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The Medical Issue EL PASO/LAS CRUCES HOME & DESIGN MAGAZINE

100 Trost years & OVER

issue

Trost

of Radford

WITH A MODERN TWIST

the art of

CONTEMPORARY The Hospitals of Providence ICU minimalism Nevena beyond the Call of Duty Christi

n a e n a r r e t i d e M _ Ca_stle

London Fashion Week travel to europe a must see

t s e w h t u o s s meet What’s Spring fashion

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Spring, 2019

lifestyle ¡ luxury design ¡ architecture EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Shelley Mozelle | shelley@thecitymagazineelp.com EDITORIAL Managing Editor Kim North | kim@thecitymagazineelp.com Editorial Assistant/Staff Writer Henry Craver | henry@thecitymagazineelp.com GRAPHIC Editorial Design Ernie Sanchez Creative | ernie@thecitymagazineelp.com Junior Graphic Designer Andy Martinez | andy@thecitymagazineelp.com Graphic Design Assistant Paulina Gines BUSINESS Accountant Dawn Munoz | dawn@thecitymagazineelp.com Office Manager Josh Sanchez | josh@thecitymagazineelp.com ADVERTISING Development-Sales-Marketing Joe Rivera | joe@thecitymagazineelp.com Senior Advertising Executive Chaz Wilson | chaz@thecitymagazineelp.com Advertising Executives Jesse Maynes | jesse@thecitymagazineelp.com Oscar Acosta | oscar@thecitymagazineelp.com Marisol Bustillos | marisol@thecitymagazineelp.com Kristin Brown | kristen@thecitymagazineelp.com Marisa Cedillos | marisa@thecitymagazineelp.com Inside Sales Genevieve Frias SPECIAL PROJECTS Brandi Lambert INTERNS Biyanca Gomez, Hope Alegre, Zak Hansen

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lifestyle · luxury design · architecture

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS Grace Neuhaus, Janene Rojas, Andy Martinez, Jesse Maynes, Henry Craver, , Ladonna Apodaca, Zak Hansen

PHOTOGRAPHY Art Moreno, Jr.

SENIOR STYLIST Ladonna Apodaca

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Your seasonal guide to being the perfect guest. Here’s a sure way to be invited back and look as good as the goods you bring. No more wondering what you should wear or what to show up with.

Plus One

Isabel Marant Jango Embroidered Denim Jacket

WHAT TO WEAR

A firm believer in always having a backup option for every occasion, I’ve graduated past the point of caring about how acceptable it may appear to have an outfit change in-between activities. That’s why mix and match brunch hike and post-trek cocktails outfits are in order. Use this cheat code for good style and stay fresh on and off the mountains with these open airinspired rig-outs.

LOEWE Burgundy T-shirt

Klein → Calvin Slim Arielle Jeans

Res Ipsa Kilim Loafer

WHAT TO BRING

Tom Ford Cromwell Boots

Stone Island Logo Patch Cotton Shorts

Trail Mix is the perfect snack to accompany a hike or picnic. It’s easy to make and there’s not a lot of rules to doing it. Take a walk down the loose bin aisle at your local health food store and just pick and choose what looks good. Mix it up with nuts, seeds, dried fruit and some chocolate morsels if you’re feeling sweet. Do you love old fashions but worry they’re not cool enough? I don’t, but it’s still fun to remix the classics sometimes. That’s why I recently began ordering the cocktail with brandy, as opposed to the usual bourbon. I can’t actually take credit for the idea, brandy old fashions are the norm in Wisconsin where German and Scandinavian settlers popularized the spirit. In addition to switching out the liquors, top it off with a touch of 7up or sprite.

