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REVIVED SABAH MASTERS RETURNS ON THE ASEAN PGA TOUR FROM NOVEMBER 3 - 6 PG.10

VOL 3 OCTOBER 2011

ADVANCED PERFORMANCE WITH FEEL 712 series

SPOTLIGHT

EXCLUSIVE!

An interview with Callaway's Leighton Richards


TIS THE SEASON TO TURN PRO Starting as a rookie golf journalist just a few years back, one of my favourite questions to ask top amateurs was “When are you turning pro?” Back then, it seemed like ‘the’ question to ask and obviously, a scoop of sorts if you get the answer that your ears wanted to hear.

THE TEAM Chief Golf Writer Edward Saminathan

A few years on, I cringe each time I hear that question thrown forward, especially when the target is nothing more than a giddy 16 or 17-year-old newbie, who is still getting to terms with what it means to be a winner.

Sub-Editors Lina Abdul Wahab, Khalidah Jamil Evelyn Gan Contributors Justine Moss, Mark Bates, Normas Yakin, Richard Fellner, Scott Kramer, Shaun Moulds

I was rather surprised and pleasantly so, I must say to hear twotime Asian Amateur Championship winner Hideki Matsuyama categorically deny, not once but twice - any intentions of joining compatriot Ryo Ishikawa in the glitzy world of the Japan Golf Tour until he is done with university.

Official Photographer T. Ravi Chitty

The reason for penning this is that in the last few months, a few amateurs have expressed their intention to turn professional to us at The ClubHouse and asked if we could be of any assistance in putting a good word out there on their behalves, for prospective sponsors and endorsement deals.

Brand Manager B.N. Murali Art Director Siva Yoham Jalaguvalan Operations Associate Puteri Nadia Azman The ClubHouse Magazine is published by

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While we have listened to such requests and faithfully done our bit, it is nonetheless something that has troubled our conscience quite a bit and sparked numerous debates in the office and through emails with some of the top coaches in the country. It continues to baffle me why, many of these young and talented amateurs, who are still green between their ears, forsake the opportunity to continue their studies and earn a piece of qualification for the unpredictable and struggling life as a journeyman professional. Yes, some of them are admittedly not academically inclined, but the question still remains: what if you don’t have what it takes to make it or suffer a serious career-ending injury? What is there for you then? The lure of money, having participated in the burgeoning domestic tour and finishing credibly, has given the impression to many of our amateurs that they can make a stable living as a professional. A commonly cited example is Mohd Iylia Jamil, the former national player who won on his professional debut in Kinrara earlier this year. I have had the opportunity to speak to the charming 21-year-old on many occasions this year and while he has been raking in some consistent results, he will be the first to admit that life on tour can be topsy turvy and he’s much thankful to the stabilising influence of his mother and brother Hanafiah Jamil, also a professional. The fact is, and he mentioned it, that as a rookie professional, he has had to rough it out on more than a few occasions. Individuals such as Iylia or even for the matter fact, Lexi Thompson, Matteo Manassero and Tom Lewis are exceptions in the play-for-pay ranks. For every single youngster who has made it big, there is another bunch of talented young golf player struggling to make halfway cuts, finding it hard to pay the bills and make ends meet. One only has to look at Lee Slattery and Bryce Molder for the perfect examples, both notching their first professional victories in their 183rd and 132nd Tour starts respectively. I have no doubts that the young men who have talked to me will excel in the paid ranks if they put in consummated effort they have done in the past to become very good amateurs. However, the hard truth is, they are going to need more than a just steely mind frame, if they even have one - to get through the rocky few years of life as a touring professional. Edward Saminathan Chief Golf Writer news@theclubhouse.com.my

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FEATURES 8 MALAYSIAN GOLF ASSOCIATION 18 ENTREPRONEUR

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ON THE COVER SPOTLIGHT 4 SIME DARBY LPGA MALAYSIA 6 ASIAN AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP 20 EQUIPMENT FEATURE TITLEIST 712 SERIES

REGULARS 9 INSIDE THE ROPES 13 MY JUNIORS 15 INDUSTRY TALK 16 AROUND THE GLOBE 19 IN THE BAG 36 TEE BOX 38 GOLF DIARY 39 WHERE TO GOLF 40 SUBSCRIPTION COLUMNS 29 COVERING CARLSBAD BY SCOTT KRAMER 30 GOLFING TALES FROM THE LION CITY BY JUSTINE MOSS 31 UNCHARTED COURSE WITH NORMAS YAKIN 32 GOLF DOWN UNDER WITH RICHARD FELLNER 33 A TEACHER’S TALE BY BRADFORD WALTERHOUSE 34 TOUR WATCH WITH ASIAN TOUR 35 THE RIGHT FIT WITH TITLEIST


With StaSof


SPOTLIGHT

NA YEON NAILS IT © IMG

Korean sensation Na Yeon Choi holds off marauding Yani Tseng to triumph at second edition of the Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia

C

oming into the US$1.9 million tournament on the back of tasting a last gasp defeat in the hands of the world number one Yani Tseng on home turf, South Korea’s Na Yeon Choi was in the mood for payback and exalted sweet revenge over her good friend cum arch rival with an unswerving display of steeliness and precise play at the East Course of Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club.

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© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

Entering the final round with a one stroke advantage after rounds of 66, 68 and 67, the 23-year-old Korean suffered an early setback when she double-bogeyed the second after taking a drink. Birdies on holes six and eight and two more on the back nine soon drove her back to the top of the leaderboard, where she had a familiar name alongside her. Choi broke the deadlock on the 17th when she hit her tee shot to approximately five feet off the pin for a birdie opportunity, which she successfully drained to improve to -15. With Tseng unable to convert her own 12-foot birdie putt on the last, Choi had the luxury of two putts for par to close with a 68 and claim her career fifth LPGA crown. Fittingly, it was the 100th victory by a player of Korean descent on the LPGA Tour.

LEADING FINAL SCORES: -15 N Y CHOI (KOR) 66-68-67-68 -14 Y TSENG (TPE) 69-67-69-65 -13 A MUNOZ (ESP) 67-68-68-69 -10 PAK S R (KOR)


SPOTLIGHT

The swashbuckling Azahara Munoz threatened to steal the limelight from the more fancied players in the field for much of the week but failed to turn the screw at the crucial moments . She was outdone by a couple of missed birdie chances, her conservative choice of shots on the final day perhaps her only undoing. Nonetheless, the best finish of the year for the Spanish señorita.

For long, Brittany Lang seemed to be on course to end her five-year long search for a maiden LPGA victory. The 36-hole leader was just one shot off Choi coming into the final round and a flawless run through the front nine meant that she was ahead of the pack at the turn. Then disaster struck, a string of dropped shots in four holes including a double bogey on the 16th after a trip to the cart path, saw her slip out of contention and pretty much inconsolable.

© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

With six LPGA titles to her name this season and gunning for her ninth win in 2011, Yani Tseng was all fired up to continue her winning run in Kuala Lumpur. Despite carding four sub-70s rounds, the top ranked favourite was left undone by one stroke at the end. When asked if she would have done anything different, she explained that she should have played more aggressively in the early rounds, as if they were her last.

The veteran Korean Pak Se Ri did not let her ardent Malaysian fans down, turning back the clock with an show-stopping third round of 65, highlighted by a whooping seven birdies against a bogey. It left her four strokes off the lead but a mixed back nine on the final day meant she failed to make the final push.

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© IMG

© IMG

© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

The biggest mover on the final day was Angela Stanford, who managed seven birdies to haul herself up the leaderboard. The only pity she bogeyed the final hole, just as Anna Nordqvist had done in the third round, to tie the course record of 65.

A third day 72 meant that halfway co-leader Stacy Lewis had to pull out something special on the final day but the 23-year-old failed to produce the same form which saw her card a superb 65 on the second day.

The local cheer was led by amateur Kelly Tan, who tied for 65th on 13-over 297 with a fourth round score of twoover 73 to finish as the top amateur of the tournament for the second year running. The 17-year-old student at IMG Leadbetter Academy in Florida was also the leading Malaysian in the field.

72-68-65-69 -9, S LEWIS (USA) 68-65-72-70, B LANG (USA) 66-67-69-73 -7 A STANFORD (USA) 71-71-68-67, S PETTERSEN (NOR) 68-69-69-71


NO MONKEYING AROUND Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama claims second visit to Augusta National with explosive display at third Asian Amateur Championship 6

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he ClubHouse team spent a weekend in the Lion City for the third edition of the Asian Amateur Championship at the Singapore Island Country Club from September 30 to October 2. Edward Saminathan summarises the top ten highlights of the week.

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THE FALDO FACTOR

It is always a privilege to have a Major winner in the house. Which better person to grace the occasion, other than triple Masters and Open champion Sir Nick Faldo. A guest of the tournament, following in the footsteps of Gary Player in 2008 and Ryo Ishikawa last year, Faldo gave an inspirational speech to players and officials during a private dinner, much to the delight of golfers from smaller and lesser-known countries.

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THE CLUB

Considered the most challenging 18 of SICC’s 81 holes, the 6391-metre New Course which was carved out of the virgin rainforest that flanks the Peirce Reservoir proved both a physical and mental test for the participants. If not for the sheer grit of hardworking

golf journalist, who found himself panting for breath after tracking just nine holes of the naturally undulating layout, which was remodelled by Peter Thompson in the late 90s. While slightly wide, the course proved a tad long for some of the more unaccomplished players and a trip to penal thick rough was not advisable.


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THE MONKEYS

It was quite a sight to saunter out of the media centre at 5pm one evening and to see hundreds of tiny brown dots on the fairway of the 18th. On closer examination, it proved to be large troop of monkeys, enjoying a late afternoon picnic in the sun! For the next few days while walking through the course, I held on tightly to my knapsack each time I heard a ruffle in the trees.

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THE HOSPITALITY

A privilege that even some of the leading Asian professionals take some time getting used to, all 120 participants were housed at the five-star Ritz-Carlton, Millenia Singapore. And just in case they did get bored with all the amenities on offer in their rooms, a mini-Games village with ping pong tables, PlayStations, iMacs as well as board and card games was set-up. Players who failed to make the weekend were surprised with complimentary day entry into the Universal Studios - with pocket money to boot!

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THE MALAYSIAN LADS

Six of our talented amateurs were among the record field from 35 Asia Pacific Golf Confederation (APGC) member countries and there was plenty to cheer about despite only the trio of Kenneth De Silva, Low Khai Jei and Paul San Weng Yau, who barely survived the halfway cut, which came at six-over 150.

OUTSIDE THE ROPES

Kenneth provided much of the early fireworks, going out second last on Saturday after opening rounds of 67 and 69, but the occasion once again got to him, as the 21-year-old struggling to a 73 in Round 3 before closing with a disappointing 76 on the final day for a three-under total and a share of 17th placing.

New Zealander Ben Campbell, who was the 54-hole leader, slipped behind Matsuyama after a double bogey on the second but stayed in touch with a battling 70, including two late birdies on the 16th and17th, to take third place at 16-under.

THE CHAMPION

Arriving in Singapore as the reigning champion and pre-tournament favourite, Hideki Matsuyama made sure of his return trip to Georgia next year with another exquisite display of his all-round prowess, which had seen him lift the Silver Cup at the Masters earlier this year. After lurking behind the early leaders, the 19-year-old student of Tohoku Fukushi University made his move on Saturday - just has he had done a year back in Kasumigaseki Country Club - draining seven birdies in a blemish free round 65 to head into the final round one-shot behind Campbell.

In the end, it was 15-year-old Khai Jei, who stole the limelight. He closed with a fine round of three-under 69 for a respectable four-day total of six-under 282 in his debut at Asia’s premier amateur event. It left him in a tied for 12th and the distinction as the best placed Malaysian in the field.

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With officials from around Asia in presence, it was indeed heartening to see a couple of Malaysian rules official on duty during the four-day tournament. In the words of Johorean C.C. Boo, “It was a very engaging and informative week, filled with great experience and new friendships.” It was also not surprising that many of the world’s top equipment makers as well as colleges and universities had sent their scouts, to keep an eye on stars already under their belts as well as unearth some new talents.

tournament - an eight-under 68 - mixing nine birdies with a single bogey to just fall a stroke short of eventual winner Hideki Matsuyama of Japan.

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THE ORGANISATION

The good folks at Augusta National Golf Club and Royal & Ancient sure know how to put on a show and they left no stones unturned in ensuring that the stage was set for Asia’s top amateurs to put on a great display of golfing excellence. In view of their heavy investment in the event, it was not surprising, perhaps to see William Porter Payne, the chairman of Augusta National and his counterpart Allan Gormly of the R&A in the galleries daily.

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THE PRETENDERS

Korean Lee Soo-min had the scant consolation of a start at the The Open Championship International Final Qualifying Asia after finishing second in the tournament with a four-day total of 17-under 27. Lee, who got the tournament to a great start with a first round 65 to lead by two, endured two quiet days in between before storming into contention with the lowest round of the

The lanky Japanese was never behind after the first hole of the final round but kept the marauding Lee at bay with a bogey-less closing round of 67 to stamp his mark on the tournament for the second year running.

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THE 2012 VENUE

The Asian Amateur Championship will remain in South East Asia next year, making the short trip to Amata Spring Country Club outside of Bangkok for the fourth edition of the marquee event from November 1-4. With Matsuyama already confirming his intention to remain as an amateur for a wee bit till he’s done with university, there’s no doubt that the latest golfing sensation in the making of Japan will be eyeing a third crown.

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MALAYSIAN GOLF ASSOCIATION

Baldwin to chart Malaysia’s fortunes in Jakarta

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ormer Singapore national coach Kim Baldwin has been appointed as the interim high performance coach for the national team to the 26th South East Asian (SEA) Games in Jakarta next month. Baldwin's appointment is in line with the Malaysian Golf Association's (MGA) target to end its decade long gold medal drought at the biennial Games.

