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CONTENTS

MoDA

8. The MoDA Group 20. What is MoDA Runway? The designers who will be showing at the 2015 production of MoDA Runway.

31. What is MoDA Market? Showcasing our creative artisans for MoDA Market 2015.

39. What is MoDA Grant? Building the future of fashion and building a platform for emerging talent, with the help of First Global Bank.

43. Flashback Just in case you missed anything from the 2014 staging, here are some of the highlights. FASHION

52. Look Book Looking ahead to the Spring/Summer 2016 trends.

56. Noir et Blanc Fashion inspirations that are redefining the 60s Mod.

64. Fashion Notes News delivered directly from the front row at some of New York City’s hottest fashion shows.

68. Cover Story - Becoming Grace Getting personal with Empire star, Caymanian actress Grace Gealey, who shares her perfect 48 hours in her home town. PULSE MODEL ALYSIA FRANCIS STYLED BY FIDGE FLETCHER PHOTO BY MARVIN BARTLEY Full story page 80

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75. A Fine Balance Jewellery designer Matthew “Mateo” Harris opens up about his style inspirations and on designing his first female collection.


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FEATURES

80. Outback Decadence Majestic and luxurious fashion inspired by the outback.

NECKLACE SHOP SHARI BLACK HAREM PANTS MEESH TOP BLAQUE LABEL HANDBAG KAR & CHACH

90. A Caribbean Collective Exploring the unique position for Jamaican and Caribbean fashion within the global perspective.

104. Who the Crown Fits A peak inside the closets and style of Tigerlily Hill. STYLISH LIFE

110. In Studio The intricacies and future of ceramic design with Dana Baugh, Baughaus Design Studio

115. Efficient Beauty Where intergrity and architecture combine to create sleek, modern spaces.

121. Beauty Routine Secrets from the MoDA Team.

124. Ni Hao Beijing Exploring Beijing alone, Tara Bradshaw shows you how.

130. Live & Let’s Eat A romantic and local-inspired menu from Executive Chef Clarence Thomas, at GoldenEye.

140. VIP Concierge Services A curated listing of the island’s most stylish spots, Dr. Bird approved.

On the cover: Grace Gealey, Photo by Gilles Toucas.

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Published by The Collection MoDA © The Collection MoDA. The publisher makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of information given in editorial and advertising pages of MoDA Mag, but accepts no responsibility for errors or omissions for claims made in any section of this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, without written permission from the publisher.


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ince its inaugural showing in 2010, Collection MoDa has steadily grown to become a beacon of hope and progress for the Caribbean’s fashion industry. Each successful staging out-classes the previous and the tireless support from those who believe in our mission has been most gratifying. This year the Collection MoDa has strengthened its resolve to launch a more rigorous assault on the barriers facing the Caribbean’s fashion market. Fashion with a purpose is probably a fitting cliche as we once again renew our sense of commitment to the nurturing and development of some of the Caribbean’s most promising creative talents into business savvy artisans.

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This microlevel effort is geared at encouraging a culture of ethics and professionalism among Caribbean merchants, which is the cornerstone of development: invigorating trade among the Caribbean family. Not just the trading of merchandise, but also the exchanging of ideas and skills with a shared vision for mutual success. With a sustainable fashion industry within the Caribbean, the region will then be better equipped to navigate international territory and gain higher ground. A sustainable industry would undoubtedly secure the region’s footing in the rapidly changing landscape of the global fashion environment.


elcome MoDa Market has been a huge success with participating exhibitors­­gaining exposure to new buyers and this year is expected to be no different. The next level of our vision is to encourage trade as well as lively and gainful interaction with international markets. A fashion hub in the Caribbean could drive economic stability by stimulating business, not only for the creative sectors, but for other industries as well, including tourism and entertainment. Our vision has been strengthened but remains unchanged. To grow year by year so that we may provide a sound platform from which the Caribbean’s many hidden talents can launch their brands into success and soar through longevity, is but a modest reflection of our bold endeavour to rejuvenate an economy through fashion. Such lofty goals may seem out of reach but can be realised only through consistent hard work and dedication. We are a long way from the outcome and though the journey so far has been a trying one, the ceaseless support of our partners and sponsors has been a tremendous source of encouragement and motivation. First Global Bank continues to demonstrate its

commitment to nurturing Caribbean talent with the First Global MoDa Grant, which will assist one rare treasure amongst a vault of gems, to take his or her art and business to the next level of maturity. These glimmers of hope are the life force that feeds our cause. So thank you to all our sponsors and partners, but most of all thanks to you, our audience of progressive thinkers and style disciples, for your unwavering support. It is you that we invite to imagine a thriving creative district in our own backyard. Imagine a bustling village of trade and commerce right at the heart of Kingston city. Now imagine it connecting with a global network of other similar markets feeding and sustaining each other. This is the vision you are helping us to make into a reality.

KERRY-ANN CLARKE EVENT DIRECTOR FOUNDER, THE MoDA SERIES

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Style is your mood communicated without words. Style is everything…it makes or breaks your look.

THE GROUP

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THE CREATIVE TEAM BEHIND THE COLLECTION MoDA SERIES.

STYLE IS ... Photo Credit: Tiffany Lue-Yen

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Style is an outward reflection of the way in which you experience the world and the world experiences you back. Style is a way of speaking without having to say a word.

Style is inextricably wrapped up in who are - how you look, what you do and say and with whom you surround yourself.

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PROFILES KERRY-ANN CLARKE / MoDA DIRECTOR

A graduate of the Parsons School of Design, her career in the fashion industry spans 20 years. Her incomparable drive and passion, mandate of excellence, and elevated sense of style are evident in the successfully established brand and concept store – KERRYmanwomanhome

AIESHA PANTON / MoDA MARKET CURATOR

The owner of Pussbackfoot, Aiesha has been curating stylish and glamourous events for over 10 years. She also serves as director of “Conversation Piece”, a pop-up experience celebrating Jamaican art and lifestyle. Through Pussbackfoot she has feted many guests through a host of private and corporate events.

FIDGE FLETCHER / MoDA CREATIVE DIRECTOR

A graduate of Domus Academy in Milan, Fidge launched her career in the fashion industry 10 years ago. She has worked on several fashion weeks, and has styled collections for major players in the industry including Fendi, Costume Nationale, BCBG, and Zac Posen. She has executed styling campaigns for Rolex, Movado , Estee Lauder and Clinique and was also lead stylist for NBC Universal.

LEISHA WONG / MoDA MAG EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

A lifestyle editor who moved to Jamaica eight years ago from London, England (via Miami and New York), with a passion for living a stylish life. Having graduated from New York University, Leisha has written about interior design, art, fashion, travel and food for the past 11 years, at various publications. She joins the Collection MoDA family as editor in chief of the MoDA Mag, and is dedicated to showcasing the unique style of the Caribbean and it’s people.

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Contributors CAMESHA POWELL // STYLIST

Jamaican born, New York City based Camesha Powell is the designer of luxury Resort/swimwear line La Poshe and fashion consultant/blogger of image consulting firm Poshestyle. She holds a master’s from the Fashion Institute of Technology in global fashion management, and has held positions as a professional stylist, creative director and magazine fashion editor.

DEBRA EDWARDS //WRITER

A devotee to all things fashion, food, art and entertainment, Debra Edwards has covered lifestyle and entertainment for various newspapers and publications, including the Jamaica Observer and Cayman Net News. With experience in most aspects of media including, public relations, marketing, copy writing, and advertising, she now resides in New York.

MICHELLE GORDON //WRITER

Michelle Gordon is a parenting consultant and long-time lover of writing. She puts pen to paper as the editor-in-chief of b3 Parenting and Indulge Food & Wine magazines.

MARVIN BARTLEY// PHOTOGRAPHER Marvin Bartley is a fashion and commercial photographer, but also intertwines a special approach in his practice and is known for his artistic approach to the practice, taking part in exhibitions at the National Gallery among others.

TARA BRADSHAW // WRITER

Tara Bradshaw is a self-confessed travel addict. She currently works in business development for the Caribbean’s leading travel agency, Trafalgar Travel, and takes advantage of every opportunity to hop on a plane. Her goal is to visit at least one new place every year. You can find her on instagram at @tarabarrra, where she shares pictures of her trips, in hopes of inspiring wanderlust in others.

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Contributors SHARKY // GRAPHIC DESIGN

Creative Director of Bespoke Musik NYC and co-founder of Passion Fruit Jamaica. Brand design projects in Kingston include local clients like Usain Bolt, KGN Kitchen, JNGI, and Phase3. His aim is to deliver simple yet iconic design solutions. His poster art for Bespoke Musik NY is seen worldwide, along with his global music festival antics, which keeps his client list fresh.

WALTER GREENE // WRITER

Walter Greene is an international journalist, editor, author and fashion consultant based in New York city. As fashion editorial director of Profiles98 magazine, he's responsible for the overall fashion and beauty content. Walter has formerly held fashion editor positions at Odyssey Couleur and Sister 2 Sister magazines and has interviewed luminaries in the fashion and entertainment worlds from Meryl Streep and Denzel Washington to Naomi Campbell and Beyonce.

TIFFANY LUE-YEN // PHOTOGRAPHER

Through her passion to capture life’s most sentimental moments, her photography has been featured in several notable publications such as Brides magazine, The Washington Post, and a host of local media.

LANCE P. BROWN // PHOTOGRAPHER

Lance P Brown found his passion for photography at the age of 16. After graduating from Jamaica College, Lance sought to turn his passion into a business and worked arduously to teach himself about his chosen craft. He specializes in fashion, food and event photography working with entertainers including Cecile and Ashanti; celebrity chefs Chef Roble; international brands such as Digicel and Red Stripe; the highly acclaimed Mission Catwalk television series and the popular Kingston Kitchen event.

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BEHIND THE SCENES Life is not polished. Life is messy, at times manic, and imperfect. Life is not the runway, but what happens backstage at the show. Take a peek at our backstage scenes in the preparation of this magazine. From the breathtaking, barefoot luxury of GoldenEye, in Oracabessa, Jamaica; to in-studio fun with the Collection MoDA team. Enjoy!

Photos by: Lance Brown & Tiffany Lue-Yen

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EDITOR’S NOTE

COME ON IN

Photographer: ©Tiffany Lue-Yen

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D

efined as “a manner of doing something” or a “distinctive appearance, typically determined by the principles according to which something is designed”; style is a very subjective term. Personal to each of us, not only the understanding of it, but also the way in which it is expressed. Jamaica’s style is one defined through the bold and vibrant music, the streetside fashions, the hairstyles, the diverse history and fiery flavours of food. It is an expression of experience. But within the experience, are the people who shape this expression. It is those people that look at a piece of a fabric or a painting and are inspired to design an entire clothing collection around it. Or perhaps see beauty in the way a piece of precious metal contorts to build a wearable masterpiece. They are artists expressing themselves through different mediums, whether it is a canvas, on a plate, or through a woman’s dress. These talented, creative and inspired artists live a life defined by beauty, texture, colour, print, luminosity, silhouettes, and contours. They make our world more beautiful with their own style. It is these individuals that we showcase at The Collection MoDA. From the runway to the marketplace, to the pages of this magazine, we speak to those that inspire us with their creativity, and who are seamlessly able to transform their visions of beauty into reality. We hope you enjoy the third edition of our magazine. A lot of love went into its creation, by all the writers, the photographers and the sales team, and our graphic designer. I want to personally say thank you to everyone for helping to turn our beautiful vision into reality.