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contents 7 22

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FENG shui your front door By Grace the Psychic Lady

Contemporary minimalism By Zak Hansen

BETTEr read than dead By Henry Craver

UVAS SPRINGS MANOR By Ladonna Apodaca

Mediterranean meets southwest By Henry Craver

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SPRUCING UP THE FRONT DOOR WITH

Feng Shui

| By: GRACE NEUHAUS, CERTIFIED FENG SHUI CONSULTANT & PRACTITIONER |

THE FIRST IMPRESSION to our homes is the front doorway, which sets the tone for the energy in our homes and also our life’s experiences. A positive front entry creates uplifted spirits and positive expectations. The ideal entrance is welcoming and inviting. It greets you with uplifting sights, sounds and smells. It makes you and your guests feel comfortable and at home. The front door to our homes is considered the mouth of the dragon and many of us fail to utilize this space appropriately. In order to activate the Chi energy of the front door, one must maintain its use regularly by entering and exiting. An overgrowth of trees or shrubs leading to the front entryway of the residence can block the opportunities presenting themselves to you, which can be especially critical in our careers. You want the pathway for opportunity to be clear, without obstructions. Spring is around the corner and sprucing up the front door is a great way to rejuvenate the energy of the entrance. If the door is worn and haggard, freshen it with some new paint—the most popular color to apply is red as it symbolizes the chi. Think of it like going for a job interview—you would not wear old torn jeans and expect to land an executive position. You want to make a good first impression. Also, if the doorknob is loose, be sure to tighten it to help get a “grip” on your finances. Purchase a new door mat to welcome new opportunities into your life. Remember to clean the outside light fixtures to make sure they burn brightly at night for several hours. I personally keep my porch light on all night as a way to lift the energy of my home and also protect it from harm. Plants are another way to bring good energy into the home. I suggest purchasing two clay pots, one for each side of the front door, either in a deep blue or black color, and filling them with red geraniums. Geraniums leaves are round like Chinese coins and red activates the chi which is good for financial growth. You can also place jade plants for wealth, but avoid plants that have sharp points as this will afflict your money and health. A water feature, such as a fountain placed to the left side of the front door, is another enhancer for prosperity. If the energy seems stagnant, you may utilize things, such as a garden banner, that are cheerful and inviting to lift the chi. Hanging crystals, prisms or windchimes with five metal hollow rods help to move the energy. One final thing to consider for the entrance of your home is door greeters or protectors. A few examples are Fu Dogs, lions or angels. Not only do they greet your visitors, they also protect the residence. www.thecitymagazineelp.com

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50 56 62 62

Spring renewal Fresh downtown By Wayne Hilton el paso’s newest accomodations

In and Out In and Out

By Janene Noel By Janene Rojas

56 60 A contemporary addition Cook’s Block to a historic beauty By Jesse Maynes By Zak Hansen

50 56 The Medical Issue EL PASO/LAS CRUCES HOME & DESIGN MAGAZINE The Medical Issue

100 100 Trost years years &

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THE CITY CITY && THE THE CITY CITY SPACES SPACES $25 $25 THE (one year) year) (one

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CONTEMPORARY The Hospitalsof ofProvidence Providence ICU The Hospitals ICU

2019 Nevena

Nevena beyond theCall Callof ofFeDuty Duty beyond the Christi Christi ng Shui

Design trends for

minimalism HOW TO

n ea n a rr e it ed M e l t ra s ba e a l ar _ t C B s ta a C _anmeets southwest S

London London Fashion Week Fashion Week travel to europe travel to europe a must see a must see

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Y S S O be B BOSSY PINK

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V I L LA I N

A EU RO PEA N

T H E H EA RT OF T H E S OU T H W E ST

By: HENRY CRAVER | Photography by: ART MORENO JR. Story Coordinator: LADONNA APODACA

