Issuu on Google+


THE CITY  From Institutes of the Christian Religion, by John Calvin, translated by John Allen, originally published in Geneva in Latin in 1536. The Lord commands us to be good to all men universally, a great part of whom estimated according to their merits are very undeserving. But here the Scripture assists us with an excellent rule when it inculcates what we must not regard the intrinsic merit of men but must consider the image of God in them to which we owe all possible honor and love. Whoever therefore is presented to you that needs your kind offices, you have no reason to refuse him your assistance. Say that he is a stranger; yet the Lord hath impressed on him a character which ought to be familiar to you, for which reason He forbids you to despise your own flesh. Say that he is contemptible and worthless; but the Lord sows him to be the one who he hath deigned to grace with his own image. Say that he is unworthy of your making the smallest exertion on his account; but the image of God, by which he is recommended to you, deserves your surrender of yourself and all that you possess. If he not only has deserved no favor but, on the contrary, has provoked you with injuries and insults, even this is no just reason why you should cease to embrace him. He has deserved, you will say, very different treatment forom me. But what hath the Lord deserved? Who when he commands you to forgive men all their offences against you, certainly intends that they should be charged to himself. This is the only way of attaining that which is not only difficult but utterly repugnant to the nature of man; to love them who hate us, to requite injuries with kindnesses, and to return blessing for curses. We should remember that we must not reflect on the wickedness of men, but contemplate the Divine image in them, which, concealing and obliterating their faults, by its beauty and dignity allures us to embrace them in the arms of our love.

A publication of Houston Baptist University

SPRING 2012

+++


THE CITY   Publisher Robert Sloan Advisory Editors Francis J. Beckwith Adam Bellow Paul J. Bonicelli Joseph Bottum Wilfred McClay John Mark Reynolds Editor in Chief Benjamin Domenech Books Editor Micah Mattix Writer at Large Hunter Baker Contributing Editors Matthew Lee Anderson Ryan T. Anderson Matthew Boyleston David Capes Victoria Gardner Coates Christopher Hammons Anthony Joseph Joseph M. Knippenberg Louis Markos Peter Meilaender Dan McLaughlin Paul D. Miller Matthew J. Milliner Russell Moore Robert Stacey Joshua Trevino   THE  CITY Volume V, Issue 1 Copyright 2012 Houston Baptist University. All rights reserved by original authors except as noted. Letters and submissions to this journal are welcomed. Cover photo by Joshua Trevino. Email us at thecity@hbu.edu, and visit us online at civitate.org.


S P R I N G   2012   

4CONTENTS$ Lessons from History Louis Markos on Saint Augustine Paul D. Miller on Alexis de Tocqueville Paul Bonicelli on Andrew Jackson

4 18 36

Features A Conversation with Mary Eberstadt Paul Rahe on Catholicism and Conscience Tim Goeglein on Tea with Russell Kirk

47 58 67

Books & Culture Ryan T. Anderson on the Morality of Capitalism Aaron Belz on Reclaiming Wendell Berry Burwell Stark on Teddy Roosevelt and Football Micah Mattix on The Confederacy of Dunces

73 92 96 100

A Republ ic of Letter s Hunter Baker

105

Poetry by John Poch

45,104

The Word by G.K. Chesterton

3

119


THE CITY 

W ISD OM & T HE C ITY OF G OD 4AUGUSTINE)FOR)TODAY$ Louis Markos

I

n 410 A.D., the unthinkable happened. For the first time in 800  years, the invincible city of Rome was sacked and looted. Im‐ agine if the destruction of the World Trade Center on Septem‐ ber  11,  2001  had  been  followed  by  a  full  scale  invasion  of  Manhattan; such  a  cataclysmic  event  would  have  left the  citi‐ zens of America (and the world) gasping for breath, and for answers.  Nothing again would seem stable; it would be as if the end of civili‐ zation  had  arrived.  Just  such  a  sense  of  apocalyptic  doom  fell  over  the empire in 410.   In  response,  the  pagan  intellectuals  of  the  day  cast  the  blame  for  Rome’s demise on Christianity. On the one hand, Rome’s rejection of  her traditional pantheon had clearly prompted Jupiter and his fellow  deities to abandon the city they had nurtured and made great. On the  other,  the  Christian  ethic  of  turn  the  other  cheek  had  left  her  weak  and vitiated, unable to resist the virility and martial spirit of the bar‐ barians. Desperate to defend the reputation of Christianity, a Roman  official named Marcellinus begged his fellow North African, St. Au‐ gustine, to write a refutation. The result was a massive, 22‐book tome  with  the  epic  scope  of  Virgil’s  Aeneid  and  the  philosophical‐ theological‐ethical layering of Plato’s Republic.  The pagan gods, argues Augustine in Books I‐X of The City of God,  were  not  what  made  Rome  great. According  to  Aeneid  II,  the  future  gods of Rome were not only too impotent to save their city from the  Greeks; they had to be saved themselves by Aeneas, who carried the  idols  of  Jupiter  and  his  fellow  gods  from  the  flames  of  Troy  to  the  hearths  of  Italy.  Furthermore,  long  before  Christianity  came  on  the  scene,  the  citizens  of  Rome’s  once‐virtuous  Republic  had  fallen  into  4


S P R I N G   2012   

corruption—a decadence attested to by such pagan writers as Virgil,  Cicero, Sallust, and Varro. Christians, in contrast, were ethical, moral‐ ly self‐regulating citizens who obeyed the law. As for the pagan phi‐ losophers who accused Christianity of bringing on the Fall of Rome,  they  served  gods  who  were  not  only  incapable  of  providing  a  firm  ethical base for their earthly lives, but who could not guarantee them  eternal life in heaven.  Having  set  the  record  straight  on  the  relative  merits  of  paganism  and Christianity and the role they played in 410, Augustine goes on  in Books XI‐XXII to trace the origins, historical developments, charac‐ teristics, and final ends of those two cities that make up the theme of  his work. The earthly, temporal City of Man was founded by the en‐ vious, fratricidal Cain and perpetuated by all those who live accord‐ ing  to  the  flesh.  Rome, founded  by  the  ambitious,  fratricidal  Romu‐ lus, also comprised a part of the City of Man, as did all the kingdoms  of  the  world  that  refused  allegiance  to  the  One  True  God.  Though  Augustine extols Roman peace, law, and civilization as good things,  he makes it clear that the only City that will endure is the one whose  foundation  is  God  and  whose  citizens,  who  live  according  to  the  Spirit, dwell on this earth as pilgrims. The City of God and the City of  Man, whose rolls include angelic and human citizens, stand in eter‐ nal  opposition,  and  yet,  for  all  of  human  history,  they  have  existed  side by side. Indeed, writes Augustine, “the former lives like an alien  inside the latter” (XVIII.1).   For over 1500 years, The City of God has been hailed as a key text‐ book in the social sciences, offering invaluable insights into the histo‐ ry  of  Israel,  Greece  and  Rome,  the  right  ordering  of  political  struc‐ tures,  the  proper  relationship  between  Church  and  State,  and  the  development of just war theory. All of these topics continue to be of  paramount importance in our modern, global world, but they do not  exhaust the wisdom contained within Augustine’s wide‐ranging, far‐ reaching,  insanely‐tangential  masterpiece.  In  what  follows  I  shall  mine  The  City  of  God  for  the  timely  advice  it  offers  in  two  areas— biblical interpretation and interaction with other religions—that have  proven to be stumbling blocks for the twenty‐first‐century church.   

F

rom  the  anti‐supernatural  bias  of  the  Enlightenment,  to  the  higher criticism of the nineteenth century, to the Jesus seminar  of today, the church has faced an ongoing crisis of biblical au‐ 5


THE CITY 

thority. Though the crisis has been strongest in the Protestant Main‐ line, Catholics and Evangelicals have also been affected by what Car‐ dinal Newman (in a note appended to his Apologia Pro Vita Sua) iden‐ tified as liberalism’s “mistake of subjecting to human judgment those  revealed doctrines which are in their nature beyond and independent  of it, and of claiming to determine on intrinsic grounds the truth and  value  of  propositions  which  rest  for  their  reception  simply  on  the  external authority of the Divine Word.”    Most of the departures from traditional orthodoxy that have com‐ promised the witness of the church—the acceptance and even cham‐ pioning of abortion and gay marriage; the embrace of universal sal‐ vation;  the  questioning  of  such  key  doctrines  as  the  Incarnation,  Trinity, and Resurrection; the rending apart of God’s justice and mer‐ cy; the substitution of the atoning work of the Cross for a social gos‐ pel of good works—are rooted in an orientation that privileges “hu‐ man  judgment”  over  “the  external  authority  of  the  Divine  Word.”   When faced with the question, “Is the Bible the Word of God, or does  it only contain the words of God?” the theological liberal will almost  always favor the second option. And the same goes for a number of  related questions: Is the Bible to be taken literally and historically or  figuratively  and  allegorically? Are  its  pronouncements  timeless  and  universal, or do they change from age to age and culture to culture?  Is each word and phrase inspired or only the wider message?   In  The  City  of  God,  Augustine  makes  it  clear  that  the  Bible  is  the  “fount  of  Christian  faith”  (IX.5).  It  holds  complete  authority  in  the  life of church and believer alike, an authority that rests not only on its  divine status but on its clear and demonstrable trustworthiness: “our  Scriptures never deceive us, since we can test the truth of what they  have told us by the fulfillment of predictions” (XVI.9). The Bible does  not  receive  its  authority  from  the  community  that  reads  it  but  from  its  reliability  in  all  matters  of  faith.  The  God‐inspired  truth  of  the  biblical narrative is made manifest in the hundreds of Old Testament  prophecies  that  were  accurately  fulfilled  in  the  life,  ministry,  death,  and resurrection of Christ.  And  yet,  the  prophecies,  sufficient  as  they  are  to  substantiate  the  Bible as the Divine Word, form only a part of its uniqueness. In sharp  contrast to the theological, philosophical, and ethical writings of the  City  of  Man,  which  war  with  each  other  in  their  claims  and  asser‐ tions, the books of the Bible, despite being written over the course of  6


S P R I N G   2012   

centuries by a wide array of prophets and kings, priests and laymen,  form a cohesive whole that attests with one voice to the Triune God.  “How differently” than the confused, Babel‐like witness of the pagan  City of Man, rhapsodizes Augustine, “has that other race, that other  commonwealth of men, that other City, the people of Israel, to whom  was entrusted the word of God, managed matters!  No broadminded,  muddle‐headed  mixing  of  true  prophets  with  false  prophets  there!   They have recognized and held as the true‐speaking authors of Holy  Writ  only  those  who  are  in  perfect  harmony  with  one  another”  (XVIII.41).   Augustine places much trust in the timeless unity of the scriptures,  but his trust does not rest on some weak‐kneed fideism. Throughout  The City of God, he maintains a high critical standard, subjecting the  Bible to careful analysis. For example, though Augustine did not con‐ sider  the  authority  of  the  scriptures  to  be  compromised  by  copyist  errors,  he  does  counsel  his  readers  to  consult  the  oldest  available  manuscripts: “it is better to believe what we find in the original from  which  the  translations  have  been  made”  (XV.13).  Augustine  shows  equal  scholarly  discernment  and  restraint  in  assessing  the  pseude‐ pigrapha. After asserting that the “canon . . . must be kept immacu‐ late” (XVIII.38), Augustine explains why he does not accept as canon‐ ical (and therefore authoritative) the alleged prophecies of Enoch and  Noah. Though these two men of God were true prophets, their writ‐ ings are too old to be authentic, or at least to be proved to be so. Au‐ gustine further adds—perhaps meditating on the careful distinctions  that  Paul  makes  in  1  Corinthians  7—that  prophets  can  write  some‐ times under divine inspiration and sometimes under human capaci‐ ty,  resulting  in  writings  that  may  be  historically  accurate  but  which  lack spiritual truth (XVIII.38).    

A

ugustine’s  most  interesting  textual  analysis,  however,  is  found  in  his  discussion  of  the  Septuagint  (or  LXX).  With  great  brio,  he  retells  the  well‐known  legend  that  the  70  (or  72)  scholars  who  met  at  Alexandria  to  translate  the  Old  Testament  into Greek went into different rooms to work but emerged with iden‐ tical  translations  (XVIII.42).  Without  ridiculing  or  dismissing  out  of  hand this beloved legend, Augustine argues that the LXX retains its  reliability  whether  or  not  the  legend  is  true:  “For,  even  supposing  that  [the  Seventy]  were  not  inspired  by  one  divine  Spirit,  but  that,  7


THE CITY 

after  the  manner  of  scholars,  the  Seventy  merely  collated  their  ver‐ sions in a purely human way and agreed on a commonly approved  text,  still,  I  say,  no  single  translator  should  be  ranked  ahead  of  so  many” (XVIII.43). This is sound advice for any textual critic, past or  present, but Augustine goes further. As a believer who knew not only  that the Bible was no ordinary book but that the Holy Spirit was its  ultimate author and interpreter, Augustine offers a fuller assessment  of  the  unique  status  of  the  LXX,  a translation  in  which  the Apostles  had full confidence and which the Greek Orthodox Church considers  to be canonical.   Earlier in The City of God, Augustine, commenting on variations be‐ tween  the  original  Hebrew  and  the  LXX  that  increase  the  messianic  nature of Old Testament prophecy, boldly suggests that “the transla‐ tors were inspired by the divine Spirit to depart deliberately from the  original,  for  along  with  their  duties  as  scholars  they  had  rights  as  prophets”  (XV.14).  In  Book  XVIII  he  develops  this  thought  further,  positing  that  the  Spirit  used  the  combined  witness  of  the  original  prophets and the Seventy to reveal deeply hidden truths:     For the same Spirit who inspired the original Prophets as they wrote was no less present to the Seventy as they translated what the Prophets had written. And this Spirit, with divine authority, could say, through the translators, something different from what He had said through the original Prophets—just as, though these Prophets had the two meanings in mind, both were inspired by the Spirit. Beside, the Holy Spirit can say the same thing in two different ways, so long as the same meaning, in different words, is clear to anyone who reads with understanding. The Spirit, too, could omit certain things and add others, to make it clear that in the translators’ work there was no question of their being bound to a purely human, word-for-word, slavish transcription, but only to the divine power which filled and mastered their minds. . . Whatever is found both in the original Hebrew and in the Septuagint, the one same Spirit chose to say through both.   This remarkable passage, which rests on a profound faith in Christ  as the Word (or Logos), balances a commitment to the fixed truth of  scripture with an openness to the dynamic nature of the Spirit’s work  in the church. Truly, the timeless Word of God on which the Creeds  of the Church are founded is the same Word which is sharper than a 

8


S P R I N G   2012   

two‐edged  sword  and  which  cuts  both  ways,  dividing  bone  from  marrow.  Augustine’s  assessment  of  the  LXX  may  sound  a  bit  abstract  to  modern  ears,  but  he  does  offer  a  concrete  example  of  a  prophetic  verse from the Old Testament whose full messianic meaning can only  be gauged by combining the Greek Septuagint with the Latin Vulgate  (which  was  based  on  the  original  Hebrew).  The  verse,  Zechariah  12:10, reads thus in the King James: “And I will pour upon the house  of  David,  and  upon  the  inhabitants  of  Jerusalem,  the  spirit  of  grace  and of supplications: and they shall look upon me whom they have  pierced, and they shall mourn for him, as one mourneth for his only  son, and shall be in bitterness for him, as one that is in bitterness for  his firstborn.”    This amazing prophecy, which looks forward not only to the cruci‐ fixion  but  to  the  end  times,  when  many  Jews  will  turn  to  Christ  as  messiah,  is  rendered  differently,  Augustine  explains,  in  the  Vulgate  and  the  LXX.  Where  the  Vulgate  gives,  “they  shall  look  upon  me  whom they have pierced,” the LXX reads, “And they shall look upon  me  as  one  whom  they  have  insulted.”    Musing  on  these  seemingly  contradictory translations, Augustine the orthodox believer and tex‐ tual  critic  suggests  that  if  “we  combine  the  two  readings,  ‘insulted’  and ‘pierced,’ we get a much fuller picture of  our Lord’s passion than  by  taking  either  the  Septuagint  or  the  Vulgate  reading  by  it‐ self”(XX.30). Through the dual inspiration of prophet and translator,  the same verse in Zechariah is able to point ahead both to the means  of Christ’s sacrifice (“pierced”) and to the fickle crowd’s response to  that sacrifice (“insulted”).    

hough  Augustine’s  personal  and  scholarly  immersion  in  the  Bible (especially the Psalms) was total, he seems to have been  particularly  drawn  to  Genesis.  In  addition  to  writing  a  full  length commentary of the first book of the Bible and devoting the last  three books of his Confessions to an almost obsessively close reading  of  Genesis  1,  Augustine  interlaces  the  political  and  philosophical  musings of his City of God with an ongoing analysis of the Creation,  the Garden of Eden, the Fall, and Cain’s slaying of Abel. Particularly  in  his  analysis  of  the  days  of  creation,  Augustine  weighs  carefully  every  word  and  phrase.  While  leaving  open  to  interpretation  the  length of the “days” of Genesis 1 (XI.7), Augustine treats the account  9


THE CITY 

itself  as  “sacred  and  infallible  Scripture”  (XI.6)  and  takes  seriously  each detail. As a result, Augustine, far from falling into some narrow,  anti‐intellectual  “fundamentalism,”  succeeds  in  making  an  observa‐ tion  about  our  universe  that  would  not  be  revealed  to  science  until  the full nature of the Big Bang was uncovered: “the world was made  not in time but together with time” (XI.6).   Later in The City of God, Augustine mounts a spirited defense of the  early chapter of Genesis. In answer to smug critics who disparage the  reliability of Genesis because it does not explain where Cain got his  wife or how he built a city when there were apparently no other peo‐ ple  alive  to  build  it—such  critics  are  still  with  us  today—Augustine  explains  that  the  author  of  Genesis  4  “was  under  no  obligation  to  mention  the  names  of  all  who  may  have  been  alive  at  the  time,  but  only of those whom the scope of his work required him to mention”  (XV.8).  He  further  explains  that  whereas  marriage  between  brother  and  sister  was  allowed  in  the  beginning  when  “natural  necessity  compel[led]  it,”  it  was  later  condemned  by  morality  and  custom,  partly  as  a  way  to  spread  love  and  affection  beyond  the  confines  of  tight, insular families (XV.16).  Readers  uncomfortable  with  the  seeming  literalism  of Augustine’s  handling of Genesis may wish to remind me that Augustine himself  said  in  his  Confessions  that  he  could  not  understand  and  accept  the  Old Testament until he learned to read it allegorically. Augustine did  in  fact  make  such  a  statement;  indeed,  he  helped  teach  the  Middle  Ages how to identify allegorical meanings in scripture. Nevertheless,  modern Christians who fear the dangers of dead literalism must re‐ sist  falling  into  the  Enlightenment  trap  of  turning  literal/figurative  and historical/allegorical into simple either/or dichotomies. At sever‐ al points in The City of God, Augustine takes pains to explain that al‐ legorical readings of scripture, though valid, must not be allowed to  usurp  the  literal,  historical  sense.  Rather,  the  two  must  be  held  in  a  creative  balance  and  tension  that  maintains  biblical  authority  while  allowing for deeper spiritual meaning.  Thus, in Book XIII, Augustine argues that Eden is an historical and  real place, even if it can also be allegorized to represent the life of the  blessed  (with  the  four  rivers  standing  in  for  the  classical  virtues)  or  the Church itself (with the same rivers standing for the four gospels).  “No one should object to . . . the allegorical interpretation of the Gar‐ den of Eden, so long as we  believe in the historical truth manifest in  10


S P R I N G   2012   

the faithful narrative of these events” (21). Speaking more generally,  Augustine  insists  that  proper  interpretation  of  the  Old  Testament  must  attend  to  the  historical  meaning  before  moving  on  to  higher  allegorical levels: “I do not censure those who may have been able to  carve  out  some  spiritual  interpretation  from  every  historical  fact  re‐ counted [in the Bible], so long as they take good care first and fore‐ most  to  adhere  to  the  historical  fact”  (XVII.3).  By  arguing  thus, Au‐ gustine puts a limit on bizarre and fanciful allegorical readings, while  protecting  the  integrity  and  authority  of  the  literal  meaning  of  the  inspired Word of God.   

he seriousness with which Augustine takes up the interpreta‐ tion of scripture is both bracing and instructive. By following  his  example,  the  twenty‐first  century  church  can  regain  its  respect and awe for the Bible as God’s unchanging Word in a chang‐ ing  world.  Indeed,  if  we  are  to  understand  the  nature  of  our  world  and ourselves—including the ever‐contending domains of the City of  God  and  the  City  of  Man—then  we  must  (to  borrow  a  distinction  from  Chesterton’s  Orthodoxy)  learn again  to  trust  the  timeless  truths  of the Bible and doubt our own historical moment. Augustine, living  in  a  time  of  political,  social,  and  cultural  ferment,  did  just  that  and  was  inspired  with  a  vision  of  the  greater  forces  that  propel  history  forward and of the final telos (purposeful end) of the human person.  Those forces and that telos Augustine found in the Bible, but he en‐ countered them first in the Aeneid of Virgil and the dialogues of Pla‐ to. Though Augustine’s faith in the absolute authority and centrality  of  the  Bible  was  as  great  as  that  of  Luther  or  Calvin,  he  never  suc‐ cumbed  to  a  temptation  to  which  many  heirs  of  the  Protestant  Reformation  have  fallen  prey:  that  of  treating  the  Bible  as  the  sole  source of truth and thereby dismissing other, non‐Christian theologi‐ cal,  philosophical,  and  ethical  writings  as  potential  sources  of  wis‐ dom. In The City of God, Augustine avoids this temptation while sim‐ ultaneously avoiding its opposite—a relativistic, inclusivist approach  that treats the Bible as merely one text among many. Instead, Augus‐ tine  uses  the  Bible  as  a  touchstone  to  measure  the  claims  made  not  only by the pre‐Christian writers of Greece and Rome but the Stoics  and Neo‐Platonists of his own day as well.   Books  V‐VII  of  the  Confessions  explain  the  origin  of  Augustine’s  finely‐honed  talent  for  discerning  the  merits  and  dangers  of  non‐ 11


THE CITY 

Christian writings. Before becoming a believer, the young Augustine  spent  time  as  a  member  of  the  flesh‐denying  Manicheans  and  the  more  sophisticated  Neo‐Platonists.  Whereas  the  gnostic  doctrines  and  strange  rituals  of  the  former  were  rejected  and  abandoned  by  Augustine,  the  Plato‐inspired  teachings  of  the  latter  played  a  vital  role in leading him to true faith. The Bible alone taught him that the  Word  became  flesh,  but  his  study  of  Plotinus  and  Porphyry  helped  open his eyes to, and prepare his heart for, the existence of an Eternal  Word.  As  a  result,  Augustine  learned  to  discern  between  heretics  who twisted the scriptures and genuine seekers from other religions  who yearned for higher truth.    

hough there are times in The City of God where Augustine the  apologist  defends  the  pure  doctrines  of  the  Church  against  those of other religions, his general stance is best expressed in  an early chapter when he disputes those who say that Rome’s great‐ ness was caused by fortune or fate: “For the moment, my argument is  not  directed  against  sincere  pagans,  but  only  against  those  who,  in  defense  of  what  they  call  gods,  attack  the  Christian  religion”  (V.1).  Augustine  acknowledges  the  existence  of  sincere  pagans,  distin‐ guishes them from active enemies of the church, and deigns to enter  into conversation with them and their theories. He acknowledges as  well  that  throughout  the  long,  dark  centuries  before  the  coming  of  Christ,  there  existed  a  remnant  of  righteous  pagans:  pre‐Christian  Gentiles  who,  though  ignorant  of  the  Law  and  the  Prophets,  glimpsed  divine  truths  about  the  nature  of  God,  man,  and  the  uni‐ verse and lived lives of relative piety and virtue. While meditating on  the  impotence  of  the  ancient  gods  to  protect  their  worshipers  from  calamity,  Augustine  adds,  “I  except,  of  course,  the  Hebrew  nation,  and a few individuals beyond its pale, wherever by God’s grace and  His secret and righteous judgment they were found worthy” (III.1).   Augustine,  like  so  many  of  the  early  and  medieval  Fathers  of  the  Church,  counted  Virgil  among  that  hidden  leaven.  Though  Augus‐ tine  does  not  hesitate  to  reveal  errors  in  the  Aeneid,  he  more  often  accepts Virgil’s view of history as inspired and definitive. Virgil is the  “greatest and best of all poets” (I.3), someone who was used by Yah‐ weh  to  sing  the  glory  of  Augustus’s  Rome—a  Rome  whose  Pax  Romana prepared the way for the coming of the Prince of Peace even  as  its  political  and  judicial  structures  prepared  the  way  for  the  Ro‐ 12


S P R I N G   2012   

man Catholic Church. On an even deeper level, Virgil’s celebration of  the City of Rome points to that greater City of God which is the sub‐ ject  of  Augustine’s  book.  In  a  sentence  guaranteed  to  give  Virgil‐ loving  Christians  goose  bumps,  Augustine  offers  the  following  de‐ scription of The City of God: “In that land there is no Vestal altar, no  statue of Jupiter on the Capitol, but the one true God, who ‘will not  limit  you  in  space  or  time,  but  will  give  an  empire  universal  and  eternal’” (II.29). The phrase that Augustine places in quotes is lifted  directly from Aeneid I, where it forms part of Jupiter’s grand prophe‐ cy  of  the  future  glory  of  Rome.  By  using  the  phrase  to  describe  the  celestial  city,  Augustine  affirms  that  Virgil  was  a  proto‐Christian  prophet who somehow glimpsed a grandeur and majesty that trans‐ cended the finally fleeting glory of Augustus and his empire.   And as he finds historical and eschatological truths in Virgil’s Aene‐ id, so does he find theological ones as well. As a former Manichean,  Augustine  knew  how  vital  it  was  for  Christian  philosophers  and  apologists  to  defend  the  intrinsic  goodness  of  matter  and  the  body.  Our flesh is not, as the Gnostics taught, inherently evil; neither is our  body a prison house from which our soul seeks to escape. In order to  demonstrate  that  this  great  truth  was  known  and  accepted  by  the  wisest of the righteous pagans (the Neo‐Platonists), Augustine turns  to  a  scene  in  Aeneid  VI  where  Aeneas,  during  his  descent  into  the  underworld, meets souls who long to return to earth and inhabit new  bodies.  Aeneas  is  taken  aback  by  the  souls’  desire  to  be  incarnate  again, but the desire is nevertheless recorded and defended by Virgil,  whom Augustine accounts an inspired mouthpiece of the Platonists:    From this it is clear that, even if the belief [in reincarnation], which is absolutely unfounded, were true, namely, that there exists this unceasing alteration of purification and defilement in the souls which depart from and return to their bodies, no one could rightly say that all culpable and corrupt emotions of our souls have their roots in our earthly bodies. For, here we have the Platonists themselves, through the mouth of their noble spokesman, teaching that this direful desire has so little to do with the body that it compels even the soul already purified of every bodily disease and now subsisting independently of any kind of body to seek an existence in a body.   Along  with Arianism,  Gnosticism  has  plagued  the  church  for  two  millennia. Its heretical teaching that the flesh is inherently sinful ren‐ 13


THE CITY 

ders  the  Incarnation  an  impossibility  and  makes  a  mockery  of  the  great promise made manifest on the first Easter morning: that we are  not destined to be disembodied souls but will be clothed for eternity  in  Resurrection  Bodies.  Of  that  great  promise,  Augustine  finds  glimpses not only in the Psalms and the Prophets but in an epic po‐ em written by a righteous pagan who died nineteen years before the  birth of Christ.    