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Malaysia last struck gold in the 2001 edition in Kuala Lumpur when the men’s quartet of Airil Rizman Zahari, S. Sivachandhran, Mohd Shaaban Hussin and Sahal Saedin won the team competition at the Sungai Long Golf and Country Club. In a sign of times, the national squad for the SEA Games was finalised after joint consultation between the MGA and the Malaysian Ladies Golf Association (MALGA), with MGA executive committee member Captain (R) Sharuddin Sharif and

MALGA executive director Dato’ Rabeahtul Aloya Abbas appointed as joint captains for the team. The men’s team for the SEA Games will comprise of US-based player Arie Fauzi, Kenneth De Silva, Low Khai Jei and Abel Tam. Meanwhile, the ladies team will be captained by Kelly Tan, who was a double bronze medallist at the Laos Sea Games in 2009, as well as Malaysian Amateur Open winner Aretha Pan and seasoned junior Nur Durriyah Damian. Baldwin is optimistic that he can whip the team into a winning force shape, despite having little less than a month to work with the players. “Having had the privilege to witness Malaysia’s performances from the other side of the halfway line for a couple of years now, I feel that the team has just not got over the line at the crucial moments during a tournament.

Ahmad Zahir the toast in Terengganu

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consistent three-day display saw Ahmad Zahir Abdul Ghani emerge the gross champion of the ninth Terengganu Amateur Open held from September 23 to 25 at Kuala Terengganu Golf Resort. The two-handicapper from Royal Pahang Golf Club carded rounds of 72, 74 and 72 for a 218 total, four strokes ahead of scratch handicapper Mohd Azri Asyraf Noor Azam. National player Mohd Afif Mohd Razif was third on 223. In the nett division, Adnan Md Amin (10) managed a three-day total of 196 to claim the title, followed by Mohamad Awang in second place on 205 dan second runner-up Shahrul Jusoh who totalled 206. Organised by the Terengganu Golf Association, the event saw 81 players comprising of national junior players, the Terengganu state Sukma team as well as golfers from across the East Coast in action.

"There is no want for talent here but I feel Malaysia has underperformed and hopefully, I can take these players out of their comfort zones and into the next level ahead of the tournament,” said Baldwin during the flag presentation ceremony to the squad at Saujana Golf & Country Club on October 9. MGA aims to deliver two gold medals during the golf event, which will be held at Jagorawi Golf & Country Club in Bogor from November 15-18. “In Kelly, we definitely have a potential gold medal while the men’s team has a good mix of experience and exuberance to deliver the goods. We have left no stones unturned with his preparations of the players for the SEA Games, which includes two training stints at Jagorawi and the special appointment of Kim to oversee the squad’s final preparations ahead of the tournament," said MGA vice president and national team committee deputy chairman Low Teck San.

Kelly crowned Johor sportswoman of 2010

R

ising star Kelly Tan Guat Chen was crowned the Johor Sportswomen of 2010 during the Johor Sports Award Night on September 27. The 18-year-old US based golfer beat four other talented sportswomen from the state based to receive RM5,000 in cash, trophy, blazer and plague. Last year, Kelly steered Johor to a two-gold haul during the Malaysian Games (SUKMA) in Melaka as well as taking the gold medals at the national schools and ASEAN schools meets. She was also the best-placed amateur in Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia 2010, finishing tied 32nd.


INSIDE THE ROPES

Seventh heaven for Guido

G

uido Van Der Valk capped a sensational return of form by ending a seven-year winless run with a marvellous seven-shot victory at the PGM-MIDF-KLGCC Classic.

© Khalid Redza / Asian Tour

The 31-year-old was the favourite for the win after a stunning 67 during the third round at the Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club’s West Course - which was the only score in the 60s all week. All that despite closing with a one-over-par 73, held on comfortably for a seven-stroke victory in the RM200, 000 (approximately US$66,000) tournament organised by the Professional Golf of Malaysia (PGM) Tour, with the support of the Malaysian Industrial Development Finance Berhad (MIDF). Filipino Gerald Rosales failed to mount a challenge as he settled for second place in what was also the eighth and final leg of the 2011 Asian Development Tour season, closing with a 73 for a level par 288 total. Van Der Valk was clearly elated with what was his career fifth title but his first since winning the Dutch PGA Championship in 2004. He accumulated a four-day total of seven-under-par 281. “It’s been a good week. Today was a struggle as I did not hit the balls that well off the tees but I managed to get the job done and that was the most important thing. My overnight lead made it that much easier and I just had to be careful of not falling into the trap of thinking that you’re in the lead and you’re done,” said the Manila-based player, who made up for his early bogeys with a good run mid-round display to earn US$10,594 for his victory. The local failed to impose themselves in tough scoring conditions with Nicholas Fung continuing his own recent run of form,

finishing fifth, signing off with a 77 for a 296 total. Kenneth De Silva was the best placed, who finished with 10-over total 298. With three Asian Tour cards at stake for the top-three finishers of the Asian Development Tour Order of Merit, American Jonathan Moore comfortably finished top of the rankings with US$29, 579 after coming in fourth. Chinese Taipei’s Chiang Chen-Chih took second place with a season haul of US$23,341 but countryman Kao Shanghung had to endure a nervous wait before sealing third spot with US$19,874 when closest rival Takafumi Kawane of Japan failed to secure the top-four finish required to pip Kao for a priceless Asian Tour card.

PGM - MIDF - KLGCC Classic Leading final scores 281 288 289 293 296 297 299 300

Guido Van Der Valk (Hol) 71-70-67-73 Gerald Rosales (Phi) 74-70-71-73 Yosuke Tsukada (Jpn) 72-75-70-72 Jonathan Moore (USA) 74-72-73-74 Nicholas Fung 71-74-74-77 Marlon Dizon (Phi) 73-73-79-72 T.J. Kim (Kor) 76-76-74-73, R. Nachimuthu 75-73-74-77 S. Murthy 75-73-80-72, M. Sasidaran 76-76-73-75, Pawin Ingkhapradit (Tha) 77-70-76-77, S. Sivachandhran 77-73-72-78

Golf Malaysia appointed official media partner of Tour

P

rofessional Golf of Malaysia (PGM) recently inked an agreement with Golf Malaysia Magazine to act as its official Tour media partner.

Under the synergy, the burgeoning PGM Tour will give full access to the magazine in terms of tour coverage and interviews as part of their plans to take Malaysian professional golf to new height. PGM Tour players will also be encouraged to contribute golf tips and articles to the magazine in return. PGM’s general manager Mior Abdul Rahman and Golf Malaysia general manager Dato’ Zulkifli Shariff signed the deal, witnessed by Tun Ahmad Sarji Abdul Hamid, who is the Chairman of both entities. In his speech, Ahmad Sarji explained that Golf Malaysia has a stake in promoting the local professional golf scene more tellingly. “This agreement will enable both parties to work together to bring professional golf in Malaysia to a higher level and allow golf to be become a viable career option for youngsters,” he shared.

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INSIDE THE ROPES

Sabah Masters revived after 12-year hiatus

RAPID FIRE with Anis Helmi Hassan

What is your favourite club in the bag? My Ping Tour S wedges (52° & 58°) as they create a lot of spin for my chips.

T

he Sabah Masters will make a long awaited return next month as the season finale of the burgeoning ASEAN PGA Tour. The tournament, which was last played in 1999 at Sutera Harbour Golf & Country Club will make a sentimental return to the same venue from November 3 to 6, boasting a prize purse of US$60,000.

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Great names such as Thailand’s Thaworn Wiratchant have claimed the title in the past and with a strong field playing next month, including some of South East Asia’s rising stars, another great champion’s name could be on the run to be inscribed onto the trophy. With the top seven players from the Tour’s Order of Merit after the Masters qualifying for the following week’s US$6 million Barclays Singapore Open, it promises to be a thrilling week of golf in the Land below the Wind. Sabah Tourism Board has paved the way for the tournament’s revival with handsome sponsorship and is seeing the event as an ideal way to promote Kota Kinabalu and Sabah as a tourist destination. “Sabah Tourism Board are thrilled to be supporting the Sabah Masters for the next three years. The tournament has in the past, played an important role in our tourism industry and will now continue to do so in the future. Sabah has some fine golf courses and of course some of the country’s top golfers and it was therefore a unanimous decision to see the tournament played once again,” said Datuk Masidi Manjun, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Environment Sabah. The last winner of the event was American Robert Huxtable, who triumphed in 1999 when Sutera Harbour received rave reviews from players and golf fans alike. Designed by leading golf course designer Graham Marsh, Sutera Harbour Golf & Country Club boasts 27 holes for day and night golfing and has garnered various awards of distinction.

Who is your favourite golfer? Louis Ooosthuizen - not because he is another Ping player but I admire the way he hits miles despite having such a soft swing. What is your dream car? Has always been an Audi TT If you were not a professional golfer, what would you be? I think I have a decent chance of making it as recording artiste. What song currently plays heavy on your Shuffle? P.Diddy’s I Need a Girl Part 2 Your best mate on tour. Nicholas Fung. We started travelling together since he turned pro last year and it sort of stuck. What do you do to calm yourself when you are playing? Put a song in my head and just hum to it. Winning on your professional debut? Of course, it does bother me a little that I have not won since joining the paid ranks five years ago but it does not stress me. What motivates to continue doing what you do? Shooting under-par scores consistently and improving my play statistics. Toughest shot you have ever made? Goes way back to my amateur days. I struck a 25-foot downhill birdie putt on the fifth extra hole to claim the Sarawak Amateur Open in 2005. It was a four-way playoff that day at Kelab Golf Sarawak.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for Sutera Harbour to showcase the many treats that it has to offer from its wonderful golf course to its marina and luxurious hotels,” said Brian E. Werner, general manager of Sutera Harbour Golf & Country Club.

Describe your coach in one word: Andrew (Argus) is very precise. We have built a trusty relationship since my days as a national team player.

“The ASEAN PGA Tour has been fortunate to welcome on board some new tournaments since we were inaugurated in 2007 and so it is also extremely rewarding to be able bring back a tournament that has not been played in over a decade. The Sabah Masters was a hugely popular tournament thanks to the delights of Kota Kinabalu and it is with eager anticipation that we await its return,” said Ramlan Haron, executive director of the ASEAN PGA.

If you had RM10 million in the bank now, what would you do? Send my parents for Hajj - they have sacrificed a lot to get me to where I am today.

The ClubHouse is the exclusive media partner for the Sabah Masters 2011.

Toughest part of being a professional: Being disciplined in what you do because there won’t be anyone tell you what to do.


INSIDE THE ROPES

Chia earns Classic start as upcoming PGA Tour stars confirm MINES debut anny Chia will make his debut at the US$6.1 million CIMB Asia Pacific, Malaysia after receiving a sponsor invitation from event title sponsor CIMB Group for being the best-placed Malaysian in the Official World Golf Rankings. The announcement on October 11 ended weeks of speculation on who will tee-off alongside national qualifier champion Shaaban Hussin in the PGA and Asian Tours co-sanctioned event from October 27-30.

“I’ve had a few issues with my game this season, but in the past few weeks things have got better. I am hitting the ball much cleaner than I did earlier this year and

that has given me more confidence,” said Chia, who will be eager to ride on his recent uplift in form and fitness, which saw him bag the Professional Golf of Malaysia (PGM) Clearwater Classic as well as two top-20 finishes on the Asian Tour. “So far as the tournament goes, I am looking forward to it. It will be a good challenge and I hope to put on a good performance. I will certainly do my best,” added Chia, who has consistently over the years, been the best domestic performer at the Malaysian Opens. At press time, five former Major winners have confirmed their appearances for the second edition of the event with Malaysia’s ‘adopted’ son Vijay Singh making his debut

alongside Angel Cabrera, Stewart Cink, Lucas Glover and David Duval. An experienced lineup of multiple Tour winners have also confirmed date with their Malaysian fans later this month including nine time PGA Tour winner Stuart Appleby of Australia, six-time winners Rory Sabbatini and Jonathan Byrd, Mark Wilson (4) and charismatic Colombian Camilo Villegas, thrice a winner on the PGA Tour. Also boosting the line-up is 2011 rookie Tour winners Brendan Steele, Jhonattan Vegas, Chris Kirk and Scott Stallings, who will be hungry to continue their winning momentum at The MINES Resort & Golf Club and bag the champion’s share of US$1.3 million in the no-cut tournament.

Kim, Villegas set light up Iskandar Johor Open

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here are more good news for golf fans down South after the Iskandar Johor Open named youthful PGA Tour duo Anthony Kim and Camilo Villegas as two of their star attractions alongside defending champion Padraig Harrington for the event.

Both Villegas and Kim primarily ply their trade in the United States and their participation will provide an interesting storyline as they go headto-head against some of the top European Tour players as well as the crème of Asian professional golf in the prestigious championship.

© IMG

The fifth edition of the event which returns to Horizon Hills Golf & Country Club from November 17-20 will also offer a fattened prize purse of US$2 million, in line with its status as a co-sanctioned event by both the Asian and European Tours this year. Camilo Villegas

Villegas and Kim will be in the field of 156 players consisting of 67 players each from the Asian and European Tours, eight invites, eight local players and six qualifiers, all vying for the top purse of US$317,000 (approximately RM954,000). In another development, the national qualifier for the eight domestic slots will take place from November 1-2 at the Pulai Springs Golf Resort in Johor.

© IMG

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Chia, who reclaimed his position as the best placed local from Iain Steel after finishing tied 20th at the US$1.7 million Asia Pacific Panasonic Open in Japan on September 25, is cherishing the chance to prove his worth in a star-studded field. This includes five Major winners and a host of proven winners with a combined 114 PGA TOUR victories between them.

© Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

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Anthony Kim © Ravi Chtty / The ClubHouse


MY JUNIORS

Overall champions Muhammad Azry and Dottie

f results from the 100Plus Malaysian Open, which took place from September 13-15 are to be analysed, it is obvious that while Malaysia has depth of talents in the boys’ division, much more needs to be done to unearth new talented girl golfers to take over the mantle from the current set of established players in the future. While the Malaysian boys had a clean sweep of all four titles on offer in the boys’ division, only experienced campaigner Nur Durriyah Damian managed to claim a victory in the girls’ division, winning the girls’ under-16 category during the three-day national junior championship at Saujana Golf & Country Club. India proved the surprise package, with 13-year-old Aditi Ashok leading the subcontinent team to victory in the girls’ under-14 before combining with Indian national junior champion Trishul Chinappa to triumph in the overall team category as well. The Malaysian charge was led by the unsung Muhammad Azry Asyraf Noor Azam. He claimed another big scalp after edging past experienced national amateur Low Khai Jei on the second extra hole to clinch the overall and boys’ under-16 titles. The 16-year-old Kulim lad, who sprung to national prominence after lifting the Perak Amateur Open in June this year, had taken a one-shot lead after the completion of the rain-delayed second round in the morning of the final day. After a jittery start to his final round with a double bogey on the first, Azry composed himself, mixing three birdies against three bogeys to finish regulation play on two-over 74 and level on four-over 220 with Khai Jei, who matched the final round’s best with a closing even-par 72.

With the dark clouds gathering fast and drops of rain falling every now and then, Azry kept his cool to sink a one-foot birdie after a superb approach to the pin on the second play-off hole at the par-five 18th to clinch victory over the Lion City Cup individual champion. A tiring Jeremiah Kim, who suffered cramps on the 13th hole, shared third place with Indonesia’s Joshua Andrew Wirawan on six-over 222.

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Dottie Ardina emerged the third Filipina golfer to claim the girls’ overall title with a total of four-over 220. The 16-year-old from Manila blew up with a poor nine-over 81 today but did enough over the first two days to win the title by four strokes from India’s Aditi Ashok (76). Defending champion Sarah Ababa finished third alongside Malaysia’s Loy Hee Ying with a score of 11-over 227. Results (Malaysian unless stated) Team 301 India (Trishul Chinappa 77-76, Aditi Ashok 73-75) 318 Indonesia (Kow Eiki 75-76, Putri Aisyah Aman 83-84) 336 Taiwan (Min Suhuang 85-85, Tzu Hanchen 85-81) Boys Overall 220 Low Khai Jei 76-72,-72, Muhammad Azry Asyraf Noor Azam 72-74-74 * Azry wins on second play-off hole 222 Joshua Andrew Wirawan (INA) 72-77-73, Jeremiah Kim 69-78-75 223 Paul San 81-70-72 Under-18 222 Jeremiah Kim 69-78-75 227 Trishul Chinappa (IND) 77-76-74 228 Kow Eiki (INA) 75-76-77 Under-16 220 Low Khai Jei 76-72,-72, Muhammad Azry Asyraf Noor Azam 72-74-74 222 Joshua Andrew Wirawan (INA) 72-77-73 223 Paul San 81-70-72 * Azry wins on second play-off hole

© Khalid Redza

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© Khalid Redza

Inspiring performance by boys, work in progress for girls

Under-14 231 Albright Chong 74-77-80 234 Ervin Chang 79-72-83 239 Jordan Jude Tay 83-82-74 Girls Overall 220 Dottie Ardina (PHI) 67-72-81 224 Aditi Ashok (IND) 73-75-76 227 Sarah Ababa (PHI) 76-73-78, Loy Hee Ying 75-74-78 Under-18 220 Dottie Ardina (PHI) 67-72-81 227 Sarah Ababa (PHI) 76-73-78 240 Sheryl Villvencio (PHI) 67-72-81 Under-16 229 Nur Durriyah Damian 72-76-81 235 Sarfina Vinota Seretharan 75-79-81 244 Genevieve Ling 79-85-80 Under-14 224 Aditi Ashok (IND) 73-75-76 227 Loy Hee Ying 75-74-78 233 Xhung Tingtu (TPE) 79-75-79


MY JUNIORS © Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

Joe Thiel touch for local juniors PGA Master professional and Mizuno Master Instructor Joe Thiel recently flew down to Malaysia for a two-day exclusive workshop from September 30 to October 1. The aim was to unlock the true potential of serious junior amateurs in the country. Known for his dedication to the short game and holistic training practices that have led our PGA Tour Professionals and leading amateurs to success, Thiel conducted clinics on three subjects, namely ‘Preparing for Golfing Greatness: The Blueprint to Your Success’, ‘Short Game: Greater ball Control to Gain a Competitive Edge’ and ‘Putting: Mental and Emotional Strategies for Tournament Play’. He also took the opportunity to speak to young golfers and their parents about managing expectations and having a healthy balance between playing golf, studies and their social lives. In a short interview with The ClubHouse during the clinic at Bukit Jalil Golf & Country Resort, Thiel expressed the importance of character building among junior golfers. “Before we talk about creating champions from these young and talented juniors, it is important that we educate them on being good human beings. It’s vital that a young golfer is brought up to respect his or her elders, to respect the game and the other players before we can groom them to be champions.”

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With over 40 years of teaching experience, Thiel also had some choice advice for parents of junior golfers. “Your kids are vulnerable young children, who have limitations as to the pressure and expectations that they can take. Yes, they may be talented individuals with good prospects in the future, but when you lean too much on them, these tender young athletes can crack, lose interest and in the worst case scenario, they pick up bad traits such as indiscipline and cheating, which will lead to their downfall. It is important that parents manage their expectations and allow these kids to reach their potential at their own pace and enjoy playing golf.”

Ball Of A Time During Snag It Challenge At CITYGOLF

STARS OF TOMORROW

Amir Nazrin Jailani (Seri Selangor GC) - 14 years old How old were you when you started golfing? I started playing golf when I was seven years old. I had watched Tiger Woods on Golf Channel and told my parents that I wanted to play golf. Do your parents play golf? At first, no one else in family played golf except me but my dad eventually picked it up. Today, he’s always up for a contest with me on the golf course. Do you remember your first competitive event? Yes, it was a leg of the SportExcel National Junior Golf Circuit. I was nine going ten then and I remember that I shot a 105 on that day. Who is your coach and describe your relationship with her? I have been coaching with Ng Mei Yee of Kidz@Golf since I was nine. She’s good with kids and while she is a serious coach, she injects a lot of fun into training. Best golfing memories so far. I managed a hole-in-one at Clearwater Sanctuary Resort in Perak during the practice round of a SportExcel leg there. It came on the par-three 11th. Do you follow any special diet regime? I drink goat’s milk and take protein supplements daily. My mom says it will help me grow taller faster! How do you juggle the demands of school and golf? I miss a lot of school days because of tournaments but I make up by attending tuition classes. What is your motivation to succeed in golf? I want to become a successful professional and take good care of my parents with the money I earn in future. What would you say are your strengths and weakness on the course? I’m happy with my driving and ironplay but I would like to work on the accuracy of my short game.

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hirty children participated in the 8th Kidz@Golf Carnival, held on October 9 at CityGolf in Bangsar. It proved a fun competition, with many of the young golfers getting a taste of indoor golf for the first time. In Category A, Lee KeXin emerged as the champion with a score on -7, five strokes ahead of runner-up Christian Bartley. Fomin Aleksandr was third with even par. In Category B, Hannah Muhd Nasir emerged as the champion with a score of +5 ahead of joint runner-ups Rania and Sarivin Ponnusamy, who recorded +7.

What lessons have golf thought you? Not to be greedy and to leave your ego at the clubhouse before you hit the fairways, because golf is a humbling game. If you do not become a golfer, what is your ambition? I would like to become an automotive engineer and design cars. Why do you like golf? I like golf because golf is a game for strong-minded players. You have to be always positive if you want to excel. Who’s your toughest rival on the course? Ervin Chang as he always pushes me to my limits. I like to play with him.


INDUSTRY TALK

New banking partner for RSGC

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inancial services provider AmBank Group recently inked an agreement with the Royal Selangor Golf Club (RSGC) to act as the official banking partner of the premier members club.

Under the five-year agreement worth an estimated RM550,000 annually, AmBank will receive branding right and exposure within the club premises while on their part, RSGC will not only bank exclusively with AmBank but also explore co-branding opportunities with the bank for the benefit of their members. Revenue raised from the agreement will be channelled towards the formation of a

Rahman Putra F&B team nets FHM Culinaire medal

new junior golf centre at the club. Present to sign the agreement was AmBank chairman Tan Sri Azman Hashim and RSGC president Admiral (R) Tan Sri Dato’ Sri Mohd Anwar Mohd Nor. “We are delighted to come onboard as the official bank for the RSGC as it is a well-known and reputable club situated in the heart of Kuala Lumpur. Its members are the who’s who in town - the captains of industries, professionals and key decision makers - from the local and international business community,” said Azman, who is also a member of the club.

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he F&B team of Kelab Rahman Putra Malaysia led by executive chef Simon Lee recently picked up the silver medal at Food Hotel Malaysia (FHM) Culinaire 2011. The only golf club team amongst the hotel and restaurant representatives, the team finished second behind The Westin Kuala Lumpur in the Nyonya Food Heritage competition. The Paya Serai team from Hilton Petaling Jaya came in third.

The teams were judged by a panel of 6 judges, which included Peranakan culinary experts Florence Tan, Amy Beh and Helen Ong. Chef Lee, who has over 35 years experience, said the team took two months to prepare for the competition. “We had to prepare 13 types of dishes from appetisers to desserts within two hours during the competition. Next year, we hope to go for the gold,” he said.

KLGCC driving range set to be one-stop golf hub

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ON THE MOVE

he Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club driving range complex is currently undergoing a transformation of sorts with

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an ongoing upgrading exercise to meet the growing needs of discerning golfers.

tiers. Members will continue to enjoy exclusive usage of the middle tier.

The club’s management is working in tandem with MST Golf with each of the 78 bays being upgraded with a revamp of the automated ball dispensers, new high quality mats and balls and a more user friendly card swipe system. Each bay will also have built-in tables and chairs for a relaxed dining experience via a new unique bay waiter service with golfers no longer required to pay the RM10 entry fee for usage of the upper and lower range

On top of the existing MST Golf pro shop, MST Golf Tech fitting studio, the KLGCC Golf Academy as well as the allday dining R&R Cafe, golfers will soon be able to utilise a new sports clinic concept by Sime Darby Medical Centre, aptly named Dr Golf. This facility is being structured to cater for sports injuries and recuperation plus preventative medicine techniques for golfers.

arroul Hossey Abdullah has joined Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club as their Asst VP 2 - Golf & Sports. The American-trained golf professional was previously attached with two top clubs in Selangor and Johor.

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randSlam Golf has appointed Edwin Check as their new general manager with effect from October 1. Bringing a wealth of experience with him, he will head the expansion of the Cobra and Puma brands.

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AROUND THE GLOBE

Tseng beats Choi and partisan Korean crowd to Hana Bank title

Thompson sets another career milestone

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op-ranked Yani Tseng won the LPGA Hana Bank Championship on October 9 for her sixth LPGA Tour victory of the season and ninth overall title of the year., She shooting shot a final round of fiveunder 67 to edge two-time defending champion Na Yeon Choi by a stroke. The 22-year-old Taiwanese star finished at 14-under 202 on the Sky 72 Golf Club’s Ocean Course in Incheon. Brittany Lincicome (66), Jamin Jang (68) and halfway leader Soo-Jin Yang (71) tied for third at 11 under. “It was very tough out there,” Tseng said. “Na Yeon was playing so good well today. She made two birdies in a row and I missed the birdie putt. I really enjoyed it out there. It’s not easy. I tried to focus on every shot, every hole.”

Wei-chih edges ahead to home title 16

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ot for the first time in her life, Lexi Thompson entered the record books - this time as the youngestever winner of a LPGA tournament. The 16-year-old high school junior closed with a final-round two-under-par 70 to seal a five-stroke victory in the Navistar LPGA Classic on September 18. Thompson carded rounds of 66, 68, 67 and 70 to finish at 17-under 271 at the Robert Trent Jones Trail’s Capitol Hill course in Alabama. Tour rookie Tiffany Joh (68) earned her highest career finish by winding up in second, with Angela Stanford (66) in third.

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hinese Taipei’s Lu Wei-chih had a crucial birdie on the closing hole to thank after it gave him his second Asian Tour title at the Yeangder Tournament Players Championship (TPC) on October 9. Wei-chih posted a final round three-underpar 69 for a four-day total of five-under-par 283 to deny compatriot Lu Wen-teh his sixth Tour win as well as the opportunity to become the second oldest winner in the Asian Tour history at 48 years and 225 days. Wen-teh closed with a 73 to take second place on 284 while Mars Pucay of the Philippines signed off with a 74 to take third place. Australia’s Adam Groom posted a 72 to share fourth place with Chinese Taipei’s

Lin Wen-tang and Kao Shang-hung on 287 in the US$300,000 full field Asian Tour event. Starting the day five shots off the lead, Weichih made his move quickly with a flawless outward-nine that was highlighted by birdies on holes one, four and nine. He reached the turn in 33 and continued the momentum with another birdie on the par-five 10th at the Linkou International Golf Club. It then turned into a battle of youth verusversus experience as Wei-chih and Wen-teh went head-to-head right up till the closing hole., before Wei-chih sank a decisive birdie from nine-feet to end a personal six-year title drought.

“I was just focusing on playing the golf course and do did the best I could do,” said Thompson, who also holds the record for being the youngest player to qualify for the U.S. Women’s Open when she was 12. “It’s been my dream in my whole life just to play out here. Getting a win right now, I can’t describe the feelings, but it’s the best feeling ever,” she shared. In the aftermath of the victory, Thompson petitioned the LPGA to join the tour fulltime in 2012 without going through Q-School, thereby waiving the 18-yearold age exemption. LPGA commissioner Mike Whan approved the petition on September 30.


AROUND THE GLOBE

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Fowler gets one over McIlroy

ickie Fowler has long had to live with the comparison drawn between him and Rory McIlroy. butHowever, the 22-year-old Fowler put an end to any doubts about his own ability by claiming his professional title at OneAsia’s Kolon Korean Open on October 9.

The 2010 PGA Tour rookie of the year opened with rounds of 67 and 70 and shot a 63 on Saturday. before closing He closed with a three-under 68 for a 16-under total and more importantly, a six-stroke victory over U.S. Open champion McIlroy.

