Upcoming breakfast networking meeting is May 10, 8:00-9:00 a.m. at Beef ‘O’ Brady’s in St. Francis. Board meeting is May 17, 11:00 a.m. at the St. Francis Community Center, 23340 Cree Street. Meetings are open to the public. Pioneer Days June 9-11 visit our website to find our more about the event www. stfrancischamber.org or call 763-438-5163.

New East Bethel TOPS weight loss support group meeting. Meeting held at St. Andrew Lutheran Church, 1450 237th Avenue NE, East Bethel, Mondays at 5:30 p.m. Visitors are welcome to their first meeting free or charge with no obligation.

Oak Grove Seniors Meet the second and fourth Wednesday of the month at the Oak Grove City Hall at noon for a potluck and short business meeting. Bingo follows each business meeting. For information about the club and events, call Marion Schulz at 763-444-5652.

North 65 Chamber of Commerce Membership meeting May 17, noon-1:00 p.m. For location and more information visit www.north65chamber.com. East Bethel Chamber of Commerce Membership networking meeting May 11, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at Smokey’s Pub N’ Grill, 552 Lincoln Dr., East Bethel. Board meeting May 23, 8:00-9:00 a.m., Aggressive Hydraulics, 18800 Ulysses Street NE, Cedar. Visit www. eastbethelchamber.com for more info. Ham Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Networking luncheon meeting is May 10, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at Maxx Bar and Grill, 17646 Central Ave NE, Ham Lake. The Board of Directors meeting is May 17, 10:00-11:00 a.m. at 21st Century Bank, 17635 Central Avenue NE, Ham Lake. Visit www.hamlakechamber for location and more info.

Bloodmobile Volunteer

City & Township Meetings

St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Oak Grove is hosting a Red Cross Bloodmobile on June 6, 1:30-7:30 p.m. Register online at www.redcrossblood. org or at the info desk in St. Patrick’s.

Andover City Council Meets 1st & 3rd Tuesday, 7:00 p.m., 1685 Crosstown Boulevard NW andover 763-755-5100 Bethel City Council Meets 1st & 3rd Thursday, 7:00 p.m. 23820 Dewey Street, Bethel, 763-434-4366 Nowthen City Council Meets 2nd Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 19800 Nowthen Boulevard NW, Nowthen 763-441-1347 East Bethel City Council Meets 1st & 3rd Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 2241 221st Avenue NE, East Bethel 763-367-7840 Oak Grove City Council Meets 2nd & last Monday 7:00 p.m. 19900 Nightingale Street NW, Oak Grove 763-404-7000 St. Francis City Council Meets 1st & 3rd Monday, 6:00 p.m. ISD 15 Central Services Center, St. Francis 763-753-2630 Stanford Township Board Meets 1st Monday, 7:00 p.m. 5050 261st Avenue NW, Isanti, 763-444-6370

ISD 15 School Board ISD 15 SCHOOL Board Meetings: May 8 Dialogue with School Board 6:30 p.m., Regular Meeting 7:00 p.m. and May 22 Retiree Recognition 6:00 p.m., Regular Meeting 7:00 p.m. at Central Services Center, Community Room, 4115 Ambassador Boulevard NW, St. Francis.

American Legion American Legion Auxiliary Unit 622 – St. Francis General membership meets on the third Thursday of the month at 7:00 p.m. All members of the auxiliary are welcome and encouraged to attend. For more information, call 763-753-4234. American Legion Post 622 – St. Francis General membership meets the second Thursday of the month at 7:00 p.m. All members of the post are welcome and encouraged to attend. For more information, call 763-753-4234.

Business Edward Jones Coffee Club meets the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 8:00 a.m. at Bridge Street Coffee, 3122 Viking Blvd., Oak Grove.

AA/NA AA/NA Meeting at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in East Bethel. NA on Mondays at 7:00 p.m., AA on Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m., NA on Fridays at 6:30 p.m. AA Meets at Long Lake Lutheran Church, 5 miles north of St. Francis on Hwy. 47, Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m.