A

ugustine’s  respect  and  love  for  Virgil  is  made  manifest  throughout  The  City  of  God,  but  the  Bishop  of  Hippo  saves  his  greatest  admiration  for  Plato.  Plato  did  far  more  than  stumble by accident upon a few scattered bits of proverbial wisdom.  He was nothing less than a pagan prophet who, on the basis of gen‐ eral  revelation  (transmitted  through  conscience,  reason,  and  the  or‐ der of creation), identified, defined, and passed on to his heirs time‐ less truths that would prove invaluable to the Fathers of the Church.  Plato, writes Augustine, is “a master rightly esteemed above all other  pagan  philosophers”  (VIII.4).  His  true  followers  “have  perceived,  at  least, these truths about God: that in Him is to be found the cause of  all  being,  the  reason  of  all  thinking,  the  rule  of  all  living”  (VIII.4).  Indeed,  “none  of  the  other  philosophers  has  come  so  close  to  us  as  the Platonists have” (VIII.5). In sharp contrast to their idolatrous and  superstitious  brethren,  Augustine  adds,  the  Platonists  “acknowl‐ edged the true God as the author of being, the light of truth and the  giver of blessedness” (VIII.5).  Clearly,  the  Platonists  paved  the  way  for  the  full  revelation  of  Christ and the New Testament. But they did something else of equal  value.  Immediately  after  extolling  the  virtues  of  Platonism,  Augus‐ tine lays down a philosophical challenge that is particularly relevant  to our own age. Those philosophers, Augustine asserts, “the materi‐ alists who believe that the ultimate principles of nature are corporeal,  should yield to those great men [the Platonists] who had knowledge  of so great a God. Such [materialist philosophers] were Thales, who  found the cause and principle of things in water, Anaximenes in air,  the  Stoics  in  fire,  Epicurus  in  atoms”  (VIII.5).  Living  as  we  do  in  a  post‐Enlightenment  Age  where  materialistic,  secular  humanistic  thought  has  seized  control  of  every  discipline  in  the  academy,  and  where scientists, social scientists, and even most humanists insist on  positing a material origin for everything, we need to pay heed to Au‐ 14


S P R I N G   2012   

gustine’s  warning.  When  philosophy,  and,  by  extension,  the  liberal  arts,  allows  itself  to  be  hijacked  by  philosophical  materialism  and  methodological naturalism, universities falter and lose their connec‐ tion  to  eternal  truths  and  fixed  standards.  The  rigidly  evolutionary  mindset of the last 150 years does not mark a progression in philoso‐ phy, but a return to the materialistic theories of Pre‐Socratic philoso‐ phers  whose  reductive  worldviews  Plato  decisively  dealt with  2,400  years ago!    

t is well known that for most of the Middle Ages, the Timaeus was  the only Platonic dialogue available (though Plato’s ideas contin‐ ued  to  be  conveyed  indirectly  through  Aristotle,  Cicero,  Virgil,  and Plotinus, among others). A close reading of The City of God makes  it clear that this was essentially the situation by 410, a rather lamen‐ table  situation  aided  by  the  fact  that  even  the  great  Augustine  had  little knowledge of Greek. And yet, one cannot help wondering if this  was  not  divinely  ordained.  Of  all  Plato’s  dialogues,  Timaeus  comes  closest  to  expressing  Christian  truths;  indeed,  it  is  perhaps  the  only  Gentile, pre‐Christian work that approaches the great and distinctive  biblical teaching of creation ex nihilo. It is certainly one of the few that  speaks of creation as a good and positive thing with which the Crea‐ tor was pleased.   Augustine,  one  of  the  great  defenders  of  matter  and  flesh  against  the  heresies  of  Gnosticism,  marvels  again and again  at  how  percep‐ tive  Timaeus  is  in  its  treatment  of  creation.  And  as  he  marvels,  he  wonders what the source might have been for Plato’s surprising dec‐ laration  “that  the  best  reason  for  creating  the  world  is  that  good  things  should  be  made  by  a  good  God.  It  may  be  that  [Plato]  read  this  Scriptural  passage  or  learned  it  from  those  who  had,  or,  by  his  own keen insight, he clearly saw that ‘the invisible things’ of God are  ‘understood  by  the  things  that  are  made,’  or,  perhaps,  he  learned  from others who had clearly seen this.”  The passage Augustine en‐ closes  in  quotes  is  taken  from  Romans  1:20;  in  this  verse,  Paul  ex‐ plains  the  nature  of  general  revelation  and  how  God  spoke  even  to  the pagans through the power and beauty of the cosmos. Regardless  of  whether  Plato  gained  his  knowledge  from  general  revelation,  by  reading Genesis 1, or by having it read to him by someone else, the  fact remains that Plato was aware of the goodness of creation.  15


THE CITY 

This awareness is vital, for there were many in Augustine’s day—as  there are still many today—who too quickly blame Plato for the he‐ retical  teachings  of  the  Gnostics.  Augustine  sets  the  record  straight  on  this  misconception.  In  Book  VIII,  he  makes  it  clear  that  the  true  heirs of Plato are to be found among the Neo‐Platonists, in particular,  Plotinus, Iamblichus, Porphyry, and Apuleius. Later, in Book XIII, he  highlights a specific area in which Plato and the Gnostics part com‐ pany. According to the Gnostics, the soul “will be perfect only when  it  returns  to  God  simple,  solitary, and  naked,  as  it  were,  stripped  of  every shred of its body.”  This teaching, which stands in stark opposi‐ tion  to  the  Christian  doctrine  of  the  resurrection  of  the  body,  lies  at  the  root  of  Gnosticism’s  dismissal  of  matter  and  the  body.  It  is  a  teaching, Augustine writes, which Plato did not share.   Indeed,  not  only  did  Plato  not  view  the  body  in  wholly  negative  terms;  in  the  Timaeus  he  provides  a  pre‐Christian,  extra‐biblical  glimpse of the Resurrection Body. In one of the most memorable pas‐ sages of Timaeus, God tells the lesser gods that he is able to hold body  and soul together in an indissoluble link and promises them that they  may remain forever in the same body if they do not become corrupt.  Surely  Plato  would  not  have  included  such  a  divine  promise  if  the  body were inherently evil!  No, concludes Augustine, those Gnostics  and so‐called Neo‐Platonists who claim that the body can only be a  prison and a chain, “forget that their very founder and master, Plato,  has  taught  that  the  supreme  God  had  granted  to  the  lesser  gods,  whom he had made, the favor of never dying, in the sense of never  being separated from the bodies which he had united to them.”    Still,  though  true  Platonists  “are  not  so  senseless  as  to  despise  earthly bodies as though their nature derived from an evil principle”  (XIV.5),  they  do  not  rest  content  in  a  mere  earthly  existence.  Plato  knew something that many Christians, in Augustine’s day as well as  our  own,  often  forget:  that  there  is  no  happiness  apart  from  God.  Platonists, writes Augustine,     are deservedly considered the outstanding philosophers, first, because they could see that not even the soul of man, immortal and rational (or intellectual) as it is, can attain happiness apart from the Light of that God by whom both itself and the world were made, and, second, because they hold that the blessed life which all men seek can be found only by him who, in the purity of a chaste love, embraces that one Supreme Good which is the unchangeable God. 16


S P R I N G   2012   

    Plato, that is to say, urges us to seek after the Beatific Vision, a pur‐ suit that drives the true Platonic initiate as firmly as it does the ma‐ ture Christian.  “The bodies of irrational animals,” Augustine reminds us in a pas‐ sage  reminiscent  of  Timaeus,  “are  bent  toward  the  ground,  whereas  man  was  made  to  walk  erect  with  his  eyes  on  heaven,  as  though  to  remind him to keep his thoughts on things above.”  In Romans 11:11,  Paul  suggests  that  one of  the  reasons  God  lavished salvation  on the  Gentiles  was  to  make  rebellious  Israel  envious.  In  The  City  of  God,  Augustine treats sincere Neo‐Platonists as fellow travelers on a spir‐ itual  journey;  they  may  dwell  outside  of  God’s  grace  as  a  result  of  their  adherence  to  erroneous  doctrines,  but  the  purity  of  their  lives  nevertheless stands as both an indictment and an encouragement to  believers  who  have  forsaken  the  call  to  be  perfect,  even  as  their  Fa‐ ther in heaven is perfect. In a similar manner, Christians today who  have  grown  lax  in  their  faith  and  given  up  on  the  godly  pursuit  of  holiness should be ashamed and struck to envy by the righteous lives  of  Muslims,  Hindus,  and  Buddhists  who  pray,  fast,  and  meditate  with great fervor and discipline. Such zealous seekers after the Beatif‐ ic Vision are the new Platonists of our materialistic age.                    

Louis Markos (www.Loumarkos.com), Professor in English and Scholar in Residence at Houston Baptist University, holds the Robert H. Ray Chair in Humanities. His two newest books are Apologetics for the 21st Century (Crossway) and Restoring Beauty: The Good, the True, and the Beautiful in the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Biblica).

17


THE CITY 

T OC QUEVILLE & T HE T EA PARTY [order0and0liberty{  Paul D. Miller

T

he rise and success of the Tea Party in American politics  may be one of those moments, rare but always recurrent  in  our  history,  when  a  new  movement  steps  forward  to  offer a new interpretation of the country’s first principles.  The  abolitionists,  the  progressives,  and  the  Civil  Rights  movement  each  won  a  “new  birth  in  freedom”  in  different  ways  in  their  respective  eras.  They  embody  Thomas  Jefferson’s  belief  that  every generation needs a new revolution. 

Yet each new founding accomplished its goals only by handing the  government some new powers. The abolitionists applied civil rights  to all Americans regardless of race and, in so doing, greatly empow‐ ered  the  federal  government  to  hold  the  states  accountable  for  their  treatment  of African Americans.  The  progressives  changed  the  rela‐ tionships among the market and the government, greatly empower‐ ing the latter to regulate and interfere with the former. And the Civil  Rights movement completed the work of the abolitionists, but again  only  by  enabling  the  federal  government  and  its  courts  to  override  and regulate the states.  By comparison, the Tea Party movement may be something unique  in American history:  a fundamentally conservative, anti‐government  populist uprising. Populist movements tend to have a specific agenda  and they seek to seize the government so as to grant it new powers to  enact that agenda. But for the Tea Party, the government is the agen‐ da. The Tea Party seeks to win power not to pass laws on education,  or welfare, or civil rights, but to refashion how power is created, le‐ gitimized, and wielded in the United States. That accounts for the Tea  18


S P R I N G   2012   

Party’s  near‐obsession  with  taxes  and  the  budget.    Money  is  power,  and  beneath  the  Tea  Party’s  talking  points  about  restoring  job  crea‐ tion  and  entrepreneurship  is  an  obsession  with  power:    the  govern‐ ment’s  power  to  seize  citizens’  wealth  versus  the  citizens’  power  to  use her wealth as she sees fit.  But if this is indeed a moment to redefine the meaning of the Amer‐ ican constitution, our most pressing questions are not of public poli‐ cy—taxes,  the  budget  deficit,  health  care  coverage,  or  the  merits  of  green infrastructure. They are questions of philosophy. What is gov‐ ernment?  Why  do  we  need  create  a  large  human  institution  and  grant it the legitimacy to wield power over our lives? What dangers  does  it  pose?  And  how  do  we  design  it  to  use  its  power  properly?  This is an especially important exercise to undertake because differ‐ ent  traditions  of  political  thought—libertarian,  utilitarian,  and  reli‐ gious—approach  these  questions  differently  and  can  often  obscure  an underlying unity to American political thought. The Tea Party has  brought  about  the  most  fundamental  debate  about  the  meaning  of  the American experiment in self‐government in a generation.   In carrying out this debate, it has become clear that libertarians and  social conservatives need each other. By themselves, they look to out‐ siders narrow, shallow, and extreme. Libertarianism is heartless and  cruel  to  its  critics;  social  conservatism,  bigoted  and  ignorant.  More  importantly,  even  on  their  merits  they  are  insufficient.  Neither  by  itself offers a coherent ideology on which a feasible political agenda  can be based. Social conservatism fails to address the realities of cul‐ tural pluralism and is often reticent to grant the liberty enjoyed by a  majority  culture  to  minorities.  Libertarianism  errs  in  the  opposite  way, ignoring the vital cultural foundation of ordered liberty and the  government’s role in fostering and supporting it. Both together start  with a common insight—that human nature requires government to  exist, but also to be restrained. That insight, in turn, should support a  common  agenda  for  ordered  liberty:  the  devolution  of  power  and  renewal of local liberties.   

A

ny philosophy of government must start with a philosophy  of  human  nature.  The  Book  of  Genesis  says  that  “God  saw  that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that  every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continu‐ ally,”  (Genesis  6:5).  King  Solomon  wrote  “There  is  not  a  righteous  19


THE CITY 

man  on  earth  who  does  what  is  right  and  never  sins,”  (Ecclesiastes  7:20).  The  prophet  Jeremiah  lamented  that  “the  heart  is  deceitful  above  all  things,  and  desperately  corrupt;  who  can  understand  it?”  (Jeremiah 17:9)  The Biblical view of man is that he ignorant and fool‐ ish at best, downright bestial and wicked at worst.   This is not a uniquely Jewish or Christian view. Plato warned in The  Republic  against  the  “wild  and  brutish”  part  of  the  human  soul  which,  given  free  rein,  will  drive  man  almost  literally  mad.  A  man  led  by  his  passions “will  shrink  from  nothing” including  incest  and  parricide. And Plato believed this was a universal trait of humanity:  “every one of us—even those accorded the highest degree of respect‐ ability—harbors a fierce brood of savage and imperious appetites.”   Even  Aristotle,  a  thinker  with  a  much  sunnier  view  of  man,  was  acutely aware that men’s conceptions of justice were shaped by their  self‐interest. The rich and the poor define justice in ways most favor‐ able to themselves, the poor advocating for equity of distribution, the  rich for equity of merit. Thomas Hobbes, reflecting a pessimistic mix  of Puritanism with Enlightenment secularism, wrote “I put for a gen‐ eral  inclination  of  all  mankind,  a  perpetual  and  restless  desire  of  power after power, that ceaseth only in death.”   Even recent social science has gravitated away from the naïve and  simplistic rational actor or behaviorist models of human nature. Em‐ pirical  research  about  how  humans  actually  behave  and  make  deci‐ sions had led towards a more complex description of human beings  whose  professions  of  objective  reasoning  are  limited  by  bounded  rationality,  misperception,  imperfect  information,  cognitive  bias,  wish‐fulfillment, and self‐delusion. Simply put, all human beings are  capable  of  malice,  irrationality,  ignorance,  stupidity,  cowardice,  and  sheer barbarity.   Different  traditions  of  thought—religious  and  secular,  speculative  and  scientific,  ancient  and  modern—have  come  to  some  version  of  the same conclusion:  people are generally stupid and evil. Most im‐ portantly,  the  human  capacity  for  stupidity  and  evil  is  something  fixed and unchangeable absent divine intervention. This view differs  decisively  from  the  view  of  human  nature  found  in  socialism,  com‐ munism, and the “progressive” liberal left, all of which are premised  on the improvability, even perfectibility, of mankind.    20


S P R I N G   2012   

he  stupidity  and  wickedness  of  human  nature  have  political  implications.  It  means  that  most  governments  are  stupid  and  evil. As Hamilton and Madison wrote in The Federalist Papers,  “What is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on hu‐ man  nature?”  Governments  are  little  more  than  vast  collections  of  stupid and evil people acting in concert. Governments therefore typi‐ cally act with malice, irrationality, ignorance, and barbarity as a mat‐ ter  of  course.  There  is  no  reason  to  expect  otherwise,  and  history  bears out that verdict. That is why governments often bear a strong  resemblance  to  organized  crime.  As  Augustine  asked,  “Take  away  justice,  and  what  are  kingdoms  but  great  robberies?”  Most  govern‐ ments throughout history have been little more than gangs of thieves  and murderers. This insight is the seed of libertarian thought. Liber‐ tarians rightly fear the destructive potential of human nature when it  is  organized  and  given  expression  through  great  concentrations  of  power, particularly of political power.  That is why libertarians view the power of the United States Gov‐ ernment, and the growth of the regulatory state since the 1930s and  the  national  security  state  since  1945,  with  alarm.  The  government  has dozens of agencies to coerce citizens on scores of different issues  and  can  invoke  seemingly  infinite  reasons  to  compel  behavior.  The  government  can  seize  your  property  in  order  to  give  it  to  someone  who will make more profitable use of it, according to Kelo vs. City of  New London. It can seize your property without just compensation to  protect the environment, or for months or even years without charg‐ es if it claims your property was involved in drug trafficking. It can  arrest  and  imprison  you  for  weeks  as  a  “material  witness”  without  filing charges or issuing a writ of habeas corpus. Under hate speech  laws,  the  government  can  arrest  you  for  saying  things  that  offend  others. The government routinely confiscates up to half your wealth  in taxation, mandates that you buy auto and health insurance, regu‐ lates  which  chemicals,  foods,  and  drugs  you  can  and  cannot  con‐ sume, and decides when and where you can pray and erect symbols  of your religion. If it claims you are a terrorist, it can simply kill you.  The government advances plausible justifications for most of these  powers  considered  individually.  But  libertarians  understand  that  government  inevitably  seeks  to  accrete  power,  like  a  law  of  nature.  They see few checks on the growth of the federal government’s juris‐ diction and powers of enforcement, and they know where this trend  21


THE CITY 

concludes. And they also understand that government does not need  to  be  vested  in  the  hands  of  one  man  to  be  tyrannical.  Democracies  are just as capable of becoming tyrannical: all they have to do is dis‐ regard law and govern by raw power.   Tyranny  is,  in  fact,  not  really  government  at  all.  Under  a  tyranny  men do not live under laws, but under the whim of other men. There  is no predictable mechanism for resolving disputes. There is no real  security or public order because the tyrant—whether a man, a mob,  or a bureaucracy—may, at any moment, decide to rob or murder any  citizen. The tyrant’s decisions are arbitrary, unreliable, and final. John  Locke asked regarding tyranny, “I desire to know what kind of gov‐ ernment  that  is,  and  how  much  better  it  is  than  the  state  of  nature,  where one man, commanding a multitude, has the liberty to be judge  in his own case, and may do to all his subjects whatever he pleases,  without the least liberty to any one to question or control those who  execute his pleasure?” It is, in fact, no government at all. “Much bet‐ ter it is in the state of nature, wherein men are not bound to submit to  the unjust will of another.” This is the libertarian paradise.  However,  it  is  difficult  to  organize  an  effective  and  long‐lasting  tyranny  because  it  requires  intelligence  and  cooperation  to  design  and sustain a highly‐organized system of oppression. Man’s stupidity  happily  limits  his  capacity  to  implement  man’s  evil.  Cooperation  must  come  voluntarily  through  trust  or  it  must  be  coerced  through  terror.  Trust  is  hard  to  sustain  because  people  are  evil—even  tyran‐ nies  are  undermined  by  corruption,  petty  graft,  turf  wars,  and  bu‐ reaucratic infighting. Terror, on the other hand, is hard to orchestrate  and sustain because people are stupid—totalitarianism is a complex  and sophisticated undertaking. Libertarians are right to fear tyranny,  but they often give proto‐tyrants more credit than they’re due. As a  result, dire libertarian warnings about the encroachment of the state  often sound like Chicken Little or the boy who cried wolf.  In  fact,  there  is  an  equally  dangerous  possibility  at  the  opposite  pole  from  tyranny.  Government  is  a  difficult  art,  especially  large,  effective government over an expansive territory. Many governments  fail not only to impose a tyranny worth fearing, but any semblance of  government  at  all.  The  evilness  of  human  nature  can  be  channeled  into oppressive concentrations of power, but the stupidity of human  nature  can  sometimes  take  over  and  simple  resist  any  exercise  of  power in institutions, governments, and entire nations at all, a point  22


S P R I N G   2012   

libertarians routinely miss. In that circumstance human stupidity and  evil is not concentrated in one locus of power; it is instead manifested  in the absence of any power at all. In other words, if libertarians fear  human nature when it is organized, social conservatives fear human  nature left to run amok. The result is social breakdown and state fail‐ ure. In the complete absence of government, authority, or order, hu‐ manity is left in a state of nature, which is to say, a state of anarchy,  war, and chaos—dilemmas for which libertarians have no solution.    Thomas Hobbes gave the famous description of the state of nature,  and  it  reads  like  a  contemporary  journalist’s  account  of  Somalia,  or  Detroit in the 1970s. It is the social conservatives’ nightmare:     In such condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain: and consequently no culture of the earth; no navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by sea; no commodious building…no arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear, and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.   Social  conservatives  look  at  evidences  of  growing  cultural  chaos  with  alarm.  Rates  of  crime,  divorce,  teenage  pregnancy,  out‐of‐ wedlock  births,  drug  use,  school  dropout  and  illiteracy  are  high  or  rising.  High  school  and  college  curricula  do  not  convey  the  same  content, at the same rigor, or to the same standard that they did for  past generations. Education appears now to inculcate the lack of val‐ ues  instead  of  their  presence.  “Emergent”  and  “seeker‐sensitive”  churches  offer  concert‐like  entertainment  rather  than spiritual  nour‐ ishment.  Public  discussion  is  more  blunt,  crude,  and  dissonant.  The  worldviews  reflected  in  commercially  successful  television  shows,  film, and pop music are increasingly coarse, inhumane, and barbaric.  High  art  is  celebrated  for  overtly  and  publicly  mocking  traditional  values.  The  atrophy  of  sustained  relationships  into  bite‐sized  Face‐ book and Twitter encounters is a sign of the times. Anarchy has not  yet arrived, but we are slouching toward it.  To a social conservative, big government may be intrusive and ex‐ pensive,  but  it  also  the  only  institution  holding  the  line  between  us  and  the  barbarians.  We  need  a  powerful  government  because  the  enemies of civilization are powerful. Drug cartels, the mafia, violent  gangs, pedophiles, pimps, child pornographers, hackers, pirates, and  23


THE CITY 

terrorists are the Visigoth Army at our gates. The FBI and the Marine  Corps  may  be  jack‐booted,  but  the  boots  are  made  in  the  USA  and  they march to our tune.   

ivilization is under perennial threat from tyranny and chaos.  Tyranny is the concentration of too much power; chaos is the  complete  dissolution  of  it.  Libertarians  fear  tyranny;  social  conservatives fear chaos. The former fears the growth of government  is  the  road  to  serfdom.  The  latter  fears  the  center  cannot  hold  and  embraces government as the tool with which to fend off social anar‐ chy. The evils are the Scylla and Charybdis through which statesmen  must steer the ship of state. And because human nature is fixed, the  ship is never in the clear. The perils are forever just off the port and  starboard. Statesmanship consists largely of recognizing which dan‐ ger looms closer and edging the ship a little further off, even recog‐ nizing that to do so is to bring the opposite danger a little closer. The  question  of  the  moment  is:    which  is  closer?  Does  the  government  wield too much power, or not enough?  The  problem  confronting  conservatives,  and  the  Tea  Party,  is  that  there is little agreement about which is the greater danger today. Lib‐ ertarians and others respond to social conservatives’ concerns with a  shrug.  They  point  out  that  the  U.S.  economy  and  political  system  continue to hum along, arguing that every generation has its doom‐ sayers  who  believe  things  were  better  back  then  and  the  world  is  going  to  hell  in  a  handbasket  tomorrow.  Social  conservatives  lack  perspective and are only masking their bigotry as concern for social  stability.  Meanwhile  the  growth  of  governmental  power  is  the  true  threat that has caused great powers to collapse in the past.  Social  conservatives  respond  that  libertarians  are  a  little  paranoid  in their fear of the American government’s supposed “oppressions.”  Libertarian fears are the fevered conspiracy theories of people privi‐ leged  to  live  in  the  freest  society  in  the  history  of  the  world.  Mean‐ while, libertarians (and liberals) fail to understand the role of culture  and society in a nation’s long‐term life. Culture is the foundation be‐ neath the economic and military greatness of our country. Without it,  no amount of budget‐cutting, government shrinking, or tea‐partying  will  make  a  difference.  To  a  social  conservative,  culture  is  the  sum  total of the intellectual and ethical capital of the population. Investing  in and protecting our culture means schools turn out educated peo‐ 24


S P R I N G   2012   

ple  who  will  innovate,  prosper,  and  not  snicker  at  the  words  “civic  responsibility.”  It  means  families  stay  together  and  raise  honest,  whole,  decent  children  who  do  not  grow  up  to  be  burdens  on  the  welfare state or penal system. It means churches and synagogues, the  YMCA  and  Boy  Scouts,  are  a  real  part  of  their  communities,  free  to  support  families  without  being  burdened  by  invasive  state  regula‐ tions  ensuring  their  compliance  with  a  social  engineering  project.  Ignoring the clear warning signs of an unhealthy culture is to fail to  see that the bridge is out, the train is going full speed ahead, and the  brakes are broken. If you look out the window, the view is nice and  the ride feels fine. You have to know how the train works, and look  ahead down the tracks, to understand the danger.    What if both sides are right? What if, like the blind men feeling the  elephant,  libertarians  and  social  conservatives  have  both  identified  partial,  incomplete  aspects  of  a  broader,  deeper  problem?  Plato  be‐ lieved  that  to  be  the  case—that  anarchy  and  tyranny  support  and  feed off each other in a strange and devilish symbiosis. He witnessed  in  Athens  a  democracy  so  unable  to  enforce  basic  order  that  it  de‐ scended into anarchy—and then it turned to tyranny to save itself.     Plato  argued  this  dynamic  was  inherent  in  democracy,  where  he  argued liberty becomes a kind of religion. It becomes so bad that de‐ mocracy makes “the souls of citizens so hypersensitive that they can‐ not bear to hear even the mention of authority.” In the name of liber‐ ty, people shuck off all forms of authority. Sons rebel against fathers,  students against teachers, slaves against masters, and ultimately citi‐ zens against government. The excess of liberty leads to ruin, anarchy,  and  state  failure.  In  the  midst  of  social  breakdown  the  people  will  freely elect a “protector” to bring change and restore order. The pro‐ tector wins the support of the mob through economic populism:  he  “hints at the cancellation of debts and the redistribution of property.”  Because he has the unquestioning support of the mob, he can easily  overstep his bounds and act above the law. In this way liberty leads  to tyranny like an iron law of nature:  “excess in one direction tends  to provoke excess in the contrary direction.” For Plato the argument  between  libertarians  and  social  conservatives  is  the  bickering  be‐ tween two allies on the right side of a losing war.  And we may be seeing the early stages of the convergence of trends  in  the  United  States,  which  means  libertarians  and  social  conserva‐ tives are both right, in their own way. Libertarians are right in poli‐ 25


THE CITY 

tics:  the  government  has  grown  beyond  all  reason  and  threatens  to  become  an  overbearing  Leviathan.  Social  conservatives  are  right  in  culture:  disorder  and  degeneracy  are  on  the  rise  and  threaten  the  long‐term  foundations  of  civilization.  The  trends  reinforce  one  an‐ other. As social disorder grows, the state grows to meet the increas‐ ing  demands  made  on  it. And  as  the  state  grows,  private  and  non‐ profit  associations  that  constitute  the  remnants  of  a  healthy  culture  are pushed out and replaced by government.   

