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ISSUE.2 1


Are your

dividend

returns

Li s t ed o n t h e Ja m a ic a St o c k Exch an ge . 20 Micoud Street, Castries, St. Lucia

•

E-mail info@weareproven.com


112

TRAVEL BEACH, TRAVEL CHIC

Pack your bags with this season’s must-have accessories.

8.

WELCOME

10.

THE MoDA GROUP

14.

EDITOR’S NOTE

18. THE MoDA GRANT First Global Bank & the 2013 winner Ayanna Dixon are proof that dreams can come true! 24. THE MoDA SCHEDULE Mark your calendars and get ready! The MoDA Group is thrilled to bring you so much more for 2014.

KERRY’S BEAUTY MUST-HAVES 44.

Our Event Director Kerry-Ann Clarke gives us a sneak peek of what she can’t leave home without.

ON COVER: Model Kaci Fennell in Korto Momolu. Photographed by Marvin Bartley

46. TRAVEL Take a journey through India and satisfy those cravings for Jamaican food at restaurants located outside of our island in the sun. 64. ENTERTAIN Not quite ready for this holiday season? MoDA has you covered with some yummy recipes & modern table settings. 83. MUSIC Sevana, Ms. Nix, Jane Macgizmo & Zia Benjamin all have a wonderful musical gift of their own, and you should be listening. 94. FASHION Enter the eclectic closet of Sara Chang, dazzle in this season’s bold prints & bright colours and see what two budding Jamaican designers have in store this year.


The Collection MoDA is an electrifying fashion week in Jamaica geared towards facilitating new designers and showcasing the best of emerging talent in the industry. The annual event features designers from Jamaica, the wider Caribbean and the USA, and welcomes over 2000 visitors. With a mandate to promote the business of fashion, The Collection MoDA concept debuted in 2012, and showcased some of the finest international and local talent in one fashionable week. We continue to bring our mandate into fruition this year with a series of four fantastic events – the debut of MoDA Grooming, The Business of Fashion Seminar, The Collection MoDA Fashion Showcase and also new for 2014 — and our final celebration for the year is an extensive collection of curated pop-up shops under one roof — MoDA Market. The Collection MoDA is the perfect platform that gives the emerging industry a chance to shine by providing knowledge, experience and guidance.

6


W E LC o M E —THE FAST DEVELOPING LANDSCAPE OF THE CARIBBEAN fashion scene has experienced significant growth since The Collection Moda first opened its runway to some of the best emerging and independent designers the industry has to offer both locally and abroad. Now in its third year, TCM has certainly done some growing too and what was once a vision to create a platform for promoting the zeitgeist of Caribbean fashion is now a flourishing reality. To those who have been with us from the start I must extend my warmest gratitude. Your continued support has been the wind beneath my glamour-streaked wings and I could not have gotten this far without you. For those who we picked up along the way or who are just now joining team TCM, thank you for recognizing and supporting my vision for a brighter future in fashion for Jamaica and the Caribbean. We’ve come a long way but there is still much that needs to be done if TCM is to make the global impact that we have set out to achieve. As we continue to elevate Caribbean fashion and showcase talented local designers on our world class runway we hope to change the tempo for high fashion in the region to align more with international standards. This will hopefully jumpstart a culture of prosperity in the Caribbean through the catalyst of fashion. Jamaica is a hotspot for creative inspiration and many international artists have made the trip to our blessed island just for this reason. As


KERRY-ANN CLARKE 足Event Director @kerryMWH

Jamaica continues to become a part of the globalised world, platforms like TCM which showcase the talent and potential that the country has to offer become increasingly necessary. Kingston possesses the infrastructure and the brainpower it needs to secure itself as the fashion hub of the Caribbean but this dream of prosperity for the region will remain a dream without proper support and investment. A special thanks goes out to our sponsors, friends and well-wishers. TCM is the acronym for The Collection Moda but could also represent the spirit of the Caribbean fashion scene Timeless. Chic. Modish. To all our supporters we say thank you once again and stay TCM.

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Photography by Tiffany Lue-Yen


MoDA THE

G R O U P —MEET THE TEAM BEHIND

THE COLLECTION MoDA

GAIL MOSS-SOLOMON MoDA Legal Advisor

FIDGE FLETCHER Creative Director/Fashion Editor @Thestylefactor


AIESHA PANTON MoDA Market Curator @pussbackfoot

CORTIA BINGHAM Sponsorship Director @cortia

TIFFANY LUE-YEN MoDA Photographer @tiffanylueyen


MY ABSOLUTE FAVOURITE WORD IN THE WORLD IS ‘WANDERLUST’, which means a strong desire to travel. There are days when I sit looking through my windows dreaming where the next place will be for me to experience a new culture, indulge in eating exotic foods, listen to live music and most of all feed my deep love for fashion. This is why when Kerry-Ann Clarke approached me to be the Editor and Graphic Designer for MoDA Magazine, I couldn’t say no, as discovering and supporting our local talent, and finding emerging designers and artists around the world is a great passion of mine. I’m therefore extremely ecstatic to show you what the team and I have found! We’ve got the shoppers and non-shoppers covered with pages of this season’s must-haves for the holidays and tropical getaways (pages 102 & 112). We’ve showcased some new talent that has appeared over the past few months and these new ‘kids on the block’ have so much promise. They are definitely the ones to watch (pages 108 & 120).

14


EDITOR’S NOTE ALIA MICHÈLE ORANE Editor & Graphic Designer @aliamichele

Hungry? We’ve located some of the best Jamaican restaurants outside of our sweet little island and provided some great international recipes for you to try, just in case you’re staying put (pages 50 & 64). Some cool musical geniuses grace our pages as well, tempting us to load our iPods after our ears have been tickled (page 83). It’s all pretty exciting! This will be a great year for the MoDA Group, and you, as when you turn the pages you’ll discover new and wondrous things. All our contributors did such a great job of capturing exactly what it was that we wanted to inspire you with. Hopefully it will spark the wanderlust within all your hearts. Actually, I guarantee you it will.