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Article Title

THE CITY CITY SPACES SPACES HOME HOME & & DESIGN DESIGN THE

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eep in El Paso’s westside, toeing the line between Texas and New Mexico, sits one of the region’s most refined subdivisions, Villa Encanto. The brainchild of CGN Design’s Chad North, Villa Encanto is defined by a unique combination of architectural styles. Think of it as mediterranean meets Southwest. This villa, built by Cullers & Caldwell Builders, typifies Chad’s signature look. 4,690 square feet and two stories high, the home centers around a sunlit piazza—or courtyard—in typical Italian fashion. In addition to serving as the ideal open air coffee or wine area, the hollow center fills the house with light and provides stunning views of the Franklin Mountain Range. Venture inside and you’ll find yourself surrounded by elegant, eyebrow-shaped doorways and halls. Sunshine floods through window speckled walls, bathing the rooms in a beautiful soft light. The interior showcases an eclectic, but coherent, selection of materials. Chiseled travertine stone gives way to Venetian plastered walls—all tastefully accentuated by expansive iron work. As visually pleasing as the home is, it’s also practical. In fact, no aspect of the structure sacrifices functionality for the sake of aesthetics, or vice-versa. For example, the groin-vaulted ceilings are not only stunning, but create perfect acoustics. The hand-hewn wood floors help insulate the house in winter and keep it cool in the summer, mitigating the costly energy bills that are common of houses this size.

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SU NS H I N E F L O OD S T H ROUG H W I N D OW

S PE C K L E D WA L LS , BAT H I NG T H E RO OM S I N A

BEAU T I F U L S OF T L I G H T.

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On that note, this home is big, but not excessively so. Altogether it has four bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms. The ground floor master suite features a relaxing quasi-terrace and a two-sink bathroom. The kitchen, tied together by a black marble topped island, is spacious and fully stocked with every accoutrement any chef could ask for. The guest house—or mother-in-law suite—is across the courtyard with its own rooftop patio area. The entire home is made for indoor-outdoor living, with several outdoor fireplaces and areas to gather. Just a short walk from the home you’ll find Villa Encanto’s central park. The lush space is community’s meeting point, providing youngsters with an ideal space to shake out their restless legs and the older crowd a

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place to mingle out in the fresh Chihuahuan air. Surrounded by tall trees, the lawn is spacious enough to accommodate pick-up soccer games and evening baseball catches, however, in no way does it give off a sports recreation vibe. It’s easy on the eyes like everything else in the proximity. While Chad and his group’s work certainly has a distinct feel, they pride themselves on accommodating the client. Every house is tailored to the home buyer’s desires, as Chad explains, “Our clients give us a wish list complete with pictures as well as different ideas of what they like. We look at what they want and try to put everything on a piece of paper. Bit by bit we have to make sure that everything fits together. It’s a very fun process.”

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Spring, 2019 El Paso/Las Cruces’ premier Lifestyle Magazine THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

Pick up a copy of this month’s issue at your local Walgreens and check out THE CITY After 50 magazine, The City WEDDINGS magazine, THE CITY SPACES and Home & Design Magazine

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The Medical Issue EL PASO/LAS CRUCES HOME & DESIGN MAGAZINE

April's New Music

100 Trost years & OVER

issue

Trost

of Radford

WITH A MODERN TWIST

the art of

CONTEMPORARY The Hospitals of Providence ICU minimalism Nevena beyond the Call of Duty Christi

n a e n ra r e it d e M e l Ca_st hwest _

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London Fashion Week travel to europe a must see

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

Spring, 2019

Headline

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LESS CAN BE MORE By: ZAK HANSEN | Photography by: ART MORENO, JR.

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Story Coordinator: LADONNA APODACA

he term contemporary is entirely relative in the context of style. It doesn’t refer to a specific time period; rather, it refers to the materials, styles and design movements of today—whenever today happens to be. Because of this, the concept of contemporary design is a fluid thing that changes with the times and is difficult to pin down. Contemporary design today still maintains elements from mid-century modern style— which relies on stark, clean lines, bare, neutral walls and wood floors and furniture in whites, creams, greys or light browns, with a much-needed “pop” coming from large artworks, bold, colorful accent pieces and layered fabrics. The term minimalist refers to much more than a decorating style—it’s a lifestyle that wholly embraces the “less is more” aesthetic, right down to the décor. Key components of minimalist style include the limiting to just one or two neutral colors—whites, blacks and greys are the most common—with clean lines, flat surfaces, defined curves and plenty of wide-open, empty spaces. Natural light is a must, and surfaces and walls are kept mostly bare, save for eyecatching accent pieces like large artworks and playful textures in complementary tones. This boldly minimalist home in El Paso should provide plenty of inspiration for anyone aiming to incorporate “less-is-more” décor in their own life—or a bold vision for a dream home down the road.