A

lexis  de  Tocqueville  described  this  reciprocal  cause‐and‐ effect  with  remarkable  and  prophetic  insight.  “The  more  government  takes  the  place  of  associations,  the  more  will  individuals  lose  the  idea  of  forming  associations  and  need  the  gov‐ ernment  to  come  to  their  help.  That  is  a  vicious  circle  of  cause  and  effect.”  Tocqueville  believed  the  growth  of  government,  even  if  for  benign purposes, was threatening to liberty because it subtly under‐ mined the cultural underpinnings of a healthy democracy. “The mor‐ als and intelligence of a democratic people would be in as much dan‐ ger  as  its  commerce  and  industry  if  ever  a  government  wholly  usurped  the  place  of  private  associations.”  Taking  over  retirement  insurance, health care, the banking system or the auto industry isn’t  just  bad  economics:    it  teaches  people  an  unhealthy  reliance  on  the  public  dole,  which  may  then  force  the  government  to  continue  run‐ ning private industry as people forget the skill of doing it themselves.  Government  cannot  recreate  by  fiat  the  culture  of  democracy  that  its  own  programs  undermine.  “A  government,  by  itself,  is  equally  incapable of refreshing the circulation of feelings and ideas among a  great people, as it is of controlling every industrial undertaking.” The  effort itself takes government beyond its rightful sphere and lays the  groundwork  for  tyranny.  “Once  it  leaves  the  sphere  of  politics  to  launch  out  on  this  new  track,  it  will,  even  without  intending  this,  exercise  an  intolerable  tyranny.  For  a  government  can  only  dictate  precise  rules.  It  imposes  the  sentiments  and  ideas  which  it  favors,  and  it  is  never  easy  to  tell  the  difference  between  its  advice  and  its  commands.”  Once the government arrogates to itself the responsibil‐ ity to nudge us into good behavior and foster in us good habits, it is  acting less like a democratic government and more like a church—a  church with armed police, tax collectors, and an army.  26


S P R I N G   2012   

This  is,  Tocqueville  believed,  a  new  kind  of  oppression,  different  from  the  cruel  tyrants  of  the  ancient  world.  Despotism  in American  “would  be  more  widespread  and  milder;  it  would  degrade  men  ra‐ ther  than  torment  them.”  American  tyranny  will  not  rob  and  kill  people.  It  would  be  “absolute,  thoughtful  of  detail,  orderly,  provi‐ dent,  and  gentle.”  It  appears  benign,  but  has  the  subtly  dangerous  effect  of  engendering  a  culture  of  dependency.  “It  would  resemble  parental  authority  if,  father‐like,  it  tried  to  prepare  its  charges  for  a  man’s life, but on the contrary, it only tried to keep them in perpetual  childhood.” It grows so large and powerful that it does not just push  out the private sector; it pushes out individual agency. It does not kill  men, but it does kill their spirits.    It provides for their security, foresees and supplies their necessities, facilitates their pleasures, manages their principal concerns, directs their industry, makes rules for their testaments, and divides their inheritances. Why should it not entirely relieve them from the trouble of thinking and all the cares of living? Thus it daily makes the exercise of free choice less useful and rarer, restricts the activity of free will within a narrower compass, and little by little robs each citizen of the proper use of his own faculties.   The  all‐powerful  nanny  state  does  not  stop  at  engendering  a  cul‐ ture  of  dependency  among  individuals.  It  seeks  complete  control  over  society  through  “administrative  despotism,”  through  a  regula‐ tory state which smothers innovation and energy:    It covers the whole of social life with a network of petty, complicated rules that are both minute and uniform, through which even men of the greatest originality and the most vigorous temperament cannot force their heads above the crowd. It does not break men’s wills, but softens, bends, and guides it; it seldom enjoins, but often inhibits action; it does not destroy anything, but prevents much being born; it is not at all tyrannical, but it hinders, restrains, enervates, stifles, and stultifies so much that in the end each nation is no more than a flock of timid and hardworking animals with the government as its shepherd.    Big  government  essentially  creates  the  conditions  for  anarchy  by  undermining  healthy  culture  through  large  programs  and  invasive  social  policy,  and  then  makes  itself  indispensable  by  moving  in  to  stave  off  disorder  with  powerful  regulatory,  law  enforcement,  and  27


THE CITY 

national  security  powers.  Its  presence  threatens  Tocqueville’s  new  kind of tyranny, but its absence threatens chaos.   

his is why libertarians have a point, even though the govern‐ ment is not overtly oppressive. The United States Government  costs $4 trillion per year, about one‐quarter of the U.S. econo‐ my. It employs two million people, not counting the armed forces or  the  postal  service,  more  than  any  other  institution  in  the  country.  Even disregarding the law enforcement and national security powers  libertarians traditionally worry about, the scope and reach of the fed‐ eral  government’s  activities  have  expanded  dramatically  over  the  past  century.  It  built  the  roads  you  drive  on,  funds  the  schools  you  attend, regulates and taxes the place you work, polices the quality of  the  food  you  eat,  regulates  the  bank  you  save  in,  and  monitors  the  gas‐mileage  of  the  car  you  drive.  It  regularly  observes  most  of  the  earth’s  surface  from  orbit,  is  the  world’s  largest  dispenser  of  grants  for  scientific  research,  decides  on  the  technical  standards  by  which  the  internet  is  governed,  flies  astronauts,  satellites,  robots,  and  tele‐ scopes  into  space  and  onto  other  planets,  and  deploys  military  per‐ sonnel  to  dozens  of  other  countries  around  the  world.  The  United  States  Government  is  quite  simply  the  largest,  richest,  and  most  powerful institution ever created in the history of human civilization.  Many of these public programs are, considered individually, bene‐ ficial.  But  there  are  dangers  inherent  in  a  large  and  powerful  gov‐ ernment. First, its very existence, even if benign, pushes out the vol‐ untary  private  actors  who  might  otherwise  engage  citizens  in  the  work  of  governance.  Big  government  undermines  public‐ mindedness.  “Administrative  centralization  only  serves  to  enervate  the peoples that submit to it, because it constantly tends to diminish  their civic spirit,” as Tocqueville put it.  That is a bad thing by itself.  But it can lead to a second, greater danger. Big government is the first  step towards tyranny.  But this is also why social conservatives have a point:  culture mat‐ ters.  Populist  social  conservatives  often  have  a  shallow  understand‐ ing of culture and the dangers to it—the biggest threat to the family  is  not  gay  marriage,  it  is  straight  divorce—but  their  basic  insight  is  correct. Schools, families, and churches are the most important insti‐ tutions of civilization and the strongest bulwark against both tyranny  and anarchy. They are the very font and source of all power and abil‐ 28


S P R I N G   2012   

ity to have any kind of society in the first place. And they have un‐ doubtedly lost much of their authority, respect, and heritage over the  last century. Without them, the crisis spreads across generations.  How do we escape the vicious cycle of social breakdown and gov‐ ernment growth? How do we revive an active, educated, moral citi‐ zenry without a central power? How do we reduce the power of gov‐ ernment without unleashing unpredictable forces? How do we avoid  tyranny without inviting chaos, chaos without inviting tyranny?   

he  problem  with  both  libertarianism  and  social  conservatism  is  that  they  seem  to  assume  that  there  is  a  fixed  set  of  policy  proposals,  now  and  forever,  which  will  solve  our  problems.  They can sometimes become rigid, ossified ideologies. But true con‐ servatism recognizes that there is no policy solution that will forever  do  away  with  one  or  the  other  great  danger.  Utopianism  is  funda‐ mentally unreal. There is no policy agenda that is correct for all states  in  all  times.  Some  states  are  closer  to  tyranny,  some  to  chaos.  What  may be wise for one could be catastrophic for the other. True states‐ manship will look different and propose different solutions depend‐ ing on the particular circumstances of the moment.  The  solution  is  not  simply  to  cut  taxes  and  spending,  shrink  the  state,  and  repeal  Obamacare.  Libertarianism  only  works  when  the  public  is  educated,  responsible,  and  active  enough  to  maintain  civil  society with a minimal state. Social conservatives would argue, plau‐ sibly,  that  the American  public  manifestly  is  not.  The  sudden  depri‐ vation  of  public  support  from  a  people  with  an  unhealthy  culture  could accelerate social breakdown and hasten the day mere anarchy  is loosed. Tocqueville again: “There can be no doubt that the moment  when political rights are granted to a people who have till then been  deprived of them is a time of crisis, a crisis which is often necessary  but  always  dangerous.”  We  have  been  inured  to  the  overbearing  Federal state for so long that it is unclear what would happen if we  were suddenly called on to assume responsibilities for welfare, edu‐ cation,  or  social  policy.  Congressional  conservatives  have  focused  overmuch on taxes and the budget because they are the most visible  and  concrete  policy  areas  where  this  contest  for  power  is  being  played out. But those battles are ephemeral, with victories that can be  undone in the next budget cycle. And libertarians have failed to pro‐ pose what would realistically take government’s place.  29


THE CITY 

Nor is the answer simply to ban abortion and same‐sex marriage or  let the Federalist Society rewrite the Constitution. Legislating healthy  cultural practices, like Prohibition, treats the symptoms, not the caus‐ es, of social breakdown. More importantly laws like Prohibition have  a  tendency  to  not  work  and,  in  the  course  of  failing,  discredit  their  advocates.  “Laws  are  always  unsteady  when  unsupported  by  mo‐ res,”—that is, habits and beliefs—“mores are the only tough and du‐ rable power in a nation.”  Passing a law that the people don’t believe  in and are not habituated to obey is unlikely to work. Using govern‐ ment  to  enforce  good  culture  is  like  a  parent  moving  into  his  kid’s  college dorm room to ensure he doesn’t drink or have unsafe sex. If  you  haven’t  inculcated  good  habits  in  your  kid  before  they  move  away, you’ve already failed; trying to catch up by moving to college  with them is not good parenting; it is overbearing and kind of creepy.   The  effort  to  renew  civilization  is  too  broad  and  deep  for  any  of  these policy proposals to have much of a lasting impact, because it is  fundamentally a cultural and spiritual effort. “Feelings and ideas are  renewed, the heart enlarged, and the understanding developed only  by the reciprocal action of men one upon another.” Alexis de Tocque‐ ville believed that the way to sustain and renew civilization, especial‐ ly democratic civilization, was to encourage face‐to‐face human rela‐ tionships.  It  is  trite  and  clichéd  but  true:  the  first  step  in  saving  civilization is to go to school, get and stay married, spend time with  your  children,  and  go  to  church.  Investing  in  relationships  with  the  people immediately around you—in your family, at work, in church,  in  your  neighborhood—is  the  single  most  important  thing  you  can  do  because  those  relationships  will  renew  your  ideas,  develop  your  understanding,  and  enlarge  your  heart.  Relationships  make  you  smarter, wiser, and more loving.   This is not a sentimentalist bromide or a recipe for quietism:  form‐ ing  relationships  is  a  political  act.  Relationships  are  the  strong  bul‐ wark against the encroaching state. They take place outside the gov‐ ernment’s writ, create a society beyond the government’s reach, and  foster  ideas  and  activities  government  cannot  direct. And  this  is  es‐ pecially true when we go beyond our household and neighborhood.   Tocqueville  feared  the  consequences  of  isolated  men  withdrawing  to  their  little  societies  of  family  and  friends.  “With  this  little  society  formed to his taste, he gladly leaves the greater society to look after  itself…Each man if forever thrown back on himself alone, and there  30


S P R I N G   2012   

is a danger that he may be shut up in the solitude of his own heart.”  This  is  dangerous  because  it  atrophies  the  very  habits  and  skills  needed to sustain self‐government. He wanted to see men and wom‐ en engaged continuously in relationships with other citizens, perfect  strangers, to discuss and decide upon common problems.  Tocqueville  called  this  the  skill  of  association.  For  Tocqueville,  as‐ sociation was the act of gathering with other citizens—not just family  members,  friends,  and  neighbors,  but  also  perfect  strangers—for  a  public  purpose. Association  is  nothing  less  than  the  practice  of  self‐ government  at  ground  level.  Tocqueville  believed  self‐government  didn’t simply mean voting (he hardly mentions elections at all in his  entire  work).  Self‐government  means  actually  participating  in  the  decision‐making process. A true democratic republic puts the power  of  government  into  the  hands  of  the  people.  City  council  meetings,  town halls, the school board, your neighborhood watch are the most  real institutions of democracy with which citizens will actually come  into  contact.  Participating  in  them  is  more  important  than  voting  in  elections for the U.S. Congress. “The most powerful way… in which  to interest men in their country’s fate is to make them take a share in  its government,” Tocqueville argued, “The civic spirit is inseparable  from  the  exercise  of  political  rights.”  The  face‐to‐face  relationships  we  need  to  form  are  with  our  fellow  citizens,  even  our  political  op‐ ponents. “If men are to remain civilized or become civilized, the art  of  association  must  develop  and  improve  among  them  at  the  same  speed as equality of conditions spreads.”      Government  can  either  allow  or  usurp  people’s  opportunities  to  engage  with  other  citizens  on  public  matters.  A  highly  centralized  government gives me no incentive to talk to my neighbor about our  common problems or to form an association to solve them. A highly  decentralized one depends on my associating with others—the more  opportunities to participate, the better. As Tocqueville wrote:    [The Founders] thought it right to give to each part of the land its own political life so that there should be an infinite number of occasions for the citizens to act together and so that every day they should feel that they depended on one another. Local liberties, then, which induce a great number of citizens to value the affection of their kindred and neighbors, bring men constantly into contact, despite the instincts which separate them, and force them to help one another.   31


THE CITY 

“Local  liberties”  are  the  answer.  The  solution  is  to  devolve  power  away from the federal government, diffuse it among states, individu‐ als,  civil  society,  and  the  market,  but  also  to  strengthen  its  exercise  through  our  participation.  This  should  be  the  unifying  theme  of  American  conservatism.  It  reflects  an  agenda  based  on  the  bare  es‐ sentials, the common philosophical convictions of different strands of  political  thought:    diffusing  power  among  individuals  (libertarian),  civil  society  (social  conservatives),  and  the  market  (entrepreneurs).  The solution is not to cut government, but relocate it. The solution is  not  to  shrink  government,  but  rebalance  it  from  Washington  to  the  states and localities. The solution is not to attack government as the  enemy, but take it over as our right.   Decentralized government alleviates the danger of tyranny by dis‐ persing  power  among  fifty  states,  six  territories,  three  thousand  counties,  ten  thousand  cities,  millions  of  associations,  and  one‐third  of a billion citizens. Decentralized government alleviates the danger  of  anarchy  by  compelling  citizens  to  stand  up,  take  part  in  self‐ government,  associate  with  one  another,  and  form  real  human  rela‐ tionships. Decentralization is the caulk and pitch, the rope and plank,  that  will  keep  our  ever‐growing  ship  of  state  together,  keep  it  from  being  torn  apart  by  the  centrifugal  forces  of  anarchy,  keep  it  from  imploding under the weight of the centripetal forces of tyranny.   

f  this  description  of  our  present  situation  is  accurate,  the  most  important  initiative  for  restoring American  democracy  is  the  re‐ peal  the  17th  Amendment.  The  Founders  intended  the  various  branches  of  government  to  check  and  balance  one  another:    even  public schools still teach that much. But it is almost entirely forgotten  that  the  Founders  intended  the  checks  and  balances  also  to  operate  between  the  levels  of  government.  Hamilton  and  Madison  wrote  in  Federalist 51:     In the compound republic of America, the power surrendered by the people is first divided between two distinct governments [Federal and state], and then the portion allotted to each subdivided among distinct and separate departments [branches]. Hence a double security arises to the rights of the people. The different governments will control each other, at the same time that each will be controlled by itself.

  32


S P R I N G   2012   

In Federalist 28, they wrote:     Power being almost always the rival of power, the General Government will at all times stand ready to check the usurpations of the state governments; and those will have the same disposition towards the General Government. The people, by throwing themselves into either scale, will infallibly make it preponderate. If their rights are invaded by either, they can make use of the other, as the instrument of redress… It may safely be received as an axiom in our political system, that the state governments will in all possible contingencies afford complete security against invasions of the public liberty by the national authority.   The  states  were  supposed  to  help  control  Washington,  D.C.  through a powerful tool:  the United States Senate. According to the  original Article I, Section 3, of the U.S. Constitution, state legislatures  were to elect Senators to represent the state’s interests in Washington.  For a century they did so, and states remained the preeminent poli‐ ties in America. Even after the Civil War and the great centralization  effected by the 14th Amendment, states remained considerably more  powerful than they are today.  That ended in 1913. Well‐meaning Progressives believed the Senate  was  an  undemocratic  institution  (a  description  the  Founders  would  have taken as a compliment), and successfully fought to overthrow it.  The 17th Amendment to the Constitution establishes the direct elec‐ tion of Senators by the people of each state, cutting out the state legis‐ latures. The states lost their check on the federal government. This is  no arcane bit of procedural minutiae. The Founders set up the checks  because they knew “ambition must be made to counteract ambition.”  Federal  officeholders  and  bureaucrats  in  Washington  are  ambitious.  They  have  legitimate  powers  and  responsibilities.  But  unless  some‐ one else’s ambition is made to counter their own, they will go beyond  their legitimate powers. This is as certain as a law of nature.  History  bears  out  the  verdict.  The  history  of  federal  policy  since  1913  includes  the  New  Deal,  the  Great  Society,  the  departments  of  labor, education, health and human services, housing and urban de‐ velopment, energy, transportation, and homeland security, the FDA,  SEC, EPA, FCC, NEA, NEH, NIH, TVA, AID, DEA, ATF, NASA, So‐ cial  Security,  Medicare,  Medicaid,  Amtrak,  Fannie  Mae,  Sallie  Mae,  Freddie Mac, and scores of other agencies, boards, commissions, and  corporations—all of which date after the 17th Amendment. Virtually  33


THE CITY 

everything  the  federal  government  does  today,  outside  of  taxation,  trade, and national defense, started after 1913. The federal budget in  1913 was roughly around $20 billion in today’s dollars. It has grown  20,000 percent since then.   

he growth of the government is most often opposed by liber‐ tarians  who  worry  about  the  prospects  for  tyranny.  But  the  growth of federal power should be just as worrisome to social  conservatives concerned about the state of American culture as it is to  libertarians  concerned  about  American  liberties.  The  17th  Amend‐ ment not only handed the federal government unprecedented power  to centralize lawmaking and administration. It also deprived citizens  of the opportunity to engage meaningfully in self‐government.   Again,  self‐government  is  not  voting:    it  is  participation.  Three  hundred million citizens cannot meaningfully participate in a delib‐ eration  about  anything.  Meaningful  democracy  is  impossible  at  the  federal level. Biennial voting is not democracy. “It does little good to  summon  those  very  citizens  who  have  been  made  so  dependent  on  the  central  power  to  choose  the  representatives  of  that  power  from  time to time. However important, this brief and occasional exercise of  free  will  will  not  prevent  them  from  gradually  losing  the  faculty  of  thinking, feeling, and acting for themselves,” wrote Tocqueville. The  more centralized the decision‐making, the less citizens are involved,  the  less  informed  they  will  be.  The  right  to  vote  is  important—but  under  a  centralized  government  the  simple  act  of  casting  a  vote  be‐ tween two, and only two, parties means very little.  Participatory democracy is not a romantic ideal or a utopian vision.  The goal is not the direct democracy of ancient Athens (which horri‐ fied the Founders). The goal is something closer to deliberative rep‐ resentative democracy instead of sound‐bite mass media democracy.  The  goal  is  to  lower  the  ratio  of  citizens  to  representatives.  That  in‐ creases the likelihood that citizens will actually know who is making  decisions  that  affect  their  lives,  call  their  representative,  attend  a  town hall, vote in elections, give money to a candidate, talk to their  neighbors  about  public  problems,  and  even  run  for  office.  (It  may  also diffuse the impact of money in politics. The hundreds of millions  of dollars of political money that is generated every two or four years  is currently highly targeted on influencing campaigns for 536 federal  elective  offices.  As  power  shifts  to  state  legislatures,  some  of  that  34


S P R I N G   2012   

money  would  follow  and  be  spread  over  the  7,382  state  legislative  seats in the United States).   The  solution  is  not  to  increase  the  number  of  representatives  in  Congress. In 1788 there were 30,000 citizens for each member of the  U.S. House of Representatives. A similar ratio today would require a  Congress of some 10,000 members. Because that is obviously imprac‐ tical,  Congress  capped  its  membership  in  1929  and  the  ratio  has  simply climbed higher and higher. Today it is close to 700,000 citizens  per representative. But there are, on average, about 40,000 citizens for  every state legislator in America. It is impractical to maintain a mean‐ ingful  ratio  for  the  federal  government,  but  it  is  practical  to  move  policy  to  the  states  where  something  closer  to  the  original  ideal  of  representative democracy can be revived.  Repealing  the  17th  Amendment  will  restore  a  fundamental  check  on the federal government. Senators representing states’ interests will  be  far  more  conscious  of  the  10th  Amendment—“The  powers  not  delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by  it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the peo‐ ple.” They will be far more resistant to the federal government’s ten‐ dency to pass laws and create programs but delegate implementation  to the states. They will never pass another unfunded mandate. States  will  start  to  assert  their  authority  to  pass  the  laws  that  they  are  in  charge of enforcing and funding. These are good goals and worthy to  be  at  the  heart  of  a  new  conservatism.  But  even  most  states  are  too  big  to  afford  much  of  an  opportunity  for  meaningful  participatory  and  representative  democracy.  Repealing  the  17th  Amendment  will  begin to move power away from Washington and back to the states,  but it is only the beginning of the revival of American democracy.        

Paul D. Miller is assistant professor of international security studies at the National Defense University. Previously, he served as director for Afghanistan on the National Security Council staff and a political analyst in the U.S. intelligence community. The views in this article are the author's, not those of the U.S. government. 35


THE CITY 

O L D H I C KO RY ’ S IRAN SOLUTION ]the0jacksonian0return}  Paul Bonicelli

T

he problem of Iran and its determination to build nuclear  weapons dominates the news at the writing of this essay  and perhaps it still does. We might still be waiting to see  if  Israel  and  others  will  strike  Iran.  We  might  be  in  the  midst of war and numerous terror strikes by Iran’s prox‐ ies.  We  might  be  in  the  aftermath  of  a  war  with  the  Mullah‐led  re‐ gime  in  free‐fall  as  the  nascent  democracy  we’ve  hoped  for  takes  power. Or perhaps the regime might have survived post‐conflict up‐ risings  by  killing  tens  of  thousands;  or  perhaps  the  untried  Iranian  democratic forces will prove not to have been as interested in taking  power as they are in revenge against Israel and anyone else who de‐ stroyed their nuclear weapons compounds.    What  should  the  United  States  do  given  the  nature  of  the  Iranian  threat?  Let’s  view  the  matter  as  a  statesman  would  who  has  grand  strategy in mind, who is focused on national interests, and not from  the  perspective  of  one  whose  goal  is  the  immediate  achievement  of  domestic  political  goals—pressures  writ  large  in  President  Obama’s  decision making in the run‐up to November.    It’s time to ask what Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the Unit‐ ed  States,  would  do.  Such  an  approach  takes  us  far  away  from  our  time and closer to the way we need to think about the Iranian prob‐ lem and, I would aver, all of our national security problems. Andrew  Jackson is emblematic of the leader who understands grand strategy  and the constitutional role of the president.     Jackson’s  approach  to  national  security,  summarized,  was  for  the  United States to kill its enemies. It is not so much that Jackson made a  formal pronouncement of a principle; rather, his actions as a general  36


S P R I N G   2012   

and a politician tell us  what he thought. He was not the only presi‐ dent  who  understood  this  but  he  is  most  easily  identified  with  the  principle.  That  principle  summed  up  is  that  no  person,  grouping  of  persons,  or  nation‐state  has  the  right  to  perpetually  and  credibly  threaten the interests of the United States, its citizens and their prop‐ erty. Put another way, the United States (nor any other nation‐state) is  not obligated to live in perpetual jeopardy or anxiety because an enti‐ ty of whatever kind has the power and the motivation and the will to  harm it. I would not make the case that Jackson desired and sought  to  actually  kill  our  enemies  in  every  case,  nor  that  he  was  always  right  in  how  he  secured  our  interests,  whether  he  was  dealing  with  the American Indians, the British, the French, the Spanish or the Rus‐ sians.  I  would  simply  argue  that  no  matter  from  whom  or  from  where the threat, Jackson saw his job clearly: eliminate the threat and  with force if appropriate—and above all, demonstrate that he would  not flag or fail in the objective of eliminating a threat.     Such a view does not preclude diplomacy (backed by force, else it  is  worthless),  various  forms  of  overt  and  covert  measures—forceful  or  otherwise—or  any  other  kind  of  activity  that  can  persuade  the  threatening  entity  to  cease  being  a  threat.  Prudent  statesmen  will  treat war as a last resort if at all possible whether they are versed in  Augustine’s just war doctrine or not. War is costly in many ways and  free  governments,  above  all,  tend  to  abjure  war  when  they  can  be‐ cause their voting publics are not typically inclined to sacrifice their  progeny unnecessarily. Tyrannical states might go to war more readi‐ ly but they, too, have to be concerned with the loss of their power and  perhaps their regime’s destruction if they are even perceived to lose a  conflict.     According  to  this  way  of  thinking,  threats  must  be  dealt  with  by  whatever  means  necessary  so  that  the  threat  ceases.  Citizens  expect  this  of  government;  it  is  an  obvious  first  duty  of  any  government,  free  or  not,  to  protect  the  territory  and  citizens  from  enemy  threats.  Why  else  form  a  government  if  not  to  protect  these  things?  Self‐ preservation is the first purpose of a civil body politic. Governments  are  not  formed  primarily  to  facilitate  commerce,  establish  a  welfare  state  or  even  to  secure  the  right  to  worship  freely  (the  Pilgrims  ex‐ cepted as a unique situation because they were not contemplating a  separate  republic).  The  American  Founders  and  the  theorists  they  read,  from  the  ancient  Greeks  and  Romans  to  the  Enlightenment,  37


THE CITY 

made  the  case  for  the  establishment  of  independent  and  sovereign  governments. The reformation of the US government with the adop‐ tion of the Constitution had as its first goal—explained in The Feder‐ alist Papers by men such as Alexander Hamilton—the preservation of  the  United States  from the  enemies  poised  to  take  advantage  of  our  early weakness and disorder.      

F

rom  the  founding  until  the  administration  of  President  Bill  Clinton,  through  Democratic  and  Republican  administrations  (and  their  forbears),  American  leaders  understood  the  Jack‐ sonian  principle  whether  they  acknowledged  him  or  not:  we  take  clear notice and measure of those who threaten our interests and deal  with them as best we can to eliminate the threats. Where we cannot  eliminate  the  threat,  we  contain  it  as  best  we  can  with  the  effort  al‐ ways in the end to be focused on the termination of the threat.     It  is  important  to  stress  both  parts  of  this:  we  must  recognize  and  understand the threat on its own terms even as we seek also to miti‐ gate it if that is all we can do, but ultimately we aim to end it. It was  understood that each nation must rely first on itself but can and will  form alliances as a matter of right for self‐defense when necessary.    Not  all  administrations  up  to  the  time  of  Bill  Clinton  pursued  the  objective  of  threat  elimination  with  the  same  vigor,  competence  or  understanding.  Some  were  far  more  successful  than  others  in  elimi‐ nating  threats  or  at  least  mitigating  them  to  the  point  of  neutering  them;  that  is,  if  they  could  not  eliminate  a  threat,  they  reduced  the  attractiveness to the aggressor of acting on the threat. The will to act  on the part of the aggressor was broken or at least stultified.     With  the  Clinton  administration  came  a  new  way  of  looking  at  threats;  it  was  the  burgeoning  of  a  way  of  thinking  that  began  to  dominate  the  Democratic  Party  in  the  late  1960s.  Desiring  to  focus  mostly on domestic matters, and bringing into his government like‐ minded individuals who had been schooled in international relations  by  the  George  McGovern  wing  of  the  Democratic  Party  (the  policy  and  academic  worlds),  Clinton  ignored  foreign  affairs  when  he  could. When he had to pay attention, he desired to see all problems  as either criminal issues (terrorism) or as problems to be solved in the  context  of  the  United  Nations  and  other  international  organizations  and  regimes.  A  desire  to  operate  from  the  standpoint  of  collective  security  replaced  the  previous  emphasis  on  self‐help  and  alliances.  38


S P R I N G   2012   

Off the table was the first response of someone like Andrew Jackson:  kill our enemies, or at least face them down for the threats they are  and neutralize or mitigate them.     Since  Clinton’s  administration  and  the  turning  of  the  Democratic  caucus in both the House and the Senate to McGovernites instead of  (Scoop)  Jacksonites,  we  now  see  that  whenever  the  Democrats  have  power they operate from a profoundly new way of looking at foreign  affairs and in particular the matter of threats to our national security.  The Obama Administration is the quintessence of this phenomenon.  Every  appointee  at  the  levels  and  in  the  positions  that  matter  view  threats  such  as  terrorism,  rogue  nation‐states,  and  world  order‐ changers as simply problems to be solved with talks and the signing  of  agreements,  preferably  at  the  United  Nations.  (The  Obama  Ad‐ ministration’s participation in the overthrow of the Gaddafi regime is  an aberration. The U.N. mandate was exceeded because the President  and his advisors were overtaken by the events of the moment and the  need to end the absurdity they were courting by trying to protect the  Libyan opposition from a cornered and bloody regime. But note: we  are not to make a comparison to George W. Bush overthrowing Sad‐ dam  Hussein  and  call  Obama  a  hypocrite.)  The  Jacksonian  wing  of  the Democratic Party is, if not dead, at least pining for the fjords.     So we entered a new era in foreign policy thinking with President  Clinton,  at  least  when  Democrats  are  in  power.  How,  then,  has  that  had an impact on the threat we face in Iran?   