THE COLLECTION MoDA

CONTRIBUTORS TA R A B R A D S H AW MALENA BURMAN RUTH CHISOLM TA M E K A C O L E Y AMINA DOHERTY D A L I A D AV I E S J U D I T H D E N TO N F I D G E F L E TC H E R HANNA GRANKVIST WA LT E R G R E E N E CRAIG HARLEY T I F F A N Y L U E -Y E N ARNOLD MILFORD ALIA MICHÈLE ORANE A I E S H A PA N TO N ALLISON PORTER SMALLING WA D E R H O D E N


—THE FIRST GLOBAL MoDA GRANT WAS established to reward innovation in aspiring young designers in the local fashion industry. The grant was introduced last year during The Collection MoDA’s second staging, and designer Ayanna Dixon who graced the stage with her designs in 2013, took home the winning prize (see her story on page 19). With 89 impressive submissions received this year, only 15 applicants progressed to the 2nd round. After completing one item of clothing using unconventional materials, the final 3 designers were chosen and required to create a look from the sketches provided in their MoDA application. The winner will be announced on November 21, 2014 and will receive a cash price of $250K and two sewing machines from Singer, along with mentorship and business development advisory services from the Jamaica Business Development Corporation and the Richard Branson Centre for Entrepreneurship. M


Photo by Colin Porter

AYA N N A

TA K E S T H E D R E A M Words by Tameka Coley

—THERE ARE MANY CLICHÉD SAYINGS ABOUT SUCCESS, IT’S ALL about that right moment. You know… the one that finally comes when you constantly work on that breakthrough idea and chase that one dream you’re so passionate about. Success comes when preparation meets opportunity, they say. It comes by practicing excellence and being ready. 19


On the local fashion scene, designer Ayanna Dixon is a living testament to these concepts. Hers is the Cinderella story of the Jamaican fashion industry, her success, some would say, was well over five years due. Let’s backtrack to the skinny kid who fell in love with the arts growing up with an architect father, a textile designing-mother and an aunt who loved clothes. High school would find her in the dilemma of her age when her father refused to buy a new outfit for a friend’s birthday party, forcing her to spend all day making a skirt by hand. Little did she know, this is when she entered the preparation room where she would spend years sketching, sewing, waiting for the ‘right time’. Following stints at Edna Manley, The Art Institute of New York, internships at Monique Leshman, Marchesa and her ‘spirit designer’ Donna Karan, she returned home with hope renewed. She later endured a harrowing experience to enter and place second in the premiere season of Mission Catwalk, the Caribbean’s first fashion-focused reality TV show, then a slew of near hits, disappointments, loans and frustrating occurrences later, she realised she needed to ‘wheel and come again’.

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Illustrations by Ayanna Dixon


Ayanna —the dedicated designing entrepreneur and teacher— decided to be her raw, passionate self. The 2013 First Global Bank MoDA Grant competition presented the perfect opportunity for this, and after years of hard work, her ‘no-frills, strictly business’ essay and fresh E.23 collection catapulted her to the top. She was euphoric, in tears, and finally a winner! Here’s how she feels… Winning the MoDA Grant was… The answer to my prayers. Definitely a sense of validation and accreditation for me as a designer and a person who works really hard

For me, happiness and personal development are crucial, so every moment is a chance to learn, evolve and be inspired. and had never won anything before. I was so genuinely happy and grateful in that moment and it has done a lot for my career. It’s an awesome feeling to have your work and vision recognised and I’m forever thankful to Kerry-Ann Clarke and First Global Bank for this excellent initiative that will help many more designers like me. Her biggest accomplishments since… Wow, I have been truly blessed. Being invited to be a part of the Branson Centre’s entrepreneurship programme is definitely it right now, as well as to be a part of the National Integrity Action documentary, that’s a real honour. I also hosted Jamaica’s first fashion illustration exhibition on my birthday and showed at The British Fashion Council’s International Fashion Showcase in England during London Fashion Week 2014.

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Photo by Randy Richards

On where she is now in her life and career… As a designer/illustrator, Christmas is the next big focus and as an artist, I’m always evolving creatively. Career-wise, I’m just getting started. This is my warm-up stage. I now have a much better idea of what I want my designs to communicate so the best is yet to come. I’m making the most of my journey and the opportunities that I’ve had and I look forward to the growth of my business and ASD Clothing becoming a household name. For me, happiness and personal development are crucial, so every moment is a chance to learn, evolve and be inspired. M 23


MoDA MoDEL

GROOMING Words by Judith Denton Photography by Craig Harley

—THE MoDA GROUP HAS ADDED GROOMING TO ITS EVER-EVOLVING portfolio. With its 2014 debut, MoDA’s grooming course gave 20 young ladies a variety of lessons including: etiquette, deportment, fitness and poise. These course elements proved valuable not only to modeling aspirants, but also to corporate professionals and persons keen on building these and other related skills. Krista White, cycle 14 winner of America’s Next Model, Yendi Phillipps, 2010 Miss Universe runner-up and television presenter, along with Sara Chang, lifestyle coach, rounded out a bevy of fashion industry experts who shared their knowledge and best practices with the participants. L’Oreal and Soft-Sheen Carson helped each participant to put their best face forward with make-up, hair styling tips and demonstrations. Look out for MoDA Grooming and other industry offerings in the years to come! M 24


Above: The Collection Moda Director Kerry-Ann Clarke with America’s Next Top Model cycle 14 winner Krista White, and celebrity stylist Arnold Milfort. Below: Participants of MoDA Grooming learn make-up application with the L’oreal skin experts.


The participants of MoDA Grooming, held at Eden Gardens Wellness Resort & Spa in July, enjoyed sessions with lifestyle coach Sara Chang, L’oreal skin care and make-up experts, and received invaluable industry insights from co-host Yendi Phillipps.

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LUBICA

COURTNEY WASHINGTON


DEXTER HUXTABLE

SIMONE NEILSON

—THE COLLECTION MODA FASHION SHOWCASE RETURNED bigger and better for its second installment in September 2013. The show featured one of NY Magazine’s top 5 designers to watch, Korto Momolu, along with her Project Runway Alums Gordana Gehlhausen and Jerell Scott. Our local designers Ayanna Dixon, Courtney Washington, Dexter Huxtable, Lubica, Simone Neilson and Simone Tasha Gordon, wowed the crowd with their innovative and ready-to-wear collections. Last but not least, Omar Salaam closed the show with his exceptional Spring collection, fresh from the runway of NY Fashion Week. M 29


Photography by Randy Richards

—THE BOUNDLESS POTENTIAL OF THE FASHION INDUSTRY, NOT only in the realm of creativity and cultural evolution/development, but also from an economic standpoint, is one reason why The Collection Moda (TCM) has decided to dedicate its platform to promoting the fashion business in Jamaica and the rest of the Caribbean. The rapid expansion and evolution of the fashion industry and the possibilities that this has signalled for Jamaica and the Caribbean will be discussed by industry experts at TCM’s Business of Fashion (BoF) Seminar on November 20th. Representatives from the Exim Bank, The Richard Branson Centre and the JBDC’s business advisory team, along with a host of other partners (including Project Runway designer, Korto Momolu) will be offering their informed perspective on everything and anything to do with the business aspect of the fashion industry. Speakers will be tackling topics from trademarks and copyrighting, to establishing a visual identity and dynamic social media presence to young entrepreneurs and emerging fashion designers. M


Clockwise from far left: TARA Couriers’ Yasmin Eyre asks questions during one of the panel sessions at the BOF seminar; FLOW’s Jeanette Lewis and Jamaican Designer Courtney Washington speak to the attendees; Guest speakers, Project Runway alums Jerell Scott and Gordana Gahlhausen.