Tops Chapter MN #1774 Meets every Tuesday morning at 9:00 a.m. at the St. Francis Community Center, 23340 Cree Street N. TOPS stands for Take Off Pounds Sensibly and is a weight loss support group. Check out a meeting or visit www.tops.org. Long Lake Lutheran Church Invites you to join us for GriefShare Wednesday evenings at 6:00 p.m. Free. We are located five miles north of St. Francis on Hwy. 47. For more information please contact Sharon Sudeith at 763-444-4483 or visit www.longlakeluth.org. For general information on the GriefShare program, visit www.griefshare.org.

Lions/Lioness CEDAR/EAST BETHEL LIONESS CLUB Meets the first Monday of the month at 6:00 p.m. at Maxx’s Restaurant & Bar on Hwy. 65. For membership information call Yvonne Johnson, 763-434-6985. We Serve! CEDAR/EAST BETHEL LIONS CLUB Meets bimonthly, first and third Tuesday, 7:00 p.m., at Maxx’s Restaurant & Bar on Hwy. 65. Call Judy Ricke at 763-226-4893. Oak Grove Lions club Meet every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at Oak Grove City Hall, 7:00 p.m., adjourning at 8:00 p.m. For more information, call Lion Mark Silvernagel at 763-753-2215. NOWTHEN LIONS CLUB Are you looking to serve in your community of Nowthen? Meet new friends? Have a lot of fun? Come join the Nowthen Lions Club! The Nowthen Lions meet at Nowthen City Hall on the first Thursday of the month for the board meeting and on the third Thursday of the month for the membership meeting. Please email nowthenlions@yahoo.com. St. Francis Lioness Club Meets monthly. First Wednesday, administrative board and third Wednesday, general membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. Meetings are held at St. Francis City Hall, 23340 Cree Street. For more information, call Mary Madden at 763-444-5020 or Cheryl Eldstrom at 763-753-4602 or email bluesage51@ gmail.com. St. Francis Lions Club Club meets three times during the month at the St. Francis American Legion. First Wednesday board meeting; second Wednesday regular business meeting; fourth Wednesday social and program. All meetings start at 7:00 p.m. and adjourn at 8:15 p.m. Call Lion Kevin Schuldt for more information at 763-7531205 or visit www.stfrancismn.lionwap.org.

St. Francis Seniors Life is good when you can make new friends, get out and enjoy the multitude of activities that our community has to offer. We meet the first and third Thursday of each month at the St. Francis American Legion. Social time and lunch begins at noon, with the meeting beginning at 1:00 p.m. and games until 3:00 p.m. We play cards, bingo, scrabble, cribbage, go on trips, lunch outings, have picnics and stay active as we get older. Come and see what we are about. Call President Ray Steinke at 763-753-1871. East Bethel Seniors Dances are held 1:00-4:00 p.m. Cost is $6, lunch included. The Friday, May 5 dance will have old time music played by Dick Szyplinski. Entertainment for June 2 will be by Michael Elsenpeter. All are welcome to our Pancake Breakfast on Sunday, May 14, 8:30 a.m.-noon. Serving pancakes, French toast, sausage, juice, coffee and choice of egg, 50¢ per egg. Cost for breakfast is $5 for adults and $2 for children under 10. Are you 55 or older? Come and enjoy some companionship. All are welcome. Seniors meet the third Thursday of each month for a business meeting and catered noon lunch, 10:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.; second Wednesday of each month is crafts, 9:00 a.m.-noon with potluck at noon; fourth Wednesday is crafts only, 9:00 a.m.-noon. Cribbage once a month, call Barb for date/time at 763-434-6179. We also go on tours, etc. The East Bethel Senior Center is available for rent, call Dennis at 763-434-9244. Join East Bethel Seniors for $10 a year and receive a monthly newsletter. The East Bethel Senior Center is located one mile east of Highway 65 on 221st Avenue in East Bethel.