W

e have been faced for over 32 years with a serious threat to  our interests in the form of the Iranian regime led by radi‐ cal  Muslim  clerics,  an  existential  threat  to  our  ally  Israel.  They are directly and indirectly responsible for deaths of hundreds of  Americans  through  terrorism  and  extra‐legal  killing  on  battlefields.  They have never paid a serious price for the harm caused to the U.S.,  including the taking of hostages in the storming of our embassy dur‐ ing  the  Carter Administration.  The  mullah‐led  regime  is  a  textbook  example of a threatening power that has been encouraged to pursue  its  interests  through  our  inaction.  For  years  they  have  continued  to  pose a threat and acted on their intentions because we have allowed  it.  That  the  Iranian  regime  cannot  destroy  the  United  States,  take  down our government or defeat us on the battlefield and on the seas  is not the point. What is pertinent is that the safety of American lives  39


THE CITY 

and property and those of our allies is always at risk because the Ira‐ nian regime maintains a threatening posture toward us with the mo‐ tivation, the will and the means to harm. It is a “sworn enemy” in the  truest sense of those words of the United States as well as our allies.  Its interests are in conflict with our interests and it is a mortal battle,  as they never fail to state.    What  have  we  done  to  protect  our  interests?  Jimmy  Carter’s  Ad‐ ministration  failed  utterly  to  dissuade  the  Iranian  regime  from  its  course.  His  one  attempt  to  actually  reverse  the  gains  they  achieved  when  they  stormed  our  embassy  and  took  our  diplomats  hostage  collapsed  in  the  desert  in  a  helicopter  crash;  he  made  no  second  at‐ tempt.  But  even  under  Ronald  Reagan,  the  administration  did  not  make  the  regime  pay  for  what  it  did.  Clearly  Reagan’s  posture  and  actions were much more confrontational regarding the threat, and his  support  of  Iraq  (along  with  that  of  several  Arab  states)  in  its  war  against Iran greatly mitigated the ability of the regime to make mis‐ chief  in  the  region  and  against  us.  But  Iran’s  proxies  in  the  form  of  terror  groups  continued  to  kill  Americans  and  augmented  regimes  hostile to us and our allies.     It is important to note that Reagan never saw the problem of Iran as  a matter of a diplomatic dispute that could be resolved with earnest  talks  that  could  lead  to  a  peaceful  coexistence  if  not  friendship.  He  saw  the  regime  as  he  saw  the  Soviet  regime:  another  form  of  evil  government that enslaves its own people and threatens the peace of  the world in addition to being an existential threat to our allies and a  serious threat to our well‐being. But he had a lot on his plate in the  form  of  the  Cold  War,  and  during  the  length  of  his  presidency  the  Iranian  threat  was  somewhat  mitigated  by  its  being  embroiled  in  a  war  with  Iraq,  whom  we  supported  to  a  degree  to  keep  an  enemy  fighting.  Our  unofficial  policy  for  the  Iran‐Iraq  War  was  enunciated  by Henry Kissinger: “It is a war that both of them deserve to lose— and that should be our policy.”    The Clinton Administration also failed to deal with the threat from  Iran, and sadly, so did the two Bush Administrations, the latter Bush  actually acceding in 2007 to the notion that Iran was not still building  nuclear  weapons.  It  also  tolerated  Iranian  killings  of  Americans  on  the border with Iraq, and Iranian support for those fighting the new  democratic government of Iraq.     40


S P R I N G   2012   

W

e  are  now,  according  to  many  experts,  less  than  a  year  away  from  an  Iran  with  nuclear  weapons.    What  are  we  doing  now?  At  the  insistence  of  the  Congress,  we  have  imposed  harsher  sanctions  that  are  biting,  but  they  came  too  late,  long  after  the  regime  has  been  making  great  strides  in  building  nu‐ clear  weapons.  Our  current  activity  is  characterized  mostly  by  the  fact that we are engaged in a debate about whether Iran is rational or  not. That is not likely to be fruitful.    This debate intensified when Obama Administration officials testi‐ fied  before  Congress  in  February  that  Iran’s  regime  was  a  rational  one  and  that  it  had  not  yet  made  the  decision  to  develop  nuclear  weapons.  Let’s  spend  a  moment  on  this  debate  to  demonstrate  that  answering  the  question,  “Is  the  Iranian  regime  rational?”  will  not  solve for us the question of whether to move against it.    Three different assumptions drive the debate: First, that the regime  is  rational  as  the  West understands  rational  behavior,  as  even  Stalin  understood  it,  and  so  will  not  do  anything  that  could  provoke  a  harmful  reaction.  Survival  is  their  goal  and  the  mullahs  won’t  risk  their  positions  or  the  advances  they  believe  they  have  made  in  the  name of Islam in the establishment of their de facto theocracy. Not to  mention risk to their purses and those of their children. The regime is  corrupt, of course, as are all tyrannies.    Second, the regime is rational but has a different calculus than we  do  or  Stalin  did.  They  will  risk  more  to  get  ends  we  think  are  not  worthwhile but are valuable to a theocracy. Or that due to the nature  of  the  regime  (extreme  secrecy,  isolated,  disorderly  with  intermixed  republican and clerical structures vying for power), they will miscal‐ culate and can’t really reason well because of who and what they are.    And third, the regime is irrational, with an apocalyptic mindset. It  is dominated by men who seek to induce the coming of the Hidden  Mahdi  (the  Twelfth  Imam  who  will  vanquish  God’s  enemies  and  thereafter  bring  peace)  and  who  believe  their  interpretation  of  the  Koran  is  the  supreme  guide  to  all  questions  political,  scientific  and  economic. They are on a crusade to restore the greatness of Islam in  the world no matter what the cost, specifically their sect of it, and so  are  not  governed  by  logic  or  facts  proved  by  testing  and  scientific  methodology. We think of Hitler in this category.     Taken  in  reverse  order,  Assumption  Three  compels  us  to  see  the  Iranian  threat  as  the  most  dangerous  because  it  is  the  most  unpre‐ 41


THE CITY 

dictable. We can truly expect the worst of people who fit the category  of  irrational  and  suicidal—who  contemplate  setting  off  a  nuclear  holocaust to welcome the Hidden Mahdi.    Assumption Two brings little comfort. Just because we can catego‐ rize  the  regime  as  rational  but  having  problems  operating  logically  shouldn’t  encourage  us.  International  relations  theorists  for  genera‐ tions have argued over the Rational Actor model and whether it real‐ ly gives us the kind of explanatory and predictive power we seek. I  happen  to  put  great  stock  in  this  model  as  a  means  to  determine  what options we should be ready to use, but we have to recognize its  limitations  that  might  well  be  demonstrated  in  the  present  Iranian  case: regimes that isolate themselves from the world, whose leaders  never  have  left  or  hardly  ever  leave  their  country  or  talk  to  anyone  who does, who don’t know much about the modern world, are hard‐ ly able to calculate rationally because rational action requires access  to  information  and the ability  to  question  hypotheses.  In  foreign  af‐ fairs conducted according to reason, surety is not attainable and not  sought; probability is sought and flexibility is maintained.     So  there  remains  Assumption  One,  the  idea  that  the  regime  is  as  rational as any modern state can be. This is the best situation we can  hope for, but problems remain. The Iranian regime has chosen a path  of  theocracy  overlaying  a  pseudo‐republic.  All  its  efforts  to  oppose  the West both at home and abroad and to impose a strict Shia inter‐ pretation  of  Islam  have  left  it  economically  deprived  and  politically  unstable. Worse still, the Arab Spring has toppled Ben Ali, Mubarak,  Gaddafi  and  perhaps  quite  soon  Bashar  al‐Assad.  And  Iran  is  in‐ creasingly  surrounded  by  enemies  and  an  emboldened  Europe  ap‐ parently ready to deal with the Iranian threat once and for all.      The  regime  has  painted  itself  into  a  corner  so  that  it  might  have  little  choice  soon  but  to  produce  the  weapon  it  believes  it  needs  to  protect itself, but that will be the very thing that causes its enemies to  fall  upon  it.  So  just  because  the  Iranian  regime  might  be  acting  ra‐ tionally does not mean it is not the threat that many perceive it to be.  Its very rational behavior in the quagmire it produced for itself make  it very dangerous indeed.    So,  what  is  the  United  States  to  do  if  it  faces  a  power  that  is  dan‐ gerous whether it is acting rationally or not?     42


S P R I N G   2012   

 doubt  Andrew  Jackson  would  suffer  a  lengthy  discourse  from  professors and policy wonks on this matter. It would be enough  for him to see that no matter how we characterize the thinking or  ideology  of  the  regime,  its  interests  and  capabilities  can  be  under‐ stood and measured and we can see if they conflict with ours or not.  And  if  conflicting  interests  combine  with  capabilities,  motivation,  and demonstrated will to do us and our allies harm, the path of ac‐ tion  is  clear.  Let’s  examine  our  interests  and  those  of  the  mullahs  simultaneously to find it.     It  is  in  our  interest  is  to  prevent  the  existence  of  another  regime  whose capability and will combine to our destruction if they choose  it or if they err into it. A nuclear weapons‐capable Iran is not subject  to regime change. If we seek the peace of the Middle East, we should  eliminate  or  at  least  neuter  a  regime  that  seeks  to  overthrow  the  United States or its preferred order in the region.    It is in our interest to prevent the existence of a tyranny in the Mid‐ dle  East  that  prevents  or  retards  indefinitely  the  democratization  of  the  region.  It  is  in  our  interest  to  prevent  another  state  sponsor  of  terrorism from existing in perpetuity—Iran is the state sponsor now  that we have stopped Libya and Iraq from playing that role and the  Syrian regime is busy trying to survive.  It is in our interest to insure  that  yet  another  rogue  regime  with  nukes  is  not  sharing  them  with  others, including terror networks.     It is in our interest not to allow the Iranians to believe they can be  more  adventurous  because  their  nukes  provide  a  firewall.  They  can  even  now  with  their  paltry  navy,  we  are  informed  by  U.S.  military  war games, inflict serious damage on us if we try to prevent adven‐ turism in the Gulf. Why let them feel even more confident?    It is also in our interest to knock off another one of Russia’s allies in  the region. The Russian regime is no longer democratic nor is it oper‐ ating  in  the  interests  of  a  community  of  democracies  of  Western‐ oriented powers. We should do what we can to weaken it further.     The  root  motivation  for  the  United  States  in  all  of  this  is  that  we  should  not  countenance  forever  a  rogue  state  with  the  capabilities  and intentions that Iran has. We should seek regime change, not con‐ tainment, when we can and when the status quo is an unacceptable  threat.  We  face  an  enemy  with  the  will,  the  determination,  and  the  motivation  to  harm  us.  It  has  already  been  harming  us  for  years,  it  recently tried to kill the Saudi ambassador on our own soil, it threat‐ 43


THE CITY 

ens to close the Strait of Hormuz and obliterate Israel, and it is even  now building the weapons to harm us in ways that make 9/11 seem  small by comparison.     What should we do? We might ask, “If Andrew Jackson were alive  and attuned to all the tools that the modern US president has at his  disposal, what would he do?” I believe the answer would be: public‐ ly  and  firmly  ally  ourselves  with  Israel,  the  anxious  Gulf  states  and  the bolder European leaders—and lead that alliance, from the front.  Announce that our objective is nothing short of the termination of the  Iranian  regime’s  ability  to  threaten  us.  Apply  political  pressure  on  every part of the regime from a global perspective. Do the same with  economic  pressure.  Implement  covert  measures.  Stop  counter‐ proliferation. Attack  the  well‐being  of  the  leaders  of  Iran,  including  and especially the Revolutionary Guards. And above all, seek the end  of the regime and abet the coming to power of democrats who desire  peace with their neighbors and with the West. This latter objective is  accomplished  by  supporting  the  forces  of  democracy,  encouraging  and  aiding  the  internal  opposition  be  they  democratic  forces,  youth  and  civic  forces,  abused  ethnic  minorities,  and  any  and  all  Iranians  inside  or  outside  the  country  whose  goal  is  a  democratic  Iran  that  lives at peace with its neighbors.      Some  of  this  has  already  been  in  process  for  a  decade,  mostly  by  the Israelis but with some US cooperation. But we need more of all of  this, and with greater intensity and with a clear public and sustained  message that the termination of the threat is our objective.    I can’t know with certainty what Andrew Jackson would do. But I  do  know  how  he  thought  and  how  he  acted.  By  the  same  token,  I  can’t know what the Iranian mullahs are going to do. But I do know  what they have done, what they have said, and how they have been  thinking  for  32  years.  It  seems  quite  reasonable  to  me  to  pit  the  thought  and  action  of  one  of  our  toughest  and  wisest  presidents  against one of the most evil and dangerous regimes we’ve ever faced.  It is time for Old Hickory.   

Paul Bonicelli is executive vice president of Regent University and a former assistant administrator of USAID. 44


S P R I N G   2012   

The Cross John Poch You can make one with your fingers, your hands, your whole body. A common tattoo. A corkscrew gone through itself, away from the wine and into the hand. The simplest arm of a broken snowflake. Pure outdoor torture furniture. A Roman invention, but more important—a human invention. Sexy on a rock star’s throat. Does it make you mad? angry? cross? Don’t cross me. Don’t cross your eyes. They’ll stay that way. Cross yourself. Stay that way. Cross your heart? Hope to die? A rose staked up, thorns and blooming all over. All over. A wet but drying double-crested cormorant hangs in the air. Mortal support. The new math. For instance, time’s crossroads times zero equals infinity. A plus.

45


THE CITY 

Death’s Learjet, seen from below. A God’s-eye view of a rush-hour intersection, crawling. An old phone pole, calling. Two high beams coming at you, blinding you. The X of a kiss, turned a little tighter. The X of murder turned a little tighter. The X of buried treasure, found, turned a little tighter. A lower case t, sans serif, sans seraphim. The word torture has two t’s. This poem has exactly one hundred t’s, all crossed. Do you wish to cross-examine? To a tee. To a tree. Excruciatingly double crossed. A million potential splinters. The scarecrow that works forever. Someone waits on a hill in silhouette.

John Poch is professor of English at Texas Tech University. He has published individual poems in Yale Review, Agni, Poetry, Paris Review, and other journals. His most recent collection of poems is Dolls (Orchises 2009) 46


S P R I N G   2012   

THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION RECONSIDERED [life0after0the0pill{ A Conversation with Mary Eberstadt Benjamin Domenech for The City: Mary Eberstadt is a research fel‐ low  at  the  Hoover  Institution  and  consulting  editor  to  Policy  Review.  She  was  previously  executive  editor  of  the  National  Interest  magazine,  manag‐ ing editor of the Public Interest, a speechwriter for Secretary of State George  P.  Shultz,  and  a  special  assistant  to  United  Nations  Ambassador  Jeane  J.  Kirkpatrick.  Her  most  recent  book,  Adam  and  Eve After  the  Pill:  Para‐ doxes of the Sexual Revolution (Ignatius), explores the unexpected con‐ sequences of the sexual revolution for society, particularly the unanticipated  consequences for women’s happiness and family stability.  First,  a  broad  question:  Has  the  sexual  revolution  been  good  for  women  and if not, why not? 

Mary Eberstadt: To  go  even  more  broad  than  that,  I’d  pose  the  question: has it been good for men, women, and children? Two years  ago which was the 50th anniversary of the approval of the pill by the  Food  and  Drug Administration,  there  was  a  lot  of  celebratory  com‐ ments in the mainstream press about the pill, about how it had liber‐ ated  women  from  the  chains  of  their  fertility,  and  so  on.  The  mood  was not exactly jubilant, but it was celebratory. And what I wanted to  do with this book was point out that there’s also a darker side to all of  this.  There’s  evidence  that  the  pill  hasn’t  been  bad  for  women,  and  I’m using the pill obviously as a metaphor for all of the sexual revolu‐ tion.  There’s  evidence  that  it  has  been  bad  for  women.  There’s  evi‐ dence  from  the  popular  culture,  from  the  sorts  of  magazine  that  47


THE CITY 

women  talk  to  each  other  in,  from  books,  from  social  science  that  I  cite in this book. There’s evidence that there’s more trouble between  the sexes than there used to be. There’s evidence that the pill is, that  the  sexual  revolution  has  been  deleterious  for  men  because  of  the  increasing rates of consumption of pornography.   All of these are things we’re not supposed to talk about, but I find it  fascinating that in many cases there is social science evidence to sug‐ gest that there are problems with the sexual revolution. We as a soci‐ ety  don’t  want  to  deal  with  those  problems  for  understandable  rea‐ sons.  But  you  don’t  have  to  know  theology  to  see  that  there  are  problems in society that didn’t exist before the sexual revolution, and  that  are  traceable  to  the  sexual  revolution,  and  those  are  the  things  that I tried to get at in the book.  

The City: In terms of one of the myths of the sexual revolution that you  highlight, it’s about the question of whether it’s made women happier or not.  Do  you  think  that  this  is  something  that  really  can  be  measured?  In  the  sense that it’s a difficult question to ask: “Are you happy relative to the way  you were before this transitional event?” 

Eberstadt: Well, one study that I cite which is done by two Whar‐ ton  School  economists  a  couple  of  years  ago  is  actually  called  the  “paradox  of  declining  female  happiness.” And  again,  this  is  secular  social science we’re talking about. They used survey data from across  the western world, not only in America. And what they found really  surprised them. What they found was that it looks as if, as a group,  women’s happiness has been declining over the last 35 years. And as  they point out, this is really paradoxical, because over those same 35  years  women  have  obviously  made  major  breakthroughs  in  the  workplace,  there’s  less  discrimination  against  them,  they’ve  gotten  better educated, and of course, they’ve also been able to avail them‐ selves of artificial contraception which our secular world tells us was  supposed to make them happy too.   So, what’s going on here? What I argue in the book is that increas‐ ing the sexual marketplace the way the pill did, that is increasing the  likelihood  of  multiple  partners,  increasing  the  likelihood  of  recrea‐ tional  sex,  has  also  increased  the  problems  with  commitment  that  people  have.  And  this  is  a  problem,  again  for  men  as  well  as  for  women. I’m not the first person to point this out. A couple of secular  male sociologists, or social thinkers, were writing about this 10 or 20  years ago—George Gilder and Lionel Tiger. And they argued similar‐ 48


S P R I N G   2012   

ly  that  if  you  flood  the  sexual  marketplace  with  available  partners  you’re  going  to  have  an  effect  on  marriage  and  other  forms  of  male/female commitment.   It seems obvious when you sit down to think about it, but again it’s  one  of  those  truths  about  the  sexual  revolution  that  we  as  a  society  don’t really want to face for understandable reasons. The sexual revo‐ lution is like a great big party that has gotten out of control and no‐ body wants to be the first one to leave, and nobody wants to get any‐ body  else  in  trouble.  But  nobody  actually  really  knows  what  to  do  about it at this point. 

The City: There’s been a marked growth of articles and various speakers  recently who are making the case for a total female libration from marriage. I  am thinking particularly of Kate Bolick’s cover story in The Atlantic where  she says that “it’s time to embrace new ideas about romance and family and  to  acknowledge  the  end  of  traditional  marriage  as  society’s  highest  ideal.”  What  do  you  think  about  that  statement  and  what  is  your  reaction  to  it?  And what do you think about the unstated or underappreciated dangers that  come as a result of that? 

Eberstadt: My first reaction, and it’s a strong reaction, is that peo‐ ple  who  say  things  like  that  are  not  stopping  to  ask  the  question,  “what is it doing to children?” And this is a perfect example of what I  tried to describe in the book. The sexual revolution has made people  more  callous  toward  children.  The  idea  of  purposefully  creating  a  fatherless child, bringing into the world a child that has no father, is  just  so  callous.  And  we  are  so  jaded  that  we  don’t  always  see  that  that’s the proper response to the statement that you just read me.   So, first of all I think it’s an excellent example of the kind of narcis‐ sistic thinking that the pill has helped to bolster. Second, I think it’s a  very sad statement because to me what it says is that that woman is  giving up. This is not a statement of liberation. It’s a statement of res‐ ignation and it is based on what has to be a really bleak view of hu‐ man nature and male nature especially, according to which they still  can’t  be  trusted,  that  you  can’t  try  to  make  a  life  with  them.  And  I  think that’s a very sad thing.   Third, as a general point about this kind of writing by women and  for  women,  it  is  preposterous  to  me  that  anyone  pretends  to  speak  for  all  of  womankind.  If  there  were  such  a  thing  as  united  woman‐ kind it would only exist because women are thinking with their hor‐ mones and not with their heads. This stereotype always comes from  49


THE CITY 

exactly  the  quarters  that  complain  that  women  shouldn’t  be  said  to  be thinking with their hormones. But that’s what they do when they  stereotype in this way.  

The City: Let me go ahead and quote to you a series of statistics from an  article  by  Mona  Charen:  “According  to  the  Pew  Research  Center,  44%  of  millennials and 43% of Gen X’ers think marriage is becoming obsolete. As  of  2010  women  held  51%  of  all  managerial  and  professional  positions  as  compared with 26% in 1980. Women account for the lion’s share of bache‐ lor’s and master’s degrees and make up a majority of the work force. Three‐ quarters of the jobs lost during the recession were lost by men. Fully 50% of  the adult population is single compared with 33% in 1950.”  Now, this is the crux of what I’m concerned about. If you look at such a  significant portion of Millennials and Gen X’ers who think marriage is be‐ coming obsolete, and a society wherein women are essentially trying to pair  themselves  with  men  who  are  less  educated,  underemployed  compared  to  them, do you think that that is a bad thing for society, and if so why? 

Eberstadt:  When  you  quote  the  numbers  about  the  Millennials  that things look very dark indeed. And the reason is, of course, that  many  of  them  have  grown  up  in  broken  homes.  This  is  something  else I try to get at in the book: it is very, very important to bring not  just clarity to this debate but also compassion, because so many peo‐ ple  are  affected  by  the  sexual  revolution,  the  broken  homes  that  it  produced. I know I am, I know anyone with a family or an extended  family have been affected by this. So first we have to understand that  we are all in this boat together somehow. And that gives us an oppor‐ tunity to reach out in the right way.   A  lot  of  these  kids  who  think  that  marriage  is  over  think  this  be‐ cause  in  their  own  lives  marriage  was  over. And  it’s  very  hard  for  a  child coming from a broken home to feel as if his parents have both  done  something  wrong.  This  is  very  natural.  It’s  natural  to feel  pro‐ tective of one’s parents in a situation like that and to resist the mes‐ sage  that  traditional  marriage  is  something  that  should  be  pro‐ claimed as a positive thing.   We  have  to  start  by  understanding  what  people  in  that  boat  are  feeling.  If  we  have  the  proper  understanding  of  what  they’re  going  through we may be able to reach them and to change things. So, what  looks really dark if you just quote the statistics—the obvious decline  in  how  traditional  marriage  is  perceived  by  younger  people—can  50


S P R I N G   2012   

actually be turned into something light if we really try to get on the  ground and understand them.  

The City:  My  next  question  is  about  men.  Kay  Hymowitz    and  other  writers  have  highlighted  again  and  again  the  rise  of  a  culture  among  men  who have given up on the dating scene, and do not view hook‐up culture as  something that ends when you get a diploma but rather something that con‐ tinues  well  into  what  we  traditionally  have  considered  adulthood.  She’s  highlighted the problems of underemployed men who spend their time play‐ ing videogames and don’t essentially turn into marriage material.   How much of the reason for that do you think is found in the sexual revo‐ lution and the pill as opposed to the men themselves? And should we expect  more from them? 

Eberstadt: Well, on one level we should always expect more from  all of us. But I think of the men described by Kay Hymowitz, and I  know her book and I love her stuff, I think of those men as victims in  all  of  this.  Because  traditionally  what  ever  made  men  grown  up?  I  mean, traditionally what makes most men grow up is having respon‐ sibility,  having  a  wife,  having  a  family.  Once  you  give  100%  control  over  reproduction  to  women  and  women  alone,  men  are  sidelined  and this is again not a point original to me. Lionel Tiger argued in a  book called The Decline of Males that this is the world the pill would  bring about. It would bring about a world in which men—who were  already as a group, not talking about any individuals, but as a group  already more distant from domestic relations than women are—that  this would make them even more so because in effect the contracep‐ tive revolution, although it liberated them for recreational sex, it also  left them less important in the whole mix.   So, is it any wonder that we have all these people with their base‐ ball caps on backwards sitting in the basement playing videogames?  No. It’s no wonder at all. Some people actually saw it coming.  

The City: I want to quote from Victor Davis Hanson who was in this case  talking about military experience, but I think it’s interesting in terms of the  situation  of  men  today  in  America.  He  talks  about  the  increasing  lack  of  people  in  the  leadership  of  the  country  who  have  experienced  “the  tragic  notion  that  if  you’re  in  a  dead‐end  job,  you  have  to  work  with  muscular  strength, there’s no good and bad choices, bad and worse choices.” He talks  about the reason for that worldview being that we have a subset of the male  population that for a variety of reasons is essentially 19th century in men‐ tality.  And  what  he  means  by  that  is  “they  are  more  likely  to  believe  in  51


THE CITY 

transcendent religion. They’re more likely to believe in nationalism. They’re  more likely to accept that tragic view that you can be good without having to  be  perfect,  so  they  don’t  become  depressed  or  give  up  because  of  an  error.”  And the people who represent that, from his perspective, have been a great  salvation to the United States in military affairs.  I  wonder  about  that  stretching  into  the  context  of  relationships.  Do  you  think  that  maybe  one  of  the  reasons  that  men  have  this  attitude,  that  Hy‐ mowitz and others have described, is because they essentially give up on the  concept  of  relationship?  They  give  up  on  the  challenge  of  having  to  be  the  men that women have demanded them to be, or expected them to be. And in  addition to that they are giving up on what necessarily would be demanded  of them to take on these leadership roles in society. 

Eberstadt:  I  come  back  to  the  old  adage,  adults  don’t  make  chil‐ dren. Children make adults.   The sexual revolution has put pressure on all the parties involved.  It’s put pressure on the formation of traditional families. It’s made it  easier  for  people  to  leave  home.  It’s  made  it  easier  for  people  to  ex‐ periment sexually in a way that puts further pressure on marriage or  commitment of any kind. That it seems to me is the central problem  here. It’s from the point of view of a man, what’s the point in making  a  commitment  that  might  easily  be  unraveled  in  an  age  of  no  fault  divorce say. In making it harder to form homes the sexual revolution  has made it easier for people not to grow up, and that’s not just true  of  men.  I  would  argue  it’s  true  of  women,  too.  It’s  been  observed  elsewhere that a lot of adults in America today live an extended ado‐ lescence. It’s not just the guys. They’re just the most obvious.  

The City: Perhaps what’s lost there is the idea of the interdependence of  the sexes—that we need and complement each other in certain ways. And I  wonder, is the dawn of the pill and the ramification of the sexual revolution  that was never anticipated turned out to be the loss of the smallest level of  society that can exist with the interdependence of the sexes—the family and  the children that come from that? 

Eberstadt:  I  don’t  think  it’s  lost  altogether.  I  don’t  think  it’s  a  lost  cause.  I  do  think  that  the  sexual  revolution  has  been  a  tsunami  and  we are just kind of getting to the surface to see what happens after‐ wards. I really do believe this is an exploration that’s going to go on  for  centuries  because  it’s  only  been  in  the  lifetime  of  middle‐aged  people that relations between the sexes have changed this drastically.  It’s going to take a lot of work and a lot of observation to figure out  52


S P R I N G   2012   

all the fall out, to map this new world. That’s what I’m trying to do in  a  very,  very  preliminary  matter  is  just  try  and  map  out  a  little  of  where we are once we get to the surface and we can see the damage  that’s been caused. 

The City:  You  pose  a  provocative  question  in  your  book  about  sex  and  food. And as someone who knows a great number of foodies I’d be remiss if I  didn’t  ask  you  about  this.  I  actually  think  this  is  a  very  fascinating  argu‐ ment, but I wonder if you could boil it down essentially for our readers in  terms of the perspective that you advance.  