TO REGISTER FOR THE BOF SEMINAR, VISIT TCM’s OFFICIAL WEBSITE: WWW.THECOLLECTIONMODA.COM OR CALL 929-2096.


2014 DESIGNERS

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LUBICA Slovakian born designer, Lubica, studied fashion design at Ryerson University in Toronto. Lubica playfully expresses her love of the tropics through her creative use of materials, colours, hand embellishments and appliquテゥs in her clothing lines. Her signature flower appliquテゥs and excellent colour blocking are just some of the features that define her elegant resort wear.窶起ow based in Jamaica, the Lubica collection is widely enjoyed by women of all ages, with availability across the Caribbean, the United States, Canada and Europe.


JAE JOLLY Before attending the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts, Janel Jolly’s designing career began as just a hobby. She launched her first collection at the 2010 Caribbean Fashion Week, followed by the creation of a successful swimwear line, which included colourful and playful bikinis and coverups.

Her

unique

talents

are expressed in the mixing of different fabrics and patterns, as well as intricate detailing on every piece she creates. Her designs are inspired by things of nature with collections titled Ocean Floor, Safari Paradise and Enchanted Garden.


CLAUDIA PEGUS It was the late 1970’s and Claudia began

importing

clothing

from

London for retail sale in Trinidad. The realisation that the European cut was no fit for the Caribbean body awakened the entrepreneurial skills within her and she began stripping and recreating garments. Since then, the Trinidad & Tobago based designer’s work has been shown and lauded

internationally,

regionally

and locally at major fashion weeks for over three decades. Renowned for her signature work in various types of silks, intricate hand embroideries and luxurious fabrications,

she

is

definitively

dynamic sassy and classy.


DEXTER HUXTABLE Since 2008, Dexter Huxtable—the CEO, designer and creative energy behind Spokes Apparel—has been revolutionizing men’s fashion in the local market and has transformed Jamaican menswear and how it is perceived both locally and internationally. ​ The Spokes brand is a showcase of creativity, classic sophistication and superblyfitting apparel made to be worn by the man who is confident and comfortable with himself. Dexter likes to work with clean lines and textures,Z presenting a quality of work that will stand out from the ordinary.


ANDRE ROWE Andre Rowe began his career studying Food and Beverage Management at The University of Technology, Jamaica. He was accepted to the Academy of Art, San Francisco, and after not being able to fund his way through fashion school, he decided to pursue his dreams locally and has not looked backed since. In 2008, he launched unto the fashion scene during Style Week Jamaica and has since been featured in numerous publications locally and internationally. Andre is known for his superb technical knowledge of a garment’s proper fit and design, and his work can be seen on some of Kingston’s elite corporate executives and celebrities.


FRANZ CHRISTIE At age 12, Franchester Christie’s desire to create diverse clothing was inspired by the success of Jamaica’s own Uzuri International. He studied garment construction at Ka-Ju Fashion Institute, and later developed his impeccable fashion design skills at the University of the Arts London. After making it to the top four of television’s Mission Catwalk, Christie debuted his first collection at Saint International’s Style

Photo by Joel Finnigen

Week. Known for his funky yet versatile clothing, the young designer opened his very own boutique, Franzique, and showed some of his latest collections in London and New York.


KORTO MOMOLU Highlighted as one of the top five designers to watch by New York Magazine, Korto Momolu is known for her chic and exquisite women’s wear and accessories. After continuing her education at the renowned Parsons School of Design, Korto was the first runner up on the 5th season of Project Runway and appeared on the show’s popular spinoff Project Runway All-Stars. Influenced by her African roots and inspired by rich fabrics, she embraces colour, diversity and asymmetric draping with ease. Korto has partnered with Madera Exotic Woods to design The Saba Collection, an exclusive line of eco-friendly jewellery, and she has been featured in magazines such as Southern Living, People and Essence.


BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Conversation Piece


*SHOP THESE DESIGNERS ON NOVEMBER 23, 2014 AT THE JAMAICA PEGASUS


KERRY’S

BEAUTY MUST-HAVES

LOUIS VUITTON PURSE This purse holds all my tiny things and it fits perfectly into each and every bag.

SEPHORA EXPRESS CLEANING WIPES “I beat the heat of Jamaica with these. They make my face feel refreshed on-the-go.”


SMASH BOX BRONZER This stuff gives me the extra glow without looking too shiny. So obsessed with it!

MAKE UP FOREVER PROFESSIONAL MATIFYING FOUNDATION “I absolutely cannot live without this. It goes on light and stays throughout the day. I never feel like I have on makeup.”

Photography by Tiffany Lue-Yen

BATH & BODY WORKS ANTI-BACTERIAL HAND GEL “I cannot ever leave home without this. I use it religiously.”

BUXON LIP GLOSS “I searched high and low for a lip gloss that wouldn’t leave my lips dry or chapped. This keeps them moisturized all day long. ”

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT KERRY’S MUSTHAVES? FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER: @KERRYmwh

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India

a journey worth the wait

Words & Photography by Tara Bradshaw


Picturesque green hills provide a natural contrast to the weathered but resilient sandstone fort, while an unorthodox mix of colours and textures combine to provide a unique & pleasing perspective in this palace doorway.

— My fascination with India is something that has been there almost my entire life. When I was a child, my mother found me in front of the television one day sobbing my little heart out. When she asked me what was wrong, I wailed, “My prime minister is dead!” Confused, she reminded me that the Prime Minister of Jamaica was in fact alive and well. To her amusement, I was in fact referring to Indira Gandhi, India’s Prime Minister. 47


25 years later, I sat onboard a British Airways flight with a glass of wine in one hand and a permanent smile on my face. I was headed to India. India is a country full of contradictions. It’s easy to become overwhelmed by the riot of sights, sounds, colours and scents. Roads are full of cars, trucks, scooters and the ubiquitous auto-rickshaws, all jostling for space and each adhering to their own personal road codes. The ceaseless honking of horns is at first startling, but then surprisingly fades into a general background noise. But after the initial culture shock, you truly begin to appreciate India. From the sprawling urban chaos of Mumbai to the laid-back tropical beaches of Goa, there’s something to please everyone. The air is rich with spices, and each region has its own distinct cuisine. Ancient temples and palaces that have withstood centuries are visited by thousands of tourists and locals alike. Saturated colours abound, seen in everything from the women in intricate embellished saris to entire cities in shades of pink or blue. I spent two weeks in India and yet that was barely enough time to even scratch the surface of this mysterious, at times perplexing, but always exhilarating subcontinent. M 48


—Amber Fort, built in 1952 and located near to Jaipur, is set in the rugged hills of Rajasthan. —Intricate hand painted ceilings with mirrored mosaics and coloured glass, so that the ceiling flickered like jewels when illuminated by candelight.