Jobs! Advertising Representative to be hired for school district Communications Department. See www.isd15.org/ employment to review this posting and to apply online. Job #2681. Independent School District 15 is looking for the following: Custodians, Educational Assistants, Nutrition Services, Bus Drivers and Substitutes. Please visit www.isd15.org and click on employment. Find your next job with MinnesotaJobs.com! We’ve been helping connect employers and job seekers for over 20 years. Visit our site to find your next job. We have employers with immediate openings for Direct Support Professionals, CDL Drivers, Machinists/ Tool Designers and much, much more. No registration necessary! Simply search and apply. Go to minnesotajobs.com to get started today!


32 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Life St. Francis Alumni Choir to be featured at Sandhill Community Fair May 20 June Gossler Anderson

Sandhill Center Advisory Council Tim Fultz St. Francis Alumni Choir President

A performance by the St. Francis Alumni Choir will be the grand finale at the Sandhill Community Fair, Saturday, May 20. For the most part the choir is made up of former St. Francis High School (SFHS)choir members, including long-time director, Lee Carlson. Directed by SFHS alumni Dr. Bruce Gleason, music director at St. Thomas University, the group meets the second Saturday of the month at the Wirtz-Olson farm for a two-hour practice followed by a potluck. New members are always welcome. The choir has performed at Diamond Lake Lutheran Church and the Nowthen Threshing Show.

Their repertoire includes sacred choral music and fun songs like Rocky Top. This free hour-long concert starts at 1:00 p.m. and is the choir’s debut performance for the St. Francis community. St. Francis alumni choir history Early in 2013 a number of Carlson’s former choir members were reminiscing about the great times they had in high school choir. It was decided that the group meet with Carlson at a deli in St. Francis in May 2013. On that Saturday morning eight of us got together, passed around some memorabilia, chatted and laughed and talked over the good, old times together. It was such a fine time that we decided we needed to sing together again on the second

Saturday in June at Elim Baptist Church in Anoka. That Saturday we had more choir alumni show up, enough to sing in four-part harmony and we sang from 10:00 a.m. until noon. We all went out to lunch together and agreed to get

together again on the second Saturday in July. In July even more vocalists came to share music and memories. Since then we’ve met every month on the second Saturday. Gleason has taken over as our official director, Carslon as

3220 Bridge Street, Suite 107 in the St. Francis Mall St. Francis Alumni Choir

Call

763-753-1277

Panda Angels project

for an Appointment

ISD 15 ABE Student

Chiropractic Orthopedist

Ask Fido:

6/12

What makes Fido’s your favorite home away from home?

“Easy. Four free walks a day, every day I’m here!”

More personal care boarding perks:

10% Off for new Grooming Customers!

• $18 per day plus a multi dog discount • Pick-up/drop-off 365 days a year • 24 hour on-site care • Maintaining Fido’s routine of pottying outside­—we’re not in the business of starting bad habits • Free medication administration

Fido’s Barber Shop 19847 Orchid St. NW, Oak Grove

All Breed Professional Dog Grooming and Personal Care Boarding Day and Evening Appointments

763-213-8143 www.fidosbarber.com

During the Sichuan earthquake, the Wolong Panda Center was badly damaged and many The Panda Angels Project offers the chance for giant pandas were tragically killed. Because of this disaster, the majority of the pandas at you to become an ‘angel’ to the wonderful giant Wolong needed to be relocated—so volunteers panda bears in China. The giant panda bears have become ‘panda angels’ by building houses, are one of the most endangered animals in the feeding, researching and taking care of them. world. In this program you can help take care What do you do in this program? of the giant panda by volunteering at the Panda ■ Go to the Panda Research Base in Chengdu or Research Base in China! It is a unique chance to to Bifengxia Panda Protection Centre in Yaan. actually cuddle the giant pandas, not just watch You will stay there one week to take care of them in the zoo. “China’s treasured” pandas. ■ At Panda Bears Rescue Exhibition, volunteers learn the reasons why giant panda bears are endangered and how to protect natural resources for panda bears. ■ Learn how to make nutritious and delicious food to ensure panda bears are healthy and feed them. Bring in this ad for ■ Plant lots of bamboo and $ 00 build many houses and playgrounds for panda bears. Clean the place where panda bears live. Any ■ Learn how giant panda bears exam grow from baby pandas to Offer expires 5/31/17. One coupon per customer, adult pandas at the Panda per visit. Not valid with any Bears Theater. other offers. If you are interested in this “We treat your pets like our own” program, please contact Xia Li phone at 415-966-6631 or St. Francis Veterinary Clinic by email shirlayli@hotmail.com. Xia Li