© OneAsia

“It was a lot of fun,” Fowler said. “I played well early earlier on in the final round and then I was comfortable over the last few holes. Overall, I enjoyed the whole week. “It feels great to have the first win. “

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nglishman Lee Slattery overcame a wobbly final round to win the Bankia Madrid Masters on October 9, His double bogey on the final hole was good enough for a one-stroke victory over Lorenzo Gagli of Italy.

South Korea’s Kim Meen-whee (71) was third at 10-under, while compatriot Y.E. Yang (75) followed at five-under.

Slattery hangs on for Madrid breakthrough

Two clear at the start of the final round, the 33-year-old Slattery bogeyed two of his first five holes at El Encin Golf Hotel to hand the initiative to Gagli and Argentine veteran Cesar Monasterio. before Slattery regained control with four birdies in five holes from the 11th.

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“I’ve never shaken so much in my life,” he said. “I just stood over that putt and the hole looked tiny. I was strangling that putter because that one putt is a lifechanging putt.”

© Getty

But tThere was still plenty of drama to come on the 18th as he hit his second on the par five last into a bunker and then pushed his approach into the water to the right of the green. ButHowever, a decent chip left him with two putts from ten feet, and he holed a two footer to secure his breakthrough victory in his 183rd career start.

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A first for Molder

ryce Molder won his first PGA Tour title by outlasting fellow American Briny Baird in a nerve-jangling playoff for the Frys.com Open at CordeValle Golf Club on October 9. Molder sealed victory with a six-foot birdie putt on the sixth extra hole. after Baird could only par after driving into thick rough of the par-four 18th.

© Getty

As his ball disappeared into the cup, Molder dropped his putter to the ground in a mixture of delight and relief before embracing his caddie and shaking hands with Baird. “It’s a little surreal right now,” the 32-year-old American said on greenside in fading light after finally breaking into the winner’s circle on his 132nd PGA Tour start. “A lot of golf today, but it was a lot of fun. You practice practise and you work and everything, and you just hope there is some validation behind it. I got some breaks at the right time today and I am excited.”


The other important thing we adhere to is the front-end information of the product we sell. You can’t sell something well if you don’t know about the product, so we constantly keep ourself updated with the development of the golf industry as a whole.

For over two decades, golf equipment specialists VK Enterprise have been a household name to golfers from all stratum of society - from the ordinary hardcore golfer to members of the royal families of Malaysia. Vinoj Kumar and Anil Kumar share their story of success. When did you start the golf business and where? We set-up the business in 1988 - originally it was just our father and Vinoj. We were among the pioneer retailers to set up shop at the newly opened Semua House back then - it was a small 200 square feet outlet. We’ll be honest, at the time when we started off, we didn’t even own a car! We lived just a par-four away at Selangor Mansion, so it was a natural and convenient decision we suppose. We had also some other locations in mind as well but I guess in the end, we knew this block much better than the rest.

Finally, we strongly believe in networking and marketing. As far as possible, we like to get feedback from our customers - be it the ordinary golfers or even the professionals who frequent our shop. Because of the different types of customers we get, it’s vital to stay on top of the game and comprehend the different kinds of business we get.

IT RUNS IN THE FAMILY

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Why get involved in the golf business? To be honest, the idea to initiate the business was the brainchild of the late Sultan of Terengganu, Almarhum Al-Sultan Mahmud Al-Muktafi Billah Shah Al-Haj. The late Tuanku was a regular customer of our father (who was then the head of the golf division at one of the biggest golfhouses in Kuala Lumpur) and one day, Tuanku advised by father to put his extensive networking and sales acumen into full use and start his own business. That was the real starting point for us. How important of a role did your father play in inculcating the passion for this business? Our father definitely was our point of reference from day one. He was and still remains the platform of this business - he has passed on his intricate knowledge of the golf business to both of us - be it in retailing, stock taking, what sells, what doesn’t. We must remember that the business is successful today because of the many intimate personal relationship our father had built. We never had problems with stocks and supplies, the reputation my father had with the suppliers saw us through our formative years.

What were some of the challenges you faced in the early days? Being new in the market necessarily meant that we had to work harder to capture the audience. Other than that because of our location, competition was low, business was very brisk and we were very stable even from the early days. The other limitation we had to cope with was the small space but we managed quite well.

For a business that has been around for as long as you guys have been, how have you kept relevant with modern times? Today, we offer golfer’s insurance through our tie-up with Multi-Purpose Insurans, which is a value-added service to our clientele. In recent years, we have also began showcasing exclusively for banks such as Maybank, whereby we take up booths during their promotions as well as getting involved with their credit card loyalty programmes. The other thing about doing business in the 21st century is being on your feet. Today, we can pride ourselves that we are only a call away, we close the deals swiftly and make sure our customers get quality products at good prices in the fastest possible time.

You were always renowned for having one of the widest range of products. Was this the case from the early days? We believe that it was our strongest selling point in the 90s and remains our distinct advantage in a highly saturated market today. Being able to carry any brands that penetrates the market has definitely been our advantage. We like to be at the top of food chain - if possible we would like to have every single golf brand under our belt because we feel that it gives us the strong brand positioning as a retailer. We must be able to satisfy all levels of clientele and give a fair share of business to all our suppliers regardless of the price point. Any business philosophy that you have adhered to over the years? We feel that you can ask anyone in the market and while we don’t like to boast, they will definitely agree that we are one of the best paymasters in the business. No defaults, no bad debts. Where possible, we prefer solid cash transactions.

Is there a clear plan of succession for the next 20 years? Part of the success story of VK has been family bond and we will like to keep the business within the family in the long run. We are grooming our kids as the bastions of the next generation and they have harnessed the power of social media and the internet to good use. Any plans of expansion? We started small and are more comfortable being small. While we will continue to search for new avenues of growth and different levels of business, we will remain a small family-driven unit. A bigger unit will meet higher operational costs and the need to hire outsiders, which is something we want to avoid at best.

VK Enterprise

Lot 1-5 Plaza City One First Floor Jalan Munshi Abdullah 50100 Kuala Lumpur Tel: 603 2694 5992 / 2715 1431 Fax: 603 2715 1431


EQUIPMENT FEATURE

TITLEIST TARGETS SERIOUS GOLFERS WITH NEW GENERATION OF ADVANCED PERFORMANCE EQUIPMENT I

t’s always an intriguing experience when Acushnet Company unveils a new generation of its Tour-validated line of golf clubs. The strong golf media pack from Singapore and Malaysia, which gathered at Sentosa Golf Club on October 2 were surely not disappointed with what they saw, heard and felt as the leading equipment manufacturer introduced a whole bag full of advanced performance golf clubs.

by blade and mid-mallet style heads with five different neck styles.

Dedicated to serious golfers who are in the market for the highest performing equipment in golf, Acushnet will launch the third generation of the successful Titleist AP irons line, together with the CB and MB lines on November 15. Renowned for providing modern ball flight and forgiveness with traditional looks, the AP line-up was revisited with the key design ethos focusing on adding forgiveness while retaining workability.

While many equipment manufacturers would categorise their clientele by the handicaps or their swing speed, Titleist has taken a novel definition in identifying their target audience. “Our definition of a serious golfer is by their attitude towards the game, not by their age, gender and handicap or by ball speeds. Perhaps in the past, our lineup appeared too focused on the lower handicappers but we realise and appreciate the fact that a guy who plays off a handicap of 20 but plays four rounds of golf a week, is a serious golfer,” said Rick Brown, the brand manager of Titleist South East Asia. “These are the sort of guys who like to know and care about what the best professionals in the world use. They would likely want to try or are already using our products to take their game to the next level,” he added, noting that Titleist will offer an extensive range of shafts to compliment its new range of products through its Titleist Fitting Network.

Titleist will also introduce the new Vokey Design SM4 wedges on the same date; the first generation of wedges were crafted from the ground up after the limitations put in place by the USGA and R&A groove rules in 2010. Designed by Bob Vokey himself, the new SM4 wedges feature 17 precise, individually cut and 100% inspected grooves that maximise groove geometry and push the groove edge radius to the conforming limits. Buoyed by the positive response for the previously launched 910 lineup, they will also introduce a 910 line extension,

Also receiving a re-branding touch is the Pinnacle line of golf balls, which has been streamlined from a four-model family to deliver one performance target, i.e. delivering powerful distance and soft feel with exceptional quality and consistency at a value.

specifically designed to help golfers with slightly lower swing speeds with clubs such as a 12° driver as well as a 27° hybrid for increased launch angle. Putter fans will also not be disappointed with the introduction of the improved lineup of California putters from the Scotty Cameron family, which retains the formmeets-function achievements of the original California putters. The new line features five models – Del Mar, Fastback, Monterey, Monterey 1.5 and Sonoma - characterised

Full specifications and details of new lineup on pages 20, 21 and 22.

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EQUIPMENT FEATURE

ADVANCED PERFORMANCE introduces the next generation of its groundbreaking Advanced Performance irons - 712 series, dedicated to serious golfers looking for the highest performing equipment in their arsenal.

Dual cavity design pushes weight to the perimeter for a hotter face and flight.

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Redesigned high quality stainless steel soleplate and integrated tungsten nickel sole weight redistributes discretionary mass from the topline, center bar and sole cradle to low in the head for increased MOI, forgiveness and stability.

* Available from November 15 at all good golf outlets.

712 AP1 Irons

712 AP2 Irons

Overview Advanced performance, multi-material, dual cavity irons providing more forgiveness with solid feel and improved looks, aspiring to skilled golfers.

Overview Advanced performance, multi-material, dual cavity forged irons proving more playability, solid feel and an improved classic profile for the serious and skilled golfer.

Stock Shaft Nippon NS PRO 950GH Steel - high performance light weight shaft with a medium tip for control and soft butt section for feel Tour AD by Graphite Design - a slightly higher launching shaft for graphite users

Stock Shaft True Temper™ Dynamic Gold Steel - high performance steel shaft with tour preferred feel, weight feedback and shot control Nippon NS PRO 950GH Steel

Stock Grip Titleist Tour Velvet by Golf Pride Price (4-P) RM2,975 (Steel),

(4-P) RM3,780 (Graphite)

Stock Grip Titleist Tour Velvet by Golf Pride Price (3-P) RM4,800 (Steel) (3-P) RM5,440 (Graphite)


EQUIPMENT FEATURE

Tour Professionals on the new 712 series

WITH FEEL

“…some of the most solid irons that I’ve felt. … There’s no vibration through the impact. They really do swallow up the golf ball. It really is an addictive kind of feel” Greg Chalmers

The thin face with integrated aluminum and soft elastomer Tuned Feel System in the back cavity improves sound and feel at impact for a hotter and more lively feel.

“Love the look of it… Club seems to go through the ground better. Feels very, very solid off the face. … Has the workability of the old AP2’s.” Brendan de Jonge

“They felt really good. They move through the turf a little bit better.” Rickie Fowler

Shorter blade length, thinner topline and reduced visual offset deliver control and performance.

712 MB Irons

“…they look great. They feel very good. …a little more solid. Very workable.” Nick Watney

712 CB Irons

Overview High performance muscle back forged irons with improved feel, classic looks and superior shot control for the highly skilled golfer.

Overview High performance forged cavity back irons with improved feel, classic looks and superior shot control for the highly skilled golfer.

Stock Shaft True Temper™ Dynamic Gold Steel - high performance steel shaft with tour preferred feel, weight feedback and shot control Nippon NS PRO 950GH Steel - high performance light weight shaft with a medium tip for control and soft butt section for feel

Stock Shaft True Temper™ Dynamic Gold Steel - high performance steel shaft with tour preferred feel, weight feedback and shot control Nippon NS PRO 950GH Steel - high performance light weight shaft with a medium tip for control and soft butt section for feel

Stock Grip Titleist Tour Velvet Rubber by Golf Pride

Stock Grip Titleist Tour Velvet Rubber by Golf Pride

Price (3-P) RM4,800 (Steel)

Price (3-P) RM4,800 (Steel)

21


IN THE BAG Vokey Design SM4 Wedges

www.titleist.com.my • • • • • •

COMING SOON!

High performance wedges with tour validated shapes and soles designed by master craftsman Bob Vokey, featuring the proven Spin Milled face technology for maximum spin and shot control. Maximum conforming spin through tour extreme grooves that feature 100% inspected, tight tolerance, aggressive groove edges at the limits allowed by the Rules of Golf. Superior full shot control from precise individually cut Spin Milled grooves that deliver optimal spin and predictable launch and flight. Maximum partial shot spin and control from the milled micro edge face texture that provides grip on less than full shots. Improved turf and sand performance through a neutral entry angle, trailing edge ribbon and tour validated sole designs taken straight from Vokey’s tour grinds. Slightly larger teardrop profile and CAD generated progressive leading edge, toe profile and topline radius

RRP: RM530

COMING SOON!

California Putters

www.titleist.com.my • •

22

• • • • •

Studio Weighting Technology provides greater choices for length and weight to enhance performance for all types of players. Milled from soft, 303 stainless steel with deeper milling on the face of the putter for a softer sound at impact and feel that promotes precise distance control. Draft sole design keeps the putter square in the playing position for proper alignment while a high-toe profile aids alignment and eliminates the tendency to raise the toe at address causing a player to aim the putter to the left of the target. Stepless steel shaft provides a clean, uninterrupted look at the ball in the address position and promotes better putterhead feel throughout the stroke. Equipped with a new Pistolero grip with a dancing Cameron logo for a secure hold and great feel in the hands. Features a new Sea Mist finish and recessed red Tour dot graphics that call to mind the tail lights of vintage American automobiles. The new line features five models – Del Mar, Fastback, Monterey, Monterey 1.5 and Sonoma - characterised by blade and mid-mallet style heads with five different neck styles.

RRP: RM1550

COMING SOON! Gold and Gold Ribbon

www.pinnaclegolf.com •

• • •

Soft ionomer cover blend with new 332 spherical icosahedral dimple design for more powerful distance and a bolder long game, designed and produced by Acuhsnet Company in the United States. Large, high-velocity, soft compression core for softer feel for a sharper short game. Exception quality and consistency without breaking the bank Available in two shades - Pinnacle Golf in bright white and a new high optix yellow, designed to provide ultra-high visibility against the hues of the golf course while Pinnacle Gold Ribbon - bright white and clear pearlescent pink for ladies.