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F

rom our fashion to our food, our connection to Jamaica can never be out of reach. While we love variety, a little bit of home beyond Jamaica’s shores wouldn’t hurt. Here are a few chic spots in neighbouring United States cities that propel signature aspects of Jamaican food...one of our most prized possessions. Words by Ruth Chisolm

y’s Lil s is rM

o rf

ge rie K l nie

Ph

y ob ot

Da


The Ms. Lily’sPhotography Phenomenon by Daniel Krieger —VINYL-LIKE IMAGES COVER THE WALLS. THE SEATING IS piped with red, green and gold. The photos, books and Jamaican paraphernalia pull patrons to a unique offering in the heart of Soho in Manhattan. New Yorkers do not adjust your eyes. You are not in Montego Bay or Kingston. Paul Salmon and his team have not pulled you into an island-esque wonderland. You have entered Ms. Lily’s. Jamaican’s will fall in love with the familiar and others will fall in love with the captivating cultural links that Ms. Lily’s provides.   Sitting on the corner of West Houston and Sullivan Street, Lily’s boasts Jamaican favourites that will sate the appetites of even the pickiest customer bearing 876 credentials. From ackee and salt fish to the Hellshire fish and chips, the management and staff promise that this is no optical illusion. Lily’s is the collaboration between Salmon and Binn and Genc Jakupi. It is a restaurant and a variety store, where from the food to the music and collection of books and art, it is a 52


celebration of Jamaica and the wider Caribbean. The built-in radio station is a daily tribute to reggae greats and as an event store, Miss Lily’s has hosted break out stars including Sean Paul and Chronixx along with a stellar line-up of home-grown Jamaican talent. According to Salmon, “the customer profile is quite eclectic. We could have a table of Jamaicans having lunch, and right next to them are foreign artists, or bankers who have never even been to Jamaica.”   Salmon visited Jamaica quite often during the 1980s. His fated meeting with a cook by the name of Miss Etta is one that he recalls with fondness. “She made the best home cooked meals on the beach in Negril. Done to order and cooked with so much love, I never forgot her,” he said. By the time he moved to New York in the 1990s it was the emergence of the boutique restaurant trend. With the help of renowned designer Serge Becker, Lily’s got an aesthetic image

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that quickly drew attention. Salmon and his business partners never looked back. “We wanted people to feel like they had received a home cooked Jamaican meal prepared by Miss Etta. We just had to recapture that vibe,” Salmon added.  Etta became Lily, and today with the help of the creativity interpretation and skill of Executive Chef Adam Schop, the Jamaican-inspired space has grown to be a neighborhood favourite.    “The restaurant business is very competitive in New York, but somehow we weren’t worried. The concept of Ms. Lily’s has really resonated with people. We knew what we were offering was special,” Salmon said confidently. “We take positive steps every day. It is a fun place to be. You can go on a date here or just hang out with a group of friends. Add a well-designed space, great vibes and all the other qualities that Lily’s offers and what you end up with is a bit of magic.”  Salmon’s Jamaican connection is a deep one. As co-owner of the trendy Rockhouse hotel on Negril’s west end, in Westmoreland, Salmon says he’s always had a very deep commitment to the community. “Portions of the profits from Lily’s go to the Rockhouse Foundation. I am very proud of the impact we are having on the community,” he said warmly. “That is important in hospitality because as an industry you have to impact people. So whether it is serving the stressed out guest at the Rockhouse Hotel, the friendliness and Jamaican soundtrack during your meal service at Lily’s or the service you give to the Westmoreland primary schools you’ve renovated. It is still all about impact.”  —Feeling peckish? Visit www.misslilys.com for more information. 54


Ortanique Living FROM THE GABLES TO THE CAYMAN ISLANDS

Photography provided by Ortanique

—WHITE GLOVE SERVICE WITHOUT THE WHITE GLOVES; Ortanique takes Caribbean cuisine to another level. MoDA caught up with Delius Shirley, co-owner of Ortanique restaurants  to get a sense of the food lovers’ haven.  Heralding cuisine of the sun, Shirley and his partner Cindy Huston set out to offer an all-inclusive culinary experience when it came to Caribbean cuisine. Son of the late restaurateur Norma Shirley, Delius also pursued the restaurant business. With two locations, Ortanique On The Mile in Coral Gables, Miami and Ortanique On The Crescent at Camana Bay in Grand Cayman, Shirley sought to follow in his mother’s footsteps, by presenting Caribbean cuisine in new and refreshing ways.   “It’s like being on stage, as my Mom used to say,” said Shirley. “We’re not just offering food we’re also offering an education as it relates to the way we prepare and present each dish.”  55


According to Shirley people thought restaurants were just about food. But if they think about it when they walk into a restaurant the first 15 minutes are really about the décor, the textures, the aroma and the general energy of the space. The award-winning Ortanique team works hard to appeal to their guests’ five senses. “When you walk in you really aren’t eating right away,” Shirley added. “We care about the effects of certain colours on the eyes and the mood, hence the warm and inviting yellow and orange hues that we use at both locations. How the staff engages the guests, their friendliness towards them and their knowledge of the food are all very important to us,” Shirley stated. “We don’t even burn a vanilla candle in here and the staff doesn’t even wear perfume to work,” Shirley affirmed. “We also are careful not to use too much pepper in certain dishes for example, because that overpowers the outcome in terms of the flavour and smell of the


food. We do everything we can to ensure that all the elements of our guests’ experiences are just right.” Shirley visits every table. “I enjoy interacting with the guests and I am always looking at trends to see how we can heighten their experience. Training and retention of the staff is critical he stated. “People want to be at Ortanique,” he added. “We have very little turnover. I have staff, some of whom have been here for 15 years. In fact the staff eventually sees themselves as ambassadors for the food and ultimately our brand.”   And what about him? Delius loves the business. “I curse it every day but there’s nothing else I’d rather do.” Jamaican and Caribbean foodies can’t go wrong here. Committed personnel, both to the food and the service...how could people not want to visit Ortanique. —Famished? Visit ortaniquerestaurants.com for more information.


Red Yabba

THE ALL NATURAL CAFÉ —IF YOU’RE IN THE MIAMI ENVIRONS, RED YABBA IS WORTH A visit. Promoting healthy meals in the heart of Pembroke Pines, Red Yabba boasts eclectic Caribbean-style offerings, while conveying strong environmentally-friendly messages. The spirit of their dishes is grounded in nutritional values as the management and staff strive to respond to the growing demand for healthy and organic dishes.   “Red Yabba caters to persons from all walks of life. Our goal is to 58


Photography by Ramon Pitter

provide healthy Caribbean-infused options, which include freshly extracted juices, organic salads and entrées,” stated co-owner Elaine Stephenson.   “We’ve had a customer express that she would have stomach issues anytime she would dine out. On this occasion after dining at our restaurant, she happily told us that she did not have any issues. This is a testament to what we are trying to accomplish and it makes us proud to hear stories like this.”