LEISHA WONG / EDITOR


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THE COLLECTION MoDA

MoDA RUNWAY P.20 | MoDA MARKET P.31 | MoDA GRANT P.39 | FRONT ROW P.45

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WHAT IS MODA RUNWAY? (

Fashion is a central part of Jamaica’s style and MoDA Runway showcases the best of the island’s fashion talent— both emerging and established—and creates a platform to build relationships amongst professionals in the industry, not only in Jamaica but throughout the region.

WE INTRODUCE THE DESIGNERS FOR RUNWAY 2015

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FRIDAY NOVEMBER 20, 2015 THE JAMAICA PEGASUS

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Carlton Brown Carlton Brown has been in the fashion industry since 2003 and is one of Jamaica’s leading fashion designers. Born and raised in Kingston, Jamaica, Carlton pursued his passion for designing, developing and mastering his signature style of combining formal attire with casual chic. He has gained international attention and has participated in shows in London, Canada, St. Kitts, St. Maarten and here in

Jamaica. Being named “Caribbean Male Fashion Designer of the year,” Carlton Brown’s Designs is the name in fashion throughout Jamaica and the Caribbean. His clientele includes leading men in Jamaica’s business, athletics, entertainment and politics and mostrecently known as a judge on Jamaica’s most-watched local programme, Mission Catwalk. London-based bespoken tailor, Andrew Ramroop has been Carlton’s biggest mentor and inspiration. www.carltontttbrown.net

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Carlton Jones Carlton Jones started turning heads early in his career as a stylist, when he began to transform the image of hard rapper Queen Latifah into the beautiful songstress we know today. Almost two decades later, after serving as a fashion director, style correspondent, image consultant, and wardrobe designer, Carlton has begun to combine his love

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of style and fashion with the elation received from traveling to some of the most breathtaking destinations imaginable. The genesis of his eponymous resortinspired collection utilizes his experience dressing body types ranging from Halle Barry and Erykah Badu, to Aretha Franklin and Michelle Obama. Carlton has incorporated his fondness of relaxed fluidity, sensual fabrics, colours and prints with a seasoned ability to forgive and accentuate. www.carltonjonescollection.com


Cesar Galindo Cesar Galindo is an accomplished dedicated fashion designer. He is a master tailor, a skilled draper, and a creative visionary with ease for styles, colours, textures and designs. He’s been impeccably designing dresses, gowns and suits with the Galindo trademark of orchestrated seams, one-seam garments, and engineered doses of lux architecture

for the last 23 years. He is also a contract designer for private clients such as Joan Jett, Courtney Cox, Madonna, and for established labels including, L.A.M.B. by Gwen Stefani; Dolce & Gabbana, where he designed for nine years, followed by seven seasons for Calvin Klein Collection. Cesar launched his secondary collection in the fall of 2011, CZAR by Cesar Galindo, consisting predominately of dresses and soft separate components and varied edgier statement items. CZAR offers a younger sophisticated version of his signature collection at a contemporary price point. www.facebook.com/CesarGalindonyc

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Jae Jolly Before attending the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, Janel Jolly’s designing career was just a hobby. She launched her first collection at the 2010 Caribbean Fashion Week, followed by the creation of a successful swimwear line, which included colourful and playful bikinis and cover ups. Her unique talents are expressed

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in the mixing of different fabrics and patterns, as well as intricate detailing on every piece she creates. Her designs are inspired by nature, with collections titled Ocean Floor, Safari Paradise and Enchanted Garden. www.facebook.com/jaejolly


Korto Momolu A fashion designer and stylist, Korto was born in Monrovia, Liberia, and lived there until 1990 with her parents and siblings. They left due to civil war and settled in Canada where Korto pursued her passion and studied fashion design at the L’Academies des Couturiers Design Institute in Ottawa, Canada.

Since her appearance on the Bravo series Project Runway (2008) and Lifetime spin-off Project Runway All Stars (2013), Korto has travelled the world showcasing her collections and accessory lines. Her works have been private labelled by the fashion chain Dillards, and her accessories have been showcased at the Smithsonian Museums in Washington, D.C. Fashion press include, but are not limited to US Elle, Marie Claire, Essence and Arise magazines. Korto currently lives in Arkansas with her husband and two children. www.kortomomolu.com 25


Kris Jackson Born into a family with a history and tradition in tailoring and design, Kris Jackson has style and creativity in her genes. She graduated from The Art Institute in Florida, and then worked in a wide cross-section of creative fields most notably event planning, dĂŠcor and design. Her recent decision to re-focus her efforts on establishing her own fashion

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line led her to enter and win the 2013 Heineken Inspire Competition. She then entered The Collection MoDA Grant competition in 2014 where she successfully placed in the top three. As the winner of Heineken Inspire the year before she was also afforded the privilege of showing an eight-piece capsule collection at The Collection MoDA Runway 2014. She has since created custom design pieces for private clients, including international performing artiste Tessanne Chin and media personality Kamilah McDonald. Her work continues to attract rave reviews, most recently when one of her custom designs, worn by Tessanne Chin, was featured in the Style Blog of the Huffington Post.


La Poshe LaPoshe is a luxury resort wear brand that embodies the free-spirit of the beach lifestyle with a sophisticated twist. Inspired by its Caribbean roots and world travels, the line evolves a unique, tropical flair into a globally enticing aesthetic. With contemporary lines, exotic fabrics, glamorous details and a superb fit, each piece is impeccably crafted to enhance a woman’s figure, natural beauty

and fierce attitude. This line is for the modern woman who owns her sensuality and celebrates her femininity with confidence, style and elegance. Designed by Jamaican-born, NYCbased, Camesha Powell, the debut collection was inspired by creatures under the sea — beautiful corals, exotic fish, and the unique starfish were the visual references for its exclusive prints and vibrant colours. 27


Spokes Aparrel Since 2008, Dexter Huxtable— CEO, designer and creative energy behind Spokes Apparel—has been revolutionizing men’s fashion in the local market and has transformed Jamaican menswear and how it is perceived both locally and internationally. The Spokes

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brand is a showcase of creativity, classic sophistication and superbly fitting apparel that is made to be worn by the man who is confident and comfortable with himself. Dexter likes to work with clean lines and textures, presenting a quality of work that will stand out from the ordinary.


Soka Soka is a women’s wear brand that embraces femininity while romanticizing contemporary designs. Designer of the brand, Karen De Freitas, started designing while living on the island St. Vincent and the Grenadines, where she grew up.

Shortly thereafter, she moved to New York City to attend Parsons School of Design. While a student she apprenticed with brands such Alice + Olivia, Zac Posen, Bibhu Mohapatra and Yigal Azrouel. Through these internships, Karen developed an elevated taste in contemporary designs, while remaining true to her island roots. She then launched her first contemporary collection under the name Soka in Spring Summer 2015, establishing a brand aesthetic that is strongly rooted in marrying colours and reinvigorating classic silhouettes. www.madebysoka.com 29


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WHAT IS MODA MARKET? (

An interactive and beautifully curated space created by Aiesha Panton of Pussbackfoot, designed to provide a platform to host some of the island’s most talented artisans, showcasing jewellery, fine art, fashion and food.

WE INTRODUCE THE EXHIBITORS FOR MoDA MARKET

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SUNDAY NOVEMBER 22, 2015 THE JAMAICA PEGASUS

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Ally’s Kitchen Passionate about cooking and entertaining, Allison Porter-Smalling received a Best New Caterer title from the Jamaica Observer Food Awards 2015. allyskitchen876@gmail.com Arwa Turra Her art philosophy is derived from fashion and architecture, whilst the central inspiration in each piece is the flowers. arwa.turra@gmail.com Au’Den Designs Specializing in the creation of customized stationeries and handcrafted home decor and statement pieces. audendesigns@gmail.com

Ayanna Dixon Her collection, Ayanna Dixon for ASD, is her women’s ready-towear line- and. Also includes fashion illustrated lifestyle. She has placed second in Mission Catwalk, has shown at Miami Beach International Fashion Week, and was the 2013 First Global Bank Fashion Grant winner. info@asdclothing.com Baughaus Design Studio Design-makers of Jamaican hand-made ceramics, lighting, furniture and soft goods for the home. Infusing Caribbean “roots and culture” and nature into the design and creation of each piece. www.baughausdesign.com

By Burni “I am a tactile being. My art is the abstract expression of the sensory experience of my awareness of life.” — Bernadette Matalon, artist. bernadettematalon@gmail.com Charl Baker An artist that makes unique pieces of art from vast and varied materials, known for her “tree” series. charlbaker@hotmail.com Crochet Eye Candy This product line includes crocheted sandals and custom-made accessories. Quality, comfort and style are the three core qualities that each item is promised to have. michellaewalker@gmail.com

Cyrendipity Founded in 2011 by Cyrena Forbes, Cyrendipty creates unexpected harmony between fashion, beautiful jewellery, accessories and housewares. cyrena.g.forbes@gmail.com E11ven Collections A jewellery collection created out of the theme of stacking beaded bracelets with a purpose. www.e11venCollections.com Galavant Jamaican inspired jewellery, created by global nomads for whom there’s no place like home….Especially when your home is Jamaica. anna@annaruthhenriques.com

Jamaica Clay Artist David Pinto invites you to “elevate your everyday” with his collection of dinnerware. Each piece is made by hand in his studio at Good Hope, Jamaica. www.jamaicaclay.com

Jamaica Sandal Co. Handcrafted sandals made locally, using vibrant leathers and distinct styles. www.jamaicasandalco.com 33


Janz Creations Making a difference with handmade functional items including tea cozies, luggage handle covers and bags. janzcreations@gmail.com

Kar & Chach A Miami-based, Jamaican born handmade accessories label. Inspired by individuality, their handcrafted leather bags exude an edgy, contemporary style with urban appeal. info@karandchach.com

Knockabout Kids Clothes Clothing inspired by bright and fun graphics perfect for children. dana.garbutt@gmail.com

Kristina Godfrey A Jamaican photographer and painter with a real raw passion to create with any and everything. wizzidreadproductions@gmail.com Likle But Tallawah Catering to women who not only wanted fashionable statement pieces in their wardrobe, but also tie-dye and hand painted versatile pieces that could be dressed up or down accordingly. suzette.rickman@gmail.com Little Oasis Treasures Low maintenance bottle gardens to uplift your spirit and brighten your day. Create your own little oasis and bring the beauty and serenity of the natural world into your private space today. little.oasis@live.com Loven Oven A line of gluten-free, vegan artisan breads. Each loaf is made to order and uses the finest ingredients currently available. Add-ins include cinnamon, raisins, nuts, apricots, coconut, rosemary, and sundried tomatoes. saramchang@gmail.com

Minx A headwear brand that produces a variety of items including headbands, floral crowns, hair scarves and visors. www.minxsupplyco.com