Kendall W. Goodian, D.C. Specializing in Sports, Industrial and Auto Accident Injuries

Submitted Photo

our director emeritus and we have an elected choir board, as well as several assistant conductors. Our membership includes friends who graduated in the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s. In 2014 the Olson family offered to host our rehearsals, so now we are able to get together at their home which is located between St. Francis and Nowthen, where many of us grew up. We follow our rehearsals with a potluck lunch and collect voluntary dues to cover the cost of music. We gave our first public performance in the historic Burns Free Church at the 2014 Nowthen Threshing Show and have performed there every August since, as well as other performances. We are expanding our music library and repertoire and looking for members to add to the choir. If anyone has questions or would like information, contact choir president Tim Fultz at 218371-1088.

ut Ask us abo our online pet med pharmacy!

10 off

763-444-9359

Two miles north of St. Francis on Highway 47 Visit us on the web at www.sfvetclinic.com


33

The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

Used books available at Sandhill Community Fair

Wedding

June Gossler Anderson

Sandhill Center Advisory Council

Faith Listings Abundant Life Alliance Church 3840 197th Avenue NW Oak Grove • 763-753-0284 www.AbundantLife4U.org Bethel Community Church 23860 Dewey Street NW Bethel • 763-434-9834 www.bethelschurch.org

Oak Grove • 763-753-2011 www.st-patricks.org

Cedar United Methodist Church 17541 Jefferson Street NE Ham Lake • 763-434-7463 www.cedarumc.org

The Bridge Church 6443 Norris Lake Road Nowthen • 763-516-5995 Services 10:30 a.m.

Elim Baptist Church 114 Dahlin Street SE Isanti • 763-444-9221 www.elimistani.org

Trinity Lutheran Church, School and Childcare 3812 229th Avenue NW St. Francis • 763-753-1234 www.trinitysf.org

Immanuel Church (OPC) 15036 Round Lake Boulevard NW Andover • 763-210-5846 www.immanuelchurchopc.org

West Bethel United Methodist Church 1233 221st Avenue NE Cedar • 763-434-6451

Living Hope Evangelical Free Church 23038 Rum River Boulevard NW St. Francis • 763-753-1718 www.LivingHopeEFC.org

Birth Silas Michael Hansen was born on March 24, 2017, at Cambridge Medial Center, part of Allina Health. He weighed 6 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 inches long. Proud parents are Curtis Hansen and Melissa Jellison of Isanti. Silas was welcomed by siblings Trinnety (9), Sophia (4), and Kylee (1).

Dale and Vickie Johnson of St. Francis together with Greg Priest of Woodbury and the late Bonnie Priest of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, wish to announce the marriage of Aaron Johnson and Christine Priest on June 18, 2016, at Grace Lutheran Church in Eau Claire. Aaron is a 2007 graduate of St. Francis High School and 2011 graduate of Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin, with a degree in natural resources. He is currently employed with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in La Crosse. Christine is a 2006 graduate of Eau Claire Memorial High School and 2010 graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire with a degree in ecology and environmental biology. Christine is employed with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in the Whitewater Wildlife Area. The couple resides in Pickwick, Minnesota. Submitted by Vickie Johnson

Our Saviour’s

ELCA

Submitted Photo

When the Sandhill Advisory Board sent out the call for used books to create a library at the Sandhill Center, nobody expected such an enthusiastic response. Books came in by the box load and the Ham Lake Lions, Cedar/East Bethel Lions and St. Francis Book Club donated funds to purchase book carts. A free-standing bookshelf was constructed to house the several thousand books that were donated—best selling fiction, book series, young adult, children’s and non-fiction. The collection includes works by authors such as Danielle Steele, John Gresham, Tom Clancy, C.S. Lewis along with dozens St. Francis of Star Wars books. Purchase United Methodist Church 3914 229th Avenue NW of books will be offered to St. Francis • 763-753-2273 the public for a donation to www.stfrancis-umc.com the Center at the Sandhill St. Patrick Catholic Church Community Fair, Saturday, 19921 Nightingale Street NW May 20, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Lutheran Church & Preschool Pastors Dan Nordin, Maria Pederson, Deacon Glenndy Ose

“Reaching Out With A Voice Of Hope”

Long Lake Lutheran Church 3921 277th Avenue NW Isanti • 763-444-5315 www.longlakeluth.org

Join us! Sunday Worship Schedule

Temperature Sensing For Today… and Tomorrow.