59


Red Yabba’s menu includes the classic Jamaican favourites such as curry and jerk chicken as well as the Port Royal-inspired steamed fish. But the vegetarians aren’t left wanting as the pad thai and yabba bowl do not disappoint. You can even ask for the boonoonoonus (meaning plentiful), a platter comprising cauliflower rice, guacamole and assorted vegetables. Customers can also add spirulina, chia seeds or other immune boosters to their favourite Yabba smoothie. The name yabba symbolizes togetherness, particularly over a meal with friends. Grounded in a sentiment of family coupled with the mission of healthy eating, the owners, Stephenson and her sister Jacinth ReidArtist, think the diverse South Florida community is a good fit. “We don’t have plans to expand right now but the response has been very good. Of course we want to reach a broader client base and we wouldn’t mind seeing more Red Yabba’s open up across the United States. The sky is the limit,” said Stephenson. M —Ready for a healthy bite? Visit redyabba.com for more information.


64


Delish! 窶年O ONE ENJOYS SPENDING LONG hours over a stove to cook for themselves or a family. With these easy and decadent recipes by self-taught chef and mother of four, Allison Porter Smalling, hours in the kitchen are now a thing of the past. So grab that apron and get cooking! Styled by Aiesha Panton Photography by Tiffany Lue-Yen


Coconut Flaked Basa Fillet


Coconut Flaked Basa Fillet INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

• 4 pieces of basa fish fillet

—Season fish with complete

• 1 1/2 tsp of complete seasoning

seasoning, fish seasoning, black

• 1 1/2 tsp of fish seasoning

pepper and garlic salt.

• black pepper to taste • 1/2 tsp of garlic salt • 1 tbsp butter • 1 tbsp garlic cloves (chopped fine) • 1 small onion diced

—In a deep medium-sized pan over medium to high heat, melt butter, then slightly brown fillets on either side for about 3–4 minutes.

• 1 tbsp sweet pepper (red or green)

—Add the garlic, onions, sweet

• 1 cup coconut milk

thyme, and lemon juice. Cover

• 1 tbsp escallion (chopped)

pan and simmer for another 5

• thyme

minutes over low heat.

• 1 tsp lemon juice • three pieces of okra diced • unsweetened white coconut flakes

pepper, coconut milk, escallion,

—Pour okra and gravy on top of fillet and cover pan for another minute.

• sesame seeds set aside for dressing

—Turn off heat and transfer

• 1 scotch bonnet pepper, finely diced and placed aside for spice (or can be placed in dish for the last two minutes of cooking)

coconut flakes, white sesame

• grape tomatoes for garnish

fillet to a serving dish. Sprinkle seeds and grape tomatoes for garnish. —Serve immediately. —Serves 2.


Fried Chicken Tenders with Blue Cheese Dressing INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

• 1 pack breast tenderloins

—In a bowl, combine the flour

• 1 cup all purpose flour

with all dry seasonings (dill,

• 1 tsp dill (dried)

parsley, red pepper flakes, salt

• 2 tsp parsley leaves (dried)

and pepper). Divide the flour

• 1 tsp pepper flakes (optional for added spice)

mixture between two small

• 1 tsp salt • 1 tsp pepper • 2 large eggs

bowls. —In another bowl, whisk eggs. —Dip chicken pieces in flour to

• vegetable oil for frying

coat, shaking off any excess

For dipping sauce:

—Dip chicken into egg mixture

• 1 cup of blue cheese dressing

and coat well with flour from the 2nd bowl. —Heat oil in pan to 350º for deep-frying. —Fry chicken pieces in oil, turning occasionally until brown and crisp. —Remove chicken to rack or shallow dish and allow cooling for 10 minutes before serving. —Serves 3-4 71


Thai Curried Shrimp INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

• 1 lb large shrimp

—Season shrimp with pepper

• 1/2 tsp dried hot pepper flakes

flakes, complete seasoning,

• 1 tsp complete seasoning

parsley, black pepper and salt. —Heat butter in medium-sized

• 1 cup parsley • salt and pepper to taste • 1 tbsp butter • 1 onion chopped • 3 large garlic cloves, chopped • 1 cup of coconut milk • 1 cup chopped sweet pepper • 1 tsp lemon juice

skillet over medium heat. Add chopped onions and diced garlic. to skillet. —After 2 minutes, add shrimp and stir for about 3 minutes. —Add coconut milk and sweet pepper. Simmer for another 2 minutes on very low heat, then mix in lemon juice. —Transfer to dish and serve with hot jasmine rice. —Serves 2.

WANT MORE RECIPES FROM ALLISON?

GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/ALLYSKITCHEN OR FOLLOW

HER ON INSTAGRAM @ALLYS.KITCHEN, FOR NEW & UNIQUE RECIPES, AS WELL AS UPDATES ON HER UPCOMING COOKBOOK! 72


INDUSTRIAL

SIMPLICITY THE SEASON FOR CELEBRATING WITH AND ENTERTAINING our loved ones is fast approaching. Thankfully, New York Stylist and Event Planner Malena Burman has created effortless table settings to help spark unique ideas for your upcoming gatherings. Inspired by the rough, industrial elements of New York City and the simplicity of Scandinavian design, Burman shows us how easy it is to use items we never thought of to create an inviting space for everyone to enjoy. M

Styled by Malena Burman Photography by Hanna Grankvist


THE ROMANTIC


Use some of your favourite glass vases to create a more romantic table setting consisting of dominant shapes.

Support your local flower shop and purchase simple yet unique blooms to add even more beauty.


Details such as homemade napkin rings made from paper, help create a raw New York feeling.


THE MASCULINE & RUSTIC


Use simple shapes and rustic materials such as these marble candle holders and porcelain plates, to create a more masculine feeling.


Don’t be afraid to use actual food as decor, for example kale, which we’ve used as a part of this table setting.