Pikinini Unique, heart-felt, and personalized accessories that utilize the art of crocheting for children. Soro, is the personalized line for adults. soroltd@yahoo.com RA [Raw] Soaps Created by Sylvia Zaldivar-Lowe, stunning hand crafted soap that includes no toxins, preservatives or salts. Made from simple ingredients. zaldivar.sylvia@gmail.com Ranford Anderson A fine artist known for his intricate and realistic delicate pencil drawings. ranfordandersonart@gmail.com

Renée Natalia Designer of crochet designs that she hopes will soon become staples in your closet. reneesmith@gmail.com

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Sandra Bicknell Defined by a love of fine custom-made jewellery, clients can select from the retail collection available year round, custom redesign your own jewellery or create personalized pieces for special occasions. www.sandrabicknell.com

Story & Myth Story & Myth blessing beads are an island-inspired line of sacred spiritual jewellery. Made from the Job’s Tears seed, which grows on an ornamental grass, they are good for wishes, healing and luck. storyandmyth@gmail.com Swypz Wipes These sophisticated wipes come in a variety of essential oils and are free of harsh chemicals. kalanna@hotmail.com TagItJM A boutique design and digital print studio, specializing in handmade personalised stationery and paper goods to help you celebrate the beautiful moments and important relationships of life. www.tagitjm.com

The Girl & The Magpie Handmade Jamaican jewellery, with European and African influences. Made from natural materials, delicately inserted in different metals. www.thegirlandthemagpie.be Tooksie Kay Catering 25-year-old self-trained private chef/caterer, Alexa Von Strolley is the creative talent behind Tooksie Kay, which launched less than a year ago. Already she has made waves on the local food scene including winning the Jamaica Observer Table Talk Food Awards Best New Caterer, 2015. tooksiekay.catering@gmail.com Toppin Designz One-stop shopping for everything to do with paper, from customized signs, invitations, wrapping paper, and notebooks. www.toppindesignz.com Touch by VLS A contemporary ceramics studio that produces art and artisanal pieces. The current series, The Urchin Collection, is a unified mix of handmade ceramic sculpture, lighting and crockery including driftwood and pendant lighting, inspired by sea urchins. www.touchbyvls.com Visionarri A vibrant collection of images inspired by the art of nature, the magic of light, and the pretty in the gritty. arrileigh@gmail.com

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WHAT IS MODA GRANT? Following the successful staging of the first installment of the First Global Bank MoDA Grant in 2013, the second staging last year looked to up the ante on the competition and what was asked of the applicants. The aim of the grant is to promote the business of fashion, and to build a platform for the scope of emerging talent and take the fashion industry to the next level. Eighty-nine applicants applied, representing a diverse selection of designing styles, including avant garde, menswear, swimwear, ready-to-wear, and couture ladies— all vying for the prize of J$250,000, as well as two sewing machines presented by Singer, and mentorship support from both the Branson Centre of Entrepreneurship as well as the Jamaica Business Development Corporation. In total the grant was valued at $500,000. Nicole Bryan, graduate of The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, beat out the competition to win...and was named Grant winner for 2014 [see her story on page 42].

CATCHING UP WITH THE 2014 WINNER

THE 2015 WINNER WILL BE REVEALED ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH AT THE JAMAICA PEGASUS

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Scenes from First Global Bank

MoDA GRANT 2015

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Nicole Bryan with her prize courtesy of First Global Bank, at MoDA Runway 2014.

NICOLE BRYAN Born and raised in St. Mary, Nicole was inspired by her mother who was a seamstress. She attended the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts where she majored in fashion. Bryan has worked with local fashion designers, and has experience in costuming for productions, and music videos. She has also been working on her own brand, FUCHE Designs. Since her win last year, she has remained very busy within the local fashion industry, expanding her brand portfolio and released her Rebel Pickney line earlier this year. Your style in three words? Audacious. Clean. Classy. Your style inspiration? My style inspiration comes from all avenues, but there is this one designer I always refer back to; the great Alexander McQueen. He pushed any and every boundary there was, and for that he stood out as the designer of theatrics.

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FLASHBACK 2014

Photographer: Tiffany Lue-Yen MoDA RUNWAY

MoDA BUSINESS

MoDA MARKET

FRONT ROW If you missed the 3rd staging of The Collection MoDA last year, we give you front row (as well as some backstage) access with some of the stylish highlights.

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MoDA RUNWAY

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MoDA RUNWAY

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MoDA BUSINESS

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MoDA MARKET

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FASHION

TURTLENECK AMERICAN APPAREL SKIRT ZARA BAG MANSUR GAVRIEL SHOES KENNETH COLE EARRINGS H&M RINGS H&M

FULL STORY P. 56

LOOK BOOK P.52 | NOIR ET BLANC P.56 | FASHION NOTES P.64 BECOMING GRACE P.68 | A FINE BALANCE P.75 51


LOOKBOOK SS2016 CHECKING IN WITH RESIDENT STYLIST FIDGE FLETCHER FOR SPRING/SUMMER 2016. FASHIONISTAS TAKE NOTE.

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INTRODUCING

DAO-YI CHOW & MAXWELL OSBORNE, THE NAMES BEHIND PUBLIC SCHOOL—THE COOL KIDS ON THE BLOCK FROM NYFW SS2016, SETTING THE TRENDS AND OFFERING A NEW TAKE ON SPRING.

TRENDS FOR LADIES 1. FLATS ARE THE NEW HEELS, SAW FLATS ALL OVER THE RUNWAY THIS SEASON 2. LAID BACK STREET GLAM-RELAXED 3. WHITE, NAVY BLUE AND MUTED COLOURS 4. FLUIDITY 5. SPORTY 6. MAXI DRESSES AND PARACHUTE JACKETS

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TRENDS FOR GUYS

1. SPORTY 2. SNEAKERS 3. RELAXED 4. WHITES, BLACK AND NAVY BLUE 5. STREET-WISE PANACHE 6. SHORTS

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DRESS NICOLE MILLER SHOES MICHAEL KORS NECKLACE H&M RINGS H&M


NOIR ET BLANC (

RETRO MONOCHROME FOR FALL IS ANYTHING BUT NOSTALGIC. CONTEMPORARY TOUCHES BRING THIS ’60S INSPIRED LOOK UP TO DATE TO CREATE A MODERN MOD.

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PHOTOGRAPHER HIGHMARK STUDIOS CREATIVE DIRECTOR/STYLIST: CAMESHA POWELL

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TURTLENECK AMERICAN APPAREL PANTS JOE FRESH SHOES KENNETH COLE EARRINGS H&M


JACKET CHANEL BAG CHANEL WATCH CHANEL RING H&M

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DRESS LOFT EARRINGS H&M RINGS H&M


DRESS ZARA BOOTS H&M BRACELET H&M RINGS H&M

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MODEL LADA / TRUMP MODELS/NYC HAIR ERNEST ROBINSON MAKE UP SACHA HARFORD/NEXT ARTIST’S DIGITAL POST HIGHMARK STUDIOS

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PANTS J BRAND SWEATER H&M RING H&M


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NEWS

FASHION NOTES

Coming to you live from New York City Fashion Week, Walter Greene.

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wo new venues served as the base for New York Fashion Week this season. The stark, raw space of the old post office known as Skylight at Moynihan Studios, and the just as raw, Clarkson Studios, downtown Manhattan; both startling opposites to the tents at Lincoln Center. No plaza for the parade of show goers, no food court, no bloggers pit, no booths of freebies by show sponsors, no bins and cabinets of water or soda for guests. The actual show venues were stadium styled rows of backless benches and a plain catwalk, etched in great lighting. Sorry, no glamour here! PICK AND CHOOSE So what did most designers do? Showcase in their own private venues, which made it a nightmare for us editors to get around town. My strategy was to only cover the few designers that I really liked, attend a few events that I wanted to support, and, be very selective—because it’s totally impossible to cover the some 200 designers who choose NY Fashion Week to showcase their Spring/Summer 2016 collections. THE BLONDES In a gala celebration in conjunction with Rootstein—one of the world’s biggest mannequin makers—The Blonds, designers David and Phillipe Blond, showed a stunning retrospective of their work, including outfits worn by Beyonce and Brittany Spears. They also made

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David Blond (right) and Phillipe Blond (centre) along with the historic mannequins.

history in a collaboration with Rootstein, by revealing the first ever gender fluid mannequin based entirely off of Phillipe Blond. The flamboyant design team has dressed most major celebrities, and they are known for their amazing jewelled pieces worn by several luminaries. When asked who is the “dream celebrity” that they have yet to dress; David beamed “Cher!”


BEVERLY JOHNSON CONVERSATIONS As part of it’s Public Programs Series, The Museum of the City of New York hosted “Beverly Johnson in Conversation with Andre Leon Talley”. The chit-chat revealed little known facts about the beautiful supermodel who made history as the first black model to appear on the cover of Vogue magazine. The ageless beauty, now a grandmother was also celebrating the release of her new book titled, The Face That Changed It All, which chronicles her life in and outside the world of fashion. It also includes a steamy affair with the late tennis star Arthur Ashe, and her late husband and Svengali music mogul Danny Simms. André on the other hand, spoke of his early days being mentored by Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, the launch of a new book on the late, great Oscar de la Renta, and his appearance in the new season of the hit TV show Empire.

Manolo Blahnik

AWARD FOR ARTISTRY Shoe designer Manolo Blahnik was presented with the “Award For Artistry”, for his 40-plus years of designing some of the world’s most fabulous shoes, by the Couture Council of the Museum of FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology). The annual luncheon and award was given at the David H.Koch Theatre at Lincoln Center. Most of the women in attendance wore their Manolo’s. The designer, who was born in the Canary Islands, was obviously overwhelmed with the attention, and said winning the award did not really register. “It’s a great time and a great moment,” he said. Among guests were New York’s most fashionable including former award winner and designer, Carolina Herrera; FIT President Dr. Joyce Brown; actress Uma Thurman, who presented the award; American 65


Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour; Dr. Valerie Steele, director and chief curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology; Harper’s Bazaar editorin-chief, Glenda Bailey; Simon Doona, creative ambassador of the New York shopping landmark, Barney’s; Hamish Bowles, fashion journalist and European editor-at-large for American Vogue; Linda Fargo, director of women’s fashion at Bergdorf Goodman; designer Ralph Ricci, Amy Fine Collins, writer and Vanity Fair correspondent; designer Michael Kors; and editor of W magazine, Stefano Tunichi. ELSEWHERE ON THE SCENE • Dashing Canadian singer/rapper Drake was front and centre at girlfriend’s Serena Williams’ fashion week show for HSN. • Stylist turned fashion designer Kithe Brewster opened his first boutique, located in the fashionable Greenwich Village area. Beverly Johnson breezed in early before the guests arrived and picked an electric blue “onesuit” for an upcoming television appearance. Model Yasmeen Warsume was also there trying on some of Kithe’s versatile, wearable clothes.