George: Well, one of the main themes of the book is that the sexual  revolution  has  changed  more  than  just  the  obvious  things.  We’ve  been  talking  about  family  breakup,  and  guys  not  growing  up,  and  things  like  that,  and  that’s  sort  of  on  the  surface  of  all  this.  But  un‐ derneath I think it’s also changed all kinds of ways in which we oper‐ ate  socially. And  in  the  chapter  you’re  talking  about  I  make  the  ob‐ servation that over the past 50 years people have gotten less and less  moralistic  about  sex.  We  all  know  that  of  course.  Look  at  the  gay  rights  revolution.  Look  at  the  very  phenomena  of  no  fault  divorce.  Look  at  the  lack  of  stigma  attached  to  out  of  wedlock  births.  Obvi‐ ously  things  have  changed  and  they’ve  changed  for  lots  and  lots  of  people. People have gotten less censorious about sex.   But at the same time there’s been this parallel movement that I find  fascinating which is that people are more and more censorious about  food issues. They attach moral weight to all kinds of things concern‐ ing the consumption of food. For example, organic, or vegan, or buy‐ ing  from  buying  your  tuna  fish  from  a  place  that  doesn’t  catch  dol‐ phins  in  their  nets. And  I’m  not  making  fun  of  this—on  a  personal  note I’m a vegetarian so I actually get to say this with some objectivi‐ ty. People have become more and more holistic about food.   My  point  in  that  chapter  is  that  if  you  lay  these  two  phenomena  side by side it really looks like people took what had been their mor‐ al  concerns  about  sex  and  latched  them  onto  food  instead. And  my  hypothesis is that this great big transformation happened because of  the  sexual  revolution.  And  because,  again,  to  go  back  to  the  party  metaphor,  nobody  wanted  to  leave  the  party  yet—people  found  it  less  appealing  to  be  traditionalists  about  sex  but  they  also  seem  to  find  it  more  appealing  to  be  moralist  about  food. And  I  think  these  two things are related.  53


THE CITY 

The City: Your book arrives within the same period as Charles Murray’s  Coming Apart, which has sparked so  much discussion. One  of the things  that Murray points out which I think is not a surprise to many but may be a  surprise in the context of this discussion, is essentially that the dividing line  of  marriage  between  the  white  upper  class  and  the  working  class  whites  is  really  significant,  particularly  when  it  comes  to  the  acceptance  level  of  co‐ habitation among the working class. I wonder could you extend your argu‐ ment to the effects of what Murray highlights when it comes to this divide.  Consider a few statistics from Murray’s book: in 1960 just 2% of all white  births were non‐marital, 6% of births to white women with no more than a  high school education were out of wedlock. By 2008 44% were non‐marital.  Among  what  he  identifies  as  the  higher  class  college  educated  women,  less  than 6% of births in 2008 were out of wedlock. That’s up only one percent‐ age point from 1970.  Is this a case where, as Murray says, there’s a need for a Victorian era rev‐ olution  in  terms  of  the  way  that  the  lessons  of  what’s  best  for  children,  what’s best for families, are passed down to the working class? How can we  convince the working class, essentially, that this cohabitation approach that  they’ve been sold is a lie? 

Eberstadt: Great question. I do know Charles Murray’s book, I’ve  read it twice in fact. I think it’s a wonderful, wonderful book. Essen‐ tially what you’re asking is: how do we put the genie back in the bot‐ tle? And that’s a question not only about the working class, but about  everybody who is in this mix together. And I don’t think things are as  bleak  as  a  lot  of  traditionalists  think  they  are.  The  reason  is  that  whenever  you  start  saying  something  is  inevitable,  some  series  of  facts are going to come along and clobber you. If you think about all  the  predictions  of  inevitability  Marxism,  communism,  claiming  that  they  have  inevitable  victory  on  its  side.  That  didn’t  work.  Think  of  things in your own lifetime that seemed inevitable.   When  I  was  a  kid  it  seemed  just  inevitable  that  almost  all  adults  would smoke and smoke a lot. That changed. That changed drastical‐ ly.  What  I’m  saying  is  that,  when  you  have  large  social  phenomena  you can’t ever take for granted the idea that they are there to stay, for  better or for worse. And my point about the sexual revolution is that  it hasn’t been looked at that way yet, but the empirical record is such  that it is high time that it get looked at that way. That is get look at as  something  that  does  not  necessarily  govern  the  world  of  100  years  from  now  the  way  it  governs  our  world.  People  do  learn  from  the  54


S P R I N G   2012   

factual record. Part of what I’m trying to do in this book is bring that  factual record to light so that people can make more informed deci‐ sions about this. Now, how does that affect the working class? It’s not  there yet but in the lives that everybody, whether they read this book  or not, there are reasons to reevaluate the sexual revolution and the  world that it has made.   I’ll give you another example. In Western Europe right now there’s  a multi‐faceted crisis going on. In the financial pages it’s reported as a  financial  crisis,  which  is  essentially  that  the  large  welfare  states  of  Western Europe can’t sustain themselves because they don’t have the  money. And the reason they don’t have the money is that they don’t  have the population base. Now, to me this is not so much as a finan‐ cial  crisis  as  a  family  crisis  brought  about  by  the  sexual  revolution.  And  for  all  kinds  of  reasons  I  think  one  can  image  people  making  different choices in the future.   The  generations  behind  us,  immediately  behind  us,  decided  basi‐ cally to have very few children. Some people none. This experiment  is very new in human history. It’s only been 50 years and it’s not im‐ possible that future generations will decide actually it would be bet‐ ter  to  have  people  who  can  keep  you  company  in  your  old  age.  Or  actually  maybe  family  breakup  is  a  lot  more  expensive  than  it’s  un‐ derstood.   To  the  point  about  Murray’s  book:  I  find  his  analysis  fascinating  about  how  the  upper  classes  in  America  are  more  traditionally  ob‐ servant,  than  the  lower,  they  also  go  to  church  more  often.  But  I  would flip that around as a friendly amendment and say it’s a chick‐ en and egg problem. Maybe the reason that the people in the higher  classes tend to be married more than the people in the lower classes  is  that  family  breakup  is  expensive. And  divorce  is  expensive. And  part  of  the  reason  they’re  holding  onto  their  money  is  that  they’re  holding onto their marriages.   I  don’t  think  Charles  Murray  would  have  a  problem  with  that  ar‐ gument and I think we all know from our own lives that when peo‐ ple  fail  to  form  families  in  the  first  place,  or  when  they  have  them  and tragically lose them to divorce and related things, then financial  problems to catastrophe is very often the result. So, I think there are  two ways of looking at those statistics. 

55


THE CITY 

The City: From the perspective of a young person who is either coming  out of college or is college age, what would you say to them about the case  for why that would be damaging both to them and  to the child?  Eberstadt:  Well,  for  starters  for  those  who  have  been  through  it  themselves, they know that intuitively. There is a great deal of social  science  evidence  about  this,  an  enormous  amount.  In  fact,  the  late,  great  James  Q.  Wilson  said  17  years  ago  or  so  that  there’s  so  much  evidence  about  the  problems  for  children  of  non‐traditional  family  arrangements  that  even  some  sociologists  now  believe  that  he  was  correct. The sociologists didn’t want to believe it, but the evidence is  there.  And  the  question  is,  how  do  you  use  it  without  stuffing  it  down  people’s  throats  and  making  them  feel  as  is  you’re  pointing  fingers  at  them  and  clobbering  them  with  it? And  I  think  it’s  really  tricky.   On  the  other  hand,  people  do  learn.  People  are  rational  creatures.  And it’s not an impossible thing to explain to a young adult that if he  or she asks himself or herself what they want most, I think most peo‐ ple would still answer that they’d like to be in a committed relation‐ ship  with  somebody.  We  have  human  nature  to  work  with  here,  is  my  point.  And  I  think  between  it  and  being  delicate  and  sensible  about handling the empirical record, we can get through to people.  

The City:  I want  to  close  with  this.  When  it  comes  to  your  attitude  to‐ ward the experience of the Millennial generation here, are we dealing with a  problem that has a half life? In the sense that the people who are making the  case that marriage is unnecessary, that child rearing is not necessarily some‐ thing  that  is  affirming  for  women,  that  the  sexual  revolution  was  a  great  and grand thing, and has all these wonderful consequences, also tend to be  people who don’t have many children.   And on the flip side, those who reject those arguments implicitly, whether  they do so explicitly in their own minds or not, tend to have a lot of children  and tend to raise them. Is this a problem that essentially will work itself out  in society as those younger children grow up without opposition to marriage  and acceptance of the ideas of the sexual revolution? 

Eberstadt: There are a number of people who have written really  well  about  this.  One  is  Eric  Kaufmann,  an  academic  who  wrote  a  book  called  Shall  the  Religious  Inherit  the  Earth?  And  his  point  is  to  work  with  demographic  literature  and  statistics.  He  says  this  is  what’s going to happen across the world in every religion, because in  every religion the religious have more children. And across the board  56


S P R I N G   2012   

of  the  modern  West  secular  people  have  fewer  to  none. And  in  the  long run, he thinks, as the title suggests, that the religious will inherit  the earth. I’m not a demographer so I tend not to go there, but I think  there are other forces, too, that will propel people back toward more  traditional arrangements.   This experiment of the world brought about by the sexual revolu‐ tion is a very new experiment if you measure it against the millennia  of  human  history.  Understanding  the  problems  it  has  caused  is  the  first  step  to  living  differently.  In  short,  empirical  fact  is  not  on  the  side of people who say that the sexual revolution has been a liberat‐ ing thing for humanity. Empirical fact is on the side of those who say,  this  has  a  dark  side  that  we’re  only  beginning  to  appreciate.  And  I  think  righting  the  balance  between  those two  things  is  the  first  step  we  have  to  take  in  order  to  get  to  the  point  of  changing  hearts  and  minds.                            

Mary Eberstadt is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and consulting editor to Policy Review. Her most recent book is Adam and Eve After the Pill: Paradoxes of the Sexual Revolution (Ignatius). Benjamin Domenech is Editor in Chief of T H E C I T Y .

57


THE CITY 

C ONSCIENCE & C ATHOLICISM ]the0catholic0burden}  Paul Rahe

I

n  my  lifetime,  to  my  increasing  regret,  the  Roman  Catholic  Church in the United States has lost much of its moral authori‐ ty. It has done so largely because it has subordinated its teach‐ ing  of  Catholic  moral  doctrine  to  its  ambitions  regarding  an  expansion  of  the  administrative  entitlements  state.  In  1973,  when  the  Supreme  Court  made  its  decision  in  Roe  v.  Wade,  had  the  bishops,  priests,  and  nuns  screamed  bloody  murder  and  declared  war,  I  believe  the  decision  would  soon  have  been  reversed.  Instead,  under  the  leadership  of  Archbishop  Joseph  Bernadin,  who  became  President of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops in 1974 and  the  Cardinal‐Archbishop  of  Chicago  in  1982,  they  asserted  that  the  teaching of the Church was a “seamless garment,” and treated abor‐ tion  as  one  concern  among  many.  Here  is  what  Cardinal  Bernadin  said in the Gannon Lecture at Fordham University that he delivered  in 1983:    Those who defend the right to life of the weakest among us must be equally visible in support of the quality of life of the powerless among us: the old and the young, the hungry and the homeless, the undocumented immigrant and the unemployed worker. Consistency means that we cannot have it both ways. We cannot urge a compassionate society and vigorous public policy to protect the rights of the unborn and then argue that compassion and significant public programs on behalf of the needy undermine the moral fiber of the society or are beyond the proper scope of governmental responsibility.   This statement, which came to be taken as authoritative throughout  the  American  Church,  proved,  as  Joseph  Sobran  observed  seven  58


S P R I N G   2012   

years  ago,  “to  be  nothing  but  a  loophole  for  hypocritical  Catholic  politicians. If anything,” he added, ʺit has actually made it easier for  them  than  for  non‐Catholics  to  give  their  effective  support  to  legal‐ ized  abortion—that  is,  it  has  allowed  them  to  be  inconsistent  and  unprincipled about the very issues  that Cardinal Bernardin said de‐ mand consistency and principle.” In practice, this meant that, insofar  as anyone pressed the case against Roe v. Wade, it would be concerned  Catholic  laymen  orphaned  by  their  church  and  the  evangelical  Protestants who flocked to the banner they unfurled.  I was reared a Catholic, wandered out of the Church, and stumbled  back  in  more  than  thirteen  years  ago.  I  cannot  claim  to  be  a  fully  faithful Catholic even now, but I have been a regular attendee at mass  since  that  time.  Moreover,  I  travel  a  great  deal  and  frequently  find  myself in a diocese not my own. In these years, I have heard sermons  articulating the case against abortion thrice—once in passing in Loui‐ siana at a mass said by the retired Archbishop there; once in passing  at the cathedral in Tulsa, Oklahoma; and a few weeks ago in a com‐ pelling fashion in our parish in Hillsdale, Michigan. The truth is that  the priests in the United States are far more likely to push the “social  justice”  agenda  of  the American  bishops  from  the  pulpit  than  to  in‐ struct the faithful in the evils of abortion.  I have not once in those years heard the argument against contra‐ ception  made  from  the  pulpit,  and  I  have  not  once  heard  the  argu‐ ment  for  chastity  articulated.  In  the  face  of  a  sexual  revolution  that  has produced childbirth out of wedlock on a scale unprecedented in  human  history,  the  bishops,  priests,  and  nuns  of  the  American  Church  have  by  and  large  fallen  silent.  In  effect,  they  have  aban‐ doned the moral teaching of the Roman Catholic Church in order to  articulate  a  defense  of  the  administrative  entitlements  state  and  its  progressive expansion.  There is another dimension to the failure of the American  Church  in  the  face  of  the  sexual  revolution. As  everyone  knows  by  now,  in  the  1980s—when  Cardinal  Bernadin  was  the  chief  leader  of  the  American Church and the man most closely consulted when the Vat‐ ican selected its bishops—it became evident to the American prelates  that, in many a diocese, there were priests who were rampant homo‐ sexual  predators—pederasts  inclined  to  take  advantage  of  young  boys.  The  bishops  could  have  faced  up  to  the  problem  at  that  time;  they could have turned in the malefactors to the secular authorities;  59


THE CITY 

they could have prevented their further contact with the young. They  were called upon to do so in a report drawn on their behalf up by a  psychologist,  a  lawyer,  and  an  expert  in  canon  law.  Instead,  under  the guidance of Cardinal Bernadin and those of his cronies whom he  installed  in  turn  atop  the  National  Conference  of  Catholic  Bishops,  they  opted  for  another  policy.  They  hushed  everything  up,  sent  the  priests off for psychological counseling, and reassigned them to other  parishes  or  even  dioceses—where  they  continued  to  prey  on  young  boys. In the same period, a number of the seminaries in which young  men were trained for the priesthood became, in effect, brothels—and  next to nothing was done about any of this until 2002 when the Bos‐ ton Globe broke the story and the lawsuits began in earnest.  There is, I would suggest, a connection between the heretical doc‐ trine  propagated  by  Cardinal  Bernadin  in  the  Gannon  Lecture  and  the difficulties that the American Church now faces. Those who soft‐ pedal  the  moral  teaching  of  the  Church  in  the  interest  of  creating  heaven  on  earth  and  who,  to  this  end,  subvert  the  liberty  of  others  and embrace the administrative entitlements state will sooner or later  become its victims.   

Y

ou  have  to  hand  it  to  President  Barack  Obama.  He  has  un‐ masked in the most thoroughgoing way the despotic propen‐ sities of the administrative entitlements state. And now he has  done  something  similar  to  the  hierarchy  of  the  American  Catholic  Church. At the prospect that institutions associated with the Catholic  Church  would  be  required  to  offer  to  their  employees  health  insur‐ ance  covering  contraception  and  abortifacients,  the  bishops,  priests,  and some of the nuns scream bloody murder. Now, finally, almost as  an  afterthought,  when  the  hour  is  very  nearly  too  late—they  also  raise  objection  to  the  fact  that  Catholic  and  even  non‐Catholic  em‐ ployers as well as corporations, large and small, owned wholly or in  part by Roman Catholics and those of others faiths, will be required  to do the same. These advocates consider the freedom of the Catholic  Church  as  an  institution  to  distance  itself  from  that  which  its  doc‐ trines decry as morally wrong to be sacrosanct. Yet what of the liber‐ ty of its members—not to mention the liberty belonging to the adher‐ ents of other Christian sects, to Jews, Muslims, and non‐believers—to  do  the  same?  This  they  were,  until  cornered  themselves,  perfectly  willing to sacrifice.  60


S P R I N G   2012   

This inattention to the liberties of others is doubly scandalous (and  I use this poignant term in full knowledge of its meaning within the  Catholic tradition)—for there was a time when the Catholic hierarchy  knew  better.  There  was  a  time  when  Roman  Catholicism  was  the  great defender not only of its own liberty but of that of others. There  was a time when the prelates recognized the liberty of the Church to  govern  itself  in  light  of  its  guiding  principles  was  inseparable  from  the liberty of other corporate bodies and institutions to do the same.  I  do  not  mean  to  say  that  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  was  in  the  more distant past a staunch defender of religious liberty. That it was  not. (Within its sphere, the Church demanded full authority. It is only  in  recent  years  that  Rome  has  come  to  be  fully  appreciative  of  the  larger principle.) I mean that, in the course of defending its own au‐ tonomy  against  the  secular  power,  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  as‐ serted the liberty of other corporate bodies and even, in some meas‐ ure, the liberty of individuals. To see what I have in mind one need  only  examine  Magna  Carta,  which  begins  with  King  John’s  pledge  that    the English Church shall be free, and shall have her rights entire, and her liberties inviolate; and we will that it be thus observed; which is apparent from this that the freedom of elections, which is reckoned most important and very essential to the English Church, we, of our pure and unconstrained will, did grant, and did by our charter confirm and did obtain the ratification of the same from our lord, Pope Innocent III, before the quarrel arose between us and our barons: and this we will observe, and our will is that it be observed in good faith by our heirs forever.   Only  after  making  this  promise  does  the  King  go  on  to  say,  “We  have also granted to all freemen of our kingdom, for us and our heirs  forever,  all  the  underwritten  liberties,  to  be  had  and  held  by  them  and their heirs, of us and our heirs forever.” It is in this context that  he affirms that “no scutage not aid shall be imposed on our kingdom,  unless  by  common  counsel  of  our  kingdom,  except  for  ransoming  our person, for making our eldest son a knight, and for once marry‐ ing our eldest daughter; and for these there shall not be levied more  than a reasonable aid.” It is in this context that he pledges that “the  city of London shall have all its ancient liberties and free customs, as  well by land as by water,” and grants that “all other cities, boroughs,  towns, and ports shall have all their liberties and free customs.” It is  61


THE CITY 

in this document that he promises that “no freemen shall be taken or  imprisoned  or  disseised  or  exiled  or  in  any  way  destroyed,  nor  will  we go upon him nor send upon him, except by the lawful judgment  of  his  peers  or  by  the  law  of  the  land”  and  that  “to  no  one  will  we  sell, to no one will we refuse or delay, right or justice.”   

ne will not find such a document in eastern Christendom or  in the sphere governed by Sunni Islam. It is peculiar to West‐ ern Christendom—and it was made possible by the fact that,  in  the  Christian  West,  church  and  state  were  not  co‐extensive  and  none of the various secular powers was able to establish its suzerain‐ ty over the Church. There was within each political community in the  Christian  West  an  imperium  in  imperio—a  power  independent  of  the  state that had no desire to replace the state but was fiercely resistant  to its own subordination and aware that it could not hope to retain its  traditional  liberties  if  it  did  not  lend  a  hand  in  defending  the  tradi‐ tional liberties of others.  I  am  not  arguing  that  the  Church  fostered  limited  government  in  the  Middle  Ages  and  in  the  early  modern  period.  In  principle,  the  government that it fostered was unlimited in its scope. I am arguing,  however, that the Church worked assiduously to hem in the authori‐ ty of the Christian kings and that its success in this endeavor provid‐ ed  the  foundation  for  the  emergence  of  a  parliamentary  order.  In‐ deed,  I  would  go  further.  It  was  the  Church  that  promoted  the  principles  underpinning  the  emergence  of  parliaments.  It  did  so  by  fostering  the  quasi‐republican  species  of  government  that  had  emerged within the Church itself. Given that the Church in the West  made  clerical  celibacy  one  of  its  principal  practices  (whether  it  was  honored in the breach or not), the hereditary principle could play no  role  in  its  governance.  Inevitably,  it  resorted  to  elections.  Monks  elected abbots, the canons of cathedrals elected bishops, the College  of Cardinals elected the Pope.  The principle articulated in canon law—the only law common to all  of Western Europe—to explain why these practices were proper was  lifted  from  the  Roman  law  dealing  with  the  governance  of  water‐ ways:  “Quod  omnes  tangit,”  it  read,  “ab  omnibus  tractari  debeat:  That  which  touches  all  should  be  dealt  with  by  all.”  In  pagan  antiquity,  this  meant  that  those  upstream  could  not  take  all  of  the  water  and  that those downstream had a say in its allocation. It was this princi‐ 62


S P R I N G   2012   

ple that the clergymen who served as royal administrators insinuated  into the laws of the kingdoms and petty republics of Europe. It was  used to justify communal self‐government. It was used to justify the  calling  of  parliaments. And  it  was  used  to  justify  the  provisions  for  self‐governance  contained  within  the  corporate  charters  issued  to  cities,  boroughs,  and,  in  time,  colonies.  In  the  midst  of  the  struggle  occasioned by the ratification of the American Constitution, you will  find it cited by John Dickinson in The Letters of Fabius.  The quod omnes tangit principle was not the foundation of modern  liberty,  but  it  was  its  antecedent. And  had  there  been  no  such  ante‐ cedent, had kings not been hemmed in by the Church and its allies in  this  fashion,  I  very  much  doubt  that  there  ever  would  have  been  a  regime  of  limited  government.  In  fact,  had  there  not  been  a  distinc‐ tion both in theory and in fact between the secular and the spiritual  authority, limited government would have been inconceivable.  The  Reformation  weakened  the  Church.  In  Protestant  lands,  it  tended  to  strengthen  the  secular  power  and  to  promote  a  monar‐ chical  absolutism  unknown  to  the  Middle  Ages.  Outside  Geneva,  Presbyterianism—with  its  republican  propensities—had  limited  in‐ fluence,  and  Lutheranism  and Anglicanism  were,  in  effect, Caesaro‐ Papist. In Catholic lands, the Reformation caused the spiritual power  to shelter itself behind the secular power and become, to a considera‐ ble  degree,  an  appendage  of  that  power.  But  the  Reformation,  the  Counter‐Reformation, and the religious strife to which they gave rise  also  posed  to  the  secular  power  an  almost  insuperable  problem— how to secure peace and domestic tranquility in a world marked by  sectarian rivalry and strife. Limited government—i. e., a government  in principle limited in its scope—was the solution ultimately found.  In the nascent American republic, this principle was codified in its  purest  form  in  the  First Amendment  to  the  Constitution.  But  it  had  additional  ramifications  as  well—for  the  government’s  scope  was  limited also in other ways. There were other amendments that made  up what we now call the Bill of Rights, and many of the states pref‐ aced their constitutions with bills of rights or added them as appen‐ dices. These were all intended to limit the scope of the government.  They were all designed to protect the right of individuals to life, lib‐ erty,  the  acquisition  and  possession  of  property,  and  the  pursuit  of  happiness  as  these  individuals  understood  happiness.  Put  simply,  63


THE CITY 

liberty  of  conscience  was  part  of  a  larger  package.  It  was  the  first  freedom, but not the last.  This is what the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church forgot. In  the  1930s,  the  majority  of  the  bishops,  priests,  and  nuns  sold  their  souls to the devil, and (like many a Protestant both before and after)  they did so with the best of intentions. In their concern for the suffer‐ ing  of  those  out  of  work  and  destitute,  they  wholeheartedly  em‐ braced  the  New  Deal.  They  gloried  in  the  fact  that  Franklin  Delano  Roosevelt made Frances Perkins—a devout Anglo‐Catholic laywom‐ an  who belonged to the Episcopalian Church but retreated on occa‐ sion to a Catholic convent—Secretary of Labor and the first member  of  her  sex  to  be  awarded  a  cabinet  post. And  they  welcomed  Social  Security,  which  was  her  handiwork.  They  did  not  stop  to  ponder  whether  public  provision  in  this  regard  would  subvert  the  moral  principle that children are responsible for the well‐being of their par‐ ents. They did not stop to consider whether this measure would re‐ duce  the  incentives  for  procreation  and  nourish  the  temptation  to  think  of  sexual  intercourse  as  an  indoor  sport.  They  did  not  stop  to  think.   In  the  process,  the  leaders  of  the  American  Catholic  Church  fell  prey to a conceit that had long before ensnared a great many main‐ stream Protestants in the United States—the notion that public provi‐ sion is somehow akin to charity—and so they fostered state paternal‐ ism and undermined what they professed to teach: that charity is an  individual  responsibility  and  that  it  is  appropriate  that  individuals  fulfill that responsibility by joining together under the leadership of  the  Church  to  alleviate  the  suffering  of  the  poor.  In  its  place,  they  helped establish the Machiavellian principle that underpins modern  liberalism—the notion that it is our Christian duty to confiscate other  people’s money and redistribute it.   

A

t  every  turn  in  American  politics  since  that  time,  you  will  find  the  hierarchy  assisting  the  Democratic  Party  and  pro‐ moting  the  growth  of  the  administrative  entitlements  state.  At no point have its members evidenced any concern for sustaining  limited  government  and  protecting  the  rights  of  individuals.  It  did  not  cross  the  minds  of  these  prelates  that  the  liberty  of  conscience  which they had grown to cherish is part of a larger package—that the  paternalistic state, which recognizes no legitimate limits on its power  64


S P R I N G   2012   

and  scope,  that  they  had  so  passionately  embraced  would  someday  turn  on  the  Church  and  seek  to  dictate  whom  it  chose  to  teach  its  doctrines and how, more generally, it would conduct its affairs.  I would submit that the bishops, priests, and nuns now screaming  bloody  murder  have  gotten  what  they  asked  for.  The  weapon  that  Obama  has  directed  at  the  Church  was  fashioned  to  a  considerable  degree  by  Catholic  churchmen,  who  have  pushed  universal  health  care now for decades.  I do not mean to say that I would prefer that the bishops, nuns, and  priests sit down and shut up. Obama has once again done the friends  of liberty a favor by forcing the friends of the administrative entitle‐ ments state to contemplate what they have wrought. Whether those  brought up on the heresy that public provision is akin to charity will  prove capable of thinking through what they have done remains un‐ clear. But there is now a chance that this ephiphany will take place.  There was a time—long ago, to be sure, but for an institution with the  longevity possessed by the Catholic Church long ago was just yester‐ day—when the Church played an honorable role in hemming in the  authority of magistrates and in promoting not only its own liberty as  an  institution  but  that  of  others  similarly  intent  on  managing  their  own affairs as individuals and as members of sub‐political communi‐ ties.   

n the wake of the bishops’ initial protest, Obama offered them “a  compromise.”  Under  its  terms,  insurance  companies  offering  healthcare coverage would be  required to provide contraception  and abortifacients, but this would not be mentioned in the contracts  signed  by  those  who  run  Catholic  institutions.  This  “compromise”  was, of course, a farce. It embodied a distinction where there was, in  fact,  no  difference.  It  was  a  snare  and  a  delusion,  and  the  Catholic  Left embraced it immediately, thinking that it would allow the bish‐ ops, priests, and nuns to save face while, in fact, paying for the con‐ traception and abortifacients that the insurance companies would be  required  to  provide. As  if  on  cue,  Sister  Carol  Keehan,  a  prominent  Obamacare  supporter  who  heads  the  Catholic  Health  Association,  immediately  issued  a  statement  in  which  she  announced  that  she  is  “pleased and grateful that the religious liberty and conscience protec‐ tion needs of so many ministries that serve our country were appre‐ 65


THE CITY 

ciated  enough  that  an  early  resolution  of  this  issue  was  accom‐ plished.”  The  bishops  did  not,  however,  immediately  fall  in  line.  For  once,  they did not follow the lead of the Catholic Left. There is, in fact, rea‐ son to wonder whether Obama may not have shaken some members  of  the  hierarchy  from  their  dogmatic  slumber. A  few  of  them—and,  among  the  younger  priests,  some  of  their  likely  successors—appear  to have begun to recognize the logic inherent in the development of  the administrative entitlements state. The proponents of Obamacare,  with  some  consistency, pointed  to Canada  and  to  France as  models.  As  anyone  who  has  attended  mass  in  Montreal  or  Paris  can  testify,  the Church in both of these places is filled with empty pews. There is,  in  fact,  not  a  single  country  in  the  social  democratic  sphere  where  either  the  Catholic  Church  or  a  Protestant  church  is  anything  but  moribund. This is by no means fortuitous. When faith and morals are  no longer taught and when government‐financed entitlements stand  in for charity and the Social Gospel is preached in place of the Word  of  God,  heaven  on  earth  becomes  the  end,  the  state  replaces  the  Church, and genuine Christianity goes by the boards.  It  took  a  terrible  scandal  and  a  host  of  lawsuits  to  persuade  the  American Church to rid itself of the pederast priests and clean up its  seminaries.  Perhaps  the  tyrannical  agenda  of  Obama  and  his  allies  will have a comparable effect. Perhaps it will occasion on the part of  the Catholic clergy a rethinking of the social‐justice agenda. The ball  is now in the court of Timothy Dolan, Cardinal‐Archbishop of New  York. He has refused the fig leaf that President Obama offered him.  He has chosen to fight, and the other bishops have rallied in his sup‐ port. We can only hope that he is not only cunning and resolute but  also  fully  cognizant  of  the  role  played  by  the  American  Church  in  forging the weapons now being used against it.   The hour is late, and the stakes are high. Next time, the masters of  the administrative entitlements state will not even bother to offer the  hierarchy a fig leaf. 