SEVANA S O U L . S O U N D S . S T Y L E Words by Amina Doherty


SEVANA —“I’VE BEEN SINGING FOR as long as I can remember,” Sevana muses with a big smile. “The first time I sang publicly was for my family. It was a Sunday morning and I was sitting at the table having breakfast. I started singing along to Celine Dion’s ‘A New Day’ which was playing on the radio in the background.” Her eyes widen as she recalls, “my mother walked into the room and said ‘wow, you sound really great!’ I remember my brother laughing and saying ‘yeh man, she can sing; she can really sing!”

competition, placing third along with two other bandmates who made up the group ‘SLR.’ The group disbanded shortly after the competition but Sevana says she has never given up on her dream of becoming a musician. “My music is very important to me,” She says. “I want people to listen to it and be inspired.” “My songs are about my own experiences and the things I see around me. I think that is what makes my music relatable.” The singer cites a broad range of musical influenc-

Born in Westmoreland, Jamaica, es but notes that she is cautious twenty-two year old vocalist and of attaching any particular label/ songwriter Sevana has practically genre to her work. “I want to have burst her way onto the Kingston the creative freedom to explore music scene armed with a fresh all kinds of music. I don’t want my soulful sound and a funky, youth- listeners to come to expect just ful sense of style. In spite of her one style from me.” Sevana’s first age, Sevana is no stranger to the single, “Bit too shy,” produced stage. At age 16 she entered the by Winta from Overstand Label popular Digicel Rising Stars talent and Protoje is a smooth soulful * Photo on previous page by Martei Korlry


My mother walked into the room and said ‘wow, you sound really great!’ I remember my brother laughing and saying ‘yeh man, she can sing; she can really sing!

summer tune that brings together her love for old classics and a fresher more youthful sound. Outside of her music, Sevana’s bright playful personality shines through in her eclectic and cutting-edge fashion choices. When asked about her sense of style, she responds with a laugh, “I’m a country girl, but my style is definitely Kingston style. Kingston style is freer, it’s fun, flirty, and gritty. In Kingston, rules aren’t really rules – they are just guidelines but no one follows them.” “Sometimes when I go home I think my mother would like it if I dressed a bit more conservatively,” she continues, “but she never tells me what to wear.” Crediting her stylist and friend Ayana Riviere for some of her looks Sevana says, “I like to keep it basic and don’t accessorize much, although this summer I really love those colourful wide-brimmed velvet hats; I would love one of those.” “My stylist, Ayana is great about pulling together looks for me,” she adds. “Kingston is a great place for thrifting and finding basic pieces that you can dress up” Sevana says knowingly. “Your personal style shouldn’t feel like too much work,” she says. “It should reflect your personality.” 85


Photo by Randy Richards

For someone still so young Sevana exudes an incredible level of confidence and sense of self. She is very clear about her music and her expectations. At the same time, she is undeniably herself— fun, playful, and exuberant, effortlessly discussing everything from her love of what she calls ‘gaudy sandals’, to playing alongside No-maddz, and her dayto-day work. Before we part ways, Sevana looks off into the distance musing about her visions of success. “What ‘success’ feels like to me,” she says is “Contentment. It is honest. It feels sure. It is that sense that this is what I am supposed to be doing right now. What ‘success’ tastes like? She asks flashing a smile; “Hmm. It tastes like chocolate! Like an almond Snickers. Yes, that is what success tastes like!” M 86


SEVANA T H E

S T Y L E

F I L E

SUMMER STYLE: My summer look is casual and playful. You will find me rocking denim overalls, big t-shirts, sandals and big gold hoop earrings. I’ve also always wanted a pair of doc martens so I guess those are on the top of my wishlist. SEVANA’S STYLE IS…Boho-chic, minimalist, bummy, vintage MUSES: Definitely Solange. I love her so much! I love the way she plays with her style it’s free and funky and you can tell that she has fun with it. I guess that’s why I also like Rihanna - she doesn’t follow anyone’s rules. I also really like the visual artist Charice Lundy. I’M NEVER WITHOUT… lip balm, pen and paper, a bottle of water, my phone, and hand lotion. I also walk around with a spray bottle in my bag. I find that I have to moisturise my hair often to beat the Kingston heat. I have natural hair and I used to be such a product junkie. Nowadays my hair regimen is pretty basic. I wash my hair with TRESemmé clarifying conditioner and moisturise with coconut oil, twist and that’s it! WHEN I AM ONLINE I AM: Almost always on ‘YouTube’ (I love YouTube, it’s great for people research - like interviews of people who create the music I love!) I also love ‘Hey Fran Hey,’ ‘The Huffington Post.’


SWEAT TH TECHNIQU —THE NAME DJ MS. NIX MIGHT BE NEW TO YOU, BUT IN OUR current world of music, where it’s easy to hear the same five songs rotate on the radio over and over on repeat, sometimes you need a little musical therapy; and Ms. Nix is the sound doctor you should get to know. For those of us who are consummate travellers and card-carrying members of the hip hop and dancehall nation, Ms. Nix is easily recognized as another gem in the continuation of imported, multifaceted artists who hail from Toronto, Canada. 88


She is the house DJ and announcer of MTV2’s game show Hip Hop Squares, and is a growing presence on underground musical outlets like soundcloud.com. As a citizen of the world, deejay Ms. Nix (born Nicole Lyn) has a twirling kaleidoscope of past arts and entertainment achievements. A former ballerina, children’s opera choir singer, model and actress, Nicole Lyn has already lived several different lives. And yet spinning at the most exclusive venues and private 89


celebrity parties from Los Angeles to Jamaica, Ms. Nix has found her most recent success behind the booth, earning the nickname, “A Music Lover’s Deejay”. But don’t let her tiny 5’ 4” frame, uber stylishly fashion forward wardrobe and devastatingly beautiful face fool you. DJ Ms. Nix is a professional melody-making healer. Whether you listen to her monthly, weekly or daily, all the best therapists are shared patient to patient, by word of mouth recommendations. And catching a DJ Ms. Nix set is no different.

Sometimes you need a little musical therapy, and Ms. Nix is the sound doctor you should get to know. A friend told me that Ms. Nix would be spinning in Williamsburg, Brooklyn over the weekend. As I arrived, I noticed a few other possible party go-ers standing outside smoking cigarettes, dodging eye contact, and updating their social media. I broke the silence with one young man, who told me this was his first time hearing Ms. Nix saying, “my boy text me, and all he said was ‘Yo. McCarren Park. Rooftop. Reggae. Come through.’” So I go upstairs, check in at the bar, and sit politely on a large chaise lounge. I spot Ms. Nix setting up her laptop and a moment later the therapy session begins. Ms. Nix flawlessly blends some of the most forgotten, unsung mega hits from Cocoa Tea to Toni Braxton to Barrington Levy. It was as if Ms. Nix said “tell me about your childhood”. 90


Photography provided by Nicole Lyn

Within minutes, the person sitting next to you, who was once an absolute stranger, becomes your best friend and dancing partner with the common bond of hearing good music. At one point even Ms. Nix jumps into the crowd and begins dancing with all of us. But like any good therapist, we were only booked until 10:00PM and at 10:01PM the last song of the night plays and everyone scatters aimlessly on to the sidewalk. All of us in denial that the night was over, realizing there was no other music source that night that could compete with the Ms. Nix set we all just experienced. One party go-er, bee-bopping down the street, threw his head back and yelled up into the sky, “de pah-ty done!� And he was correct. M 91