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“THE CONCEPT OF CONTEMPORARY DESIGN IS A FLUID THING THAT CHANGES WITH THE TIMES” www.thecitymagazineelp.com

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This home is currently for sale. For information, contact: Broker/Owner Lydia Leticia Mlouhi (915) 252-8193 www.thecitymagazineelp.com

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Inspiration Board

Spring, 2019

WHAT’S OLD IS NEW

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BETTER READ THAN DEAD

| By: HENRY CRAVER |

APPROXIMATE JOY CHRISTIAN ANDERSON Comprising a series of closely cropped portraits taken on the streets of Shanghai and Shenzhen, renowned photographer Christopher Anderson’s latest work offers a beautiful and moody look at contemporary Chinese life. There’s nothing cooler you could put on a coffee table in 2019.

GINGER BREAD HELEN OYEYEMI Nobody is too old for a well-told fairytale. Or at least that’s the case of author Helen Oyeyemi’s adult fables. Having already found great success retelling Snow White and Mr. Fox earlier this decade, the author’s latest effort is a spin on Hansel and Gretel. Like her previous works, Ginger Bread is charmingly original and beautifully written.

MAMA’S LAST HUG FRANS DE WAAL Primate researcher Frans De Waal sees complex emotion throughout the animal kingdom. Monkeys understand fairness, pigs display hope and whales mourn lost loved ones. Such concepts have long been cited as markers separating humans from all other species. Science, however, has recently shown that the line, or lines, isn’t so clear.

PARIS: EYE OF THE FLÂNEUR WILLIAM ALBERT ALLARD Long-time National Geographic photographer William Albert Allard’s latest book is an ode to his favorite city, Paris. Somehow, Allard has triumphed in making wonderfully fresh pictures of one of the world’s most photographed locations–no small feat. Unlike most of his previous projects, there’s no single story here. It’s all about the city’s unparalleled aesthetics, and nobody is complaining.

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UVAS SPRINGS

Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

Open the doors to this sprawling New Mexico ranch home and you’ll swear you’ve stepped into a beloved bit of Citified High Style. Written and styled by: LADONNA APODACA photographed by: ART MORENO, JR. / MLS CAMERA GUY

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MANOR

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

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n our last issue of The City Spaces (Winter, 2019) we featured part one of a two part series on this grand abode. There was simply too much to share with our readers in one story so, on the following pages, we offer you an opportunity for a second glimpse into this stately home that sits on a parcel of land spreading out over 500 acres of desert terrain just beyond the quiet little town of Hatch, New Mexico. In our previous story we shared images of the formal living areas, part of the sizable kitchen with adjoining china and stemware closet, as well as the butler’s pantry and a number of other divinely appointed rooms from throughout the home. As you’ll see here and on the following pages, the rest of this desert gem does not disappoint. One of the favored spaces for informal gatherings is the handsome bar that is connected to the wine cellar and part of the cavernous family room and nearby kitchen. This beautifully appointed area was custom designed and constructed in California then disassembled and shipped to the property where it was reconstructed on site for its final installation.