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HARBISON Industry talk was about who will be the next designer of colour to make it big on the international fashion arena. The answer came by way of Harbison. He is clearly the hottest, buzz-worthy, new designer emerging on the fashion scene, and shutting it down. Born Charles Elliott Harbison in Lincolnton, North Carolina, Harbison studied fine art at North Carolina State University, before moving to New York where he sharpened his fashion skills at the Parsons School of Design. Holding key positions in major fashion houses like Luca Luca, Billy Reid and Michael Kors, prepared him for the next level of his career growth. Harbison launched his namesake collection in 2013. His unique eye for colour blocking and manipulation of different fabrics, made him an instant hit with fashionistas. Harbison's signature style is built on his amazing sense of proportion and harmony with a clean, modern silhouette serving as his design base. Beyonce wore head-to-toe Harbison at a New York fashion show and, as they say, the rest is history. "I am beyond grateful to Beyonce for taking a chance on a little designer like myself, on such an important platform," said the young designer as he prepared for his next collection.


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G N I M O C BE

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E C A R G

ian yman rm a C , e� sto eganc world by th l e e l e wi mp a “si s taken th Empire, s a d a n i h fine ealey lhoun e: De Grac s Grace G Anika Ca s r actre characte e as th at. h just t

Photographer: Gilles Toucas

Interview: Leisha Wong

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alking in the heels of the beautiful predator also known “Anika Calhoun” in the hit television show, Empire, may not be as easy as the Caymanian actress Grace Gealey makes it seem. She grew up an island girl, running barefoot on the beach and climbing trees. But her ascension to acting stardom may have been destined. She was raised by a non-hearing mother who was “expressive and theatrical” as Grace tells us, and whose childhood was filled with music and theatre, surrounded by the musical and acting talents of her grandparents and uncles. And yet, she is still, “wallowing in gratitude because I am so humbled, amazed and overwhelmed by it all,” Grace says. She takes some time to share how she prepares for the role of Anika, and the secret world she has created for her; how she feels about growing up Caribbean; and how the inner “dance-lover” taught her inner “perfectionist” the valuable lesson of acceptance. She also shares how she would spend the ideal 48 hours back home in Cayman.

MM: You started your career in theatre, how different is it acting on television? GG: I love and appreciate both mediums. With television, the perfectionist in me likes that I am allowed a few tries to portray the moment at hand. But in the same breath, I love the stage for the exact opposite reason. The thrill of it's-risky-in-the-moment nature makes theatre entirely intoxicating. MM: How do you prepare to get into the character of Anika? GG: It's definitely a process. I tend to come on set in sweats very often because I love the physical creation of Anika. Each element layers a specific part of her. I also use much of the time in my trailer 70

studying the script and filling in the ‘in between moments’ so I've created a full life for her outside of what you see. Every time I walk on the camera, I come in fully informed of where I'm coming from, what life I've experienced since the last event and what I need now. I connect with Anika on two levels. Firstly, the external level as far as being an independent, educated woman of colour. Secondly, the internal level, being able to relate to her motives (as opposed to her actions). I think we all do, actually. We all know what it's like to be hurt, betrayed, angry and in pain—and to do things out of emotional eruption that we aren't always proud of. Other than that, we are stark opposites, and my friends and family are thoroughly entertained.


OUT H G U O R H T T A E HEARTB L A R E N E G E RHYTHM H T A “ O T S E S L U P S ALL THE ISLANDRMTH, FAMILY, AMBITION OF LOYALTY, WA. THESE QUALITIES AND LOVE CORE. ” Y M IN E IV L ) E (AND MOR

MM: What role does dance play in your life? GG: One of my survival jobs before booking Empire was a part-time front desk manager at a ballroom dance studio. I always loved dance… but I found myself feeling somewhat inadequate with certain dance forms like jazz, ballet and tap. I didn't expect to be a bonafide professional (because dancing is just a hobby for me), but I can be a perfectionist when it comes to expressing myself through art. It started to feel less fun and … after a while, I drifted away from dance altogether. I would still go to ballets and admire the forms, lines and extensions of dancers and be in awe. I couldn't deny that rhythm and movement lived so fiercely in me. I was given one free dance lesson a week and I hungrily took it. Almost a year later when Empire got picked up, I had to quit my job, but kept dancing. I was hooked. Over that period of time, I made a huge realization when it came to my relationship with dance: for my own individual process, it's not about being perfect. It's about embracing my desire to move, expressing myself, respecting the discipline and having fun! So now, I allow myself to be where I'm at, learn deeply, move meticulously and I love every minute of it— every twist, every turn, every mistake, every victory. I've removed the pressure of being perfect and added the requirement of having the best time possible. And it works for me.

MM: You were born in the United States, but grew up in Cayman, moving back to the States for university. How was the move? GG: Culture shock is real. In life, there is much more grace and compassion that we can afford to others on a daily basis— not only people from other cultures but human beings in general. MM: Is there anything you miss about island life? GG: The beaches, the food, the

relaxed vibe and my family. I grew up living a very simple life and I miss that too sometimes. It's bittersweet, but I appreciate all aspects of my life—then and now.

MM: How would you say growing up in the Caribbean shaped you? GG: The late, great Bob Marley sang

about “One Love” and he was right on the money. The Caribbean emulates such a culture of oneness although we all hail from different countries. The general heartbeat throughout all the islands pulses to a rhythm of loyalty, warmth, family, ambition and love. These qualities (and more) live in my core. They resonate with me daily and lead me fearlessly. I couldn't be more proud to hail from the Caribbean.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 72

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JET SET

GRACE GEALEY’S

PERFECT 48HOURS I N G R A N D C AY M A N

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DAY 1

“Be awoken by my 2 1/2 year old niece. Take her to daycare with my sister. Grab a Cayman Loaf from Island Taste (coco bread filled with cayman style beef and rice & beans) and chill out for a few hours at my uncle's stylish high-end boutique, Arabus. I keep him company while we sell clothes, merchandise the store and sing karaoke songs while doing it.

DAY 2

Lunch is at Cayman Cabana (it's on the water and the food is perfection!) In the afternoon, will head to the 7-mile beach for a cool dip on the still-warm sun. Around 5pm, my sis gets off of work and we go grab my niece. We head home for a home-cooked meal of oxtail, rice and beans, plantain and Cayman-style potato salad. Bathe my niece and coax her to bed. My sis and I stay up and girl-talk until we fall asleep (I love my sis).

It's a day to explore the island! I start off with a trip to Stingray City & Snorkel Tour with Captain Marvin's. I feed stingrays, see various types of beautiful ocean life and enjoy the sun! Then I move on to the Turtle Farm. I get to see the turtle eggs being incubated and the small, medium and very large/old turtle. I also love the pool, mini-waterfall and waterslide for both the young and old! We head to Camana Bay for lunch—a small outdoor mall vibe—where I can grab food at Ortanique and dessert at a local gelato place. I can also shop, go to an Internet cafe, paint and sip wine, watch a movie or peruse a book store. It's a great way to spend the afternoon. To end the day, I head to the East Side. The long drive is serene and calm. The scenic route is breathtaking. I pass the blowholes that spurt up when the tide comes in—love this view! I end up at either Cayman Kai or Rumpoint. Either one provides great drinks, hammocks, games and sports or just wading in the warm water as the sun sets. On the way home, I stop for dinner at one of my favorite amazing local spots, Miss Vivine's Kitchen. With a full belly and a full heart, I make my way home. Now, that's what I call a perfect day!” 73


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STYLE FILE

Interview: Leisha Wong

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SIMPLE. SLEEK. MODERN. STRUCTURAL. MATEO NEW YORK WORKS TO REDEFINE JEWELLERY AS WEARABLE ART.

“When you are raised in Jamaica, you don’t sit and say, ‘I want to be a fashion designer’. Especially as a male,” says Matthew “Mateo” Harris, and yet that is exactly the direction life has taken him. “But I grew up with fashion and style,” he adds. “My mother would not leave the house without asking me for approval on her outfit.” The son of a seamstress, who grew up in Montego Bay, Mateo’s journey to being an exciting addition to the jewellery landscape is not the typical story.

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t did start ordinary enough, as he left Jamaica to continue his college education in the United States. He followed the traditional route of hospitality management, and marketing. But after two uninspiring degrees, and a brief career as a model, he found himself lured into the world of jewellery, simply out of necessity. He wanted to make jewellery for himself. “I remember at the time you could hardly find male pieces, and I was always on the quest for great men’s jewellery that was refined and timeless,” he says. Although he was not trained in jewellery design, he learnt by visiting the Jewelry District in New York, asking questions, and reading books. He eventually found a mentor who helped guide him along the way. “I did a lot of research and made many mistakes while learning my craft,” he says. “I started my business in 2009 and it took me three years to develop the product that I was happy with.” In 2014 he unveiled his first women’s collection. La Barre was inspired by minimalism, jewellery that was personal and simple. “It is something that can be worn everyday, rather than jewellery that women have stored in a box and wear only on special occasions.”

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The collection is defined by delicate metals contoured into seamless pieces of art, accentuated with luminous precious gems like citrine, malachite and onyx. His Spring/Summer 2016 collection for women develops on this creative direction, with a presentation of delicate geometric shapes. Similarly his collections of male pieces maintain a strong simplicity, as he also incorporates leather and nylon cord along with the metals for a masculine combination. The male collection includes other accessories such as lapel pins, money clips, cuff links and tie bars. “For me there is no major difference between designing for men and women,” he says. “When I design it’s always from the heart. From true inspiration. I try to make both my men’s and women’s jewellery have its own point of view, although the process is the same.” With some exciting collaborations on the horizon, including a launch at TSUM in Russia, and in the United Kingdom on Amazon UK, as well as the recent launch of his leather goods, his desire to build a lifestyle brand is certainly in the making.


S T Y L E P R O F I L E

MATTHEW “MATEO” HARRIS (MATEO NY) The most stylish city in the world? Why? New York and Paris. Sounds like a cliché, but they just are. In New York, people are just not scared to take risk or be themselves. Paris, because it’s the home of fashion! The French ease of dressing is just like no other. One word that would describe your personal style. Simple. Three of this season’s must-have pieces. Gucci slip-on’s with kangaroo fur; Yves Saint Laurent black skinny jeans; tailored wool trousers. I never leave home without. Obagi Skincare, sun screen and Crest 2-Step whitening tooth paste. Great skin and a bright smile are truly the essentials when entering a room.

Top 3 favorite stores/boutiques. Collette in Paris. Barney’s New York. Ssense based in Canada. Off-the-beaten-path stylish treasure(restaurant, store, gallery, etc) What Goes Around Comes Around in Soho, New York. They have a great vintage collection of Hérmes. Style icon? Obviously Grace Jones, and James Dean. Style to me is...Personal and timeless.

Lock & key (a fashion trend that should never come back) Uggs and punk. Bring back please! (a trend that you would bring back in an instant) None! I tend not to like trends, as I hate the thought of looking back at old pictures and be like, OMG, I can’t believe I was wearing that.