New Life Church 17261 St. Francis Boulevard NW Ramsey • 763-421-0166 www.newlifemn.org

Temperature Specialists, Inc. 3175 Bridge Street NW St. Francis, MN 55070-9612

Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church 19001 Jackson Street NE East Bethel • 763-434-6117 www.oursaviourslc.org

763-753-2974 • 800-272-5709 www.temperaturespecialists.com

St. Andrew Lutheran Church 1450 237th Avenue NE East Bethel • 763-434-7146 www.standreweb.org

MANUFACTURER OF RESISTANCE TEMPERATURE SENSORS

OUTDOOR PATIO FURNITURE

NOW

HIRING!

8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Ignite Service 6:30 p.m., Dinner 5:00-6:30 p.m.

Celebrate the beginning of summer join us all morning Sunday, May 21 for food, games and fun!

Summer Worship Schedule begins on May 28 8:30 & 10:00 a.m. • Wednesday night at the Chapel in Ham Lake, 6:30 p.m. begins on June 7

Vacation Bible School July 10-14 – Register Soon

19001 Jackson Street NE • East Bethel West County Road 22, south on Jackson Street For information call 763-434-6117 or visit our website at www.oursaviourslc.org or email to: oslc@oursaviourslc.org

Pool, Spa & Patio Sale!

10% OFF

all doughboy pool packages plus

POOLS ON DISPLAY

SAVINGS UP TO

AFFORDABLE! FAMILY FUN

50% OFF

SELECT MODELS**

“The original portable pool”

4 to 7 Ft. Depth Available

PRICES STARTING AT

3,895

$

FAMILY SIZE POOL PKGS FROM

1,695

2 LOCATIONS

www.poolstoreinc.com

West St. Paul • 433 E. Mendota Road • 651-451-7778 Blaine • 10100 Hwy 65 NE • 763-786-9563

Small down payment will ensure early spring installation • 38 years of experience in the metro area • Professional Installation • Bank Financing to qualified purchasers *O.A.C. **Off regular priced items.


34 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Anxiety and depression Dr. Brian Opp

Opp Family Chiropractic PA

In today’s overworked, constantly running around and sleepless society, we fall prey to stress. This stress leads to a further label of anxiety and/or depression by our doctors. Over the past two decades, the use of antidepressants has skyrocketed.

An

One in ten Americans now takes an antidepressant medication. Among women in their 40s and 50s, the figure is one in four. The conventional understanding of anxiety and depression is caused by an imbalance of chemicals called neurotransmitters in the brain. Treatment involves medications that increase the availability of those

ortunity

to

LEARN

Detox

Can’t be a clean fish in a dirty bowl.

Opp Family at Chiropractic

Thursday, May 11 6:45 p.m. 23671 St. Francis Blvd. NW St. Francis 10 donation goes to the East Bethel Community School Weekend Backpack Program

$

Dr. Brian Opp Dr. Katie Hofkes Mention this ad and receive 15% OFF your next regular priced hour massage!

763-213-0615 www.oppfamilychiropractic.com Expires 5/31/17

chemicals or at least have some effect on those chemicals in the brain. With anxiety, it is more of a question of reducing the production of certain substances or increasing the production of other substances that can lead to a reduction in anxiety. I feel there are cases where these medications can be useful and perhaps even lifesaving; I wouldn’t argue that they do not play any role at all. Instead of just suppressing symptoms, the functional medicine model addresses the root of the problem. There are three main areas of anxiety and depression in patients: gut health, stress tolerance or response and nutrient deficiencies. New emerging research is linking the gut to the brain through what is termed the gut-brain axis. This means that your gut talks to your brain and vice versa. If you have an unhealthy gut, you have an unhealthy brain. When our gut gets inflamed due to diet, low stomach acid, overgrowth of bad bacteria, parasites or fungal infections, it causes our brain to also be inflamed. A bad gut also leads to less of the neurotransmitter chemicals being made by the gut—90 percent of our body’s serotonin, the feel-good chemical in our brain, is produced by the gut. With this knowledge and the newest research that supports all disease starts in the gut, we work with our patients to improve the health of their gut.