RRP: RM78 (15-ball pack)


IN THE BAG

MP-69

golf.mizunoeurope.com • • • • • •

A pure Mizuno muscleback with clean blade look throughout the set, aimed at higher level amateurs and Tour professionals looking to balance feel and workability. Heads forged using patented Grain Flow Forged™ process from a single 1025E “Pure Select” mild carbon steel billet for balance of pure feel and hardness. New 4D muscle pad design distributes weight strategically with a deeper centre of gravity, resulting in consistent sweet spot height throughout the line that creates predictable penetrating trajectory. Redesigned sole shape maintains effective bounce while increasing overall versatility with a bevelled trailing edge for cleaner exit off the turf. Unmatched level of feedback through impact sound engineered by Harmonic Impact Technology™ Confirming modified U-grooves produce ideal spin rate for maximum playability in all conditions.

RRP (#4-PW): RM4199 (NS PRO 950GH),

RM3899 (True Temper™ DG Spinner™) & RM4299 (Project X)

MP-59

golf.mizunoeurope.com • • • • • •

Mizuno’s Forged Ti Muscle maintains thickness behind impact for blade-like workability, combined with forgiveness normally found in a full cavity design. 5% larger sweet spot area and lower centre of gravity for enhanced playability and maximum forgiveness, all in a compact head shape. Titanium insert forged into middle of the muscle centre for ideal amount of thickness behind the impact area, ensuring that the centre of gravity remains close to the clubface, allowing strong players to produce controlled draws and fades. Ti weight also promotes greater stability from off -centre strikes, allowing for less usage of offsets and improving the irons’ overall look at address. A thinner top line and weightier sole is finished with a new sole grind for greater versatility. Double-nickel chrome finish, highlighted with a black chrome stainless steel accent for elegant and durable finish.

RRP (#4-PW): RM4299 (NS PRO 950GH),

MP-R12 WEDGE

golf.mizunoeurope.com • • • •

RM3999 (True Temper™ DG Spinner™) & RM4599 (Project X)

HOT OFF

THE MILL

!

The patented Grain Flow Forged 1025E “Pure Select” mild carbon steel make-up delivers ultimate soft, solid and consistent feel. Features a CNC milled face along with Mizuno’s proprietary Quad Cut Groove technology, which delivers maximum spin control and supreme ball stopping ability in all playing conditions. Integrated loft specific sole geometry design maximises the effectiveness of the clubs for full shots while promoting clean contact with the ball for every wedge. Lofts 50°to 54° created with narrower and deeper grooves, best suited for full shot spin while lofts 56°-64° have a wider and shallower groove, appropriate for partial shot spin. Combined with a True Temper™ DG Spinner™ shaft and available in two exotic glare resistant finishes – satin chrome and black nickel.

RRP: RM599

23


IN THE BAG

LEGACY BLACK IRONS

www.callawaygolf.com •

Continues the tradition of premium soft feeling irons providing distance plus ease of use and control. A straight leading edge and taller toe appeal to the better player while notch weighting in the toe and heel, plus an undercut cavity provide higher MOI and forgiveness. Utilises the VAR medallion to help reduce vibrations at impact. Forged from premium S20C steel, the Legacy Black has weaker lofts compared to previous generation Legacy Forged irons (26° 5-iron vs 24° 5 iron) for added focus on spin control and attacking the greens. Comes in two options of steel shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S200 M10DB and GS95 with Tour AD 85 as the graphite option.

• • • •

RRP: To

be announced

www.ping.com • •

24

• •

G20 FAIRWAY WOODS

A large stainless steel head and face increases the MOI to maintain consistent ball speeds across the hitting surface. External weighting locates the CG lower and deeper back for higher launch on impact as well as optimal spin for long, straight results. A large, variable thickness clubface helps ensure higher ball speeds across the entire surface. Range includes 3-wood (15°), 4-wood (16.5°), 5-wood (18°) and 7-wood (21°) and comes standard with a TFC 330F graphite shaft.

RRP: RM995

GHOST PUTTERS

www.taylormadegolf.com • • • •

White finish provides tremendous contrast with the turf making the putter incredibly easy to aim while the Basketball-Court alignment lines help you get the ball on the line you want. The Surlyn insert in each Ghost Series putter incorporates Pure Roll to promote forward roll, accuracy and control for better performance on the greens. High MOI, thanks to the unique wire-frame head design provides strategic weight distribution, and movable weight technology making it the most forgiving putter in the TaylorMade line. Tune the head weight and feel with TaylorMade’s patented Movable Weight Technology

RRP:

RM750


IN THE BAG

DOING WHAT WE DO BEST There is an old saying that a new broom sweeps clean and there’s little doubt that Callaway Golf have undertaken a spring cleaning of their own in recent times. Leading the streamlining of operations in this part of the world is the company’s new managing director for South East Asia and South Pacific, Leighton Richards, who took some time off his packed trip to Kuala Lumpur recently to explain the brand’s new direction So, what can we expect now that you have undertaken the South East Asia portfolio on top of the South Pacific role you previously held?

his presence is felt probably more so today than before. Naturally I feel, all good companies always go back what they were always good at.

First thing for us at Callaway is to amalgamate the operations in this region to be more relevant to its needs. If you take Australia out, South East Asia, the South Pacific and India are all quite small on their own and as it is the case with developing markets, trying to get the things that are relevant to these markets has been more difficult with the old structure.

Odyssey line of putters have done tremendously well. What do you feel has been the strong selling point of the range?

Is there any specific reason that the Callaway has decided on this move? I feel the most encouraging factor was the time difference - it makes doing business much easier. I think the Commonwealth influence also played a part and in some ways, the Australian golfer is not so different from South East Asian golfer. What do you feel is the greatest tasks lying ahead of you in terms of this region? We are still quite young in this part of the world, having formed a subsidiary company to take back the business from our distributors just a couple of years ago. We still have teams to develop; we still have the market to get in line with the way Callaway does its business. However, I feel the biggest challenge is managing the complexities of the different cultures involved. We will rely on our local teams to drive the business and fundamentally, my role is to be the voice of this region back to our headquarters and get what we need. Much has been talked about Callaway Golf’s downsizing globally, in terms of headcount and overall spending. How will this affect the SEA market and how? I think Callaway is a classic story of a US company that expanded offshore - a US structure that supports a big home-based business. As we have expanded globally, the added resources on an old structure means that we essentially ended up with two companies with a duplication of functions, which was highly cost inefficient. Callaway today represent a true global company with a single, common global brand function, divided into four marketing

regions - Americas, Europe, East Asia as well as South East Asia, India and South Pacific, which execute brand strategies relevant to their local markets. In the past, we were a very top-heavy organisation and the revamp has reduced many structural costs at the top-end, to the tune of US$50 million. We have since re-invested half of it back into marketing and brand building especially through our involvement in the global Tours. Callaway Golf took the bold step in introducing a more innovative and lifestyle-oriented marketing campaigns in recent years. Is there going to be a rethink or is it set to stay? In many parts of the world, we are seen as an old-school brand, so such campaigns we felt helped re-brand Callaway to become a more youthful and relevant brand to the growing demographic of younger and more trendsetting golfers in the region. There will surely be a re-think as far as our brand execution is concerned, if anything we will return to what the philosophy of brand has always been, which is ultimately to make every golfer a better golfer. That philosophy transcends all ages and segments - from beginners to elite golfers - we make products specifically for their needs. How much does Ely Callaway’s philosophy continues to influence how the company is run today? His presence still looms large at our headquarters. Many of our people at Callaway have been with us for a very long time (which is a sign of a good company). Some of them who had the opportunity to work with him, still talk very fondly of him. In recent times, with changes put in place,

I think originally Odyssey was quite innovative and if anything the 2-ball model was an iconic product in the industry. At one stage, it held the number one spot in the putter division on its own ahead of the leading competitor. The insert was certainly also innovative and then once you continue to establish a strong line of products, people just trust the brand. It is important to note that we do not pay any of the professionals on Tour to use the Odyssey range - and there are a large number of them, which is something unique in the industry. It goes a long way in proving the range’s success. Callaway professionals on Tour have enjoyed great success in 2011 - a testament to the proven Tour-quality of your product. How does Callaway intend to translate that into better sales off the rack? We have done very well on the European Tour with mixed success rate in the other Tours. I believe we need to invest more on activating that message, telling the end consumers why those players choose to play Callaway and it is something we have in the pipeline over the next 12 months. What can consumers Callaway in 2012?

expect

from

From what I can tell you, we have recently launched the Callaway Legacy Black woods and irons family in Japan and we have plans to introduce this premium range to the South East Asian market in due course. We are very excited about the launch of the new Legacy range that we hope will really make inroads into the premium sector, where I personally feel we should be in as well as a new RAZR range. We have invested heavily in research and development over the years, equal if not more than our nearest competitors have, hence I can assure that every new product launched by Callaway has an incremental improvement compared to its predecessor.

25


GEAR UP

Golf Shoes

www.eagleeyed.co.kr •

• •

Long favoured by East Asian long drive champions, the hand-made golf shoes produced by Korean shoemaker Hyeonjin provide unparalled grip and stability through its patented and scientifically proven10° degree slant design. Specially designed insole with shock absorbing and slip prevention properties ensures that the golfer’s centre of gravity and posture is always in check for improved confidence at address as well as proper forward transfer of body weight through the swing. The use of high-quality, anti-corrosive brass material in the eyelets as well as the stud inlets promote robustness and long lasting durability. Double molded TPR outer sole combined with synthetic PU leather for outstanding waterproof performance and air mesh inner lining for superior comfort.

RRP: RM890

- RM990

ClubGlider Meridian Travel Case www.sunmountain.com • • •

• •

Integrated leg set supports 100% of the weight of the travel cover when the legs are extended, eliminating the continuous bending and lifting typical when handling luggage at airports. Entirely in dense foam padding, to protect your golf clubs through the rigors of travel with additional internal cinch straps to secure your golf bag in place. Pivoting caster wheels provide superior manoeuvrability while heavy-duty two-way zippers run the full length of the bag for easy loading/ unloading. Weighs 6.5kg, it comes without load and folds for easy storage. Available in four colour variants - black, baltic/black, lava/black and red/black

RRP: RM990

each

Cell Fusion 2 Graphic Golf shoes www.puma.com/golf • • • •

Second generation Cell Fusion design as worn by Puma ambassador Rickie Fowler on Tour. Premium quality waterproof microfiber synthetic leather with 2-year limited waterproof guarantee. Welded quarter panels in saddle and heel area generate support while additional heat cut TPU teeth in critical areas of heel and forefoot enhance grip. The added stability provided by the iCell’s hexagonal structural technology in the forefoot and heel paired with Fast Twist directional locking Smart Quill® spikes that are intentionally designed to work with shifting weights for maximum traction. X-Static footbed lining maintains overall comfort.

RRP: RM659

27


GEAR UP

THREE DECADES OF LEADERSHIP

I

n 1979, Footjoy founder Bill Tarlow experimented with a rather unusual Cabretta sheepskin leather supplied by tanning experts Pittards of England. The building blocks for what was to become FootJoy’s flagship tour-performance gloves, FootJoy StaSof remains the number one gloves preferred by the world’s best players today. First introduced in 1981, StaSof not only became the primary choice of tour professionals looking for a glove that gives them the optimum combination of consistent fit, great feeling leather and amazing grip, but also a household name amongst recreational golfers looking for a soft-feel comfortable leather glove suitable to put and play in all conditions with proper perspiration management. It is a testimony to the labour of love that after three decades of business partnerships, the people behind FootJoy and Pittards remain motivated to develop a new generation of StaSof gloves to meet the modern demands of golfers worldwide.

1981

1984

1988

1991

1995

1995

1998

2000

2001

2004

2008

2011

“Sometimes in business, we tend to forget about our partners. Pittards had as much to do with the success of the gloves as Footjoy do. It was their vision and their constant work at improving the Cabretta skins to perform better than before. It was their capability in research and development, which they brought to the glove category and made them the perfect partner for FootJoy. Without Pittards, there is no StaSof glove,” says Jim Connor, the president of FootJoy.