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FASHION FEATURES

DECADENCE P.80 | CARIBBEAN COLLECTIVE P.90 | ROOTS & CULTURE P.97 WHO THE CROWN FITS P.92 79


NECKLACE SHOP SHARI, SKIRT GRACIA

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OUTBACK DECADENCE The juxtaposition of style with a decadent wanderlust creates a cosmic world of beads that are blessed and camels that are dressed.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR AND STYLIST: FIDGE FLETCHER FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER: MARVIN BARTLEY 81


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GOLD DRESS CASTING, NECKLACE SHOP SHARI TASSELS ON CAMEL KAR & CHACH

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JUMPSUIT BCBG BLESSING BEADS MALA NECKLACES AND BRACELETS STORY AND MYTH DRIFT WOOD NECKLACE GIRL AND THE MAGPIE, BELT ADA

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SKIRT AFROFUNKK, EARRINGS GIRL AND THE MAGPIE, NECKLACE AND ARM CUFFS KOKOKARIBI, BELT ADA

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WHITE ROMPER BLAQUE LABEL, CLUTCH AFROFUNKK, NECKLACE H&M

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DRESS COLLECTIVE CONCEPTS, NECKLACE H&M

MAKEUP ARTIST: LONI JONES FOR L’OREAL MODEL: ALYSIA FRANCIS LOCATION: PROSPECT PLANTATION, OCHO RIOS, JAMAICA

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A CARIBBEAN COLLECTIVE

Alicia Burke, Winner Pulse Million Dollar Girl Search.

Finding a place for the Caribbean in the international fashion industry. DEBRA EDWARDS explores. 90


Jaunel McKenzie

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any see the glitz and glamour, but don’t always grasp the business aspects that fuel the 1.7 trillion dollar industry, known as fashion. All great fashion entrepreneurs the likes of Miuccia Prada, Natalie Massenet (Neta-Porter), Heinz Holba (New York Model Management), and from the Caribbean, Meling Esau, Kingsley Cooper, and Kerry-Ann Clarke, each have a common formula for success in the fashion industry. This includes the right balance of passion, product and point of view, combined with endless hours of hard work. “I believe that if you are going to devote your time, your energy, your life to something, then it should be something that is a source of great passion, appreciation and understanding for you,” explains Parsons School of Design alum Kerry-Ann Clarke,

proprietor of KerryManWomanHome and founder of the Collection MoDA series. “My career in the fashion industry started out as a love affair, but I think I always had a strong vision to churn that inspiration into productive endeavours that would meaningfully contribute to the Caribbean fashion business. For decades fashion has commanded one of the top industries in global commerce and, as small as we are, I think that Jamaica and the rest of the Caribbean community can make substantial contributions to that industry and reap, of course, the subsequent rewards.” Like Clarke, driven by passion and belief, Pulse Models head and Caribbean Fashion Week conceptualizer, Kingsley Cooper gave up his law practice to form one of Jamaica’s most notable model agencies. The journey of building a business steeped in fashion in the Caribbean, however, didn’t—and still doesn’t—come w ­ ithout its hiccups. “In our case things were a little more challenging than usual. We started from scratch, as pioneers 35 years ago,” said Cooper. “We had no yardstick, compass or guide. So, lots of growing pains. However, even today, like all creative businesses, there are huge challenges pursuing the same, especially in the Caribbean, given the small economies and the lack of appreciation for intellectual property and creative industries generally. There are therefore market issues, financing issues, production issues, confidence issues, insufficient support services, etc.” Locally rooted brands such as Marley Apparel and Bridget Sandals have been able to make some headway internationally. Yet, as major international designers draw inspiration from Caribbean culture, as most recently evidenced at Tommy Hilfiger’s SS16 show, it begs the question…While the Caribbean inspires, does it play a major role in the overall industry of fashion? 91


Top row: [from left] Kimberley Mais, Kingsley Cooper, Romae Gordon Borttom row [from left} Nadine Willis, Kimberley Mais

“We play a relatively small role in the wider industry on the garment and accessory side,” says Cooper. But, where the region has succeeded, is in our models, certainly on a per capita basis. Jamaica has played an important role in bringing models, such as Pulse models Lois Samuels, Nikki Vassell, Kimberley Mais and many others, to the forefront of the international fashion world. From an international assessment, to truly make a dent in the fashion industry, buyers, merchandisers, editors and influencers need to be interested in what one has to offer. Are they interested in the Caribbean? “Interested, yes, but not many are convinced that we are ready for the market. We have to change that by improving production and consistency,” says Cooper. With an imaginative and resourceful mind, starting a fashion line may be at a relatively low cost, however, it is building the fashion brand and maintaining longevity as a business that may cost a substantial amount of money. One can spend thousands of US dollars

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developing initial samples and patterns to put their line into mass production. Legalizing your company is a must, and public relations, which among other things, can do wonders for ones brand, all come with a price. While some may argue it proves futile to teach the creative mind about business, another claim is that creating without a business mindset is nothing more than a hobby. And fashion school’s the world over have taken notice, integrating business courses into their creative curriculum. The Collection MoDA Group has recognized the need for capital and business mentorship for fashion brands to survive, and it is with this reasoning it will give the winner of the Collection MoDA showcase J$250, 000, sewing machines from Singer, and mentorship from The Branson Centre of Entrepreneurship and JBDC. Trinidad’s Anya Ayong Che winning the USA version of Project Runway gave the world an idea of what the Caribbean has to offer. And with the popularity of local television show Mission Catwalk, Jamaicans and the Caribbean are without a doubt interested in fashion. After all it was Vybz Kartel’s hit “Clarks” that spawned an increase in sales for the British shoe brand. The internet and various social media platforms have also done amazing things for the business of fashion. Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites increase consumer engagement and allow models, designers, clothing, and stores to be more accessible to the masses. “Today the opportunities for growth in the fashion business have increased tremendously with social media and other modern technologies that have changed the landscape of the industry and I believe that it is not too late for us [The Caribbean] to be at the forefront of this shifting paradigm,” explains Clarke.


Lois Samuels on the cover of her book “A Glow in the Dark” by Lois Samuels.

Yendi Phillips

Popular New York based designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Scholar, have noted that blog postings, and other various forms of social media going viral have had a major impact on their business. And in what can be considered “The Selfie Age” popular Caribbean Models; former Miss Jamaica Universe Yendi Phillips; and Saint International catwalk queens, Tami Williams and Kai Newman, each have strong social media followings; a noted influence in what brands look for when casting and hiring for campaigns to showcase their products.

“I think the consensus on fashion is shifting in the Caribbean,” says Clarke. “Those interested in studying fashion now have quite a few choices for schooling between Trinidad and Jamaica. Resort collections are growing, as more and more designers are adding it to their repertoire. Originally it was just Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter, which are the globally accepted fashion seasons. But resort wear is marketable in the Caribbean all year round and this presents an interesting opportunity for further exploration and growth.” Clarke’s sentiments have been echoed by none other than Vogue editor Anna Wintour. “The basic truth of the matter is that 80 percent of what sells in store are the mid season collections: resort and pre-fall. So when you’re ready, don’t ignore it, because it’s going to be something that will help you pay the bills.” (Dazed & Confused) Clarke continues, “We live resort. We understand resort. That niche should be ours to drive. Also Caribbean culture is effortlessly global, so much so that if the regional fashion industry had the support of many of the cultural icons 93


Francine James, who recently appeared in German Vogue.

and jetsetters that we have in scores, we would no doubt set a few more global trends.” Cooper is also optimistic. “There are several ways for Caribbean fashion to move forward once we get our business up to scratch. One is to pick the low hanging fruit of our tourism markets. We should start exporting by selling to our visitors who come to the Caribbean each year. A few of our designers are doing this, but there is a lot more that we can do. It’s a huge business opportunity.” While Clarke doesn’t deny that the industry, specifically in the Caribbean has far to go, she is however positive that things are changing. But what can be done to make things better? “We need private-sector support for investing in a high-tech manufacturing plant. I think a strategic alliance with Guyana or the Dominican Republic, where

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the plants already exist would also be advantageous to our cause. Also new product development, retail spaces and affordable labour are things we need to consider to be able to compete internationally. Government support is also needed to help market apparel made in Jamaica, as well as to assist in creating a physical and virtual fashion district in Kingston. I also think the government should seriously consider a buy-local consumer education drive, tax concessions and duty-free concessions on imported equipment and raw materials.” Concluding she adds, “The only way for us to move forward competitively is unified. One region, one hub, endless possibilities.”


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Photos courtesy Soka.

ROOTS CULTURE A Fashionable Marriage that Elevates Dancehall to the Runway.

An urban mix of gritty textures, bold graphics, oversized images of Dancehall icon Shabba Ranks, and sleek edges and cuts; the collection by St. Vincent native Karen DeFreitas Fraser, gives an authentic glimpse into the Caribbean experience in New York.

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orn and raised in the Caribbean, Karen’s creativity as a visual artist led her to Parson’s, The New School for Design, in New York, where she chanelled these skills into fashion and textiles. Inspired by the vibrancy of colour and pattern that surrounded her growing up in St. Vincent, her first collection under the brand Soka, (released for the Spring/Summer 2015 season) is a distinct testament to this seemingly incompatible collaboration between island life and city life, one that comes together quite seamlessly.

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“Soka is an extension of me,” Karen says. She adds that the collection is inspired by her childhood. Growing up and listening to dancehall, she was motivated not just by the Dancehall Queens with their bold and bright ensembles, but also the men. These more masculine silhouettes and moods also find a comfortable place in the collection (think refined mesh marina). “After working with different designers, and being exposed to different ways of thinking, I developed an elevated taste in contemporary designs, while remaining true to my island roots. I think I am the new cosmopolitan woman—a strong confident individual with a diverse background who embraces femininity while maintaining her independence, and who is not afraid of the words risky or tantalizing.”

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S T Y L E P R O F I L E

KAREN DE FREITAS (SOKA) One word that would describe your personal style. Soho. Three of this season’s must-have pieces. I see the 70’s trending, so palazzo pants, fringe, and leather. I never leave home without… Lipstick, phone and something to sketch on. Lock & key (a fashion trend that should never come back) Juicy Couture pants. Bring back please! (a trend that you would bring back in an instant) I still wear my grandmother’s clothes, I never pay attention to rules per se. The most stylish city in the world? Why? New York and I’m not even being biased. There’s practically a runway everyday for everyone. It’s such a melting pot of people, real life models who honestly don’t give a f@*#. Amazing. Top 3 favourite stores/boutiqes… Does amazon count? But I’m more a thrift store person, so Goodwill.

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Off-the-beaten-path stylish treasure I do actually visit museums a lot, I really like the Cooper Hewitt Museum as they focus on design and technology. You can interact with the exhibitions. Also I love going to Hell’s Kitchen. It is many blocks of different small niche restaurants, representing different cultures; Thai, Ethiopian, Turkish etc. Life is too short to not try new things. Style icon? If Grace Jones, Bianca Jagger and Solange had a baby. Style to me is… A non-verbal communication of “I”.


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WHO THE CROWN FITS

Let them wear it. And this one fits the ever-impeccably attired, Tigerlily Hill.

Interview: Leisha Wong

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rying to pin down Tigerlily Hill is close to impossible. Between residences in New York, Los Angeles, London and Cayman, Tigerlily spreads her fashionable wings in some of the most fashionable cities. But, when she is at “home” in Grand Cayman, her fashionable retreat is CeLeb, one of the island’s most fashionable boutique outposts. She opens the doors to MoDA Mag.