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A large Dutch Master’s reproduction hangs prominently nearby on a rustic wall made of reclaimed brick from an old 1930’s hotel in downtown El Paso that was later demolished in the 1980’s. The color of the grout and choice of brick were specially selected to complement the hues of this grand piece of art. For the wine cellar, the homeowners found decorative tile while traveling through Sorrento, Italy. The ornate crystal chandelier was a cherished surprise find during a visit to the isle of Murano. The pattern of grapes that is woven into the design has particular significance to the homeowners as the former family business was once called, Las Uvas … Spanish for “the grapes.” On a far end of the 20,000 plus square foot home lies a unique room called the orangery, or orangerie as it is known in Europe. Growing citrus trees indoors was once considered a sign of great wealth in fashionable residences from the 17th to 19th. Not surprisingly, the couple residing here seems to indeed possess green thumbs as everything they plant, both inside and out, seems

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

to thrive in spite of the arid desert surroundings. A small potting room situated just off the orangery certainly helps in their horticultural endeavors. Here, the homeowners do all their potting for plants and flowers or for designing bouquets. A door to the outside provides easy access to a multitude of cutting gardens. Skilled not only as gardeners extraordinaire, the couple is also known for their culinary expertise. In their spacious kitchen, they can deftly whip up everything from a sophisticated gourmet meal to simple country comfort food. A baker’s kitchen, unique unto itself, affords added ease to prepare sumptuous “from scratch” baked goods. This small yet well planned space is framed by the homeowner’s favorite window in the whole house. “From there”, the husband says, “one can see down to the highway or out to the mountain range beyond.” This baker’s dream features two ovens, a dish washer, a full sink, dish storage and is perfectly situated right next to the pantry. A true culinary delight!

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Off in another wing of the house, beyond the grand master suite, lies a spa-like master bath that has every amenity one could ask for. A large Jacuzzi tub is centered in the space and warmed by a working fireplace which serves as a dramatic backdrop. Separate his and her showers feature heated sauna units, while a sprawling custom made cabinet with towering shelving units provides ample storage space. Just around the corner and directly off of the porch that adjoins the master suite is an outdoor Jacuzzi that can accommodate up to twenty four guests. Directly behind the Jacuzzi is a small scale wading pool, perfect for a cool dip to ward off the hot summer nights that define the surrounding desert terrain. The piece de resistance of the whole property is quite likely the romantic loggia which exudes the couple’s love of European

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influence. The ultimate framework for elegant entertaining, this edifice of days gone by sits in the furthest corner of the backyard— the homeowners’ favorite spot on the property. Surrounded by more than 10 acres, Uvas Springs Manor is truly a jewel in the desert. As they lounge in this elegant setting, the homeowners share their sentiments about living in this arid wonderland… “We’ve enjoyed every minute of living in our home,” the wife says, “It’s been everything we hoped it would be. From the surrounding scenery to the comfort of the place I’ve found this to be such a peaceful place.” The husband adds, “The home is both warm and welcoming. Whether large or small isn’t this what we all want our homes to be?” We couldn’t agree more.

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This home is currently for sale. For information contact: Austin Tharp Keller Williams Realty Cell (575) 621-4117 Office ( 575) 527-0880 austin@austintharp.com austintharpteam.com Contractor - Jeter Construction, Inc. (Las Cruces) Cabinets - Supreme Cabinets (El Paso) Flooring - Carpet One (El Paso) Caesarstone Quartz and Concetto Precious Stone - 77 Stone (El Paso) Lighting - City Lights (El Paso)

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Renew Your Style | By: WAYNE HILTON |

SPRING! The season of renewal, inspiration and unbridled confidence to try something new! What better way to embrace these sentiments than by thinking about the spaces we live in. As we power our way into 2019, let’s take a look at what’s ontrend, influencing designers and inspiring consumers.

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Black Kitchens Fumed Oak. Knockout Black. Down Pipe. No, these are not the latest craft cocktails; they’re the names of some of the surfaces and colors that are leading kitchens into a new Dark Age. And we’re talking about more than just granite countertops or a wall splashed with chalkboard paint. Referencing butler’s pantries as well as Art Deco and steam-punk styling, designers are beginning to abandon the all-white Parisian patisserie color scheme—the prevailing millennium palette—for dramatic kitchens infused with smoky hues like charcoal gray and licorice black. Sexy or subdued, reflective or textured, black grounds the kitchen with its singular brand of elegance. The black kitchen trend illuminates subtle details, creating depth while letting food take center stage. Whether it’s lightened and brightened with pure white walls, or accented with gleaming geometric tile and copper details, a black kitchen makes a definitive statement.