28

“For any business, it’s a phenomenal relationship and for any two companies to share leadership in a winning product over that time is amazing,” shared Mike Dodd, the vice-president of sales for Pittards. “There’s not very much wrong with the StaSof, but collectively our teams go through a lot in trying to come out with something different and innovative. We work on improvements on the very fine aspects and details such as the grip - when you need it, where you need and how it comes into play.” The 2011 edition of the StaSof continues in the rich tradition of laboratory proven and Tour-validated success of its predecessors, featuring the most technologically innovative leather ever developed for the ultimate in grip performance. Retails at RM89 in all good golf shops. Improved Fit and Comfort Includes several new construction elements to optimise fit and comfort, including an extended cuff Adjustable Closure for Secure Fit ComforTab™ closure comfortably adjusts for a custom fit Mesh Inserts for Improved Breathability and Flex Powernet™ mesh inserts across the knuckles enhance breathability and flexibility Ultimate Feel and Tour-Proven Grip Perfomance Taction2™ Advanced Performance Leather, tanned exclusively by Pittards provides exceptional feel and optimum moisture management and improved grip performance


COVERING CARLSBAD BY SCOTT KRAMER y now, you would have noticed that a rash of PGA Tour winners and other stars have swapped to a new long stick. We do not mean the driver, but the new belly and long putters that are nearly the same length as a driver. First, there was Adam Scott, then Webb Simpson, and of course, Keegan Bradley, who used a belly model to capture the PGA Championship – the latter marking the first time a belly putter ever used to capture a Major. Even Phil Mickelson, one of golf’s mostgifted putters, recently asked Odyssey officials for a left-handed replica of Bradley’s, who expedited him the 45.25” Sabre-toothed with a White Hot XG insert from their Carlsbad headquarters. Players who initially adamantly protested their use on Tour in the past, proclaiming that it was almost cheating to anchor the butt end of a putter into the gut, have suddenly seen the light and are trying them now. Belly putters are now, well, cool to play. The current mainstream. Not just for people with bad backs and shaky nerves. Without doubt, this is just the kind of sensation that will probably take the golf world by storm. No doubt, amateur golfers will find long putters to be all the rage in 2012. In fact, putter manufacturers are putting their hopes on it. Many have begun announcing plans for the new models. Odyssey officials tell me that droves of consumers have called Callaway’s customer service department (Callaway owns the Odyssey brand), asking which model Mickelson is using and where they can buy it. The company’s retail partners have also called in large numbers, asking if the putters are going to be sold in their stores soon. Despite all of the sudden demand, officials still are not sure if they will offer that particular model. They will, however, be expanding their over-length offerings. Because of this Tour phenomenon and ensuing onslaught of retailer requests, Cleveland Golf has just drastically increased its initial sales forecast of its upcoming “Almost Belly” blade putter with a black pearl finish, which will be sold under the Cleveland Classic line. The company has had at least one belly putter in its line for years, and for 2012 will have several models under both the Cleveland Classics and Never Compromise labels. Nike’s been having worldwide Tour

Even our very own Danny Chia has gone for the belly option

Scott Kramer is a veteran golf writer based in the golf equipment capital of Carlsbad, Calif. In his 20-plus years covering the golf industry, the © Ravi Chitty / The ClubHouse

B

success with its new Method Drone belly putter, too, and will be pushing that model hard in stores soon. Neither Scotty Cameron nor PING have announced new long and belly models yet, but you can pretty much bet on seeing some. For the Belly models, you will see them with clubheads weighing about 390 grams, while long putters will sport 450-gram heads. For comparison, a standard-length putter typically has a clubhead weighing 345 grams. In case you are wondering, a longer putter needs more weight in the head, so that you can feel it during the stroke. Many golfers might find using them awkward at first, because it is not like taking a regular putting stroke. It takes some getting used to. People who think too much about their stroke may very well find this a much simpler way to putt. Anchor it in your belly and it rocks back-and-forth like a pendulum. At first, it may be hard to judge speed from longer distances, but on putts inside 12 feet, it will feel automatic. Like with any putter, golfers should be fitted for the most ideal model for their unique game. It ultimately comes down to trial-anderror, to see what works and what doesn’t. That’s basically what the entire market for longer putters will amount to, as well.

former senior editor of GOLF Magazine

has

lowered

his

playing index to 5.1, raised his IQ on the sophisticated technology used to make golf clubs, and stayed even keel on his propensity to miss short putts. But he always brings game to his columns.

Golf’s Next Putter Craze

29


GOLFING TALES FROM THE LION CITY

Growing up in a golfing family with a grandmother who was an amateur champion golfer, Justine Moss developed a love of golf at an early age. After moving to Singapore in 1998 from Sydney, and opening her own communications company a year later, Justine expanded the writing side of her business 30

and currently writes for a number of golfing and lifestyle publications in the region, with her finger on the pulse of local golf happenings in the Lion City

Brothers (and sisters) in arms

The SLGA family

I

t is no secret that the Singapore Golf Association (SGA) and the Singapore Ladies Golf Association have had their differences in the past. Hence, it was welcoming news to the local golfing fraternity when the two golfing bodies put these differences behind them to forge a new partnership. The SLGA has accepted the invitation of SGA to be its affiliate member, which means that SGA will now be responsible in selecting national women representatives for international golfing activities.

champions in this sport. It therefore makes good sense to work together towards a common goal.

Historically, SLGA has always looked after the interest of women’s social golf as well as to develop elite women’s golf in Singapore. In recent years, both SGA and SLGA have worked successfully together on joint training programmes and tournaments with the aim of having one National Sports Association (NSA) represent the interests of all golfers.

How this alliance is going to work is by having the ongoing training done individually with the player’s own coach. The national and development squads will receive allowances for such sessions. There will be games organized quarterly for ranking purposes as well. Extra group and specialised training sessions will be organised months before the major events to address or focus on specific areas for improvement.

“Since the SGA became the NSA for golf, it has strived to bring the golfing related bodies in Singapore under the ‘umbrella’ of the SGA,” explained SLGA president Lam Lian Suan. She added further, “There had been much dialogue between SGA and SLGA on the various ways in which we could work together to optimise our resources, in particular in the training of the elite national women golfers. Seeing the benefits for the future of the elite players, SLGA accepted the invitation from SGA in becoming its affiliate member.” In doing so, Lam, along with SLGA vicepresident Marvane E, will be the appointed members of the SGA Executive Board. They acknowledged the obvious benefits it will bring to the SLGA, amongst which include the reducing of duplicated efforts in spotting and grooming of young and talented golfers in Singapore. “With the combined resources and effort, time and energy are saved in arranging ranking games, training, selection and tournaments. Both SGA and SLGA embrace a common objective in promoting golf in our country. It is our aspiration to produce

“In particular, SLGA is relieved from the financial burden of looking after the development of our elite women golfers. Now our girls are enjoying the same privileges offered to the boys under SGA. They are receiving more training allowances, more opportunities for local training and greater exposure to local and overseas tournaments,” she explained further.

Six ladies have been inducted into its national squad - Kok Jo Ee, Koh Sock Hwee, Joey Poh, Stephanie Loi, Low Si Xuan and Amelia Yong. All of them have been selected based on order of merit through the SGA website. This point system will be updated on a monthly basis. “The morale of the players has been uplifted. Positive feedback has been that both boys and girls in the training squads have had their experience enriched by playing alongside one another at ranking games and training sessions”, says Lam, quipping, “We certainly hope this initiative is here to stay and we believe that it will grow stronger as we forge ahead.”


“T

UNCHARTED COURSE WITH NORMAS YAKIN

he green is the ‘heart’ of the golf course” said my club manager in 1993, then Mr. (now Dato’) Benson Lim. The green is the most important part of the golf course. On a price per square foot, it is the most expensive to maintain and the most expensive to construct. The early part of my golf course maintenance career was spent on a golf course that was still under construction by a Japanese firm. This was one of the first golf courses built and for most people who supervised them – myself included – this was our first golf course too. Therefore, you can imagine the pride I felt when I was told, and subsequently read in the marketing brochures that our green was constructed to “USGA standard”. Imagine my surprise when not many people who work there – including the architect – could tell me exactly what a USGA specification green is. Imagine my bigger surprise when other clubs’ marketing brochures also touted their green as USGA standard specification! Of course the biggest surprise was whenever I brought up the subject of USGA specifications; my peers were vague and need to go to the toilet. Me? I didn’t even know who or what USGA is. So I did a bit of digging around and found that there are four main types of golf course construction; USGA, California, hybrid of USGA and California, and push-up green. Of course there are many other names, but basically there are about the same things, for example push-up greens are also called as ‘native soil greens’; especially since some people have this thought of a bra whenever the word ‘push-up’ is mentioned. Moreover, oh, by the way; USGA is the United States Golf association who, through their ‘Green Section’ does the research and development about stuff on the golf course. We will talk about the other types of construction later. Right now, let’s get back to what we shall term loosely as USGA greens, or as some of my foreign staff would say: “Oosgar grins”. USGA specification for greens was developed way back in the 1960s with one amendment in the 1990s. Yeah it was that long ago. It was basically up to 18 inches deep with several layers of material, each layers has its own specification designed to – not just percolate water – but also to retain water at the same time. The sizes of sand for each layer was calculated and calibrated to not move water, until more water flowed down from the layer above. Genius and confusing for most people; no wonder nobody could explain the concept to me. It has also been described as ‘inverted water filter, but very different from my expensive

ionizing, hydrogenated, sulfinated, carborated, pH corrected, perforated water filter that only my maid knows how to use. It is about the filters of old where you can see a layer of gravel on top, underneath it is a layer of coarse sand, and below it is a layer of slightly smaller diameter sand and below it finally a layer of fine white sand at the bottommost. The theory is that when you pour water from the top, dirt will be trapped in the layers of gravel and sand to give you clean water underneath the filter. Turn the whole filter upside down, and you get the general concept of the USGA green – simplified, of course. To understand things better I paid a visit to a soil science professor in a local university and told him about how we planted grass. “WHAT!” he said; “Impossible! You can’t plant on sand!” “But Prof, we’ve been doing it for the past 40 years!” said the 20-something-year-old assistant golf course superintendent to the 50-something-yearold soil science professor. “But you cannot plant on sand!” he said, standing up. I stood up too; other than the fact that he was raining saliva on me, I was a bit worried just in case he had an axe or pitchfork around just for this occasion; some young upstart spewing out soil science blasphemies. Well, turns out the good professor was halfright and I was wrong; you see, the topmost layer is not made up of just pure sand. It is actually a layer called the ‘root-zone’ and it consists of other organic or synthetic materials that help to retain nutrients and water. I’m sure if I told him that he would understand. I don’t remember who the professor was and I don’t think I met him again after that. Maybe that was a good thing too; I’m getting to be a bit too old for these kinds of shock meetings. Imagine my surprise (do you get a déjà vu feeling when you read that? Why am I continually surprised?) when in the next few years, greens constructed not according to USGA standards were doing better than greens following the USGA standard in the same golf course. Remind me to tell you about it. Keep your eyes on this space for the next few months.

Normas Yakin considers himself an all-rounder: a former cocoa and oil palm planter, golf course superintendent, golf club manager, director, lecturer and consultant. He believes there are only two great mavericks in Malaysia; one of them is a former Prime Minister. Modesty, however, prevents him from telling you who the other one is. In his free time, he scribbles at www.mynormas.com

Getting to the bottom of USGA-standard greens

31


GOLF DOWN UNDER

Richard Fellner is the Group Editor of Inside Golf Magazine – Australia’s most regularly read golf publication. Hailing from the United States but now a proud resident of Melbourne, Fellner is a true golf tragic having played the game for over 35 years but never getting any better it. 32

T

he PGA of Australia has a lot to be proud of these days. Apart from the upcoming Australian Summer of Golf (touted to be the one of the most exciting golf seasons in decades) and a number of world-class players set to travel Down Under for The Presidents Cup, Australian Open and PGA Championship, The Australian PGA has also marked a major milestone in its history, celebrating 100 years as an association. Kicking off its highly touted year-long Centenary Celebrations on Sept 19th – 100 years to the day of its formation, celebrity golfers, PGA professionals and industry representatives from across the globe sent in their congratulations to the Association. “Congratulations to the PGA of Australia on reaching its first century! Over the years, I have met many wonderful people through the PGA and some of my closest mates are members of the Association. I congratulate the organisation for making such an outstanding contribution to golf in Australia. This contribution speaks for itself but it has also played a significant role in the broader sports, leisure and corporate landscape of our country. Here’s to a double ton!” Ricky Ponting, cricketing legend.

A century for the Australian PGA

“Congratulations to the PGA of Australia for reaching 100. Although, considering we love golf, 100 is not really a number worth celebrating. I would have much preferred to send a congratulatory message for a 70 (two under the card). Well done all the same.” Andy Lee, Television/Radio personality In the first of the PGA’s multiple Centenary Awards nights scheduled across the country, 36 PGA Members were honoured by their peers at Royal Sydney Golf Club; the very place where the PGA was formed in 1911. Some of the names honoured were already etched in Australian golf history, while others have pursued their passion outside the spotlight. What they all have in common is a lifetime dedication to Australian golf and of course, the badge of the PGA. The awards recipients included Sir Bob Charles, Chris Tickner, Ray McGlinn, Dan

Cullen, Neville Wilson, Peter O’Malley, Bill Dunk, Alex Mercer, Craig Parry, Eddie Emerson, Richard Beer, Ian Passwell, Al Howard, Barry Bent, Bob Richards, Col Johnston, Bruce Burrows, Paul Robertson, David Mercer, Denis Brosnan, Erik Royds, Colin McGregor, Doug Canty, Geoff Scott, Tom Moore, Kyle Francis, Bob Stanton, Kel Nagle, Peter Fowler, Andre Stolz, Jack Newton, Terry Hayes, Ray Wilson, Frank Phillips, Peter Lonard and Allen Topham. PGA Centenary Patron Greg Norman sent a message to all the award recipients acknowledging their place within Australian golf history. “You are all among some of the most highly skilled PGA Members the world over and I hope will take great pride in being part of such an historic occasion,” said Norman. The NSW PGA Member function officially kicked off the PGA’s Centenary Celebrations, which will continue with a year-long schedule of events and programs across Australia. The PGA also announced their intention to launch a PGA Hall of Fame in the next 12 months along with a number of other exciting legacy items that will resonate within the Australian Golf Industry for many years to come. The PGA formed on 19th September 1911 by 15 Professional golfers looking to advance their profession. The founding Members included R.S. (Dicks) Banks, Rowley Banks, Charles W. Campbell, E. (Ted) Cates, Carnegie Clark, Jack Clark, Tom Daniels, Arthur W. East, J. Victor East, Allan F. Maiden, Frank T. O’Brien, Jack Patterson, Fred Popplewell, Dan Soutar and W.(Willie) Thomson. Today, the PGA consists of over 2500 Members who are all among some of the most highly trained golf coaches and players the world over, and is the world’s secondoldest PGA (behind only The PGA of Great Britain & Ireland, which was formed in 1901). More information: www.pga.org.au/centenary


A TEACHER’S TALE

A member of the Canadian PGA since 2002, Brad Walterhouse

© Getty

moved to Singapore from western Canada to join the Heartlands Golf Schools in 2009. He believes that every single golfer is unique and has different reasons for playing the

I

n his book How I Play Golf, Tiger Woods said: “I won 12 times around the world in 2000, including 3 majors, and I only remember hitting one shot I would call perfect – a 3 wood on No. 14 on the Old Course at St. Andrews in the third round of the British Open.” Imagine that, during one of the most successful seasons in the history of professional golf, he only hit one perfect shot. What does that say about the rest of the shots? Well, it means that in some form or another, every other shot was a miss. Now, there is no doubt Tiger has different standards than the rest of us. Surely, there is a little bit of exaggeration in the statement. However, the point is valid; perfectly struck shots are the exception, not the norm. Frequently, my students and I have completely different reactions to the shots that they hit, and it usually turns out that they are disappointed in a shot that I am very excited about. Usually it is because they are expecting, and comparing it to their very best shot, and when the results are less than expected, there is this feeling of disappointment, which in turn led to frustration. At this point, I usually tell them the Tiger Woods story (above) and try to get them to view expectations a little differently. By understand that constant comparison to their very best shot will eventually lead them to frustration and disappointment, self-doubt, and other related emotions. Perfect shots really are the exception. We really do not even need them. For us to be successful around the golf course, what we do need, however, are a whole bunch

of shots that are good enough, a few good shots and ultimately, the odd great shot. I often tell my students; it is not about how good your good shots are, it is about how good are your bad shots? If we learn to accept good enough, we can perceive ourselves as being more consistent. This can help with building self-confidence, and as we all know, confidence is the basis of everything we do.

game, different goals and a unique swing. Noted for his interest in the mental aspects of the game, Brad espoused that golf should be enjoyed, not merely played.