Tell us a little about your background, growing up in Cayman. How did this inspire your creative foundation? My parents (of Jamaican and British decent) and their international lifestyle was a huge influence on my creativity. Due to their careers, I grew up mostly in the Cayman Islands, with a few years in the United States and London. Our household was the epitome of art, fashion, speech and sports. I took to art and fashion and my brother quintessentially is the latter two. What was the inspiration behind Crown Atelier? I'm inspired by both British and Caribbean society. My line, Crown Atelier's name came from the Cayman Islands' history of being a crown colony. Each season is filled with statement pieces, which includes blouses with delicate-looking fabrics, dresses with accented frills, jumpsuits and leather jackets. The silhouettes have a certainty of strength and coolness. It has been described as clever up-to-the-minute elegance without the usual 10-minute expiration date. Tell us a little about your experience on “Glam God”, and how this inspired or defined you as a designer and stylist. Being on US television afforded me a level of immediate exposure that would have been difficult to manoeuvre in the fashion world as a beginner. From the show I made contacts with a multitude of magazines, publicists, showrooms and agents; this propelled my career as a wardrobe stylist and gave me numerous Hollywood contacts and a certain kind of client. How did your boutique, CeLeb, come about? CeLeb opened its doors about two years ago and initially it was meant to house my line Crown Atelier; the pieces that garnered press.

As a designer you are always looking for an outlet to market and sell your line and I think this is ultimately why I opened the store. I wanted to create, market and sell my own brand. Now it has evolved into a destination for fashion-forward, free-thinking Caribbean girls who are looking for statement pieces to inject into their wardrobe. The designers I choose to sell are all at an inexpensive price point, but still maintain current and ultramodern style. The boutique is really an international style source offering both new and vintage clothing, accessories and shoes. It also stores some of the labels and pieces I use to style my US clients. What are your plans for the future? My near prospect is to open a second store; this one will be in the US (the first, CeLeb is located in Grand Cayman). I’m working on magnifying and synergising my brand of being a stylist, designer and boutique owner.

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S T Y L E P R O F I L E

TIGERLILY HILL Bring back please! (A trend that you would bring back in an instant) Guess jeans—super-tight, high waist denim with the trademark upside down triangle logo!

Three of this season's must-have pieces. Loafers; anything from the Balmain for H&M collaboration; and a semi-high neck or cropped top with cape sleeves worn with a sharp boot-cut trouser. Whether in the Caribbean, US or in Europe these looks are all feasible. Next season look out for statement earrings (seen at Prada ss16 runway show); an off the shoulder dress; and a stripe combo whether a pantsuit, jumpsuit or shirt dress (seen at Missoni and J.Crew). I never leave home without... My stylist mini kit; it contains everything a girl needs! Lock & key (A fashion trend that should never come back...) Everything comes back, but using blackface instead of hiring black models was beyond terrible. Also, equally appropriating ethnic and ethno-religious attire to make fashion statements is something I think the fashion world should not repeat.

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The most stylish city in the world? Why? It’ll always be London for me. One third of the population was born outside of Britain. The mix of cultures totally contributes to the vibrancy of its fashion. It's cosmopolitan and I absolutely love this place. Top 3 favourite stores/boutiques. Fred Segal in Santa Monica (they hold a special place for me as they were the first to carry my line); or Satine in Los Angeles, Shareen (vintage) in New York; and Beyond Retro in London. Off-the-beaten-path stylish treasure. Heritage Kitchen in the Cayman Islands; best fish fry restaurant ever! Style icon? Bianca Jagger in the 1970’s. Style to me is... Bold individuality in tune with effortless fashion; trends are not a factor.


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STYLE LIFE

IN STUDIO P.112 | EFFECIENT BEAUTY P.117 | BEAUTY ROUTINE P.123 NI HAO BEIJING P.126 | LIVE AND LET’S EAT P.132 111


IN STUDIO By Michelle Gordon, Photos courtesy of Baughaus Design Studio.

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n 1919 Germany, one of Europe’s most influential art schools birthed and popularized a combination of crafts and fine arts. That school was called Bauhaus, and its manifesto asserted that the ultimate aim of all creative activity was building. Traditional methods and ideologies gave way to a modern fusion of design at Bauhaus, and have since formed part of the foundation of numerous schools of artistic thought across the world.

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Now, when your surname and your profession are inextricably linked, you can’t help but consider the power of words like destiny, fate and providence. Were Bauhaus around today, it could easily stake claim to the fine artistry of one Dana Baugh, owner and designer of Baughaus Design Studio—a modern and culturally savvy design company based in Montego Bay, Jamaica.


MM: How is a Baughaus design born? DB: It all starts in my head. Ideas sometime come randomly or when I see a material, a method of production or some other work of art. I often envision something out-of-the-blue and quickly take note of it [advice to all designers out there; always write it down! The idea may never come again, even when you think it is so good you won’t forget…you will]. Then I usually go into development of the idea,which involves sketching, working in AutoCAD, [3D modelling], then making a prototype and in the case of ceramics a mould for production.

As far back as she remembers Dana loved making things. “I can’t pinpoint the exact moment, but it has always been a part of me. I do remember trying to figure out how things worked and making it myself,” she shares. Dana’s work today strikes a delicate balance and display of art, interior design, architecture, industrial design, graphic design and composition, all making her a master of her craft. As a child, Dana was constantly collecting things and “creating a mess”. And while this would frustrate everyone at home, Dana’s family tolerated her misadventures, encouraged her curious mind and fueled her creative journey. Today, Dana is a sought-after designer whose work adorns the homes and properties of private buyers and corporate clients across the globe—a source of pride for this young artist who lists seeing the finished product come to life as the most exciting and satisfying part of the design process.

MM: What would you say are your main influences when creating a new design? DB: Designing is a self-indulgent process. It allows you to go into your head and bring something to life. I am influenced by mid-century modern design, the materials that I use and the beauty of nature around. I love going to museums, trolling the internet and discovering all the new and exciting products released each year. MM: Which is your favourite design of all you have created? DB: I don’t really have a favourite, each new design becomes my ‘new’ favourite. Right now I’m loving my hummingbird creamers because they are so darn cute! But also because I was overthinking the design for months, and one day the simplest solution popped into my head. I made the first prototypes, which came out perfectly in the kiln and I am excited at the thought of these little birds making the perfect gift for someone. MM: How has modern technology affected or influenced your craft? DB: Modern technology is huge for me, especially as a design-maker. Right now it has the ability to change the industry, making production easier for 113


small designers like myself. I utilize laser printing, 3D printing and any computeraided design, as this is where I am most comfortable. Most of my designs start in a sketchbook, but don’t come to life until I draw them in AutoCAD and 3DS Max. This allows me to work out the kinks of the design to eventually making it. I love modern design and the way in which it reinterprets everyday items we use. Modern technology also allows us to rethink our designs and our relationship with the products we make and use. MM: What is one design you would absolutely love to create? DB: My most recent lighting installation inspired this concept that involves scaffolding-like structures, wicker and bamboo to create the most gorgeous statement lighting piece for a lobby or reception of a hotel or corporate office. I envision a piece that is architectural and sculptural, yet celebrates traditional craft. MM: We live in the land of wood and water. How, if at all, do these two elements factor into what you do at Baughaus Design Studio?

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DB: I am constantly inspired by Jamaica, how can anyone not be? I grew up in Savanna-la-Mar, Westmoreland, and loved going to the beach with my family. The colours, the sounds, the textures, all influence my work. I love nature and all the constant inspiration it gives me. I’m the girl that will run through the rain or see a dried leaf, shell or a pebble and take it home. Then let it influence the creation of something. MM: Every artist grows and evolves. What would Dana today say to Dana 10 years ago? DB: Just go for it! The sooner you embrace who you are, the quicker you get to being the best version of yourself. Even if you’re scared, do it anyways! Learn more about Dana and her work at www.baughausdesign.com


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ISLAND ART AND FRAMING OFFERS CUSTOM MADE JAMAICAN FURNITURE, CUSTOM FRAMING AND HOME ACCESSORIES. 20 Barbican Road 876 977 0318 fax 876 927 1689 email: islandart@cwjamaica.com www.iafjamaica.com

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Photos courtesy of Niya Bascom, Ishka Designs,

Writer: Leisha Wong

E F F I C I E N T B E A U T Y

WHEN DESIGN SUPPORTS AND PROTECTS THE ENVIRONMENT,IT JUST FEELS SO RIGHT.

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Sitting poolside at the The Pegasus

Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica. Anishka Clarke and Niya Bascom—the creative minds and principles behind Brooklynbased Ishka Designs—are just back from their now regular drive to the beachfront property that they are transforming into one of the island’s first fully sustainable, off-the-grid properties. An eightbedroom, luxury property, with rain water catchments, solar panels and grey water recycling systems, the property is a glimpse of the creative vision of the Ishka Design duo, a testament to their design philosophy—efficiently beautiful.

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The pair met 11 years ago through mutual friends and their creative energies were drawn to each other through shared design and art interests. After working together on a few projects they made it official in 2007 and opened Ishka Designs. “Ours is not the mainstream aesthetic in concept or creation,” says Anishka. “We are changing and growing all the time.” It was this growth, as well as the unconventional approach to design, which led them to return to Jamaica just over one year ago to take on this challenging project. Being out of


their comfort zone, working with local tradespeople and learning to navigate the Jamaican design landscape, were added experiential layers to the project. “Each time you do a project abroad, you are walking into a different network, a different system, and you have to take the time to learn it, so you know how to appropriately work it,” says Niya. “What we do is cyclical, continuous. We are constantly building, learning and growing.” But the relationship with their Jamaicabased team, took time to build. It was a lesson in trust building, a push-pull relationship with the team, and of course some challenges arose from the different dynamics. But ultimately, alongside the client, they’ve identified a great team of excellently trained tradesmen. “We are respectful of the environment, we want to build a long-term relationship with the team,” says Niya. “We learn from the new team also,” adds Anishka, “it’s a collaborative process, where we understand their capabilities, and massage the process to bring out the best possible delivery.” But the process starts with Anishka and Niya. How are they able to work so well as a creative team with two distinct creative tendencies? Anishka puts it down to respect. “Ultimately you have to respect what each person brings to the table and we both bring different experiences and perspectives to the development of the company.” While she adds there is a healthy dose of challenge that enables each to continue growing in their skill, the underlying motivation of what is best for the company, as well as the client, is what ultimately defines the decision. And speaking of collaboration, another essential addition to the team, is the client. Working closely with the client is essential in delivering an authentic space. “It’s a blending of styles, with a fresh look that we contribute,” says 119


Purposeful is an important distinction for the duo; one that ties directly back in with their mantra of “efficiently beautiful design”. Whilst they credit this to their Caribbean heritage, and a respect for alternative solutions that protect the environment, it has also defined their philosophy of design. “We want our designs to feel timeless, not trendy or of the moment,” says Anishka. “We also want them to feel pure, clean, simplistic. That’s not the same as simple.” It is this conscious approach to each project that has defined their careers, and led to accolades including being listed as one of the top 20 African American interior design firms (four years in a row), as well as repeated features in American and international press. And it looks like they are here to stay, alongside their spaces, “We aim for longevity first and foremost,” Anishka says.