Paul Rahe holds The Charles O. Lee and Louise K. Lee Chair in the Western Heritage at Hillsdale College, where he is Professor of History. He is the author most recently of Soft Despotism, Democracy’s Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect (Yale University Press, 2009). 66


S P R I N G   2012   

T EA W ITH R USSELL K IRK ]political0friendship}  Tim Goeglein

I

n  Washington,  D.C.,  relationships  matter.  These  kinds  of  friendships are easily misunderstood. That’s because so many  of  them  are  formed  and  solidified  through  high‐pressure,  high‐stress  political  situations.  Those  natural  highs  and  lows  of  American  politics  burnish  relationships.  During  all  my  years  in  Washington,  I  have  been  the  beneficiary  of  some  fortunate  friendships—people  who  I  came  to  know,  love,  and  trust,  and  who  have become among the most important friends of my life.  Some  of  these  men  and  women  were  colleagues  in  the  Senate,  on  various  campaigns,  in  the  White  House,  or  in  other  perches  in  the  administration.  Still  others  were  friends  outside  politics  or  public  policy  all  together.  But  I  was  fortunate  to  have  intellectual  friend‐ ships of my life formed long before I came to the White House, with  men who guided me in ways more important than I ever would have  thought possible in the days when our friendships were new.   I  met  Russell  Kirk,  one  of  the  founding  fathers  of  the  American  conservative  movement  in  the  years  after  World  War  II  and  the  au‐ thor of the magisterial The Conservative Mind, when I was a junior in  high  school  in  1981.  Russell,  a  fellow  Midwesterner,  developed  a  friendship  with  me  through  letters,  all  of  his  typed  personally  and  neatly with nary an error, flowing as if each one was written for pub‐ lication—lucid and eloquent, word upon word. We exchanged letters  on and off through the rest of his life, well into the 1990s, and we saw  each other whenever he came to Washington, which was at least two  times a year on average for lectures and speeches.   His remarkable wife Annette, whom he always referred to as “the  beauteous,”  became  an  equally  cherished  friend.  After  Russell’s  67


THE CITY 

death, she carried on his legacy in founding The Russell Kirk Center  for Cultural Renewal in Michigan with the help of the indispensable  Intercollegiate  Studies  Institute  in  Wilmington,  Delaware,  where  Russell and Annette’s son‐in‐law Jeffrey Nelson, also a friend, serves  as a senior vice president.   Russell changed my life by seeding my intellectual curiosity. I came  to see that his external life was much smaller than his internal world,  which was large, deep, and wide. He taught me to be wary of ideo‐ logues because they got in the way of a good life. He famously said  that “ideology is anathema.” Conservatism, I came to see, because of  the influence of Russell, was not an ideology but instead a way of life.  There  is  no official  or  unofficial  handbook  for  what  constitutes  con‐ servatism, and in fact the conservative life is various.  Through  all  our  letters,  through  our  many  conversations,  through  reading his prodigious oeuvre—both fiction and nonfiction (his ghost  stories are remarkable)—I came to see I was not exclusively a social  conservative,  an  economic  conservative,  or  a  defense/foreign  poli‐ cy/national security conservative. I was a conservative without prefix  or suffix, one who believed, with Russell, that “the twentieth‐century  conservative  is  concerned,  first  of  all,  for  the  regeneration  of  spirit  and character—with the perennial problem of the inner order of the  soul,  the  restoration  of  the  ethical  understanding,  and  the  religious  sanction  upon  which  any  life  worth  living  is  founded.  This  is  con‐ servatism at its highest.”  When I read those words for the first time in The Conservative Mind,  I  knew  I  had  found  a  soul  mate,  even  if  we  did  not  agree  on  all  things. In fact, I once raised this point with Russell, and he noted  he  was pleased that in fact we did not agree in all matters. He told me  disagreement  is  a  key  part  of  conservatism,  that  there  is  no  single  document  or  manifesto  that  guides  the  conservative  but  that  there  are  precepts  rooted  in  transcendence,  custom,  order,  and  tradition  that  guide  the  thinking  and  faith  of  those  who  find  wisdom  in  pre‐ scription.  When William F. Buckley Jr. once visited Russell in Kirk’s small an‐ cestral  Michigan  village  of  Mecosta—Russell  liked  to  refer  to  that  part  of  Michigan  as  “the  stump  country”—and  asked  him  what  he  did for intellectual companionship there, Russell pointed at the wall  of  books  comprising  his  library.  That  is  not  an  inapt  description  of  68


S P R I N G   2012   

how Russell’s friendship impacted my own public service in the Sen‐ ate and the White House.   Russell  showed  me  it  was  important  to  live  your  ideas,  that  faith  and  action  go  together  and  not  one  without  the  other.  He  was  a  commanding public intellectual, deeply respected by men and wom‐ en  of  the  Left  as  well  as  the  Right.  Even  a  liberal  like Arthur  Schle‐ singer  Jr.  also  had  great  respect  for  Russell,  and  both  men  shared  a  mutually high regard for Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, among  many other things. During my years in the White House, Schlesinger  invited me to his Sutton Place apartment and office in New York City.  We  spoke  of  Tocqueville,  Emerson,  FDR,  and  JFK.  But  when  I  told  him of my friendship with Dr. Kirk, that is all Schlesinger wanted to  talk about for the next half hour.   

 remember  spending  a  winter  weekend  with  the  Kirks  in  Me‐ costa.  I  drove  to  their  home,  which  was  about  five  hours  from  Fort Wayne. When I arrived, I thought it was one of the bleakest  days  of  the  year:  The  skies  were  grey;  the  fields  and  forests  were  cropless and leafless; and the bitter wind seemed endless.   When  I  came  into  their  village,  I  did  not  know  precisely  where  their  home  was.  Annette  had  said,  “Just  ask  anyone  when  you  ar‐ rive,” as it was a small village. So I stopped at the first place��I found,  a kind of combination gas station and gift shop. “Oh, the Kirks. Yes,  they live in that haunted house down there,” pointing just down the  street.  I  chuckled,  but  the  woman  gave  me  a  lame  grin  as  if  to  say,  “Just wait. You’ll see what I mean.”   The Gothic house was indeed a landmark in Mecosta. The original  Kirk  homestead  burned  to  the  ground  many  years  before  on  Good  Friday, but Russell and Annette built a beautiful Italianate home in its  place. It was not grandiose or luxurious; but it had a remarkable per‐ sonality, perfectly capturing its patriarch.  The  highlight  of  my  time  with  the  Kirks  was  when  Russell  and  I  took a short walk down a snowy old lane to the former cigar factory  that  became  his  library.  Thousands  of  volumes  animated  the  place,  but there were two focal points in the room: the desk where Russell  did  his  writing,  usually  in  the  dead  of  night  while  his  family  slept,  and a large, roaring, crackling fire in the fireplace that in those winter  months was rarely extinguished. When we walked in, I felt a sense of  69


THE CITY 

serenity and warmth and even peace. So many of the books special in  my life were written in that library.     The last time I saw Russell was on his final visit to Washington. We  had tea on the rooftop of the old Hotel Washington where he stayed  when he was in the city. It was a glorious afternoon, and the terrace  where we sat overlooked the White House and the Department of the  Treasury. I made a comment about the statue of Alexander Hamilton  that  stands  just  behind  the  Treasury,  near  to  the  East  Gate  of  the  White House. Russell began to expound on the key chapters of Ham‐ ilton’s life, the centrality of his role in the Federalist Papers, and was  discussing  the  importance  of  Hamilton  to  America’s  founding  as  if  he, Russell, was literally sitting having tea in the eighteenth century.   He was not lecturing or moralizing but rather discussing and evok‐ ing in the most remarkable fashion, from his great mind, one of the  central characters of all of American history. Russell’s comments had  a learnedness and vastness of knowledge that astounded me, and yet  there  was  not  a  scintilla  of  pedantry  in  his  approach.  When  I  was  with him, I always felt a sense of calm which was irretrievable, never  fictive.  He  was  a  gentle  man.  He  died,  surrounded  by  his  wife  and  four daughters, April 29, 1994.   

ussell’s  friendship,  animated  by  the  first  postulates  of  the  good  life,  guided  me  in  practical  ways  time  and  again.  His  was a worldview animated by a realm of noble ideas, myste‐ rious  splendor,  and  the  ways  God  affronted  confusion,  doubt,  and  fear.  Russell  taught  me  to  embrace  justice,  mystery,  and  an  orderly  and stable universe which was God‐ordained and true.  He  showed  that  literature  and  civilization  matter  to  the  man  or  woman who chooses public life and that being guided by those cen‐ tral, exciting ideas—truth, beauty, justice, goodness—was a wonder‐ ful way to navigate a good and meaningful life. In all of my letters,  lunches, dinners, and time with him, he never once raised a political  idea  or  discussion.  With  Russell  there  was  never  a  time  of  punditry  or current events. If I made a comment about something in the news,  he might express an opinion, but by and large we discussed history,  biography,  poetry,  philosophy,  theology,  or  shared  a  bit  of  humor.  Russell Kirk’s impact on me was indelible.    It’s  important  to  understand  the  intersection  of  friendships  like  the  one I had with Russell and those that typically exist in Washington.  70


S P R I N G   2012   

With politics comes the pressure to network and relate to people only  in a tangential, selfish manner. This is a destructive approach and one  that misses out on the relationships that give true meaning to life.   In my time working at the White House under George  W. Bush, I  was tasked with forming friendships as a liaison throughout the con‐ servative  movement,  at  think  tanks,  activist  organizations,  and  the  media, including the authors, writers, scholars, wonks, and historians  who  propounded  a  right  of  center  worldview  that  battled  back  against the liberal domination of the media.   But how to mesh these worlds? One relationship at a time, building  a  level  of  trust  and  friendship  over  weeks,  months,  and  years,  and  always respecting the bright line between my role as liaison and my  White  House  colleagues’  media  and  communications  roles.  It  was  a  balance  and  ballast  we  achieved  incrementally.  The  goal  was  not  to  get important people to agree with President Bush. The goal was to  open a dialogue, earn the honor of being heard, and having the pres‐ ident’s viewpoint thoughtfully considered.  The glue of the American conservative movement is the Madisoni‐ an view that our framers created a government of strictly enumerat‐ ed  and  restricted  powers  that  give  most  power  to  the  states  and  to  the  American  people,  not  Washington  and  its  permanent,  ever‐ expansive  bureaucracy.  It  was  a  view  Russell  espoused  in  his  way,  and  others  in  theirs.  Despite  their  differences,  the  worlds  are  more  complementary than you might think.  I came to see the conservative intellectual and journalistic world as  a vibrant place, peopled by talented individuals whose own diversity  of  opinion,  outlook,  and  styles  destroyed  the  myth  that  there  was  anything like unanimity on the American Right. Yet there was a sin‐ gular devotion among all conservatives to first principles and to the  idea  of  American  exceptionalism  best  exemplified  in  adherence  to  and respect for our nation’s founding documents, none more so than  the  Constitution.  That  idea  bound  all  American  conservatism  and  was  the  foundation  of  some  of  the  most  fortunate,  blessed  friend‐ ships of my life. 

Timothy Goeglein is Vice President of Focus on the Family and the author of The Man in the Middle (B&H Books, 2011), from which this piece is adapted. 71


THE CITY 

Books & Culture

“ 72


S P R I N G   2012   

T HE M ORALITY OF D EMOCRATIC C APITALISM \how0to0help0the0poor|  Ryan T. Anderson Wealth and Justice: The Morality of Democratic Capitalism, by Peter Wehner and Arthur Brooks, AEI Press 2010. Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach, by Martha Nussbaum, Harvard University Press 2011. From Prophecy to Charity: How to Help the Poor, by Lawrence Mead, AEI Press 2011.  

M

arket economies, free enterprise, and private prop‐ erty are important, and so their defense is also  important. But as important as these ideas and  institutions are, they aren’t enough for a complete  account of the rights and duties in the economic  sphere of our lives. Nevertheless, many conservatives seem intent on  downplaying social justice. For too long, those on the right have ne‐ glected to advance moral cases for free enterprise. The consequences  are apparent everywhere you look in politics and the public square,  particularly among younger Americans who perhaps have little  memory of the negative effects of alternative approaches, and profes‐ sors with little interest in filling them in on the historical truth. But  the problem cannot be ignored without ramifications. Consider just  one measure, a poll released by GlobeScan in 2011—it found that  public support in America for the proposition that “the free market  economy is the best economic system for the future” had dropped  73


THE CITY 

from 80% in 2002 to a mere 59%, a percentage which placed support  for the free market in America lower than it is in China.  This is a sad circumstance, particularly considering how many  moral arguments can be marshaled in favor of free enterprise and  democratic capitalism. For a generation wrestling with economic  questions, conservatives need to provide a more thoughtful consid‐ eration and response to what worries people about capitalism. Ethics  and Public Policy Center fellow Peter Wehner and American Enter‐ prise Institute President Arthur Brooks provide a helpful example of  how this is done in their new book in the AEI Values and Capitalism  series, Wealth and Justice: The Morality of Democratic Capitalism.    

ehner and Brooks begin by arguing that democratic capi‐ talism is the political‐economic system that best corre‐ sponds to a human nature that is neither hopelessly  flawed nor infinitely perfectible, but rather is a mix of beast and an‐ gel. The system allows citizens to pursue their self‐interest, rightly  understood, in a way that need not be either selfish or selfless, but  still contributes to the common good. It also avoids the coercion and  corruption present in the more totalitarian alternative regime struc‐ tures while more satisfactorily helping the poor: “Markets, precisely  because they are wealth‐generating, also end up being wealth‐ distributing.”  They go on to recount the economic achievements of capitalism,  which are, quite simply, staggering. Regardless of how you measure  standards of living—infant mortality, life expectancy, literacy, hun‐ ger, disease, violence—the spread of capitalism has benefited every‐ one, they argue, and particularly the poor. As they note: “If you were  born in London before the dawn of modern capitalism, the norm was  destitution and grinding poverty, widespread illiteracy, illness and  disease, and early death. And, even worse, your children could ex‐ pect a similar fate. The possibility for progress was almost nonexist‐ ent for your progeny.” But with the rise of capitalism, all of this  changed. Though they are careful to note the downsides of the Indus‐ trial Revolution, they argue that it needs to be measured against life  prior to it, which was “bleak, cruel, and short.”  The attempts to fix the problems of industrialization proved to hurt  the poor, not help them. Wehner and Brooks document the failures in  worldviews that sought “a world with the benefits of capitalism, but  74


S P R I N G   2012   

without its costs.” So they tally the effects of communism, as it mis‐ read human nature and “shackled more people in more chains than  any other political theory in history.” Concentrated power led to  abuses, atheism devalued humanity, and a materialistic outlook  viewed people as “merely economic units in the service of the state.”  In the end, 65 million died under Mao, 20 million under Stalin and  Lenin, and 2 million (a quarter of the Cambodian population) under  Pol Pot. And for those who survived, living standards were poor.  But in “places where capitalism has taken root and flowered, in‐ come and living standards have shot up.”  In “capitalist nations, ex‐ treme economic poverty has been largely eliminated. There is an  abundance of food. Literacy is commonplace; so are clean water, vac‐ cinations, and access to advanced medical care.” Wehner and Brooks  note that where capitalism has not taken root, “people live under  brutal tyrannies, political corruption, malnutrition, and even starva‐ tion; social and technological progress is stymied, economies are  stagnant, and the quality of life is dismal.” They conclude that “Capi‐ talism has done more to lift people out of abject poverty than any  other system in human history. All the other models—including col‐ lectivism, socialism, and communism—have proved to be deeply  flawed, and their human effects are often calamitous.”  What about the impact capitalism has on culture, morality, and the  human character? While claiming they have sympathy with some of  these criticisms of capitalism, Wehner and Brooks explore none of  them and “begin with an obvious counterpoint: The material pro‐ gress that flows from capitalism is no small matter. Lifting people out  of poverty is a hugely impressive and important moral achieve‐ ment.” They continue in this vein by arguing that capitalism avoids  the coercion of alternative political regimes and thus preserves a cru‐ cial human value: freedom. Not only that, economic liberty helps  bolster and support other political goods, especially civil rights and  religious liberty, and it helps foster peace between nations.  So what about the Bernie Madoffs of the world? Wehner and  Brooks argue that Madoff isn’t the result of “free markets corroding  moral character,” but rather of “poor moral character corroding free  markets.” They conclude that “the answer is not less capitalism. It is  better capitalists.” But we can’t expect the economic order to produce  this. Nor can we expect the political order (the government) to pro‐ duce this: “A free economy, like a democratic political community,  75


THE CITY 

requires certain preconditions in order to best function, most espe‐ cially a strong civic and social order and a shared belief in an under‐ lying moral code.” In other words, the mediating institutions of soci‐ ety—families, churches, schools, voluntary associations—need to  produce what the market and the state can’t—decent people—but  without which neither can survive.  Wehner and Brooks conclude the book by asking, “Is capitalism  unjust?” They claim that starting in the 1970s, academics in America  “broke with previous political philosophers from the ancient Greeks  to the American founding fathers in arguing that the fundamental  task of the state is to end inequality.” And they claim that “the core  of this belief is that inequality is intrinsically bad and even intolera‐ ble” and that government should do something about it. Their re‐ sponse is odd: “First, we note that jettisoning capitalism will not lead  to greater equality.” But who is suggesting we jettison capitalism?  Still, they go on for several pages recounting, again, the ills of com‐ munism, and then move on to ask a string of rhetorical questions  about how far liberals want us to go in addressing inequality:    What would proper redistribution of income look like? Should everyone have the same income, regardless of one’s occupation and station in life? … Should their income be set by the federal government? If not, should income equality be achieved by taxing at such a prohibitive rate that the gap between LeBron James and the hotdog vender is largely eliminated? And, if so, what would be the negative impact on the performance and output of people who now earn huge salaries? In short, what lengths are the new egalitarians willing to go in order to eliminate or reduce the gap? And at what cost?   They answer none of these questions, cite no egalitarian scholars  who support such a worldview, and entertain no alternative concep‐ tions of social justice. Instead, they do their best to explain away  many worries one might have about economic inequality and to ar‐ gue that government measures to fix them would be worse than the  problem itself. They conclude: “Efforts to achieve level income have  failed everywhere they have occurred because such efforts cut  against the human grain. Yet even if it were achievable, we would  still reject it on moral and philosophical grounds.” On their view,  “forced egalitarianism is itself unjust.” They cite select Biblical verses  and church teachers to conclude that redistribution of wealth, “if it is  76


S P R I N G   2012   

done at all, it is done voluntarily, as an act of charity, out of gratitude  for what God has done, not as an action of the state, through coer‐ cion.”   

W

ealth and Justice highlights both the strengths and weak‐ nesses of the conservative case for democratic capitalism.  Yes, capitalism protects liberty and free enterprise, and it  raises the standard of living as it creates and distributes wealth. But  Wehner and Brooks say hardly a word about property duties or  about what a just distribution of wealth on their view would look  like (one fears that for them it is whatever the market produces). Al‐ so, in their rush to defend capitalism against critics, they fail to dis‐ cuss any of its downsides.  

First, in the arena of capitalism and culture: Much of Wehner and  Brooks’s defense of capitalism relies on the strength of the civic and  social order. But while they want this sphere to influence the eco‐ nomic sphere, they have little to say about how the economic sphere  also influences culture. For them, capitalism didn’t corrupt Madoff,  Madoff corrupted capitalism. One need not be a Marxist, however, to  note that our economic arrangements influence our culture and mor‐ als. Every notable political thinker has thought this; start the list with  Plato and Aristotle. So saying that the answer is “better capitalists”  doesn’t take seriously the effect that capitalism can have on charac‐ ter, especially given its reward structure. And while Wehner and  Brooks mention the neoconservative Daniel Bell’s Cultural Contradic‐ tions of Capitalism (only to dismiss his worries), they have little to say  about the consumerist and materialistic culture that capitalism can  promote. Ditto on the debasement of popular culture with mass‐ produced, market‐driven “art.”  Second, social justice: Wehner and Brooks assert “that capitalism is  best at doing what it is most often accused of doing worst: distrib‐ uting wealth to people at every social stratum rather than simply to  elites. The evidence of history is clear on this point—the poor gain  the most from capitalism.” Is this really true?  It depends on how one  reads the passage. Yes, considered historically, the poor gain the  most from capitalism as compared to alternative economic regimes,  especially where communism is presented as the only alternative  regime. But do the poor benefit the most from capitalism, as com‐ pared to the rich? This is a concern that animates many, and not only  77


THE CITY 

those in the Occupy Wall Street movement. Wehner and Brooks are  silent about it.  In fact, they make an unfortunate claim that “what fundamentally  separates capitalists from those who want to redistribute income is a  different concept of justice—‘distributive justice’ versus what has  been called the ‘productive justice’ of capitalism.” So after claiming  that the 1970s egalitarians broke with the tradition of philosophical  thought, Wehner and Brooks reject a central theme in that tradition,  first articulated by Aristotelian and Thomistic philosophy: distribu‐ tive justice.  In its place, they believe in “productive justice,” the view that  “economic growth will create opportunity and wealth for those in  every social stratum—and, in the end, generate the best of all worlds:  allowing people to succeed without penalizing excellence and  achievement and providing opportunity for those at the bottom  rungs of the ladder to move up.” But this ignores the issue: Are the  gains of economic growth distributed justly? Noting that capitalism  creates the highest Gross Domestic Product, and the fastest GDP  growth, says nothing about how that wealth is distributed. Wehner  and Brooks offer no standard, no principles of justice on how to think  about this question. And the idea that we always will be able to grow  ourselves out of economic problems is wishful thinking, as thinkers  as diverse as the libertarian entrepreneur Peter Thiel and the eco‐ nomic scholar Tyler Cowen have argued.  Perhaps most disconcerting, however, is that Wehner and Brooks  offer no principles of justice on how individuals should deploy their  wealth, and in a book titled Wealth and Justice this is disappointing.  Supporting free markets and limited government doesn’t even begin  to address the question of how citizens should behave in the market:  Can a citizen be guilty of injustice in how he uses his wealth? Do  citizens have duties—in justice—to distribute their wealth? Wehner  and Brooks are silent.  In framing their argument as a defense of capitalism against the al‐ ternatives of life pre‐Industrial Revolution and life under com‐ munism, Wehner and Brooks have made their task too easy. The real  question facing developed capitalist countries now is what type of  capitalism to have, and what type of wealth distribution. Among the  most thoughtful thinkers on these questions, few are strict egalitari‐ ans, and so even here Wehner and Brooks have engaged a strawman.  78


S P R I N G   2012   

One might think current disparities in wealth are unjust, not because  material equality is the goal, but because human flourishing is, and  too many people lack the requisite material goods for that flourish‐ ing. Income and wealth equality isn’t the concern, but having suffi‐ cient goods to meet one’s needs and fulfill one’s vocation is. Like‐ wise, one might worry about the disparate political power that comes  with gross material inequalities. Wehner and Brooks say nothing  about these concerns.  When the godfather of neoconservatism, Irving Kristol, wrote Two  Cheers for Capitalism, he intentionally held back from giving it a re‐ sounding three cheers. He knew there were downsides to capitalism,  and that conservatives had to be honest about these in order to ad‐ dress them adequately. But the conservative message about capital‐ ism today glosses over these facts, proposes no principles of justice,  and fails to engage—let alone persuade—our fellow citizens who  worry about our economic order. Conservatives writing in defense of  democratic capitalism need to spend less energy fighting off com‐ munism, and more energy developing a conservative vision of social  justice, painting a picture of what a better capitalism could look like.  If conservatives don’t, the only alternatives will come from the Left.    

F

or a glimpse of what such an alternative looks like, consider  Martha Nussbaum’s Creating Capabilities: The Human Develop‐ ment Approach. Published by Harvard University Press but in‐ tended for the general reader (and she notes specifically undergrad‐ uate audiences), the book presents the results of her collaboration  with Harvard economist Amartya Sen on their “capabilities ap‐ proach.” 