Think about what expectations you have when you play golf and how you react when your expectations are not met. Are your expectations realistic? Are they causing anger and frustration? Here is a list of realistic expectations that will help a golfer maintain a positive attitude and have more fun. l Expect to enjoy yourself l Expect to have good bounces and bad bounces l Expect to have good shots and bad shots l Expect the game to be completely unpredictable l Expect to miss some putts that you thought you would make Be willing to accept the results of the shot no matter how good, bad or ugly it is. Learn to manage, or even eliminate expectations from your game, and take away the feelings of pressure, disappointment, frustration, and self-doubt. With all that, wouldn’t golf be a lot more enjoyable? For more information on Heartland Golf School, visit www.heartlandgolfsg.com

Are your expectations getting in your way?

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© Asian Tour

TOUR WATCH WITH ASIAN TOUR

Calvin Koh and Doyle De Costa form part of the dynamic and globe-trotting media team at the Asian Tour. Known for their differing viewpoints on all things golf in Asia, the duo give their insights and thoughts on the happenings and developments on the region’s established Tour.

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Chan Yih-shin

Who was your Asian Tour golfer of the month for September? Calvin Koh: It has to be Himmat Rai of India. Winning your first Asian Tour title is difficult enough but to do it by winning in a fiveway play-off after the sixth extra hole is just extraordinary. I was there at the ISPS Handa Singapore Classic and the play-off marathon was the icing on the cake. Furthermore, who can forget Himmat’s 25-foot birdie putt on the last, which sealed him the victory? Simply electrifying. Doyle De Costa: Chan Yih-shin’s form was as hot as his putter at the Macau Open presented by Cityneon. He produced some scintillating golf that week and was constantly smiling despite a good or bad shot! But that one moment that really stood out for me was when Chan sank that massive chip in birdie from 40 feet on the 12th hole. That impeccable shot and his flurry of one putts sealed the deal for him. If only my luck at the casinos was as good as Chan’s putting. Which tournaments are you looking forward to in October?

Of a marathon playoff and October’s highlights

CK: There is always a sense of excitement when the Asian Tour welcomes a new tournament and this year, we announced four new events on our Schedule. One of which is the CJ Invitational hosted by K.J. Choi in Korea from October 20 to 23. I have met and had the pleasure of interviewing K.J. on numerous occasions and I can tell you he is definitely one of Asia’s best golfing ambassadors and he truly deserves his own tournament. DDC: I am spoiled for choice but I’ll have to go with the Hero Indian Open. You can always expect a strong field in the US$1.25 million showpiece. S.S.P. Chowrasia, Jyoti Randhawa and self-proclaimed King of Delhi Rikard Karlberg, who won twice at the Delhi Golf Club, have all confirmed for the event. In addition, you cannot forget European Ryder Cup star Edoardo Molinari of Italy who will be in the field as well. Not many of you might know this but Delhi Golf Club also serves the

best mushroom and cheese toast and iced coffee in Asia! However, I am only there for work… Who is your best bounce back player on the Asian Tour this year? CK: Tough one but Zaw Moe of Myanmar tops my list. He has not had a single top-10 finish on the Asian Tour since 2007 but his fortunes changed after he started using a belly putter. He was in contention in Macau before finishing in tied fourth place and in the following week, he won a local event in Singapore! He might be the dark horse in the second half of the Asian Tour if he keeps the belly putter tucked in his golf bag. DDC: Ask any player who has played with Australian David Gleeson and they will tell you he is one of the finest ball strikers in the game. He last won in 2008 and with his winner’s exemption expiring this year, Gleeson did not get off to the best possible start where he missed five consecutive cuts. Nevertheless, he looks to be back with a second place finish at the Macau Open after finally rectifying his problem where he was using the wrong set of clubs! Who is your best Asian Tour performer so far? CK: The man without a victory yet – Jbe Kruger of South Africa. He has come so close on so many occasions and despite his near misses, he has still managed to be in the right frame of mind week in and week out to put himself in contention. He might not be the biggest player on the Asian Tour but he is definitely one of the most inspired and motivated players on Tour. DDC: There is no way we can leave Siddikur out. He made 17 consecutive cuts since last year before missing the halfway cut at the Macau Open. The man from Bangladesh could not have summed up his first missed cut this year better than anyone else when he said to a score recorder after submitting his scorecard, “I’m only human.”


THE RIGHT FIT WITH TITLEIST

Hailing from the small town of Windsor in New South Wales, Australia, Shaun Moulds is a second-generation club fitter,

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ur iron fitting goal is to provide the player with the best iron model and specifications to optimize ball flight and performance. The new range of 712 irons caters to all golfers with the advanced performance, multi material irons in the AP1 & AP2. In addition to high performance, cavity back and muscle back CB & MB irons provide traditional solid feel with enhanced shot control. Firstly, we start by testing the players current iron set, noting the length and lie angle. With the use of Trackman launch monitor we observe their ball flight and note their ball speed, launch angle, backspin and carry distance. Discussing the player’s normal course conditions and their preferred ball flight, carry distance and ball stopping performance expectations will allow us to determine the best iron model for the player based on those needs. We now will test the player for length. We do this by applying face tape to the face of a 6 iron and get the player to hit 2 or 3 shots. The face tape shows us exactly where the player is hitting the ball on the face. We can adjust the length of the club to allow for more consistent on-centre impact marks. When the ball is struck from the centre of the face, it allows maximum ball speed for the player based on their club head speed. Fitting for lie angle, we begin testing at the fit length by applying lie tape to the 6 iron with a 62.5° (Standard Titleist lie angle). Ideal lie marks are in the centre of the sole. Evaluating marks we continue testing at +/-2° at the fit length until ideal marks or the players preferred ball flight/shot shape is achieved. Based on a 165-yard 6 iron shot a lie angle that is 2° off can equate to a shot 20’ off line.

The ideal ball flight will vary based on the player’s preference and course conditions. Iron ball flight should provide specific yardage gaps and ball stopping ability throughout the entire set. Iron launch conditions can be finetuned with the correct shaft type and flex. Selecting the correct flex allows the golfer to properly load the shaft to achieve better ball striking. Generally, quicker tempos require heavier shafts and firmer flexes while smoother tempos require lighter weights and softer flexes. Testing various shafts we analyse ball flight noting ball speed, launch angle, backspin and carry distance. The feel of the shaft to the golfer is very important. Finding a shaft that feels good when hitting will generally allow a more consistent swing, providing better results. When determining the longest iron in the players set we need to test the long irons and establish which long iron provides a playable trajectory. Playable trajectory is a high launching trajectory that produces maximum carry distance with a descending angle that will allow the ball to stop on the green with control. Quite often, we see golfers where their carry distance, for example, of a 4 & 5 iron may be the same but the 4 iron is unable to land on a green and stop on the green before running through. The 5 iron in this case provides the same carry distance and is able to hold the green due to the steeper descending angle. For the player, the 5 iron is the longest iron with playable trajectory so we would recommend replacing the 4 iron with a hybrid or a higher lofted fairway wood, whichever would give the best results for a playable trajectory. Finally, we look at grip type and size. The type of grip selected is based on the golfers preferred feel and size. The correct size of the grip allows the players fingers (on the top hand on the club) to slightly touch the palm/base of thumb on that hand.

having

tweaked

clubs

for

close to a decade. Now based in Singapore where he is the regional club fitter for Titleist SEA, the two-handicapper is discovering South East Asia for what it is but is still on the lookout for a great angling spot.

Iron Fitting

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TEE BOX

MAXIS TEAM GOLF TOUR 36

Sime Darby LPGA date for grand finals champions

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here was a pleasant surprise awaiting T. Rajan, Desmond Ang Hock Hai and Ong Wee Kiong after they emerged as the Maxis Team Golf Tour grand finals champion in the Thai resort of Pattaya recently. Not only did the three friends from Johor walk home with a trophy and Hewlett

Packard Pavilion laptop each for their win but they also received priceless invites to Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia pro-am tournament. The trio who had won the preliminary leg in Horizon Hills Golf & Country Club earlier in the year to qualify for the grand finals. They recorded a nett score of seven-under 209 which gave them a comfortable 13-stroke victory at the Siam Country Club in Pattaya. Raymond Khong, Wong Kiang Foong and

Tan Wah Leng took second placing with a 222 total on countback and received a Maxis iPhone4 each for their efforts. Patrick Tan Wah Yew, Alex Yau Wai Heng and Lim Lean Kuan claimed third place and won Hewlett Packard all-in-one colour printers. In the individual gross category, a commendable round of even-par 72 saw Yap Kim Fatt emerge victorious by two strokes from Abu Samah Kechil. Yam received a trophy and a Hewlett Packard Pavilion laptop.

WORLD AMATEUR INTER TEAM GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP Indians continue winning run in Selangor

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eams from India once again proved that they were a force to be reckoned with after teams PSPB Falcons and Noida Golf Course claimed the top honours in the sixth and final qualifying round of the World Amateur Inter Team Golf Championship (WAITGC) 2011 held in Selangor from September 26-29. Comprising of an all-single handicapper quartet of Gagan Verma (3), Manav Das (2), Jasjeet Singh (2) and Rahul Bajaj (2), The Falcons chalked up a steady score of 219, 221, 218 and 215 strokes over four rounds at Kelab Golf Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah and Kota Permai Golf & Country Club to chalk uprecord a winning total of 873 strokes. Australian team Twin Creek Tiger represented by Geoff Wright (5), Russell Chegwyn (6) alongside scratch players Justin Wells and Blake Bryne settled for second on 939 with combined rounds of 240,231,238 and 230. Former champions Lapor Po Tiger of Brunei whereended in third on 970 The Noida Golf foursome of Amit Kumar Bhadana (6), Kabir Talwar (9), Joseph Koshy (9) and Umesh Dubey (13) fired 96, 107, 94 and 116 for a total of 413 Stableford points to claim the nett title. Another team from Down Under, Twin Creek Lions represented by Wee Liat Tan (14), Barry Hopkins (15), Saif Buhari (17) and Meng Lim (18) finished 16 points behind the team from the sub-continent, for a total of 397 points (101-99-100-97).


TEE BOX

CROSS CREEK PHARMATON CLASSIC

Battle royale in Chiangmai awaits golfers

Under a new format introduced this year, the national finals featured the gross winners and nett winners as well as the runner-ups from the A, B and C Medal categories of 10 preliminary rounds organised around the country. The top ten gross and nett finishers progressed to the last stage. Faizul Hafez Zulkefli returned with a gross 77 to top the winners’ list, edging Sutanto Sanarja by a stroke while Nordin Yahaya was a stroke further adrift.

SABAH SENIORS OPEN AS Khamis holds on to crown

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ounds of 87 and 78 saw Datuk A.S. Khamis (8) successfully defend the Sabah Senior Open title with a one-stroke win over Ishikawa Mitsuyo (10). The two-day event took place from September 21-22 at Dalit Bay Golf & Country Club. Third place went to 11-handicapper Herman Anjin who managed a two-day total of 167. In the nett division, Fred Hung from Sandakan Golf Club took the honours, carding rounds of 68 and 72 for a 140 total. Liew Kim Siw (17) and Wong Yin Pow (28) were joint runner-ups on 142. A total of 51 players took part in the tournament with Bernard Chan providing the highlight of the tournament, when he aced the par-three fourth hole on the first day for a memorable hole-in-one.

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he national finals of the Cross Creek Pharmaton Classic held recently at Swiss-Garden Golf Resort and Spa Damai Laut was a closely-contested affair with the participants all fired up to earn their berths to the event’s grand finale in Chiangmai.

Haji Zaharuddin Mat Yassin (18) emerged victorious in the nett category with a score of 70. Four strokes behind in second was You Cheong Huan while third place went to Zainal Abidin Saini, who came home with a 75.

PRUDENTIAL ASTRO MASTERS

Second Masters title for Sasi

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. Sasikumar grabbed his second Prudential Astro Masters title after carding a two-day gross aggregate of 156 during the exciting grand final in Phuket, Thailand recently.

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The 35-year old golfer, who won his first Astro Masters title in Chiangmai four years ago, shot a 79 at Loch Palm in the first round and followed it up with a five-over 77 at the challenging Red Mountain course. He edged Mohamad Shahnizam Mohd Mohagi and Mohamad Shukir Saad by just one stroke. Mohamad Shahnizam took second place ahead of Mohamad Shukri on countback. The grand final at Phuket was an exclusive affair for the 36 finalists gross and nett winners who qualified from 20 preliminary rounds held throughout the country.

SINTOK MASTERS

Adam triumphs on countback

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he Sintok Masters held at the Kelab Golf Universiti Utara Malaysia on September 24 provided an exciting finish with two players - Adam Shafiq and Amirul Aizat carding matching scores of 68 to top the standings. Adam was declared the winner on countback, taking home a trophy and 32” LCD television. Aminuddin Ahmad took sole possession of third with a round of 70 in the annual affair.

VISA INFINITE GOLF INVITATIONAL Super finale for Visa Infinite cardholders

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ver 60 Visa Infinite cardholders in Malaysia were recently regaled to a superb round of golf at Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club during the Visa Infinite Golf Invitational Grand Final on September 20. The exclusive finale was the highlight of the annual league organised by Visa Infinite to present its cardholders with an opportunity to experience the privilege of golfing in a competitive yet friendly tournament at some of Malaysia’s top members-only golf courses. Dato’ Low Chin Meng emerged the grand prize winner with a score of 40 stableford points while Thong Weng Kin and Yong Peng Tak finished second and third with 36 and 35 points respectively.