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Artisanal Accessories This will truly be the year of the bespoke touch for home dÊcor. Anything resembling the work of a detail-obsessed artisan will be right at home. Whether it’s a handcrafted accent table, a standout chair, or a custom hand-painted frame, a few artisanal elements will keep your dÊcor interesting without the pressure of committing an entire space to the look. When looking for inspiration, turn first to your local arts and crafts markets, galleries and seasonal art fairs. Shopping locally creates the opportunity of finding those special pieces that are in line with the artistic vernacular of a community. Great online resources include sites like Etsy, Zibbet, Artfire and Domino.

Contrasting Tile and Colored Grout The trend of using tile as a focal point has grown in popularity over the last several years. Popular styles include Moroccan, herringbone, complicated geometrics and the ubiquitous white subway tile. In the coming year, tile is going to become even more interesting as the use of colored grout is introduced. The cautious practice of matching grout colors to tile colors, or at least within a shade or two, is giving way to high contrast applications. White tile with black or vibrant colored grout, and vice versa, becomes a dynamic focal point. Designers are using contrasting grout colors (think opposites on the color wheel) to pop the patterns in tile. Also, this practice is not limited to just backsplashes and showers; we are seeing this dynamic trend on floors, walls, tabletops and fireplace mantles.

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R E N E W YO U R ST Y L E

Spring, 2019

Warm Neutrals We’ve been slathering rooms in icy, aloof grays for years now, but in 2019, warm neutrals will thaw that trend out. Warm neutrals include all shades and tints of brown, as well as metallic colors such as gold, copper and bronze. There are also warm neutrals found in the color families of red, orange and yellow. Even whites, though technically a shade, are divided into cool whites and warm whites. A monochromatic color scheme is a safe and easy way to mix warm neutrals into a room. Think of how the colors are displayed on a paint chip. For a cozy feel, go with a dark color on the walls, like chocolate brown. Balance the space by choosing lighter shades for furniture and window coverings, then a pop of color for accents, like pillows and table-top accessories. Rich textures also bring out the life and warmth of warm-toned neutrals. Different textures add layers of depth and dimension to neutral fabrics, upholstery and furnishings. Natural textures like bamboo, wicker, rattan and grasscloth add an exotic touch. Burl wood, leather, barn wood and rough, knotty pine provide a rustic feel, while silk, cashmere and velvet add a sense of luxury and sophistication.

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Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

Terrazzo Made from a mix of glass, granite, marble or quartz chips suspended in a polished cement or resin, this midcentury mainstay was once the de facto flooring option in schools, hospitals and airports thanks to its durability and thrifty price tag. I can remember when my father re-tiled our kitchen and dining room with white terrazzo, speckled with flecks of pink and brown aggregates. Who would have thought this once cost-effective floor covering would evolve into a retro-luxe design choice! Terrazzo has been stealthy in making its way into applications far beyond floors and walls. This once understated material is appearing in table tops, planters, accessories and even terrazzo-inspired prints on fabrics and papers. There you have it! A small sample of what will be shaping the design and dĂŠcor world over the coming months. Be inspired. Be fearless. Look to trends for ideas, but stay true to yourself and always create spaces that reflect YOU. May the coming year be filled with creative ideas that become beautiful realities, in your home and life. Cheers!

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

Spring, 2019

SHINE A LIGHT ON THE WORLD Upcycled Globes

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Spring, 2019

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

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Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

he WS Hills Building has a long and storied history in El Paso. It was there that Mr. W.S. Hills settled himself in 1879, investigating the land holdings of famed developer Robert Campbell, of the Campbell Real Estate Company. Quickly recognizing the Pass City’s enormous growth potential, he then erected what was El Paso’s first two-story building, a modest adobe, to accommodate his new profession as realtor and the arrival of his wife and son. Later on, Hills brought the very first electric light to El Paso—somewhat unsuccessfully. From the Oct. 21, 1929, El Paso Evening Post: “To W.S. Hills probably belongs the honor of bringing the first electric light to El Paso. In 1883 he set up storage batteries and a generator and managed to get occasional glimmers from the lights. The first electric lights were placed in a saloon. But the old oil lamps were kept handy and frequently during the evening it was necessary to light up the lamps for a while until the batteries regained power.” In the same place, working with his boss, Hills set the blueprints for downtown El Paso, pulling together disparate landowners, laying out and naming its streets—