Anishka. “But it also offers a fresh look on our work. It’s never ever the same.” Truth be told, they share, the beachside project may seem like a departure from their characteristically minimal and organic vision, but Anishka explains that this is what keeps their work fresh. “It’s gratifying to see our clients engaged in the process alongside us. There is an inherent trust,” she says. And yet while there are some design elements that may not fit into their aesthetic, an underlying commitment to an authentic, natural and textured Caribbean sensibility is what ultimately dictates the project. “This project is a healthy mix of classic forms and styling with very modern and organic choices to bring a fresh and interesting perspective,” she says. “It’s… a little more layered than expected for us, but it will still feel paired down, clean and purposeful.”

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Anishka Clarke and Niya Bascom, Ishka Designs.


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BEAUTY ROUTINE The Collection MoDA team shares their must-have beauty products along with some beauty secrets.

Fidge MATCH MASTER SPF 15 FOUNDATION

CHANEL COCO MADEMOISELLE BATH & BODY The best body moisturizer

A woman can’t leave her house without great coverage, and this is the best on the market. It gives me the right coverage and feels so natural. It also has SPF for protection. Maccosmetics.com US$36

on the market, I discovered this product while living in Milan, Italy on a shopping trip to Paris. This gives the body the best coverage without feeling like you’re wearing lotion. Chanel.com US$90

MAC TOUCH LIPSTICK This lip stick works

LA MER MOISTURIZING GEL CREME

well for either day or night, from the office to a cocktail party, it goes with everything. Maccosmetics.com US$17

Aiesha

RA [RAW} SOAP Getting clean with simple,

After attending a La Mer party and testing this product on my skin with amazing and instant results, this is the fountain of youth. I suffer from acne from time to time, and it’s one of the best solutions when I am running around for work. Cremedelamer.com US$310

DIPTIQUE Legendary candles, and when

all natural and local ingredients, is a wonderful feeling. Available at MoDA Market.

I light them, I feel like they embody a Parisian passion and joie de vivre. Diptiquepariscom US$60

DIY COFFEE SCRUB Great natural remedy for plumping, nourishing and smoothing skin. The caffeine in coffee has shown to provide antioxidants to the skin and reduce the appearance of cellulite. And it smells delicious!

TARTE BROW GEL A subtle brow boost,

gives the perfect arch and frames my face. Amazing how simply shaping the brows can change you face completely. Tartecosmetics.com US$21

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Leisha RUBY WOO LIPSTICK, MAC I don’t

know what it is about this lipstick, but whenever I wear it, the most amazing things happen! Maccosmetics.com US$17 CLARISONIC MIA 2 DEEP PORE DETOXIFYING SOLUTION A busy schedule leaves little

time for an intensive skin routine. But the 1-minute pulsing timer on the Clarisonic Mia 2 leaves no room for excuses. Clarisonic.com US$119

SHISEIDO BENEFIANCE WRINKLERESIST 24 INTENSIVE EYECREAM Two of my mother’s

major beauty “secrets”, are sunscreen and eye cream. This ultra-rich eye cream is super luxurious. Shiseido.com US$55 CURL DEFINING CREAM, MOROCCAN OIL My curls and I have a love/hate

relationship. But whenever I use this curling cream…it’s straight love! Combined with Paul Mitchell’s Super Sculpting gel, and a diffuser, my curls always come out just right! Moroccanoil.com US$35

Kerry KAI BODY GLOW All natural hydrating body mist that smells so fabulous thanks to the jojoba, chamomile and cucumber essences. Also Kai is committed to a conscious philosophy of beauty and are cruelty-free, vegan and recyclable packaging. kaifragrance.com US$34

STRIVECTIN SD ADVANCED INTENSIVE CONCENTRATE It’s like Botox in a bottle

SMASHBOX HALO POWDER Gives my skin

Amazing nourishing oil that leaves my skin feeling intensely supple thanks to the almond and camelina oils rich in omega 3s and omega 6. And it smells amazing, evoking essences of the South of France. Usa.loccitane.com US$44

amazing luminous finish, I love how it makes me glow. Smashbox.com US$49

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and attacks wrinkles with the power of collagen, providing super powerful anti-anting benefits. Strivectin.com US$79 L’OCCITANE ALMOND SUPPLE SKIN OIL


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B o a H Ni lood, b r e h n i t s anderlu ijing. e w B f o n e o s e a k c a t a With ided to c e d w a h s d Tara Bra

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Alone.


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T R AV E L

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Those eight words brought on some of the most puzzled looks that I’ve ever received in my life. And that’s saying something, considering the reactions I get when I admit to hating cheesecake (really). I was congratulated on my bravery in going so far alone. (“Aren’t you afraid?”) Cautioned that I would be lonely. (“What happens when you want to say ‘this is amazing, don’t you think so?’ and then you remember no one’s there?”) Questioned about my sanity. (“China? By yourself? I could never do that. You’re obviously crazy.”) Advice on what to eat. (“Pack some crackers, tin sausage and Immodium.”) And the most popular reaction, which also happens to be my favourite, (*blank stare*) And so, undeterred by my wellmeaning family and friends, I was off on my first solo adventure, halfway around the world to the Chinese capital, Beijing. Several connections later, I groggily exited the airport in Beijing. Thankfully, I immediately saw my private guide holding a sign with my name on it.

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“I JUST BOOKED A SOLO TRIP TO BEIJING”

As soon as we were in the car, he launched into the history of Beijing and the various dynasties. I nodded pleasantly at what I hope were the right spots, but my mind was already occupied with wondering what I would be having for dinner that night. After checking into my hotel, I was free to explore on my own. The hotel was conveniently located in an upscale neighbourhood in Beijing, just minutes from Wangfujing Street—the busiest commercial street in Beijing—and home to the infamous Snack Street and night market. I spent the evening strolling around and checking out the different foods on display at the endless stalls. The Snack Street is most famous for offering such “delicacies” as fried scorpions, tarantulas, seahorses, starfish and more. The most enjoyable part


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for me was watching terrified tourists squealing when confronted with this sight (admittedly, I squealed too), but even more enjoyable was watching the ones who actually ate them. I witnessed one unfortunate gentleman take a bite of a tarantula, turn bright red, but gamely continue chewing so as not to disappoint his gleeful tour companions. Incidentally, the companions subsequently refused to eat any insects. Undeterred by the delicacies of the market, it was on to explore the unequalled historic treasures that define the city’s visual and historic culture. The adventure started at the Temple of Heaven (a medieval complex of religious buildings situated in the southeastern part of central Beijing) and with a private tai chi lesson in the park. I honestly expected this to be a bit cheesy and clichÊ, but in releasing myself to the grace and flow of the movements, I ended up thoroughly enjoying it. My instructor very clearly took pride in what he does, and it turned out to be one of

my most memorable moments of the trip. Another major highlight of this trip was my visit to the Great Wall of China, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. On arrival at the Wall, I looked incredulously up at the seemingly vertical stairs. Fortunately, I had whipped myself into shape prior to this trip, for Jamaica Carnival. Armed with the smugness of 129


the newly fit, I took on the stairs like a seasoned pro, smiling internally at the 19 years olds I saw huffing and puffing and taking rest stops. They didn’t need to know that I would have been just like them only two months earlier. After checking off the major sights, which included the Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square and the Summer Palace, I wanted to explore the hutongs. Hutongs are narrow alleyways where o x m a i d c b w i e c u n b r f you can still find traditional Chinese buildings, and get a feel for daily life in Beijing. The locals ranged from tolerant to indifferent of my curious looks. Maybe they were familiar with this, the wideeyed tourist strolling through their neighbourhood, under the guise of being an “authentic traveller”. Maybe they laughed amongst themselves as they played their mahjong games, knowing that what I was seeing was just oxmaidcbwiecunbrf a fraction of what life was really like. Maybe they really just didn’t care. Either way, they were happy, and so was I. Night market eye openers? Check. Take in some history? Check. Cultural immersion? Check. Now to check off my next item…Shopping. Shopping in Beijing is an experience in and of itself. The key is to look completely uninterested. Even if you see that handbag that you just, kill-you-dead, empty-your-wallet, need to have… control yourself. I guarantee you two things. One, it’s certainly a fake. Two, oxmaidcbwiecunbrf you’ll find it at approximately 200 other stalls. Probably the stall right next door. 5000 RMB for that ‘Gucci’ bag, you say? I offer you 500 RMB. You don’t want it, you say? I walk away. I’m called back and asked the best price that I can offer. I offer 500 RMB. I’m shouted at. I shrug and walk away. I’m called back again. And so the dance continues. Afterwards, I emerge victoriously with my purchases, and the knowledge that I was still probably ripped off. Ripped

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off by authentic Chinese store owners? Check. Now, off to drown my sorrows in some succulent Peking duck, for which Beijing is famous. I’m a bit skeptical, since I’m not usually a fan of duck (too fatty). However I soon realise my fears are totally unfounded. This was by far the best meal I had in China. In fact, it was more than a meal, it was an experience. The chef rolls up a cart with a whole duck ready for carving. Mouth already watering in anticipation, I go closer to see the process for myself. He starts by expertly carving the skin off the duck, arranging it in overlapping layers in a shallow dish. I’m instructed to dip the skin into a small bowl of sugar. The combination of sweet with the hot, savoury, perfectly crispy skin is incredible. It literally melts in my mouth the minute it touches my tongue. There isn’t an overly fatty or chewy piece to be found.

I’m so busy stuffing my face with the skin that I nearly miss the next steps of removing the white and dark meat from the duck. Impressively, the carving of the skin has not disturbed any of the meat. My guide demonstrates the proper way to eat the duck—dipping a few small slices into fermented bean sauce and placing it into a thin pancake along with spring onions and cucumbers. I use my chopsticks to wrap everything together and deliver this parcel of yumminess to my mouth to be devoured in one bite. I waddle out of the restaurant, satisfied with the perfect ending to my trip. All too soon, it was time to say goodbye to Beijing. My sanity still intact, and far from feeling lonely, I was simply filled with appreciation to have had this opportunity. My solo trip was leaving me with unforgettable memories that would belong to me forever. So I encourage you to take chances, step out of your comfort zone, and explore… everything. 131


G OL DE N E Y E ~ Oracabessa, Jamaica ~

LIVE & LET’S EAT

The former stomping ground of James Bond creator, Ian Fleming, is the inspiration for this romantic oceanfront dinner for two.

Close your eyes, and amongst the

waves lapping the shore, you can almost hear the laughter of lazy bygone days ~ the glamorous days of afternoon cocktails, siestas, and dressing for dinner. Almost 70 years ago, iconic James Bond creator and writer, Ian Fleming, purchased a quiet and private cove in Oracabessa, and along with his crew of

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Hollywood starlets, writers and artists, defined the early days of tourism in Jamaica. Now, the laughter is that of visitors reliving these hedonistic days, whiling away their time in the barefoot luxury of Island Outpost’s GoldenEye property that continues to redefine the Jamaica experience. Authentic, holistic and


Photographer: Lance Brown

Menu natural, this experience extends to the dining at GoldenEye, the responsibility of the talented and quiet soul of Chef Clarence Smith, Executive Chef at GoldenEye. Inspired by the Ian Fleming Villa at GoldenEye, Chef Smith creates a menu fit for the villa’s original resident.