Did you know? May Day is an ancient festival that welcomes spring and was once celebrated widely on May 1 every year. May Day falls approximately halfway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice and has its origins in pre-Christian times. Ancient Romans celebrated the festival of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers. It’s also related to the Celtic festival of Beltane, a springtime festival of optimism and the Germanic festival of Walpurgis Night, which also celebrates the arrival of spring. A traditional British May Day celebration included crowning a May Queen and dancing around a Maypole, which was covered in ribbons. Source: MetroCreative Graphics Editorial

X1001

What’s for Dinner?

Express Gasolines Per Gallon All Grades of Gas

Expires 5/31/17

Per Gallon All Grades of Gas

We might be able to help. Stop by the refrigerated case at the main entrance of the St. Francis store for suggestions.

Valid on cash transactions only, must pay inside St. Francis County Market. Not good with other offers. Limit one per visit.

X1001

Express Gasolines Valid on cash transactions only, must pay inside St. Francis County Market. Not good with other offers. Limit one per visit.

Next we look at how the body is tolerating stress or responding to stress. We are living in a stress-filled world and how we perceive stress plays a major role in anxiety and depression. Chronic stress response by the body lowers our tolerance by stealing the needed substances to make our neurotransmitters for the brain. One stressor on the body that is often overlooked is inflammation in the body. A second stressor is lack of sleep; we are sleeping three hours less on average than our parents did. The third stressor is uncontrolled blood sugar levels that are shrinking our brains. Which appears to be a significant component in the development of depression, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally we look at nutrient deficiencies that contribute to anxiety and depression. Lack of certain B vitamins, zinc, the DHA portion of fish oil, magnesium and certain amino acids that are needed to make the chemicals like taurine, glutamine and L-theanine, all play a role in healthy brains. Producing necessary nutrients keeps you and your body healthy. Please remember it’s important to consult your health professional before taking any supplements. Looking at how we can get to the root cause of the problem instead of putting a band aid on it is the key for long-term health and happiness.

www.kingscountymarket.com 23122 St. Francis Boulevard NW • St. Francis 763-753-3334 Open Seven Days A Week Monday-Saturday 5:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. Sunday 6:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m.


The Courier | www.the-courier.orgMay 2017

Healthy snacks for your active family Samantha Jochum

Stout Student Dietetics Association

Editor’s Note: Samantha Jochum, a 2015 graduate from St. Francis High School (SFHS), is in her junior year at the University of Wisconsin/Stout and is majoring in dietetics. For a class project, she wrote an article and requested that it be published in The Courier. We are happy to present the following article about eating healthy snacks. Parenting and eating healthy snacks, are you able to do both? We all want to think that we eat fruits/ vegetables and only whole grains every day but we know that is not the truth. We more than often eat snacks that are easy and loaded with sugar because of the convenience. As we all know nothing is worse than a starving kid or a ‘hangry’ parent when the family is on the go. The makings of a snack Carbohydrates are a very important part of any snack. Carbohydrates include whole grain breads and cereals, fruits, and vegetables. Adding fruit to a snack can help make it sweeter on the taste buds. Contributing vegetables to your snack can provide fiber that helps fill you up. Carbohydrates are the main fuel to the body that provides energy. Adding protein is the next step to making a delicious snack. Protein helps build and repair our muscles. Choosing lean meat, low-fat dairy or nuts as your protein in snacks can be very easy. Protein helps prevent your body from having a sugar crash. Lastly, add a small amount of fat to your snacks. Adding fat will help keep you full longer than having a piece of fruit by itself. Look on labels for monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats because these are the healthy fats for the body. Preparation ahead of time Being a parent involves being constantly on the move. This can make it difficult to have time to make snacks right before hitting the road. An easy thing to do is to prepare snacks in one day for the week. Gather your necessary ingredients and designate one day to plan out your snacks for the rest of the week. Below are some easy snacks that can be packaged ahead of time and taken on the go. ■ Trail mix: Choose your favorite kind of nuts and dried fruit. If you’d like to add a little extra sweetness, then choose your extra goodies. Mix all of these chosen ingredients into a bag or container.