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Florence Street for his daughter, Lee Street for his son, Campbell Street for the man who employed him—and forming its first streetcar company. There, after Mr. Hills’ death, Trost and Trost constructed a brilliant example of the second renaissance revival style for which they are best known—designed with inevitable upward expansion in mind—commissioned in 1926 by Mrs. Hills in memoriam of her late husband. The building’s second-story scaffolding would later become a preferred workstation for American muralist, author, war correspondent and illustrator Tom Lea. The El Paso legend completed some of his best-known government projects there, including the murals in the Hall of State Building in Dallas and the “Pass of the North” mural at the Historic Federal Courthouse in El Paso. And it was there, after the dominos fell on Billy Abraham’s downtown real-estate portfolio, that architects and developers William “Bill” Helm and Edgar Lopez, of In*Situ Architecture, and Rida Asfahani, of Root Architects, saw the dawn of a new era of growth in El Paso, much like that golden era that awaited W.S. Hills when he first arrived from St. Louis.

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Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

A New Mixed-Use Residence Coming Downtown | By: ZAK HANSEN |

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Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

“ W I T H T H I S , W E G E T T O PAY H OM AG E T O T RO S T A N D T RO S T, H I S V I S I O N WA S T O G O U P , A N D N O O N E H A S PA I D AT T E N T I O N T O T H AT. ”

The WS Hills Building project will produce a seven-story mixed-use structure with business/retail on the ground floor and basement, two floors of business and office space, and four floors of market-rate, for-rent, loft-style apartments. “We, collectively, have been looking for some years for a property downtown to invest in and redevelop,” said Helm. Originally scouted as a possible location for the Tom Lea Institute, which passed on the option, Helm and company nonetheless established a relationship with the owner. In 2017, when it became available, they jumped. “That conversation took all of about 45 seconds,” said Asfahani. “When we were discussing if it was a good idea to pursue this, it was a no brainer. It has immense potential, and there are not a lot of buildings like this available in the downtown area. It wasn’t a question of ‘if we can make it happen,’ but ‘how can we make it happen?’” In the business of “offering ideas and solutions for other people,” as Lopez puts it jokingly, the trio finally had the opportunity to do if for themselves—and the know-how to do it. “We are professionals in this, and anyone doing this work comes to professionals like us for not only the ideas and insight to do it, but the means and professional ability to execute a project like this,” said Asfahani. “Often, you’re always battling budgets and expectations, but we know what it’s going to cost, we know how much time it’s going to take, we know the level of complexity—and we know there’s a need. There’s the potential to execute a nice-looking project that is financially viable and is also something that’s missing. There hasn’t been new market-rate construction, or anything higher than that, in downtown in years.” Working from the original Trost plans, which not only accommodated for but intended eventual vertical expansion, the trio’s challenge was to create something that pays due respect to Trost’s original design while moving the conservation forward. The result reference’s Trost’s timeless design structurally, rhythmically and materially through contemporary materials and styles. “With this, we get to pay homage to Trost and Trost,” said Lopez. “His vision was to go up, and no one has paid attention to that.” To that end, they’re confident in their vision, not only for the W.S. Hills Building, but for El Paso as well. “We’re paying homage and paying tribute, but still moving forward and doing something different,” said Asfahani. “With the design… the building recesses to respect the original perimeter, and starts getting this new skin that’s entirely different, in terms of material—a modern version of the pressed metal that was up on there—and maintains the same lines.”