A R T I S TCSH TO WAT

<JANEMACGIZMO> <ZIABENJAMIN> With singles Babylon and Black

You’ve probably heard her deep

Skin, it’s hard to miss the dynamic

sultry voice on the airwaves with-

voice that Jane Macgizmo holds.

out even knowing it. Benjamin,

Her music has been described as

who is currently working on her

‘Reggae Funk Magic’, and it’s no

upcoming EP, has been featured

surprise as her voice easily puts a

on top albums including Sean

spell on you. It’s soft, sultry with a

Paul’s hit Tomahawk Technique

little edge, and our ears are glued

and Major Lazer’s Free the

to our speakers to listening to

Universe. Her EP will feature

her unique melodies. Macgizmo

tracks produced by Leftside and

is set to release her EP later this

Skygrass’ Simon Samuel, and have

year, which will feature a collabo

a ‘Rum Shop Blues’ sound that

with Zia Benjamin called Physical.

will captivate us all. She’s one to

Check out her music on Sound-

keep an eye on, after all her music

cloud (janemacgizmomusiq) or

“mek yuh want to pull over to that

Youtube, and discover another

street corna rum bar and tek een

talent that this tiny island holds.

a listen” ...and ain’t that the truth.

92


AN

undeniable

STYLE —WHEN ONE GOOGLES A SMALL TOWN NAMED Moberly, all one will find is a dot in the middle of Missouri dubbed “The Magic City”. A magic city it is indeed, if the name refers to the Moberly-born-and-raised chick with a big personality, by the name of Sara Chang.

Writing and Photography by Alia Michèle Orane 95


It’s a sunny day in Kingston, Jamaica, the place Sara now calls home since her work in the Peace Corps back in 1997. “The 80s and 90s are my fashion years I prefer not to go back to,” she mentions. “I always wanted an afro, so I permed my hair and wore it really big!” This comes as a big surprise because the lady who opened the door to her home obviously left the big hair dream in the past, and became a style maven on her own. We’re here to discuss her unbelievable personal style, which of course comes easily, as we are two fashion-loving personalities standing in the centre of her jam packed closet of goodies, on this lovely summer day.

The 80s and 90s are my fashion years I prefer not to go back to; I always wanted an afro, so I permed my hair and wore it really big!

96


“I’m all about comfort when I’m at home,” she says as my eyes scan her walk-in-closet in amazement. Her pile of denim sits comfortably on two shelves, her blouses and dresses hang side by side with a noticeable theme of groovy prints, and her floor is lined with boots and wedges that scream eclecticism. The first thing she reveals is a mini-dress with a lime green fur trim. Totally random, yes, but she immediately sells the idea of the funky dress that hangs amongst more everyday pieces, and the delight on her face while doing so proves that her obsession with fashion is nothing less than real. Sara, not a person to play it safe, has an incredible ability to mix prints, as she describes the looks that an average person would not put together. She has no problem wearing boots in the no-less-than-70degree weather in Jamaica, and always purchases fashion items that are versatile enough to be worn in many different ways. For example, she shows a dress created by a young designer from Tel-Aviv, which can also be worn as a top, with options of wrapping the long

WHO IS SARA CHANG? Sara is a certified Integral Life Coach from New Ventures West and is a 200 hour RYT. Integral coaching encompasses an approach to working with individuals around developing presence, cultivating awareness and practicing gratitude and compassion. It also includes developing an understanding of what is happening within your thoughts, your heart and your body. For more information, follow Sara on Twitter: @serlifestyle

97


straps of fabric attached. She is any girl jealous as they hang like also a big fan of up-cycling, which art on her walls, or rest elegantly explains the large number of tops on her armoire. Her collectors she discovered in London, made items include jewellery made by from colourful printed vintage her favourite designer, Anna Ruth scarves. “I think of all my clothing as a canvas and my accessories are

Henriques, whose pieces consist of awe-inspiring pearls and golden spiders with tiny diamonds.

the details on the painting,” she One may question where this says, as we delve into a plethora love affair with fashion began. of hats, scarves, handbags, and There is no distinct time, but it’s glasses that she later reveals in obvious Sara had style in her the depths of her closet. Her bones from the day she was born. jewellery collection would make Living in a small town with only 98


Walmart and thrift stores, she had no choice but to be creative, which explains her collection of cool halter tops and a leather pouch she made herself! In college she dressed more conservatively in order to fit in, but luckily for us, she broke out of that mould pretty quickly. “I realized the frat boys probably wouldn’t show interest anyway,” she expresses. Her travels later opened up a whole new world of access to any and everything, where she continually supported local designers, markets and small boutiques and of course the innovative, always drool-worthy store, Anthropologie. To put it simply, this girl after my own heart, loves to shop and mix pieces that she collects wherever she goes. With a lust for travel, an eye for out-of-the-box fashion and a die-hard love for accessories, Sara is far from anything considered normal…in a good way of course. Her eclectic style shines in any room she enters and her fun-loving personality captivates the cool kids. The love she has for it all is not ordinary – it is inspiring. She describes her style as sophisticated with edge, I say… it’s incredibly awesome! M

Sara’s style incorporates versatile yet comfy clothing, quirky hats, funky shoes and lots of drool-worthy jewellery.


SARA’S STYLE FILE TRAVEL ESSENTIALS—Large tote from Cynthia Vincent, carries my laptop, sweater, books and magazines; Dermalogica skin care line; Scarves, hats and boots. STYLE INSPIRATION—Coco Chanel, Audrey Hepburn, Lady Gaga. DENIM YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT—My Paige denim jeans. YOUR HOME UNIFORM— Hardtail yoga and lounge wear. YOGA/LIFE COACHING INSPIRATION—The biggest sense of freedom you will find is when you are present to right now.


D R A W R O F Styling by Arnold Milfort Photography by Wade Rhoden

窶認ASHION TRENDS DICTATED FOR SPRING 2015 INCLUDE vibrant fluorescent colours, aztec tribal prints and bold jewelry to make a statement. Face forward with your looks this season by experimenting and mixing various colours and textures to create a cohesive ensemble that will show off your style sense and personality. M

102


D

Top, C Luce; High waist panty, boots and accessories, Stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own. Model Krista White.


Opposite page: Jumpsuit, Korto Momolu; Necklace, Lisa Freede; Clutch, bangles and rings, Available at Kerry manwomanhome. This Page: Pants, Alice and Tixie; Necklaces, Lisa Freede; Shoes, Stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own.

105


Top, Vintage; Shorts, Jaryn K; Sandals, LAMB; Accessories, Available at Kerry manwomanhome.