GOLF DIARY November 3 - 6 WGC-HSBC Champions Shenshan International GC, Shanghai, China US$7,000,000 October 22 -24 Kedah Amateur Open Darulaman GGG, Kedah Oct 31 - November 3 Selangor Amateur Open Perangsang Templer GC, Selangor November 11 - 13 Melaka Amateur Open Ayer Keroh CC, Melaka November 14 - 16 AXA-Affin National Inter-Club Team Championship Venue TBA November 17 - 19 Penang Amateur Open Bukit Jawi GR, Penang

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October 28 - 30 Kedah International Red Tee Golf Invitational Gunung Raya GR, Kedah

November 3 - 6 Sabah Masters Sutera Harbour Resort, Kota Kinabalu US$60,000 November 23 - 26 Ancora Classic (Matchplay) Emeralda GC, Jakarta, Indonesia US$50,000

October 20 - 23 CJ Invitational hosted by KJ Choi Haesley Nine Bridges Golf Club, Jeju, South Korea US$750,000 October 27 - 30 CIMB Asia Pacific Classic, Malaysia The Mines Resort & Golf Club, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia US$6,100,000

Mercuries Taiwan Masters Taiwan GCC, Taipei, Chinese Taipei US$600,000 November 10 - 13 Barclays Singapore Open Sentosa GC, Singapore US$6,000,000 November 17 - 20 Iskandar Johor Open Horizon Hills GCC, Johor, Malaysia U$2,000,000

October 20 - 23 Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Classic Magnolia GC, Lake Buena Vista, Florida US$4,700,000 October 27 - 30 CIMB Asia Pacific Classic, Malaysia The Mines Resort & Golf Club, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia US$6,100,000 November 3 - 6 WGC-HSBC Champions Shenshan International GC, Shanghai, China US$7,000,000

November 10 - 13 Emirates Australian Open The Lakes GC, Sydney, Australia $1,500,000

October 20 - 23 Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship Sunrise GCC, Yang Mei, Chinese Taipei US$2,000,000 October 20 - 23 Castello Masters Club de Campo del Mediterraneo, Valencia, Spain €2,000,000

November 4 - 6 Mizuno Classic Kintetsu Kashikojima CC, Shima-Shi, Japan US$1,200,000

October 27 - 30 Andalucia Masters Valderrama Golf Club, Sotogrande, Spain TBC

November 10 - 13 Lorena Ochoa Invitational Guadalajara GC, Guadalajara, Mexico US$1,100,00

November 3 - 6 WGC-HSBC Champions Shenshan International GC, Shanghai, China US$7,000,000

November 17 - 20 CME Group Titleholders Grand Cypress GC, Orlando, Florida US$1,500,000

November 10 - 13 Barclays Singapore Open Sentosa GC, Singapore US$6,000,000 November 17 - 20 Alfred Dunhill Championship Leopard Creek CC, Malene South Africa €1,000,000 Iskandar Johor Open Horizon Hills GCC, Johor, Malaysia U$2,000,000

October 21 - 23 Sanya Ladies Open Yalong Bay GC, Sanya, China €200,000 October 28 - 30 Suzhou Taihu Ladies Open Suzhou International GC, Suzhou, China €300,000


WHERE TO GOLF - MALAYSIA & SINGAPORE KUALA LUMPUR

TANJUNG PUTERI GOLF RESORT

KINTA GOLF CLUB

MIMPIAN JADI GOLF CLUB

KUALA LUMPUR GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(54 holes) Tel: (607) 271 1888

(18holes) Tel: (605) 366 7270

(18 holes) Tel: (088) 787 122

(36 holes) Tel: (603) 2093 1111

PULAI SPRINGS RESORT

TAIPING GOLF RESORT

MOUNT KINABALU GOLF CLUB

ROYAL SELANGOR GOLF CLUB

(36 holes) Tel: (607) 521 2121

(18 holes) Tel: (605) 883 7500

(18 holes) Tel: (O88) 889 445

(36 holes) Tel: (603 ) 9206 3333

PORESIA COUNTRY CLUB

KUALA KANGSAR GOLF CLUB

NEXUS GOLF RESORT KARAMBUNAI

KELAB GOLF PERKHIDMATAN AWAM

(36 holes) Tel: (607) 510 1812

(9 holes) Tel: (605) 776 2396

(18 holes) Tel: (088) 480 888

(27 holes) Tel: (603) 7957 1958

STARHILL GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

BUKIT JALIL GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

(36 holes) Tel: (607) 556 6325

(18 holes) Tel: (603) 8996 1468

IOI PALM VILLA GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

BUKIT JAWI GOLF RESORT

LAHAD DATU GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

KELAB REKREASI ANGKATAN TENTERA

(27 holes) Tel: (607) 599 9099

( 36 holes) Tel: (604) 582 0759

(18 holes) Tel: (089) 889 288

(9 holes) Tel: (603) 2141 1113

THE LEGENDS GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

PENANG GOLF RESORT

SABAH GOLF COUNTRY CLUB

KELAB GOLF TITIWANGSA PDRM

(27 holes) Tel: (607) 652 4388

(36 holes) Tel: (604) 578 2022

(18 holes) Tel: (088) 247 533

(9 holes ) Tel: (603) 2693 4964

AUSTIN HILLS GOLF RESORT

BUKIT JAMBUL COUNTRY CLUB

SANDAKAN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: ( 607) 352 4300

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 644 2255

(18 holes) Tel: (089) 660 557

SELANGOR

BUKIT BANANG GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

PULAU PINANG

KEDAH

KENINGAU GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (087) 331 113

SHAN SHUI GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

GLENMARIE GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 428 6001

(36 holes ) Tel: (603) 7803 9090

DAIMAN 18 GOLF CLUB

HARVARD GOLF COUNTRY CLUB

KINABALU GOLF CLUB

KELAB GOLF NEGARA SUBANG

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 351 6813

(27 holes) Tel: (604) 458 8888

(9 holes) Tel: (088) 251 615

(36 holes) Tel: (603) 7876 0388

HORIZON HILLS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

KULIM GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

TAWAU GOLF CLUB

KELAB RAHMAN PUTRA MALAYSIA

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 232 3166

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 403 2828

(9 holes) Tel: (609) 765 555

KUKUP GOLF RESORT

BLACK FOREST GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 696 0950

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 922 2222

CHRISTINE RESORT

CINTA SAYANG GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

KELAB GOLF LABUAN

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 387 3000

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 441 4666

(9 holes) Tel: (087) 412 810

ORCHARD GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

DARULAMAN GOLF COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 897 7934

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 917 0001

PONDEROSA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

GUNUNG RAYA GOLF RESORT

(KELAB GOLF SARAWAK

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 354 9999

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 966 8148

(36 holes) Tel: (082) 440 966

JOHOR GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

PERMAIPURA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

BINTULU GOLF CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 223 3322

(18 holes)Tel: (604) 459 4000

(18 holes) Tel: (086) 252 001

SEBANA COVE GOLF & MARINE RESORT

ROYAL KEDAH GOLF CLUB

DAMAI GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 826 6655

(9 holes) Tel: (604) 731 9405

(18 holes) Tel: (082) 846 088

TIOMAN ISLAND GOLF CLUB

SG.PETANI GOLF CLUB

EASTWOOD VALLEY

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 419 1000

(9 holes) Tel: (604) 422 4894

GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(36 holes) Tel: (603) 6156 6870 SAUJANA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (36 holes) Tel: (603) 7846 1466 BANGI GOLF RESORT (27 holes) Tel: (603) 8925 3728 KELAB GOLF SULTAN ABDUL AZIZ SHAH (27 holes) Tel: (603) 5519 1512 TASIK PUTERI GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (27 holes) Tel: (603) 6034 4722 TROPICANA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (27 holes) Tel: (603) 7804 8888 BKT BERUNTUNG GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 6028 1841 BKT KEMUNING GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT (18 holes) Tel: (603) 5121 6552 BKT UNGGUL COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 8920 2888 DANAU GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 8925 8953 KAJANG HILL GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 8723 9668 KELAB REKREASI TENTERA UDARA (18 holes) Tel: (603) 5513 0998 KINRARA GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel : (603) 8076 2100 KOTA PERMAI GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 5122 3700 KUNDANG LAKES COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 6034 2725 MONTEREZ GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 7846 5989 PALM GARDEN GOLF CLUB (18holes) Tel: (603) 8948 7160 PERANGSANG TEMPLER GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 6091 0022 PORT KLANG GOLF RESORT (18 holes) Tel: (603) 3176 1323 IMPIAN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 8734 4195 SERENDAH GOLF LINKS (18 holes) Tel: (603) 6081 1077 SSG BERINGIN GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 6460 0016 SUNGAI LONG GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 90762233 THE MINES RESORT & GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 8943 2288 TEMPLER PARK GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (603) 6091 9630 PADANG GOLF UNIVERSITI PUTRA MALAYSIA (18 holes) Tel: (603) 8946 7996 KELAB DARUL EHSAN

BATU PAHAT GOLF CLUB (9 holes) Tel: (607) 432 9221

PERLIS

HORNBILL GOLF & JUNGLE CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (082) 577 930

(18 holes) Tel: (604) 976 9660

KELAB GOLF SIBU

KLUANG COUNTRY CLUB (9 holes) Tel: (607) 771 8840

MELAKA A’FAMOSA GOLF RESORT ( 27 holes) Tel: (606) 552 0888

KELANTAN KELANTAN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (609) 748 2102

TERENGGANU

(18 holes) Tel: (084) 801 119 MIRI GOLF CLUB (18 holes) Tel: (085) 416 787

SINGAPORE SELETAR COUNTRY CLUB

AYER KEROH COUNTRY CLUB

AWANA KIJAL BEACH & GOLF RESORT

(18 holes) Tel: +65 6486 0801

(27 holes) Tel: (606) 233 2000

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 864 1188

CHANGI GOLF CLUB

ORNA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

GREEN ACRES GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(9 holes) Tel: +65 6545 5133

(27 holes) Tel: (606) 521 0333

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 616 3500

SEMBAWANG COUNTRY CLUB

TIARA MELAKA GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

KELAB GOLF DESA DUNGUN

(18 holes) Tel: +65 6751 0320

(27 holes) Tel: (606) 231 1111

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 848 1041

SENTOSA GOLF CLUB

KUALA TERENGGANU GOLF RESORT

(36 holes) Tel: +65 6275 0022

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 666 6836

TANAH MERAH COUNTRY CLUB

NEGERI SEMBILAN NILAI SPRINGS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (27 holes) Tel: (606) 850 8888

PAHANG

(18 holes) Tel: +65 6592 0343 ( Garden) / 6592 0345 (Tampines)

STAFFIELD COUNTRY RESORT

AWANA GENTING HIGHLANDS

WARREN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(27 holes) Tel: (603) 8766 6117

GOLF & COUNTRY RESORT

(18 holes) Tel: +65 6586 1240

ERA GOLF &COUNTRY RESORT

(18 holes) Tel: (603) 6436 9000

ORCHID COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (6019) 255 3059

BERJAYA HILLS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(27 holes) Tel: +65 6750 2111

GEMAS GOLF RESORT

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 288 8180

RAFFLES COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (607) 948 2687

KELAB GOLF SULTAN AHMAD SHAH

( 18 holes ) Tel: +65 68617649

ROYAL PALM SPRINGS GOLF CLUB

CAMERON HIGHLANDS

SAFRA RESORT & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (606) 661 9599

(18 holes) Tel: (605) 4911126

( 27 holes) Tel: +65 542 8288

PORT DICKSON GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

ROYAL PAHANG GOLF CLUB

JURONG COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (606) 647 3586

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 567 5811

(18 holes) Tel: +65 5 6560 5655

ROYAL SRI MENANTI GOLF CLUB

KELAB GOLF BENTONG

KEPPEL CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (606) 497 9600

(9 holes) Tel: (609) 222 2585

(18 holes) Tel : +65 6375 1818

SEREMBAN 3 PARADISE VALLEY

KELAB REKREASI TUDM KUANTAN

LAGUNA NATIONAL GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (606) 633 5033

(9 holes) Tel: (609) 538 4282

(36 holes) Tel: +65 5 62481 777

SEREMBAN INTERNATIONAL GOLF CLUB

LIPIS VALLEY GOLF CLUB

SINGAPORE ISLAND COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (606) 677 5277

(9 holes) Tel: (609) 312 1963

(81 holes) Tel: + 65 6466 2244

PERAK

SABAH (27 holes) Tel: (088 ) 318 888

MERU VALLEY GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

TAWAU HOT SPRINGS GOLF CLUB

(27 holes) Tel: (605) 529 3300

(18 holes) Tel: (609) 765 555

DAMAI LAUT GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

BORNEO GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(18 holes) Tel: (605) 685 9333

(18 holes) Tel: (087) 861 888

PALM RESORT GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

ROYAL PERAK GOLF CLUB

DALIT BAY GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

(54 holes) Tel: ( 607) 599 6222

(18 holes) Tel: (605) 542 3266

(18 holes) Tel: (088) 791 188

JOHOR

(18 holes) Tel: (085) 421 010

(9 holes) Tel: (607) 552 2202

(27 holes) Tel : (605) 366 7433

(9 holes) Tel: (603) 3289 1069

SARAWAK

PUTRA GOLF CLUB

SUTERA HABOUR GOLF COUNTRY CLUB

ROYAL KAMPUNG KUANTAN CLUB

LABUAN

IMPIAN EMAS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

CLEARWATER SANCTUARY GOLF RESORT

(9 holes) Tel: (603) 4257 2333

(18 holes) Tel: (089) 916 888

Help us keep this list accurate! Please send additions, corrections and updates to info@theclubhouse.com.my

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The ClubHouse Oct 2011  

Reviews of Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia and Asian Amateur Championship

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