Nussbaum is Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chi‐ cago and, along with Sen, a Founding President of the Human De‐ velopment and Capability Association, the publisher of the Journal of  Human Development and Capabilities, which works closely with the  United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). In other words,  this is an important, indeed consequential, body of scholarly litera‐ ture, and it challenges many reigning scholarly orthodoxies about  “development” in hopes of changing public policy. As Nussbaum  notes, “We need a counter‐theory to challenge these entrenched but  misguided theories, if we want to move policy choice in the right  direction.”  79


THE CITY 

What are these entrenched but misguided theories? Nussbaum ex‐ plores three approaches to development: GDP approaches, utilitarian  approaches, and resource‐based approaches. A GDP approach tries  to measure development in terms of GDP per capita, the average  amount of wealth in a nation. But Nussbaum faults this approach for  failing to pay attention to each individual, especially those at the bot‐ tom, who might not enjoy any of the benefits of increased average  GDP if the distribution of benefits lies solely among those at the top.  Furthermore, this approach treats incommensurable aspects of hu‐ man lives—“health, longevity, education, bodily security, political  rights,” and more—as if they could be measured by a single number.  Utilitarian approaches, measuring average utility (understood as  preference‐satisfaction), face similar challenges, for they too aggre‐ gate across lives and components of lives. But more troubling is the  subjective nature of the measure, falling prey to the “social malleabil‐ ity of preferences and satisfactions.” After all, “when society has put  some things out of reach for some people, they typically learn not to  want those things.” Resource‐based approaches make the mistake of  assuming that material goods and wealth are adequate “proxies for  what people are actually able to do and to be.”  This concern for the opportunities actually available to people  drives Nussbaum’s capabilities approach. As she states repeatedly,  the key questions to ask are: “What are people actually able to do  and to be? What real opportunities for activity and choice has society  given them?” We can’t measure this, even approximately, by looking  to GDP, self‐reported satisfaction, or physical resources. Instead,  Nussbaum argues that there are multiple irreducible factors neces‐ sary for human development, and that each of these has to be meas‐ ured individually, not with an eye to aggregate or average scores, but  by taking each individual as a locus of value. Her measure is not ma‐ terialistic: social and legal policies and conventions play an im‐ portant role in shaping what opportunities really exist. In other  words, culture counts.  Nussbaum’s approach focuses on each person as an end, with the  ability for choice and freedom among a multiplicity of values. The  capabilities approach is “evaluative and ethical from the start,” ask‐ ing “which [capabilities] are the really valuable ones, which are the  ones that a minimally just society will endeavor to nurture and sup‐ port?” But while her conception is moral, Nussbaum insists that it is  80


S P R I N G   2012   

not moralistic: Governments should support the development of ca‐ pabilities, but not influence their functioning, leaving individuals  free to choose how to exercise their capabilities, for “capabilities have  value in and of themselves, as spheres of freedom and choice. To  promote capabilities is to promote areas of freedom, and this is not  the same as making people function in a certain way.” So, she con‐ cludes, “there is a huge moral difference between a policy that pro‐ motes health and one that promotes health capabilities—the latter,  not the former, honors the person’s lifestyle choice.”  What are the central capabilities? Nussbaum’s list includes ten  broad areas:    1. “Life.” 2. “Bodily health” (“including reproductive health”) 3. “Bodily integrity” (including “opportunities for sexual satisfaction and for choice in matters of reproduction”) 4. “Senses, imagination, and thought” (“being able to use the senses, to imagine, to think, and to reason”) 5. “Emotions” (“being able to have attachments to things and people outside of ourselves”) 6. “Practical reason” (“being able to form a conception of the good”) 7. “Affiliation” (“being able to live with and toward others”) 8. “Other species” (“being able to live with concern for and in relation to animals, plants, and the world of nature”) 9. “Play” (“being able to laugh, to play, to enjoy recreational activities”) 10. “Control over one’s environment” (“being able to participate effectively in political choices” and “being able to hold property and having property rights”)   Nussbaum doesn’t offer much in defense of this list. She subscribes  to John Rawls’s theory of political liberalism, by which we must offer  citizens “public reasons” free from any particular “comprehensive  doctrine” of the good or the right in framing our public policies. Nor  does she explain why states have a duty, in justice, to immanentize  the eschaton: “The basic claim of my account of social justice is this:  respect for human dignity requires citizens be placed above an ample  (specified) threshold of capability, in all ten of those areas.” Sadly,  she neither specifies these thresholds nor provides any argument for  why this is a valid principle of justice. Even if it is (and I’m inclined  81


THE CITY 

to think something like it is), she owes her readers an argument. In‐ stead she makes ungrounded appeals to human dignity and equality,  and then claims that these are entitlements that a state must provide:  “All people have some core entitlements just by virtue of their hu‐ manity, and it is a basic duty of society to respect and support these  entitlements.”   

P

erhaps that’s the proper place to start highlighting the severe  defects in Nussbaum’s Creating Capabilities. First, she never  defends her conception of justice against competing concep‐ tions. F. A. Hayek and Robert Nozick leveled serious criticisms  against the concept of “social” justice and defended alternative clas‐ sical‐liberal (libertarian) conceptions. Whether or not one thinks they  got it right, their arguments demand a response. Nussbaum shows  no awareness that not everyone is a welfare‐state liberal. 

Instead, she asserts that the American Founders, and the Declara‐ tion of Independence, support her view. Citing the Declaration, she  writes that governments are founded “to secure these rights,” and  then concludes that if government doesn’t “secure basic entitle‐ ments” (her ten capabilities), then it is unjust. She adds some rhetori‐ cal bluster: “The idea that the American Framers were libertarians, or  fans of ‘negative liberty,’ is extremely misleading,” and continues:  “The very idea of ‘negative liberty,’ often heard in this connection, is  an incoherent idea: all liberties are positive, meaning liberties to do  or to be something.” She concludes that her capabilities approach “is  no recent invention,” but is “a deep part of mainstream liberal en‐ lightenment thought.” Of course the American Founders, along with  Hobbes, Locke, and Kant, as well as Hayek and Nozick, would have  disagreed.  Second, regardless of the political justice of her account, Nussbaum  puts remarkable—and remarkably naïve—faith in governmental in‐ stitutions. One of her bald assertions is that “governments of richer  nations ought to give a minimum of 2 percent of GDP to poorer na‐ tions.” She then shows deep hostility to free enterprise, civil society,  voluntary associations, and private charity as proper remedies for  poverty: “Suppose a nation attempted to solve its distributional  problems through private philanthropy. It doesn’t work, and we  know that.” Tell that to the students trapped in our inner‐city gov‐ 82


S P R I N G   2012   

ernment‐run schools who yearn to attend the Catholic school across  the street.  She continues in this vein. “However fine the [charitable] organiza‐ tions are,” she notes, “they are not accountable to people in the way  that a democratic nation is accountable.”  Really? Is a public school— beholden to the teachers’ union and city hall—more accountable to  the people than a charitable charter school? Here Nussbaum does  attempt to offer a reason: “if [charitable organizations] listen to any‐ one when setting strategy, it is, most often, to their big donors.” Un‐ like politicians, of course. Are our foreign aid programs really more  responsive to “the people” than an Evangelical micro‐finance chari‐ ty?  Third, Nussbaum thinks that “equal respect for persons” requires  that we “avoid taking a stand” on the controversial metaphysical  issues that divide citizens, and instead base “political principles on  some definite values, such as impartiality and equal respect for hu‐ man dignity.” But as has been shown repeatedly, the Rawlsian search  for “public reason” that is distinct from “reason” is a fool’s errand.  Every time one rules out certain reasons as “non‐public” but sum‐ marily includes one’s own as “public,” one necessarily appeals to a  controversial standard, and merely asserts one’s preference for one’s  own view (as is evident in Nussbaum’s list). More importantly, what  we owe our fellow citizens as a matter of equal respect, when making  law, is the truth: to give them good reasons, sound reasoning thought  all the way through. Why should we artificially disqualify a class of  true reasons from being the basis of political action? Nussbaum gives  no reason.  Her Rawlsian predilections help explain why her theory of justice  is weak: “I argue that the entire world is under a collective obligation  to secure the capabilities to all world citizens.” But she doesn’t argue  this; she just asserts it. From within her Rawlsian confines, she can’t  offer any reason for this “collective obligation.” She must realize her  weakness, for she admits that “my view does need to rely on altru‐ ism,” and by the book’s closing she is seeking to develop a “political  psychology” to promote “emotions of compassion and solidarity.”  When you can’t provide reasons to care for others, the only things  left to do are to psychologize and to manipulate the emotions. A bet‐ ter philosophical approach would be able to appeal to our rational  faculties.  83


THE CITY 

Not only can’t Nussbaum explain why we have these duties in jus‐ tice (or why we should be just in the first place), her account is inher‐ ently statist because of its Rawlsian “political, not metaphysical”  framework. Since her approach only allows for reasoning about po‐ litical institutions, once she identifies her central capabilities, “we  cannot move directly to the assignment of duties to individuals: key  duties must be assigned to institutions.” But this gets the entire story  wrong. As thinkers as diverse as Aquinas, Locke, and Kant have ar‐ gued, individuals have moral duties to assist those in need, and  while the state should promote the common good, the state’s role in  directly providing assistance to the poor is a secondary function, one  where the state ought to assist individuals and voluntary associations  in meeting their tasks before usurping that role from them.  (One must also ask how Nussbaum’s argument in favor of animal  rights and animal entitlements meets the demands of “public reason”  by avoiding controversial metaphysical claims: “That animals can  suffer not just pain but also injustice seems, however, secure.” After  all, “animals pursue not simply the avoidance of pain but lives . . . of  honor or dignity.” She takes this bizarre anthropomorphism so seri‐ ously that she writes: “One form of intervention into nature that  seems crucial is animal contraception. This will mean, for animals,  modifying the capability list where reproductive choice is con‐ cerned.” Animals, as a matter of justice, don’t deserve reproductive  choice.)   

F

ourth, and perhaps most crucial, Nussbaum never gives an  argument for why we should care about capabilities rather  than the exercise of those capabilities toward fulfilling ends.  While she is willing to make morally controversial claims about  which capabilities are central, she refuses to say how they should be  exercised, claiming that this agnosticism respects freedom. But  properly understood, we best respect freedom by promoting a broad  range of worthy ends for which to act, while also insisting that cer‐ tain ends are unworthy of choice precisely because they degrade  those people who choose them. 

Nussbaum’s failure to explain how capabilities should be exercised  brings out a central problem in her talk of “human dignity.” Repeat‐ edly, she claims that all nations contain “struggles for lives worthy of  human dignity.” That phrase occurs again and again: “some living  84


S P R I N G   2012   

conditions deliver to people a life that is worthy of the human digni‐ ty that they possess, and others do not.” Disregard the infelicitous  usage of “lives worthy of dignity”—all lives are worthy of dignity.  What she ignores is that “some living conditions” aren’t the only  qualifiers for human dignity—so are human choices. Some exercises  of human capabilities, some choices, are in line with human dignity,  and some are not. If we are to measure human development and  think about its justice, we must think about how capacities are exer‐ cised.  In another effort to avoid talking about how capabilities are to be  exercised, she declares that Aristotle “did not instruct politicians to  make everyone perform desirable activities. Instead, they were to  aim at producing capabilities or opportunities.” But Aristotle thought  that the entire point of politics was promoting the good life—not  promoting morally ambiguous capabilities, but directing them to  their appropriate ends.  Nussbaum uncritically helps herself to an Aristotelian understand‐ ing of government—without arguing for it— and then distorts it to  rush to her own conclusion: “Given a widely shared understanding  of the task of government (namely, that government has the job of  making people able to pursue a dignified and minimally flourishing  life), it follows that a decent political order must secure to all citizens  at least a threshold level of these ten central capacities.” Among her  fellow liberals, this is not a “widely held” view of government. Nev‐ ertheless, she needs to explain why concern for a dignified and flour‐ ishing life should translate into a threshold of capacities without con‐ cern for their exercise. She’s wrong to think that we should promote  “health capabilities” rather than health. Health is the human good,  and we can promote it in a way that respects human freedom.  If you put it all together, Nussbaum’s theory demands that a state  coercively tax its citizens (ignoring negative‐liberty claims to private  property rights) to create a government‐run program (disregarding  subsidiarity) that will ensure that “opportunities for sexual satisfac‐ tion and for choice in matters of reproduction” are provided (regard‐ less of how those capabilities are exercised). In fact, she writes that  “thinking about sexual orientation through the lens of the whole list  of capabilities” makes us see that laws refusing to treat same‐sex rela‐ tions as if they were marriages are “unfair,” just like “antimiscegena‐ tion laws,” “conferring a message of stigma and inferiority.” But if  85


THE CITY 

we really want to measure human development, we should ask how  our sexual capabilities can be exercised in accord with human digni‐ ty, in a truly ennobling way, and we should seek to promote a cul‐ ture (including a legal culture) that respects and promotes that ideal.  A sound theory of social justice would have to explore the constit‐ uent aspects of human flourishing—not just capabilities, but their  truly perfective ends. It would have to investigate the moral norms  that govern conduct with respect to these ends, particularly property  rights and duties. Finally, it would have to ask what role the state  plays in helping to secure human well‐being. In all these areas,  Nussbaum’s Creating Capabilities falls short.   

o our detriment, most public policy discussions and national  debates about political economy become shouting matches  between two extremes. At the same time, we tend to conflate  the policy issues facing our nation as if they were one and the same.  But consider the range of America’s political‐economic challenges:  How to balance our budget; how to reform the major entitlements of  Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid; how to get the economy  growing again; how to increase employment; how to increase social  mobility; how to help the poor. 

Though related, these issues are profitably examined one at a time.  Poverty, for example, is undoubtedly linked to our debates about  government regulation, taxes, and budgets. It is certainly tied to our  debates about income inequality, social mobility, and unemploy‐ ment. But poverty in America is not primarily about any of these  issues. And political commentators of all stripes perform a major  disservice when they mesh them together.  Thankfully, Lawrence Mead knows this, and has been instructing  all who will listen on issues of poverty and policy for the past thirty  years. A professor of politics and public policy at NYU, Mead was  the intellectual driving force behind the welfare reform act of 1996.  His latest work, From Prophecy to Charity: How to Help the Poor, is a  concise statement of a lifetime of scholarship. It is a wonderful book  that covers the causes of poverty, how we measure it, who the poor  are, how government has tried to help, where it’s gone wrong and  where it’s succeeded, and how competing ideologies have hindered  or helped real policy reform. Though the book is short, it contains a  wealth of information and wisdom.   86


S P R I N G   2012   

The critical questions for Mead are these: What do the poor really  need? How can we effectively meet that need? Money comes second  to what Mead argues the poor truly deserve: a lifestyle transfor‐ mation. “Progress against poverty,” he insists, “requires programs  with the capacity to redirect lives, not just transfer resources.” In  reaching that goal, he adds, “recent conservative policies are more  effective than what came before, and it would be a mistake to aban‐ don them.”  Mead self‐consciously argues against those who “have contended  that the poor are entitled to aid regardless of lifestyle or, alternative‐ ly, that they should get nothing at all from government.” He appeals  instead to Biblical wisdom, where our duties to the poor are based  “not on abstractions such as rights, freedom, or equality but on re‐ storing community.” The key, then, is to promote “right relation‐ ships”—with spouses, children, employers, and the broader commu‐ nity. To do this, Mead thinks, we need to understand better the  causes of poverty.  While government measurements of poverty focus on economic  factors, Mead stresses that behavioral dimensions play a larger causal  role. Poverty would be simple to fix if it were just about economic  need: then we would only have to give more money. But the long‐ term poor today are unlike the working poor of yesteryear. In an  affluent society like ours, Mead argues, “poverty is not usually  forced on people for very long by conditions.” Rather, “most have  become poor, at least in part, due to not working, having children  outside marriage, abusing drugs, or breaking the law.” Simply dol‐ ing out more money does not counter these underlying causes of  poverty, which call for behavior changes that encourage law‐abiding,  productive lives.  The World Bank classifies moderate poverty as living on less than  $2 a day. By that standard, the U.S. has virtually no poverty. In the  1960s, our government’s official measure was set at three times the  cost of a minimal food budget, which, adjusted for inflation, came to  $17,285 in 2009 for a family of three (consisting of one parent and two  children). Given this standard, the official poverty rate was 13.2 per‐ cent in 2008 and 14.3 percent in 2009. While these figures note any‐ one who fell beneath the poverty line in a given year, Mead asks us  to focus on those who remain poor for multiple years, not those who  hit a temporary rough patch. This long‐term group includes 6 to 7  87


THE CITY 

percent of the American population. And while the young, disabled,  and elderly used to make up their majority, Mead notes that now  they are outnumbered by healthy working‐aged people.  Why are people in the prime of their lives poor? Mead argues that  “poor families typically arise when parents have children without  marrying and then do not work regularly to support them.” This  pattern provokes a vicious cycle: children reared in these circum‐ stances grow up to be poor themselves because they are more likely  to drop out of school, get involved in crime and drugs, become sex‐ ually active at a young age, and never learn the value of an honest  day’s work. “By these routes,” he says, “women end up early as sin‐ gle mothers on welfare while men go to prison. … Despite having  children, neither men nor women usually attempt to marry or work  regularly. That is the immediate reason they usually become poor.” If  one graduates from high school, gets a job, marries, and then has  kids—in that order—there is very little chance of falling into poverty.  Mead responds to a host of competing arguments about poverty,  noting that “poverty is caused mostly by low working hours, not low  wages.”  Good middle‐class jobs may be hard to find right now, but  there are ample low‐skilled jobs available: “In 2009, only 12 percent  of poor adults who did not work blamed this on their inability to find  work. In 2007, before the recession, the figure was only 5 percent.”  These jobs, Mead insists, “are still sufficient to avoid poverty and  welfare for most families.” Our recent economic downturn isn’t to  blame, for “in good times and bad, most poor adults are not even in  the labor force, so the recession little affects them.” (In fact, the reces‐ sion has mainly hit the middle class, and, Mead helpfully reminds us,  “inequality and poverty are largely separate problems.”)  While he  has a lot to say about employment, Mead has less to say about causes  of and responses to the erosion of marriage, where 40 percent of all  Americans are born out of wedlock, including 71 percent of blacks.  The welfare reforms of the 1990s worked precisely because they  addressed both material and behavioral causes of poverty. While  critics argue that welfare reform consisted of budget cuts, Mead  notes that after the reform more money was spent helping the poor,  not less. But the money came with strings attached—recipients had  to work. According to Mead, “Most experts opposed reform, believ‐ ing that few poor could work, given the barriers they faced. But most  welfare mothers successfully left the rolls for jobs, with most of the  88


S P R I N G   2012   

leavers emerging better off.” This confirmed Mead’s central insight  that cultural (and political) expectations, not economic barriers, pre‐ vented employment. Mead admits that low‐skilled workers do not  have an easy life, but he insists that working makes for a better life  than not. And how to get people working is a separate question from  how to get them moving up once in the job force.   

M

ead’s arguments partly counter some of those made by  Charles Murray. While Murray’s work has focused on the  rewards (and hence incentives) for bad behavior that wel‐ fare provisions provide, Mead argues that “the seriously poor are  less calculating than economists suppose. If they were economically  rational, they would never have engaged in the patterns that made  most of them poor.” And yet, the way in which welfare was provid‐ ed did keep people from working. So, while research has “not shown  that social problems like nonemployment or unwed pregnancy result  chiefly from the economic incentives set up by welfare,” he writes,  “It is indeed true that liberal social programs have been counterpro‐ ductive, but that is chiefly because they are permissive, giving no  clear guidance about how recipients ought to behave.”  While the first wave of welfare reform largely affected poor wom‐ en—mothers with children receiving aid—a second round of welfare  reform, Mead argues, should find effective programs that put non‐ working men into the workforce, and establish better academic and  moral standards in schools. Mead unabashedly says that education  and welfare need more paternalism. This paternalism is bemoaned  by many for being judgmental (not being “value‐free”), but this is  precisely what Mead thinks the poor need. And what we owe them.  Mead argues that the most effective welfare programs administered  by the states “all set clearer rules for client behavior and back them  up with oversight. Evaluations confirm that paternalistic programs  generally perform better than nondirective ones.” Religious and oth‐ er non‐governmental partnerships can play an important role in this,  Mead suggests. 

While From Prophecy to Charity has certain limitations, it should be  read by anyone who cares about government policy that helps the  poor. I would like to have seen more discussion about prudential  concerns: how to counter government‐provided welfare’s crowding  out effect on private charity, how to best structure government part‐ 89


THE CITY 

nerships, and what is entailed by a precedent of attaching moral  strings to welfare when government is run by the morally corrupt.  Mead’s discussion of competing perspectives on welfare also leaves  much to be desired, as it consists largely of his own idiosyncratic  interpretation of a handful of Biblical passages, and, in justified frus‐ tration with religious voices who have opposed welfare reform, he  overstates his case against them and too quickly dismisses important  voices. He is correct to say that a major problem with the prophetic  tradition is its scarcity of guidance for what the rich can effectively  do to help the poor, and of requirements for the poor themselves.   

A

s I see it, the two dominant political philosophies of our day  are forms of liberalism, but neither deserves the title nor  lives up to the merit of classical liberalism. Neither the  Right’s form of libertarian liberalism nor the Left’s  form of social  welfare liberalism (both of which show strong streaks of lifestyle  liberalism) can adequately form the basis of a governing philosophy,  especially when it comes to the plight of the poor. 

The libertarian argues that the sole purpose of government is the  protection of rights, and that the only real rights are negative rights— freedom from force, fraud, and harm, whether perpetrated by other  individuals or by governments. Taxing the non‐poor in order to as‐ sist the poor is robbery, a violation of property rights, and itself a  form of injustice. Provided they do no harm to others, individuals  should be free to live life as they please, the libertarian argues, even if  this means ignoring the plight of the poor. Market forces and private  charities, if left free from state interference, will sufficiently succor  the needy.  The welfare state liberal champions a conception of government  where every citizen solely in virtue of his humanity has rights to ad‐ equate material resources necessary for a dignified life. Whether it be  John Rawls’s “primary goods” or Martha Nussbaum’s “central ca‐ pacities,” the state is supposed to equip people with a fair share of  what they need in life—but it isn’t to influence how they use that  share, nor to place moral conditions on how they receive it. At the  heart is a positive right to materials coupled with a negative right  from influence.  A sound political philosophy would hold that the state should be  concerned about the welfare of all people. This means that our obli‐ 90


S P R I N G   2012   

gation to the poor has to be tied to their well‐being, and thus neces‐ sarily connected to influencing their behavior. This is best under‐ stood not in terms of rights—whether positive ones to welfare or  negative ones of noninterference—but in terms of promoting their  good, with its material and moral components. In essence, any legit‐ imate care for the poor has to be paternalistic. It has to teach true  moral values: that one needs to be educated, that one needs to work,  that one needs to marry before having children, that one needs to  respect the law.  Classical liberal political philosophers understood this, because  they knew that protecting natural rights also entailed promoting  what Michael Zuckert has called a “natural rights infrastructure.”  This can’t simply be a physical infrastructure of highways and court‐ houses, but a moral and behavioral infrastructure as well. An earlier  political philosophy simply termed this infrastructure the common  good. Promoting this necessarily forces us into discussions about  human well‐being and the moral norms that should govern our be‐ havior. Sound guidance on this is what we owe everyone, poor and  rich alike.                     

Ryan T. Anderson is the William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and a Free Society at the Heritage Foundation and the Editor of Public Discourse: Ethics, Law, and the Common Good, found at thepublicdiscourse.com, from which this piece is adapted. 91


THE CITY 

RECLAIMING WENDELL BERRY ]agrarian0conservatism}  Aaron Belz The Humane Vision of Wendell Berry, edited by Mark T. Mitchell and Natahn Schlueter. ISI, 2011.

T

his collection of essays is on a mission. That mission is to  reclaim  Wendell  Berry,  who  is  a  Christian,  as  a  member  of  the  conservative  right.  Its  editorial  thesis  is  made  ex‐ plicit  in  the introduction:  “Although  Berry  is  often  asso‐ ciated with the political Left, it is our conviction that his  work  is  profoundly  conservative  and  that,  as  a  consequence,  con‐ servatives should attend carefully to what he writes.”    Why is such a corrective necessary or even desirable? Ostensibly it  is because Berry has something new to offer American Conservatism  that too often defines itself narrowly in terms of a  blue‐blooded na‐ tionalism. Though Berry’s commitment to pacifism and environmen‐ talism, and his much‐discussed tendency to oppose big business and  technology,  represent  values  that  “make  many  American  conserva‐ tives uncomfortable,” this book argues that those values are integral  to  Berry’s  holistic,  essentially  agrarian  worldview  that  at  its  root  is  both conservative and Christian. These views complement and over‐ lap  his  more  obviously  conservative  values—his  zeal  for  monoga‐ mous marriage, intact families, and thriving neighborhoods, and his  recognition of the importance of healthy entrepreneurship to society.   The  essays  themselves  are  topical,  ranging  from  marriage  to  eco‐ nomics to art. Although it is tempting to dive right into them, many  of which are rich with insight into Wendell Berry’s work, the opening  salvoes  warrant  closer  examination.  The  most  striking  aspect  of  the  introduction  and  the  first  essay—which  is  not  really  an  essay  at  all,  but Wallace Stenger’s “open letter” to Berry, written in 1990 and re‐ 92


S P R I N G   2012   

published  here—is  their  resistance  toward  categorizing  Berry  as  a  Jeffersonian, Romantic, or Thoreauvian. He is not, these Berry advo‐ cates argue, returning to a 19th‐century value set. “It is one of Berry’s  signature achievements, then,” write the editors, “to reveal with sin‐ gular  eloquence  the  implicit  utopianism  that  often  lurks  at  the  very  heart of liberal society, a utopianism all the more dangerous because  it is hidden from our view.” As Stenger writes:     Some people have compared you with Thoreau, probably because you use your own head to think with and because you have a reverence for the natural earth. [...] Thoreau seems a far colder article than you have ever been or could ever be. He was a triumphant and somewhat chilly consummation of New England intellectualism and Emersonian self-reliance. [...] You are something else. The nature you love is not wild but humanized, disciplined to the support of human families but not overused, not exploited. Your province is not the wilderness, where the individual makes contact with the universe, but the farm, the neighborhood, the community, the town, the memory of the past, and the hope of the future.   Stenger’s  six‐page  assessment  seems  not  only  accurate  but  im‐ portant  in  any  ongoing  discussion  of  Berry.  In  fact,  it  might  be  the  finest piece of writing included in this collection.   If so, Anne Husted Burleigh’s “Marriage in the Membership” runs a  close second. Berry’s view of marriage, explored through the people  of his fictional town of Port William, his poems and other writings, is  “a connection between two people that is not private.” As such, it is  both supported by and supportive of the community in which it ex‐ ists—it  is  integral  to  the  community’s  survival.  So,  when  marriage  declines, the community deteriorates. Faithful marriage is also key to  the  survival  of  the  meaningful  language;  it  is  a  living  witness  to  its  participants’ ability to “stand by [their] words, doing what [they] say  [they] will.” In that sense, it is incarnational. Burleigh, who lives next  door to Berry in Rabbit Hash, Kentucky, has an added advantage of  being able to support her essay with evidence from her personal in‐ teractions with him. “It’s a terrible thing to say those vows,” he told  her as they sat around his kitchen table. “Something like that ought  to  be  witnessed  by  people  who  will  acknowledge  that  it  happened  and that these awe‐full things were said. And in my own experience  the sense of having loved ones’ expectations directed toward me has  been very influential, and it still is.” Finally, fidelity in marriage is the  93


THE CITY 

source of human memory. We gain a sense of our own pasts as time  goes by. Such realities, concludes Burleigh, are tangible reflections of  God’s love toward us and therefore of utmost importance.   

A

nother  fine  essay  appears  fourth  in  the  collection,  Richard  Gamble’s  “Education  for  Membership:  Wendell  Berry  on  Schools  and  Communities.”  Using  as  his  focus  text  Berry’s  short  novel  Remembering  (1988)  and  excerpts  from  Life  is  a  Miracle  (2000), Gamble positions the notion of “homecoming” at the center of  Berry’s beliefs about education, which tends to lead away from home,  interrupting  the  “pattern  of  succession”  necessary  to  the sustenance  of  community  life.  Universities,  which  create  “worlds  unto  them‐ selves,”  tempt  people  away  from  their  own  real  communities  and,  ultimately, away from reality itself. Good education, by contrast, cen‐ ters a person and is the “task of the whole community,” by which he  means  the  whole  family  and  their  physical  neighbors.  Education’s  value lies not in increasing an individual’s knowledge but in familiar‐ izing him with the “right stories”—the truth—about his own life and  the  lives  of  others  within  his  local  community.  This,  which  Gamble  refers  to  as  “the  old  norm,”  vitiates  against  “scientific  materialism”  and corrects its disorienting outcomes. Berry’s value here is essential‐ ly naturalistic—if not Thoreauvian, perhaps a variety of theistic natu‐ ralism, though that is an observation Gamble fails to make.   Matt  Bonzo’s  “And  for  This  Food,  We  Give  Thanks”  explains  Ber‐ ry’s objection to Americans “thinking of our food as having its origin  in  the  aisle  of  a  grocery  store”  when,  in  fact,  we  ought  to  be  more  connected  to  food’s  origin  in  the  land  upon  which  we  “trod.”  We  must avoid a “reductionist” attitude toward food as well as “cycling  between  high‐calorie,  high‐sugar,  high‐fat  food  and  dieting.”  Bonzo  locates  these  principles  primarily  in  Berry’s  essay  “The  Gift  of  the  Good Land” and then looks to The Way of Ignorance and Other Essays  for  larger  context,  ending  his  discussion  with  a  couple  of  small  ex‐ amples  from  Berry’s  fiction.  This  seems  to  be  an  important  oppor‐ tunity for insight into Berry’s thinking, but Bonzo provides a weaker  incorporation  of  Berry’s  literature,  so  it  seems  less  helpful.  The  sev‐ enth  essay  in  the  collection,  Patrick  Deneen’s  “Wendell  Berry  and  Democratic  Self‐Governance,”  is  more  deeply  flawed,  as  it  begins  with  eight  full  pages  of  political  theory,  from  Plato  and Aristotle  to  Hobbes and Locke and beyond, without a mention of Wendell Berry.  94


S P R I N G   2012   

Such  a  primer  would  be  relevant  if  it  presented  a  view  uniquely  Deneen’s own, but it bears too much in common with a day one Polit‐ ical Science lecture.  But this collection’s unevenness is, thankfully, not its defining fea‐ ture. Other fine entries, such as Jason Peters’ “The Third Landscape,”  which  convincingly  argues  that  Wendell  Berry  is  both  a  social  con‐ servative  and  an  environmentalist  more  authentic  and  thoughtful  than  his  secular  peers,  and  Caleb  Stegall’s  “First  They  Came  for  the  Horses,” which scours Berry’s fiction and nonfiction for his views on  technological advancement, make this anthology a necessary acquisi‐ tion for any library, public or private. Mark Mitchell’s 22‐page essay,  “Wendell  Berry’s  Defense  of  a  Truly  Free  Market,”  reveals  just  how  profoundly Berry has considered economic issues and does an excel‐ lent job of examining his “Great Economy” notion as well as his posi‐ tion on private property. Berry is no communist; he is a moral, agrar‐ ian capitalist.   The final four essays are less topical and more transcendent in their  discussion  of  Berry  as  an  author  and  a  literary  figure,  highlighting  many  of  the  distinctive  traits  of  his  imagination  and  work.  Reading  them it is easy to conclude that Berry is indeed a sui generis and one  worthy  of  continuing  discussion  among  all Americans,  be  they  con‐ servative  or  liberal,  Christian  or  not.  Yet  these  final  four  essays  also  call to mind a concern regarding The Humane Vision of Wendell Berry  as a whole, and that is that this collection, for all its lucid exposition,  might verge on festschrift. There is nary a negative word, none of the  riptide of second guessing vital to critical writing. On what grounds  might Berry’s way of thinking be questioned? If the reader’s answer  after reading this book is “none, of course,” then that points to a larg‐ er problem. We fail to consider, for example, Berry’s possible debt to  19th‐century naturalism. But even the prospect of this larger problem  does not ruin the book, for what it is: a chorus of voices explicating  Wendell Berry’s writing to show how a conservative Christian can— and  perhaps  ought  to—embrace  many  political  and  social  values  typically regarded as “liberal.”     