GRILLED CRAY FISH WITH BLOW FYAH® (STUSH IN THE BUSH) DRIZZLE BRAISED GOAT SHANK WITH JAMAICAN TUN CORNMEAL. (POLENTA) MANGO BRIOCHE BREAD PUDDING WITH BLACKWELL RUM GLAZE AND CHOCOLATE SCOTCH BONNET ICE CREAM

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GRILLED CRAYFISH WITH BLOW FYAH 速 (STUSH IN THE BUSH)

DRIZZLE

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Ingredients

2 medium-sized crayfish (about 1lb.) Salt and pepper to taste 1 tbsp. diced scallion 1 tbsp. diced garlic 2 sprigs chopped thyme 3 tbsps. Blow Fyah速 sauce 2 tbsps. vegetable oil

Method

1. Cut crayfish in half, season with salt and pepper. Further season with vegetable oil, scallion, garlic and thyme.

2. On a heated charcoal grill place the crayfish, flesh side down. Cook until the meat begins to develop a char, about 2 to 3 minutes. 3. Flip and drizzle with Blow Fyah速 sauce. Continue grilling until the meat is tender, 2 to 4 minutes more. 4. Remove and place on plate for serving. Drizzle with additional Blow Fyah速 sauce if desired.

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RUM-BRAISED GOAT SHANK 136


Ingredients

2 cleaned goat shanks Salt and pepper to taste ¼ lb. carrot diced ¼ lb. celery diced ½ lb. onion chopped 2 pegs peeled garlic ½ cup Blackwell rum 1 bay leaf 2 tbsps. vegetable oil

Method

1. Preheat oven to 375˚. 2. Season goat shank with salt and pepper and set aside. 3. On a medium high flame, heat an oven-safe pot and add oil. 4. Sear goat shank until all sides are brown. Remove the shanks and add the carrot, celery, onion and garlic to the same pot. Cook for 10 minutes stirring occasionally.

5. Return the shanks to the pot and add the rum and bay leaf. 6. Add ½ cup warm water to pot, cover and place in the oven for two hours. Ensure to check the pot frequently. If the pot seems to be drying out add additional warm water. 7. The shanks are ready when the meat falls from the bones. Remove the shanks and set aside. 8. Place pot back on a high flame until the liquid is reduced to a syrupy consistency. Season with salt and pepper. 9. Shanks can be served with your favourite starch, but it’s excellent with Jamaican tun cornmeal or equivalently, polenta.

BRIOCHE BREAD137


MANGO BRIOCHE BREAD PUDDING 138


Ingredients

2 moderate slices brioche bread (about 1 lb.) 8 oz. unsalted butter 1 cup milk (100%) 4 oz. brown sugar 2 eggs 1 tsp. cinnamon powder ½ tsp. salt

1 tsp. nutmeg 1 tbsp. vanilla 2 tsps. Blackwell rum 2 Julie mangos 2 tbsps. all purpose flour 2 oz. raisin 1 tbsp. shortening

Method

1. Preheat oven to 375Ëš. 2. Melt butter and set aside. 3. Dice brioche bread into ž-inch cubes, place in a bowl, and drizzle with melted butter. 4. In another bowl, combine milk, eggs, sugar, cinnamon, salt, nutmeg, vanilla and Blackwell rum. Whisk until sugar is dissolved completely. Pour the milk mixture into the container with the bread mixture. 5. Peel and cut the flesh from the mango then cut into medium dices. Combine the diced mango and raisins together. 6. Sprinkle flour over the bread mixture, then add mango and raisin mixture and combine. 7. Pour into a greased baking dish and place into oven. Bake time will vary depending on size of baking dish. Pudding is ready when a toothpick is inserted and it comes out clean. 8. Serve warm with Blackwell rum glaze and Scotch bonnet ice cream. 139


CHEF CLARENCE SMITH H

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e joined the GoldenEye kitchen in 2010, as a comis chef, and five years later, is now the executive chef, running the kitchen at the luxury resort. And while his “baby face” and his quiet demeanour may not be the typical characteristics of an executive chef, it is his quiet confidence and creative skills that have earned him the respect of his team.

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What inspires you?

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What makes cooking for GoldenEye guests special?

How did you get into cooking? I have always loved cooking because my grandma is a great cook and growing up I always looked forward to helping her. Having done food and beverage management in college I had no intention of becoming a chef but having started working with Chef Conroy and Chef Nerrisa at school, they encouraged me to take it up full time and here I am.

4 5

My drive to succeed. I always want to be the best so that motivates me. In fact, the sky is the limit.

It is all about the diversity of the guests that come here. You very rarely have two guests with the same request, and in addition, you get to interact with them and explore food together. It’s always a learning experience as some of our guests are great food lovers.

Signature dish?

The Mango Brioche Bread Pudding.

What local ingredients or flavours do you love right now? Two words: Scotch Bonnet, it’s so versatile.

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VIP CONCIERGE SERVICE

House Boat Great food and ambiance on the water in Freeport. www.thehouseboatgrill.com Southern Cross Boulevard, Freeport Tel: 876 979 8845 Sea Horse Grill Located at Montego Bay's Yacht club, Robbie Joseph puts on a proper seafood and steak night spread! www.theseahorsegrillja.com Montego Bay Yacht Club, Freeport Tel: 876 684 9133 Sugar Mill Lovely location and excellent food! The poached snapper is divine! www.halfmoon.rockresorts.com Half Moon, Rose Hall

Cafe EITS - 17 Mile Post (Blue Mountains) Farm to the table fusion cuisine in a lovely rustic mountain setting overlooking a valley in the Blue Mountains! www.17milepost.com/eits-cafe Tel: 876 944 8151 Regency Restaurant, Terra Nova Best formal dining experience in Kingston! www.terranovajamaica.com 17 Waterloo Road Tel: 876 926 2211

Pelican Grill Best breakfast in Montego Bay. A favorite with locals and tourists for over 50 years! Excellent French toast! www.pelicangrillja.com Gloucester Avenue Tel: 876 952 3171

East Japanese Great Sushi, always consistent and a cool collection of vinyl records. Market Place, Constant Spring Road Tel: 876 960 3962

Scotchies A little jerk and a cold Redstripe always does the trick when arriving in Montego Bay! Barnett Street Tel:876 953 8041

Tamarind Indian Cuisine Kingston's best Indian cuisine! www.tamarindindiancuisine.com Shop 28, 18-22 Barbican Road Tel: 876 977 0695 Opa! Great Greek food and service, the owner Alex is a fabulous host! www.opajamaica.com 75 Hope Road Tel: 876 946 2000

OCHO RIOS

KINGSTON

E A T

MONTEGO BAY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Chez Maria Lovely home style Lebanese food and some of the best thin crusted pizza in town! www.chezmaria.webs.com 80 Lady Musgrave Road Shop #3 Tel: 876 927 8078

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Anglers A cool local seafood spot that does some of the best Octopus (Sea Cat), lobster and fish! Anglers also helps to protect Parrot fish by only selling Snapper. St. Ann's Bay Tel: 876 794 8449 Toscanini’s The specials change regularly based on the fresh ingredients and catch of the day. Lovely Italian food and ambiance! Harmony Hall Tower Isle Tel: 876 975 4785


Geejam's Bush Bar Amazing steaks and lamb chops, great ambiance, Saturday night has live music by the Jolly Boys! www.geejamhotel.com San San Tel: 876 993 7000

John Crow's Tavern Good burgers and a cool spot for Friday night drinks in Ocho Rios. 10 Main Street Tel: 876 974 5895

Woody's Low Bridge Place Home style burgers made to order and seasoned with local spices! Tel: 876 436 5624

PORTLAND

Miss T's Kitchen A lovely local restaurant. An oasis- type setting in the middle of Ocho Rios that serves up the best oxtail on the north coast! www.misstskitchen.com 65 Main Street Tel: 876 795 0099

Cynthia’s at Winnifred Beach A very rustic and local experience, Miss Cynthia prepares a delicious ackee and king fish. Winifred Beach Tel: 876 562 4860

Pizza King Cheese stuffed dough pizza with very tasty pepperoni sausages! They deliver in and around Ocho Rios. 73 Main Street Tel: 876 974 3366

KINGSTON

NEGRIL

LFA Country Store's Deli A new supermarket located in Richmond Estate St. Ann, with a deli that does delicious ackee and callaloo quiches. Richmond, St. Ann Tel: 876 794 8562 LTU Pub Cool cliff side spot where you can swim and snorkel while your meal is being prepared. West End Tel: 957 0382 3 Dives Negril Popular jerk restaurant that serves amazing lobster! www.maherconsulting com/3dives West End Tel: 876 782 9990 Blue Mahoe Restaurant Caribbean elegant sea side dining on the west end. www.thespajamaica.com Tel: 876 39 3772 Rick's Cafe World renowned as a sunset picture taking and cliff jumping location, serving great grilled options. www.rickscafejamaica.com West End Tel: 876 957 0380

S L E E P Strawberry Hill www.strawberryhillhotel.com New Castle Road St. Andrew Tel: 876 622 9009 Terra Nova www.terranovajamaica.com 17 Waterloo Road Tel: 876 926 2211 Jamaica Pegasus www.jamaicapegasus.com 81 Knutsford Boulevard Tel: 876 926 3691 Spanish Court www.spanishcourthotel.com 1 St. Lucia Avenue Tel: 876 926 0000

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Sandals Royal Caribbean www.sandals.com Mahoe Bay Tel: 876 953 2231 Secrets www.secretsresorts.com Lots 59A Feeport Jubilation at Tryall Tryall Club Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426

OCHO RIOS

Round Hill www.roundhill.com John Pringle Drive Tel: 876 956 7050 Frankfort Prospect Ocho Rios Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426

PORTLAND

MONTEGO BAY

Half Moon www.halfmoon.rockresorts.com Half Moon Rose Hall

Geejam www.geejamhotel.com San San Doctor Bird Services / 876 993 7000 376 1426 Trident www.tridentportantonio.com Port Antonio Doctor Bird Services / 876 633 7000, 376 1426 Kanopi House Blue Lagoon Port Antonio Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426 Sea Star Villa San San Port Antonio Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426 Nautilus Villa San San Port Antonio Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426

Scotch on the Rocks Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426 Jamaica Inn www.jamaicainn.com Main Street Tel: 876 974 2514

NEGRIL

GoldenEye www.goldeneye.com Oracabessa Tel: 876 6229 007 Little Waters on the Cliff West End Doctor Bird Services / 876 376 1426 Rock House www.rockhouse.com/escape West End Tel: 876 957 4373 The Spa Retreat West End www.thespajamaica.com Tel: 876 39 3772

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For more information on personalized concierge services, contact Doctor Bird Services on 876-376-1426 or e-mail drbird.ja@gmail.com


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