Photography provided by Simone Samuels


ELEMENTS

F WHIMSY A YOUNG JAMAICAN DESIGNER MAKES HER DEBUT

Words by Walter Greene

—WHEN THE ART INSTITUTE OF NEW YORK PREMIERED THEIR Fall 2014 outstanding students collection, during New York Fashion Week, at the Lincoln Center, the only Caribbean designer among the group of thirteen who showcased their work, was talented Simone Young, an enterprising young Jamaican designer, who’s got her eyes on a bright future as an international design talent to reckon with. INFLUENCE AND INSPIRATION A first year student in fashion design, Simone said she was influenced by her mother and grandmother, Shirley Samuels who was a designer in her own right. However, once Simone’s creations hit the catwalk, it became obvious that her other design inspiration was international Japanese designer Issey Miyake. A black pleated bubble top with sheer striped 109


From left: Simone takes her final walk; Looks from her Fall 2014 collection shown at New York Fashion Week.

`peg-legged’ pants, and a micro mini coat dress with a yellow and black pleated ombre scarf, were among Simone’s standout catwalk looks. Miyake’s signature pleats served as a nucleus for Simone’s colourful ombre pleated silk dress shown with a custom made neck-piece. Also, her long pleated jacket over slim pants and her black and purple dress with a netted cowl neckline, brought a fresh, new approach to Miyake’s legendary manipulation of pleats. METAMORPHOSIS Sitting with Simone backstage before the show, the demure designer offered: “The collection is called ‘Metamorphosis’ and it’s inspired by the transition of a chrysalis into a butterfly. It also reflects my life, because I’ve been through many changes—the passing of my Mom and Grandmother, and coming to New York to find myself. The best stage was finding the Art Institute and I pretty much blossomed as a butterfly. The whole collection is very organic. My love of nature relates to the slow but inevitable change into the beautiful butterfly, which I then translated into the design and fabrication of the looks.” 110


FASHIONABLE FAVOURITES Apart from Issey Miyake, Simone loves the work of designers; Iris Van Arpen, Alexander McQueen and Zac Posen. “I haven’t seen any shows. If I were to see one show it would be Zac Posen....and Issey Miyake, but, my style icon is Grace Jones. I also love Trinidadian designer and Project Runway winner Anya Ayoung-Chee. I was blown away by her.” M 111


Ruffled onesie, Vain Glory; Bikini top and visor, Drenna Luna; Accessories, Available at Kerry manwomanhome; Shoes, BCBG MAXAZARIA


TRAVEL

beach, CHIC

INDULGE IN THIS SEASON’S ULTIMATE ACCESSORIES

—NO MATTER THE SEASON, ACCESSORIES ARE THE BACKBONE of any look within our personal closets and travel cases. Seasoned minimalist jet-setters know that having versatile accessories is not only practical but it’s also the best way to stay within our confined luggage weight limits. The key is to select pieces that can go from sunny beach days to sunset evenings no matter the tropical destination. So get ready to fly with this season’s hottest and most sought after accessories. M

Creative Direction & Styling by Fidge Fletcher Photography by Marvin Bartley 114


Model Kerrie Baylis Makeup Artist Sue-Ann Gregg


PREVIOUS PAGE: Jacket, Naaem Khan from The Style Factor; Shoes, Hervé Léger; High-rise swim suit bottom, Drenna Luna; Hat and belt used as a top, Vain Glory. THIS PAGE: Bikini and cover up, Drenna Luna; Clutch, Hervé Léger; Accessories, Available at Kerry manwomanhome.


OPPOSITE PAGE: Beach dress, Vain Glory; Black bikini, Drenna Luna; Accessories, Available at Kerry Man Woman Home. THIS PAGE: Bikini bottom, ruffled head piece worn as top, sun visor; Vain Glory; Accessories, Available at Kerry manwomanhome


THE BOLD&

THE TAILORED TAKE A WALK THROUGH THE WORLD OF THE INNOVATIVE AND INSPIRING MENSWEAR DESIGNER ANDRE ROWE.

—Why did you decide to become a fashion designer?

As a child I was always drawing and very excited about celebrities on the red carpet. I remember always being excited about John Galliano’s work for the House of Dior and wanting to be like him someday. However, as I grew into the idea of becoming a fashion designer, it was even more clear that this was my path. —What are your favourite materials to work with? As an avant garde designer I enjoy working with unconventional materials such as glass and paper, but in reality, the average man and woman can’t or don’t wear these everyday. However, I enjoy working with high quality cottons and sometimes I throw in a bit of transparent fabric into the mix. —What’s the inspiration behind your collection for MoDA? The always fashionable men who grace the Parisian streets with their high street styles, will serve as an inspiration for this collection. While developing the colour pallete I was having a bag of Soldanza chips and I was instantly inspired by the colours on the wrapper (gold and green). In the end the colour inspiration became a part of the paint splatter print for my collection. Lastly, I wanted to show the versatility of a 121


menswear collection in keeping with my fashion philosophy, “Be bold and make it wearable”. —What is your favourite part of being a designer? As a fashion designer for 7 years and still growing, nothing brings more satisfaction than seeing your finished work on a client and the smile on their face in my clothing. It also exceeds my expectations to see my work in the papers and on television, as it motivates me as a young entrepreneur. —What business expertise would you give to emerging designers? It’s not a cake walk being a fashion designer. It requires focus and the ability to create a niche/target market. We all want to design for everyone but in reality we have to find our strengths and capitalize on that, because that’s how you’ll be remembered. Lastly designing is just one aspect of the business. One should seek to educate themselves on the whole operation which includes marketing, accounting and the list goes on. —What are your plans for the future? I plan to position myself further in this competitive industry. I have already taken a piece of the pie and I am building on that slice for my business. I enjoy what I am doing as a designer and the contribution I am making to the local fashion industry, so it will only get better from here. M

It requires focus... we all want to design for everyone but in reality we have to find our strengths and capitalize on that. 122


Photography by Wade Rhoden


THE COLLECTION MoDA

PRODUCTION TEAM

MAKE UP S H A R O N W I N T F O R F A C E F O R WA R D HAIR L I SA Mc K I N TOS H FO R H O U S E O F N E A H L I S CAMERA CREW K R Y S TA L C L E A R P R O D U C T I O N S S TA G E A N D L I G H T I N G S TA R L I G H T P R O D U C T I O N S DECOR TA I F L O R A SOCIAL MEDIA S A N D O R PA N TO N


N OV E M B E R 2 0 — 2 3 , 2 0 1 4 w w w.t h e c o l l e c t i o n m o d a . c o m


O N B E H A L F O F T H E C O L L E C T I O N M o DA T E A M W E WO U L D L I K E TO G I V E A B I G

Thank You TO A L L O U R S P O N S O R S .

T H I S P R O J E C T W O U L D N ’ T H AV E B E E N A S U C C E S S W I T H O U T YO U !


MoDA MAGAZINE  

The life & style publication from The Collection MoDA, showcasing today's fashion, design, music, food and art. Issue.2

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