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Rather than topping Trost’s renowned structure with an amorphous, modern design, the project will maintain street-level appearance while pushing contemporary boundaries above. After all, 100 years later, Trost “is still pretty damn impressive,” said Asfahani. “Our attempt was to make a gesture that was a bit more timeless, because the existing building is timeless still today. What could we do ... if someone is walking by this building in 50 years when we’re dead and, feels like it could have been built last week?” With one eye to El Paso’s history and one toward its future, with the WS Hills Building project, “We get this opportunity to not only execute the original intent, but also do it as a critical point in El Paso’s history,” said Asfahani. “They’re going to look back at this time in 100 years and think about this great change, this rebirth and revival. So much has happened in the past few years here. You see what’s happening, you see the big development here, and it’s inevitable. While all these cities around the country are saturated, here we are talking about the same things these guys were talking about 100 years ago.”

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

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THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

Spring, 2019

T O D AY

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Spring, 2019

TRANSFORMING A HISTORIC BEAUT Y

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

FUTURE PLANS

Images courtesy of: Architect of Record: In*Situ Architecture Associate Architect: Root Architects Developer/Owner: Trost Hills Building, LLC www.thecitymagazineelp.com

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Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

IN

| By: JANENE NOEL |

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Little Mermaid Meets the 70s Scalloped seating in hues of the 70s is so in right now, and so is everything else about the 70s when it comes to home décor. Mustard yellows, burnt oranges, velvet seating, abstract shapes and geometric patterns—it’s all coming back!

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Living Coral As Pantone’s color of the year, we must pay homage to living coral, a color described by Pantone.com as “animating and life-affirming.” Will a new coral throw pillow really affirm my life? I’ll keep you guys posted on that one! But for now, check out this energizing tone for yourself the next time you’re home shopping or scrolling through Pinterest.

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Canopy Beds There’s something about the need for sanctuary that has us converting our bedrooms into protective havens as of late, which is why the canopy bed is making a strong return. Originally created for privacy and warmth in medieval Europe, we are taking this same idea to make a comforting nest to rest in today.

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Maximalist Art Let’s say goodbye to simplicity and hello to one of my new favorite trends; maximalist art! Floor-to-ceiling portraits and luxurious frames that make a statement are going to be huge this spring, literally.

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IN & OUT

Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

OUT

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Subway Tiles Although these are a personal favorite of mine in the kitchen, sadly, subway tiles are a thing of the past. That doesn’t mean I’m getting rid of mine though!

Gender Blues Long gone are the days that we paint baby rooms based on gender. Modern parents are looking past traditional blue and pink to more gender-neutral colors like shades of yellow, green and maybe even living coral.

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Terrazzo or Terrazz-no? Well this one is a toughie because while half of the Internet agrees that terrazzo will be huge this spring with its Easter egg like specks, other reports say it’s a no-go. In tile version, I’m noticing that terrazzo is out, but in other restroom décor like soap beds and dispensers, it is in. Don’t go removing your terrazzo tiles just yet though, I have a feeling this one will pop in and out of trend for years to come. It’s too cute not to.

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Minimalism From our paintings to our color palettes, I’m seeing that minimalism is now out. The bigger and bolder, the better!

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Spring, 2019

THE CITY SPACES HOME & DESIGN

SPRING SPACES 2019 Advertiser INDEX

A-1 Kitchens by Sierra...........................................................................................................................................................Pg. 4 Around the World Catering..................................................................................................................................................Pg. 55 Designs by LL Power..........................................................................................................................................................Pg. 53 DoubleTree by Hilton.............................................................................................................................................................Pg. 1 Evolve Credit Union.............................................................................................................................................................Pg. 65 Geico................................................................................................................................................................Inside Front Cover

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The City Spaces Spring 2019  

In this issue: Trost & Trost with a modern twist, The Art of Contemporary minimalism, Mediterranean Meets Southwest

The City Spaces Spring 2019  

In this issue: Trost & Trost with a modern twist, The Art of Contemporary minimalism, Mediterranean Meets Southwest