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4. Introduce yourself (100–150 words) to your classmates by posting to your group’s discussion board and an image that represents you at this moment in your career at UCCS. Due Sunday August 28th at 11:59 p.m. Worth up to 20 points out of 1000 total. Week 2 (August 29–September 4): The Art of Memory: Book History, Cyborgs, and Narrative Medicine – Dr. Laroche 1. Complete Reading: Chapter 2 from An Introduction to Book History by David Finkelstein, and Alastair McCleery, to be purchased as an e-book at Amazon.com or like supplier: http://amzn.to/1vydMbH ; and “Narrative Medicine Heals Bodies and Souls” from The Utne Reader, September-October 2009: http://www.utne.com/mind-and-body/narrative-medicine-heals-bodies-andsouls.aspx 2. Listen to Podcast Episode: “Our Computers, Ourselves,” Invisibilia, episode from February 12, 2015. http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510307/invisibilia (through minute 33). 3. Listen to 20-minute lecture: “Reading, Writing, Listening, Memory, and the origins of Narrative Medicine” in Week 2 folder. 4. Complete Short Written Assignment: 1. Have someone in your life read an article to you (newspaper, magazine, or blogpost, either from online or in print). 2. Have that someone read another to you as you read along silently. 3. Now read another separately and silently. 4. Write a 150-word record (including the names of the articles and the identification of your reader) of the differences among these three experiences in not only the knowledge you attain, but also in the experience of attaining that knowledge with others. Post this to the discussion board labeled in the weekly content folder. Students must post their content before they can enter the discussion. 5. Having thus reflected on these differences and posted them and drawing on this week’s materials (including one direct quote), then consider (in about 150 words) in your response to a peer’s post the implications for this assignment if the situation in which the “article” being read is a patient’s narrative of her/his illness. Due by 11:59 pm September 4. Worth up to 40 points out of 1000 total for the course. Week 3 (September 5–September 11) “Every Man His Own Doctor”: Cheap Print, Recipe Circulation, and the History of Medicine in Early Modern England – Dr. Laroche 1. Read: Chapter 3 from An Introduction to Book History by David Finkelstein, and Alastair McCleery From The Book: A Global History, and Harold Love, “Manuscript After the Coming of Print” (PDF); Four entries from recipes.hypotheses.org (linked in the Weekly Content folder for Week 3); 2. Watch: Short “Prologue” and “Syrup of Violets" and 35-Minute Video Lecture, “Every Man His Own Doctor”: Cheap Print, Recipe Circulation, and Medical Authority in Early Modern England". 3. Take the QUIZ on reading/video lecture (by 11:59pm, September 11). Worth up to 20 points out of 1000 total for the course.

HUM 3990 Syllabus p. 3

“Medical Humanities in the Digital Age” at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs  

“Medical Humanities in the Digital Age” at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs Fall 2016

“Medical Humanities in the Digital Age” at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs  

“Medical Humanities in the Digital Age” at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs Fall 2016

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