Pet Corner

Dr. Amy Morgan Oak Grove Animal Hospital, Owner

If you’d like, make a couple throughout the week. Recipe: ½ cup almonds, ½ cup cashews, 2 Tbsp. raisins, 2 Tbsp. dried pomegranates, 2 Tbsp. Reese’s pieces ■ Low fat yogurt with fruit and your favorite cereal: Choose a cereal that is high in fiber and fortified with iron. Try to avoid cereals that have a lot of added sugars ■ Cut-up vegetables with hummus For kids and active adults, snacking one to two times a day is very beneficial and necessary for fueling the body throughout the day. So set aside a day of the week to prepare snacks and help prevent your kids from starving on the go and to keep yourself from being ‘hangry.’

2017 Goal 727

File Photo

Question My dog is itchy and sometimes I find raised pink bumps on his skin. Is this allergies? Answer Dogs are frequently diagnosed with seasonal allergies; the same allergens that affect people. Spring can be a prime time for allergens to affect dogs. The good news is, if your dog doesn’t have symptoms of allergies by the time it’s two or three years old, it’s unlikely they will develop later in life. If your dog has had itchiness (with or without skin lesions) and this itchiness seems to occur at the same time each year, it may be allergies. Instead of having respiratory symptoms like people do with allergies, dogs become itchy. Allergies can affect one part of the body or several. Many dogs exhibit allergies by chewing or licking at their feet or legs, sometimes their ears are itchy, sometimes their entire body is itchy. You may notice when you pet or scratch your dog’s back that it lifts a hind leg to scratch—this is often seen with allergies. Your dog may even be so itchy that it chews its hair down to stubble or scratches it out in areas. Sometimes there are papules, which are small, slightly raised pink bumps on the skin. These can be part of the inflammatory process that occurs in the skin with allergies, or they may be secondary to excessive licking and chewing at the skin. If your dog is missing hair or is keeping you awake at night licking or scratching, it’s time to get help to decrease the itchiness. Sometimes antihistamines work to suppress itchiness in dogs due to allergies but once your dog is itchy, it’s more likely you’ll need stronger medication. The most commonly used oral allergy medications (other than antihistamines) are prednisone, Atopica (cyclosporine) and Apoquel. A new medication in injectable form, Cytopoint, has been shown to decrease itchiness due to allergies for several weeks at a time. Each medication has potential side effects and the costs vary. Your veterinarian can help you decide which medication choice will work best for you. Regular bathing once or twice a week in a hypoallergenic or oatmeal shampoo can also be very helpful as it washes away the airborne allergens that can stick to your dog’s coat. Spring isn’t the only time allergies are seen in dogs— seasonal allergies can occur mid-summer or sometimes all summer and until the first hard frost in the fall or sometimes just in the fall. Make sure you seek help for your dog if itchiness is excessive.

Have a new puppy or kitten?

Tons

57 Tons

Recycled in March St. Francis has recycled 177 tons in 2017 so far. Recycling is now easier with simple sort recycling. You no longer need to sort items. Just place them all in the large roll-off container provided by your hauler. If you have any questions about what is acceptable or would like to start a new service, call your hauler: Ace Solid Waste 763-427-3110 Allied Waste 763-784-2104 East Central Sanitation 763-689-2171 LePage & Sons 763-757-7100

35

We’ll help you keep them healthy! Ask about dog and cat grooming 19035 Lake George Blvd. NW Oak Grove, MN 55303 763-753-6336 www.oakgrovevet.net

Amy Morgan, D.V.M. Lisa Johnson, D.V.M. Kaija Youngner, D.V.M. Dawn Price, D.V.M. Katie Neshek, D.V.M.


36 May 2017The Courier

| www.the-courier.org

Office professionals central in district operations Katrinna Dodge

Staff Writer

Throughout the schools and administrative buildings in Independent School District 15 (ISD 15), office professionals are instrumental in completing and managing day-to-day activities efficiently. Office professionals (OP) support our administration, staff, faculty, students and their families in accomplishing ISD 15’s mission throughout the year. When students and family members enter the school or building, the first person greeting them with a smile is an office professional. You may see them behind a desk answering phones and questions, but office professionals have many more responsibilities than what meets the eye. “People can have the same title but different

responsibilities,” said Kara Merrifield, chairwoman for the office professionals on the Education Minnesota - St. Francis Local 1977’s executive council. There are thirty-six OPs in ISD 15 and each one has unique responsibilities depending on the department. They assist and complete payroll, budgets, scheduling, bus routes, job postings, enrollments, curriculum, attendance, ordering supplies, manage calendars, plan events and manage department/building webpages along with their customer service duties. These responsibilities support administration to have the capabilities to complete their day-to-day duties. “Each OP wears many hats on the job and we all play a fundamental role in the district. We are more than willing to answer any questions. If we don’t know, we can direct you to someone who does,” Merrifield

stated. “Most important [expectation of an office professional] is to listen to others’ needs, frustrations and concerns,” she added. Even though OPs work throughout the district, they all work together to accomplish their goals. For example, the elementary school OPs coordinate with each other to ensure that practices are uniform at each school. They also support and bounce ideas off each other to utilize the variety of knowledge and specialized training each OPs has. “We all take pride in our work,” Merrifield commented. “Having things run smoothly means our district and schools look good and perform well.” The OPs are an integral part of ISD 15, contributing daily to further the mission and core values.

Introducing social emotional learning to kindergarten Julie Sweeney and Lisa Kastenbauer SFES Teachers

Lisa Kastenbauer, St. Francis Elementary School’s (SFES) school psychologist, is working on Social Emotional Learning (SEL) with kindergarten students, based on the Second Step Curriculum. Kastenbauer has collaborated with elementary social workers/school psychologists and SFES kindergarten teachers to fine-tune areas of SEL currently needed for students. She visits all the kindergarten classrooms at SFES each Monday for six weeks, 15 minutes per session, where students have learned to identify feelings. Students have also learned that some feelings are comfortable and some are uncomfortable. They have also learned how to ask permission and each classroom has a poster that reminds them how to ask permission when it comes to sharing toys. In one particular lesson, students focused on using the words ‘I feel’ when they have a

It’s a smoking sensation! Ask us how easy smoking food can be.

feeling. Students also had the opportunity to act out different feelings. Kastenbauer commented, “The students will see me in the hallway and wave or say, ‘Hi, Mrs. K!’ I feel like a rock star!” The goal of SEL is for all kindergartners to learn how feelings help them and how to express their feelings without hurting others. Expressing emotions in a safe way, kindergartners can start to advocate for themselves—an important skill for learners of all ages. Emotional awareness and emotional regulation are two of five areas of SEL Core Competencies—the building blocks of our SEL benchmarks. The school district’s mission is to equip all students with the knowledge and skills to empower them to achieve their dreams and full potential while becoming responsible citizens in a dynamic world. Students can realize their dream by having paired with book knowledge along with having the ability to regulate their own emotions and social skills.

Achieve the best looking lawn, year-round.

Submitted Photo

Introducing Ferris Commercial Lawn Mowers & Lawn Care Equipment Stop in to see our variety of Ferris mowers.

Let us help you find the Simplicity® mower that best suits you.

0% for 48 Months Financing Available On Approved Credit 1815 Viking Boulevard NE East Bethel, MN 55011 763-434-6900 • www.plowworld.com HOURS: Mon-Thurs 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday By Appointment

See dealer for more information.

New & Used Equipment • Parts • Service • Traeger Grills

The Courier - May 2017  

Publication of Independent School District 15, St. Francis, Minnesota