Aaron Belz holds a Ph.D. in English from Saint Louis University and is the author of two books of poetry. He lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina. 95


THE CITY 

T HE WAR ON F OOTBALL [teddy0and0the0game{  Burwell Stark The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football, by John J. Miller, HarperCollins, 2011.

I

n 1953, the then little known humorist Andy Griffith recorded  a comedy routine in Raleigh. Delivered as a first‐person mono‐ logue, it was of a backwoods preacher who arrives in a college  town  to  lead  a  tent  revival.  Prior  to  the  revival,  the  preacher  decides he wants something to eat. After finding food, he gets  caught  up  in  a  crowd  and  follows  them  to  a  “cow  pasture”  with  “white  lines  all  over  it.”  The  preacher  witnesses  a  sporting  contest  involving two teams and a “funny looking little punkin” but, since he  doesn’t  have  a  ticket,  he  is  asked  to  leave  before  he  can  figure  out  what is being played.  Griffith  concludes  the  routine  in  character:  “I  don’t  know,  friends,  to this day what it was that they was a‐doing down there, but I have  studied about it. And I think that it’s some kindly of a contest where  they see which bunchfull of them men can take that punkin and run  from one end of that cow pasture to the other ‘un without either get‐ ting knocked down or stepping in something.”  That comedy routine was titled “What it Was, Was Football,” and it  sold  over  800,000  copies,  launching  Griffith’s  television,  film  and  stage career. To this day it remains one of the biggest selling comedy  recordings of all time.  What  football  was,  and  how  it  became  what  it  is,  is  the  subject  of  John J. Miller’s The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football.     96


S P R I N G   2012   

Miller is the national political reporter for the National Review and  occasional  contributor  to  the  Wall  Street  Journal.  Immersed  in  the  world of politics and political maneuvering and a long‐time football  fan and graduate of the University of Michigan, Miller is well‐suited  to write a book that combines these two subjects.  According  to  Miller,  football  has  become  a  part  of  our  national  identity,  so  much  so  that  if  “we  didn’t  have  football,  a  lot  of  us  wouldn’t  know  what  to  do  with  ourselves.”  Yet  there  was  a  time  when  “football  was  almost  taken  away  from  us  –  a  time  when  its  very  existence  was  in  mortal  peril  as  a  collection  of  Progressive  Era  prohibitionists tried to ban the sport.”   Why?  In  its  beginning,  football  was  extremely  violent,  and  many  progressive  leaders  thought  it  was  too  violent  for  people  to  be  al‐ lowed to play.   

A

merican football has its roots in rugby football  and associa‐ tion football, which is known on this side of the Atlantic as  soccer.  For  centuries  there  have  been  games  that  involve  kicking  a  ball,  but  the  modern  versions  of  rugby  and  soccer  devel‐ oped in England in the mid‐19th century; American football began to  take shape soon afterwards in the post‐Civil War era.  Most present‐day Americans, like the preacher in Griffith’s routine,  would not recognize the sport in its infancy. Miller states that during  the early years, the teams would meet on game day to establish the  rules of the game. “There was no common agreement about many of  its  most  basic  elements.  What  number  of  men  would  participate?  What  would  count  for  a  score?  How  long  would  the  game  last?”  Since  there  were  no  standard  rules,  many  games  became  a  massive  scrum,  often  resulting  in  blood  loss,  broken  limbs,  and  occasionally  death.  However,  in  spite  of  the  violence,  or  perhaps  because  of  it,  football gained in popularity year after year.  Miller centers the story of football on three central characters: The‐ odore Roosevelt, Walter Camp and Charles W. Eliot.   The  late  1800s  and  early  1900s  were,  in  many  ways, America’s  se‐ cond birth with the Civil War serving as a surrogate revolution. The  nation accelerated its shift from an agricultural based economy to an  industrial based economy. Urban centers such as New York, Chicago  and St. Louis experienced explosive growth, and immigration began  to skyrocket as people flocked to America to better their lives.   97


THE CITY 

Education,  too,  was  undergoing  a  metamorphosis  in  both  theory  and  practice.  John  Dewey  began  to  teach  that  schools  were  the  best  avenue  for  social  reform,  and  universities,  due  in  large  part  to  the  efforts of the aforementioned Charles Eliot, abandoned classical cur‐ ricula and adopted European style research methods.  Politics  were  not  immune  from  the  changing  post‐Enlightenment  zeitgeist, either. Progressive reform, largely birthed in response to the  darker  side  of  un‐checked  industrialization,  began  to  take  hold  and  led to the development and spread of progressivism; as a result, poli‐ ticians  and  educators  began  to  eschew  practices  or  pastimes  they  considered un‐enlightened and beneath the dignity of modern man.   That is, pastimes such as football.   

F

ootball,  with  its  emphasis  on  combat  and  physical  ability,  quickly found itself in the crosshairs of the progressive move‐ ment.  Or,  more  appropriately,  it  found  itself  on  the  bascule  under the progressives’ guillotine. In Eliot’s words, the “mental quali‐ ties  of  the  big,  brawny  athlete  are  almost  certain  to  be  inferior  to  those of slighter, quicker‐witted men whose moral ideals are at least  as high as his.”  Due  to  Eliot’s  efforts,  the  progressives  were  almost  victorious  in  eliminating  football  from  America,  especially  during  its  darkest  hours of the 1905‐1906 season; the violence of the sport was its own  worst  enemy.  Truly,  in  order  for  football  to  be  saved,  it  would  take  someone with the credibility to bridge the gap between the progres‐ sives and the athletes. Someone who would later found the Progres‐ sive Party and describe himself “as fit as a bull moose.” Someone like  Theodore Roosevelt.  Growing up, Roosevelt suffered from many debilitating health im‐ pairments. As a result, he never played football, but he valued physi‐ cal fitness more so than any of his presidential predecessors. As pres‐ ident, he did not have the authority to protect football or to force it to  change.  However,  he  was  the  man  who  coined  the  term  “bully  pul‐ pit”  as  it  applies  to  the  presidency,  and  he  used  that  pulpit  to  save  football.  Such  was  his  influence  that  Bill  Reid,  Harvard  coach  and  Roosevelt ally, would later say: “You asked me if President Theodore  Roosevelt helped save the game. I can tell you that he did.”  Truly,  during  football’s  infancy,  the  nation  was  locked  in  a  big  scrum between progressives and non‐progressives politically, educa‐ 98


S P R I N G   2012   

tionally, and socially. In many ways, that scrum still continues to this  day. Fortunately, however, for those of us who love the game, football  is no longer in danger of being sidelined permanently.  The Big Scrum is not only a book about the development of football;  it is also about the development of the progressive movement. Miller  combines  his  ability  to  analyze  politics  with  his  love  for  American  football  and  delivers  a  story  that  simultaneously  recounts  the  near  death experience of the sport, all the while illustrating the dangers of  unchecked progressivism. Dare I say that Miller is using football as a  metaphor for American political history? Yes, and I am glad he did.   However, readers don’t have to be interested in political science to  enjoy the book. I found Miller’s account of the sport’s beginning, the  personalities that shaped it, and the way the game has changed to be  fascinating  and  well  researched.  As  a  fan,  I  am  glad  to  know  that  whether  there  are  30  men  on  the  field  for  each  team  or  only  11,  whether  touchdowns  count  as  a  score  or  only  the  PAT,  or  whether  forward  passes  are  allowed  or  not,  the  spirit  of  the  game  is  still  the  same. At its heart, the sport still is what it was; and what it was, was  football.                           

Burwell Stark  is a columnist for The Wake Weekly and a former policy analyst. His essays and reviews have appeared in The Daily Caller, The Biblical Recorder and The American Thinker. Read more of his work at burwellstark.com. 99


THE CITY 

T HE B IG E ASY ’ S U NFORTUNATE S ON ,toole0and0the0dunces<  Micah Mattix Rev. of Butterfly in the Typewriter: The Short, Tragic Life of John Kennedy Toole and the Remarkable Story of A Confederacy of Dunces, by Cory MacLauchlin, Da Capo Press, 2012.

N

ext to J.D. Salinger and Thomas Pynchon, John Ken‐ nedy  Toole  is  surely  one  of  the  most  enigmatic  fig‐ ures  of  twentieth‐century  American  literature.  Born  in  New  Orleans  in  late  1937  to  the  Creole  Ducoings  and  the  Irish  Tooles,  John  Kennedy  would  write  what  is  still  the  best  work  set  in  New  Orleans,  The  Confederacy  of  Dunces. Toole wrote the work while on active duty in Puerto Rico in  1963  and  submitted  it  to  Robert  Gottlieb  at  Simon  and  Schuster  in  1964. Gottlieb expressed interest in the novel but requested revisions.  Toole tried once to revise the work but was unable to do so satisfacto‐ rily. He put the manuscript in a box and killed himself next to a field  outside Biloxi in the spring of 1969. He was 31.    Drawing  on  new  interviews  with  friends  and  acquaintances,  as  well  as  the  archival  materials  in  the  John  Kennedy  Toole  Papers  at  Tulane,  Cory  MacLauchlin’s  Butterfly  in  the  Typewriter  provides  a  wonderfully  balanced  life  of  John  Kennedy  Toole.  Precocious  and  witty with a real talent for impersonations, Toole entertained others  his whole life. His mother, Thelma, who taught piano, elocution and  drama, raised Toole to be “important.” He was, it seemed to her, des‐ tined  for  fame.  When  the  Travelling  Theatre  Troupers,  for  example,  100


S P R I N G   2012   

did not cast her son in the starring role for a play, she started her own  theatre  troupe.  Toole  entered  Tulane  at  16  and  was  known  among  classmates and friends for his intelligence, humor, good manners and  sharp dress. While he originally majored in Engineering, Toole loved  English and would change majors after his first semester. Early on he  had  the  sense  that  his  path  to  fame  was  either  that  of  scholarly  or  literary greatness.    et those plans did not pan out. He was accepted into Colum‐ bia and completed an M.A. but struggled to write his doctoral  dissertation.  New  York  was  both  a  source  of  great  wonder‐ ment to him and, during the winter months, deep depression. Toole  was a far cry from a Beatnik—he was gentlemanly Southerner with a  quick wit who loved good conversations, dancing, and Marilyn Mon‐ roe,  and  who  often  poked  fun  at  the  sometimes  childish  egotism  of  the  1960s  protest  movements.  (He  once  wrote  to  a  friend  that  he  found  “the  aggressive,  pseudo‐intellectual  ‘liberal’  girl  students  [at  Hunter] continuously amusing.”) Yet, he also bristled (like the Beats)  at what he thought to be the lifeless and seemingly arbitrary musings  of  the  established  critics  of  the  day. After  twice  attempting  to  finish  the  Ph.D.,  Toole  dropped  out  of  Columbia  for  good,  turning  as  chance would have it to fiction, which, unfortunately for us ended in  tragedy.  Thankfully,  the  novel  was  taken  up  by  his  mother  following  his  death. While Toole only sent the manuscript to one press, Thelma, it  seems,  sent  it  to  every  publishing  house  in  New  York,  but  without  success.  Desperate  to  get  the  novel  published,  she  read  that  Walker  Percy was teaching a course at Loyola. She cornered him one evening  as  he  was  leaving  for  his  home  in  Covington,  told  him  the  story  of  her son and placed the unpublished manuscript in his hands. Percy,  ever  the  gentleman,  took  the  manuscript,  but  knowing  how  rare  good  writing  was,  expected  the  worst.  He  asked  his  wife,  Bunt,  to  read it and tell him “what to do with it.” She did, and when she had  finished, she told him, “It’s ready for you.” Percy read it with increas‐ ing amazement and pleasure. He determined it had to be published  and  worked  hard  to  help  Thelma  find  a  home  for  the  novel.  With  Percy’s help, Confederacy of Dunces was published in 1980 by the new‐ ly  founded  Louisiana  State  University  Press  and  won  the  Pulitzer  Prize for Fiction the next year. 

Y

101


THE CITY 

The  perennial  question  for  many  Confederacy  aficionados  is  why  Toole would kill himself following what would be for most aspiring  writers  a  minor  setback  in  the  effort  to  land  a  book  contract.  As  MacLauchlin  shows,  Gottlieb  expressed  great  interest  in  the  book  from  the  outset  and  was  careful  to  express  what  he  felt  was  wrong  with the book. In an early letter to Toole (the two would correspond  over two years on the manuscript), Gottlieb lauds Toole’s humor—he  is  “wildly  funny,  funnier  than  anyone  around,  and  our  kind  of  fun‐ ny”—and  praises  almost  every  character  in  the  book.  However,  he  states  directly,  as  was  his  wont,  “With  all  its  wonderfulness…  the  book does not have a reason… it is a wonderful exercise in invention,  but… it isn’t really about anything.”   No  doubt,  this  criticism  would  be  difficult  to  take  for  any  writer.  Toole,  however,  took  it  particularly  hard.  Toole’s  mother  blamed  Gottlieb for her son’s suicide, sometimes slipping into an anti‐Semitic  rant.  In  an  interview  for  Horizon  Magazine,  for  example,  she  said  of  Gottlieb:  “He’s  a  creature…a  Jewish  creature…Not  a  man…Not  a  human  being.”  But,  as  MacLauchlin  demonstrates,  Gottlieb  was  mostly  encouraging  to  Toole,  and  showed  great  patience  with  some  of Toole’s eccentricities.     he other commonly proposed explanation of Toole’s suicide is  that  it  was  the  result  of  repressed  homosexual  feelings.  René  Pol  Nevils  and  Deborah  George  Hardy  first  suggested  that  Toole  may  have  been  a  homosexual  in  the  first  biography  of  Toole,  Ignatius  Rising,  and  this  suggestion  has  been  entertained  and  ex‐ plored by a number of critics since the 2001 work. In 2004 Raymond‐ Jean Frontain states unequivocally that Toole was a homosexual in an  encyclopedia  entry  for  a  gay  and  lesbian  publication,  and  in  a  2007  article for the Southern Literary Journal, Michael Hardin finds homoe‐ rotic symbols everywhere in Confederacy.   MacLauchlin  puts  paid  to  these  unfounded  suggestions.  Toole’s  closest  friends—some  of  them  homosexuals—have  always  rejected  that he had homosexual tendencies, and there is little in Toole’s life to  suggest that he was a homosexual.  He often flirted with the wives at  faculty gatherings at Lafayette, and seemed to have a deep attraction  and affection for Patricia Rickels in particular. He was involved with  a  number  of  women  over  the  years,  though  not  seriously,  it  seems,  because of his single‐minded pursuit of fame. “Without his own ad‐

102


S P R I N G   2012   

mission  or  substantial  evidence  to  support  the  point,”  MacLauchlin  writes, “such suggestions remain conjecture.”  Toole’s death, like his life, cannot be pinned down to one cause. Ra‐ ther,  it  was  the  result  of  a  number  of  factors,  including,  in  Toole’s  case, a family history of mental illness. Once Toole stopped working  on the novel, he became more insular, erratic and fearful of the world  around him. “Despite our best efforts to understand the ghastly hu‐ man potential for self‐destruction,” MacLauchlin writes, “it cannot be  explained by a series of events like some kind of formula.”  While  MacLauchlin’s  enthusiasm  for  Toole  in  Butterfly  in  the  Type‐ writer  can  make  him  sound  overly  enamored  with  his  subject  at  times,  the  work  is,  in  fact,  a  solid,  wonderfully  evenhanded  assess‐ ment of Toole’s life and work. With few formulas and no clear ideo‐ logical  ax  to  grind,  MachLauchlin  offers  us  a  faithful  portrait  of  a  tragic figure. If you want to know more about  John Kennedy Toole,  this is your book.                                         

Micah Mattix is Assistant Professor of Literature at Houston Baptist University and Books Editor for The City. 103


THE CITY 

Mine John Poch Hungry, you call me by your name. Under barbed wire and up arroyos I come crawling, crowbarring old boards from your mouth and wonder. I have the ancient map, a torch, a calling

to disinter a treasure. At the surface, before I take my last white breath, I call in like a bat relinquishing its purchase. I follow hunger’s swallow, my fortunate fall

through black to gold, my narrow way through myriad prospects of living in the world, when (save for one ascended) even the buried and resurrected man must die again.

From darkness, you call me yours, for words, worth earth. You call me in: Lazarus come forth.

104


S P R I N G   2012   

A R EPUBLIC OF L ET TERS ]thoughts0on0the0age}  Hunter Baker

A

s a college professor, I find myself frequently thinking  about the Occupy Wall Street movement. Though the  absolute numbers of participants are not large, it is  clear that the general sentiment of disillusionment  and anger has tendrils which spread into the general  population of young people. I would like to explore the question of  whether they have a point and how we should think about it. 

There are many good reasons for the young to be frustrated. First,  they are coming to adulthood at a time when older generations have  taken a course of action that damaged their own prospects. Large  corporations have been severely hindered by old agreements to pro‐ vide for workers after retirement. The CEO of General Motors, prior  to his dismissal, complained that he felt he was running a health in‐ surance company rather than a car company. Many of the great old  corporations have struggled against massive legacy costs of this type.   Who gained? The old management gained because they were able  to reduce wages in exchange for costs they could put off well into the  future. The old workers gained because they have secured a right to  benefits which run for decades beyond their last day of labor. Old  labor gained. Old management gained. Who is left with the check?  Later generations must pay the bill in terms of reduced competitive  capability for the enterprises and less money to invest on growth.   Resources which flow to those who ran things decades ago are un‐ available to the rising cohort. The more pensions, the more health  insurance legacies, the less which can be used for building strong  companies today. Labor and management conspired to make the fu‐ ture pay.  105


THE CITY 

Our elected officials have done the same thing, ultimately. We have  financed government at a level beyond our willingness to pay for it  and thus have racked up debt which grows prodigiously. The young  realize that while entitlement after entitlement accrued to their el‐ ders, they will be expected to pay for those programs while suffering  great pessimism over whether they will ever enjoy the fruits of them.  Just as with corporations, the government officials and their constitu‐ ents (the management and labor, so to speak) have conspired to  postpone costs into the future. The young are supposed to look hope‐ fully into the future. But how can they do so when it has been loaded  with debt like some ill‐fated corporate spin‐off?  One of the great difficulties of being a young person just out of col‐ lege like many of the Occupy protesters is that one’s personal future  is very much in doubt. Right up until the end of college, the young  person has been on an escalator that is going somewhere. Preschool  to kindergarten to elementary school to middle school to high school  and then to college. It is all easy to understand and the next steps are  clear. But what to do at the end of the escalator? There are some pro‐ grams which seem to feed people right along into another series of  escalators, such as teaching, nursing, medical school, maybe account‐ ing, but many others lead to a more open future with widely variable  outcomes. What of the English major or the student of history who  does not go into graduate study? What does an art major do? How  about the dramatic pupil, the communication arts scholar? For these  students, there is no continuing escalator.  When I got out of college in 1992, I could not simply enter an acad‐ emy of government service and get an assignment. Interestingly, I  tried to do something like that. I obtained a master’s degree in public  administration with the sole goal of getting into the Presidential  Management Internship which would feed me right into a govern‐ ment agency. Despite being at the top of my class, I did not get the  appointment.  The uncertainty of my future terrified me. I spent the  next several years of my life trying to figure out what to do and  where to go. I earned a law degree and a Ph.D. Only then did I find  my own path. During those years of confusion and wilderness, how I  envied those with sure paths. I raged at the way my own life circum‐ stances had left me without the kind of parental connections or other  favorable breaks which could start me in a career. I am sure that  many young people in the Occupy movement share those feelings.  106


S P R I N G   2012   

I went through all of that in the era of relatively inexpensive tui‐ tion. Thanks to scholarships and help from the parents, I escaped  with very little debt. For the average Occupy protester, student debt  is a very substantial part of the grievance.  There is an indictment to be delivered on those of us in the college  game. Generally speaking, we don’t prepare students mentally for  the end of the escalator. We need to impress upon them that getting  the credential of a bachelor’s degree and completing a program of  study is just the base level in the process of getting a job. Very few  people come out of college ready to do the jobs they plan to get. Col‐ lege does not train most students for a job in the way a trade school  might. Instead, college signals employers that a particular student  has a certain degree of competence, can receive and complete as‐ signments, and is used to showing up at a given place at a given time  in some kind of routine way. The college program is a foundation.  But during college, the student needs to be looking well beyond just  passing classes.  Throughout, a young person should be thinking in the manner of  the old Evangelism Explosion which queried individuals as to what  they would say when God asked them, “Why should I let you in my  heaven?” Except, in our scenario, the question from the employer is,  “Why should I give you a job with my company?” If your only an‐ swer is that you have completed a course of study at a university and  have no experience or no special skill to offer, then you are not a very  attractive candidate. You need to have completed your course of  study and know how to write really well and be able to analyze prob‐ lems and come up with good solutions and have some basic quantita‐ tive skills and be computer literate and have cultivated habits of life‐ time learning and have reasonably good social skills and be  opportunistic about finding work and delivering results.  Until a young person starts to understand just how steep the wall is  that they face before they become attractive to an employer, they will  mostly be bewildered as to why things aren’t working out. But think  about it from the employer’s side of things. They can either pay you a  salary or spend that money on facilities, technology, profit for inves‐ tors, making a product better for customers, or any number of other  items other than hiring an inexperienced young person. Being a  warm body with a nice credential doesn’t work well unless the econ‐ omy is smoking hot, as with the dot‐com boom.  107


THE CITY 

The economy is not smoking hot, nor does it show signs of being  smoking hot any time in the near future. As to why, please see the  first section on getting the bill for the six parties ahead of you. The  solution to the fiscal problem is not to make sure that the government  increases its budget to spend a lot more on young people to go along  with the very large (and unsustainable) amount we spend on older  people. Rather, the solution is to reverse the bad habits.     Corporations have been hard at work for years getting younger  employees on the 401k train rather than on pensions. Governments  will need to do the same thing. Pensions are not a sustainable model  for a population like ours that barely replaces itself. Neither do they  make much sense when people may live as many decades after work‐ ing as they spent working.  The solution to the problem of being young and uncertain is to do a  better job of preparing young people for the end of the escalator. The  old join a corporation and spend forty years there and then get a  pension model is finished. Whoever embraces it will be defeated  economically by those who do not. Everyone must be an entrepre‐ neur of their own skills and abilities. If you aren’t prepared to do  that, then find one of the few remaining escalators left which run all  the way to retirement. 

:

 was a teenager in the 1980′s when many secular Americans (in‐ cluding me) formed their view of Christianity on the basis of  what was happening with Jim Bakker and Jimmy Swaggart. Two  men who had become rich through ministry ended up making mis‐ takes that severely damaged their reputations and organizations. The  trashy, deceptive, scoundrel, flashy preacher character is part of the  stock of American literature.  

If you want to see the type in action, there are places you can go via  cable or satellite to get your fill. You can stuff yourself with shameful  judgment and delight as you watch them with their sparkling, color‐ ful clothing, jewelry, and architectural hairstyles. They model wealth  because their appeal to the viewer is that if you will call a number  and give a gift very quickly, you, too, will be blessed. You will have  planted a seed against your need. The unexpected life‐changing  check will surely appear on your doorstop very soon.  108


S P R I N G   2012   

Truly, I do not know any of these people. At age 41, I have been a  Christian now for about 23 years. I have yet to meet anyone who en‐ dorses the theology broadcast by the prosperity gospel industry. Nor  have I found any Christians who run around in rhinestones and pur‐ ple hair. But to those of you who are unchurched, who think very  little of Jesus Christ and Christianity, and who take your cues from  someone like Jon Stewart, I have an antidote to offer to the poisonous  view of the faith you may hold. The antidote is the Christian scholar.   The first person to really get my attention with regard to Christian‐ ity was Robbie Castleman. She had been doing graduate work and  would eventually obtain her doctorate. She is a professor at John  Brown University now. Robbie was never interested in spending lots  of time shopping or in the salon. She was the first person I ever met  who didn’t run after a ringing phone. Robbie and her husband,  Breck, were (and are) generous with their time and money. She didn’t  preach AT people. She had relationships with people. And the energy  behind all of it was Jesus. She put up with an egotistical, exasperat‐ ing, and lazy kid like me without losing patience. Robbie is a Chris‐ tian scholar. Such a different creature than that Brother Love charac‐ ter you all know and despise.  I won’t name names of other people to whom I’m close (because I  don’t want to embarrass them), but I don’t mind describing them to  you. The Christian scholar is the man with a rather unkempt beard  and the pants and sleeves with frayed cuffs. The tie often clashes or is  a couple of decades out of date. If you know men like these you  probably find them somewhat eccentric and uninterested in many of  the passing things the rest of us chase after. They don’t know which  buttons to fasten on a sportcoat or how to properly coordinate belts  and shoes. And the reason why is not because they are ignorant, but  rather because they are setting their powerful minds to other tasks.  They are, as a friend in Texas who had some impressive life experi‐ ence said to me, deep rivers. They are otherworldly.   I regret (a little) to say that I do know about the belts and shoes, the  right buttons to button, which colors can go together, and other mat‐ ters of concern to people of fashion. But I admire those who have no  need at all to care about those things. And when my wife, no great  follower of trends herself, happens to note that I am wearing pants  that seem to be falling apart a little or the seat is wearing out, I’m  109


THE CITY 

almost sorry to notice. Because I was just a little closer to being like  those men and women I so admire.  

:

 recently  had  lunch  with  a  friend  working  in  the  United  King‐ dom. When I asked him about the electoral politics, he reported  the following conversation: 

 

Friend:  (Speaking to British citizen) Who are you voting for?  Brit:  My parents were Tories, but I’m voting for the Lib‐Dems (the Liber‐ al Democrats).  Friend:  Really? Why are you voting for them?  Brit:  They’re for social justice!  Friend:  That’s interesting. What is social justice?  Brit:  Let me put my mind to that and I’ll get back to you. 

:

hen  I  was  a  graduate  student  in  public  administration  about  twenty  years  ago,  one  of  my  professors  was  the  much‐published,  much‐decorated  Robert  Golembiewski.  He was almost as wide as he was tall, had a terrific head of white hair  with  accompanying  white  beard  and  mustache,  and  proudly  dis‐ played  a  large  poster  for  Polish  Solidarity  (SOLIDARNOSC!)  on  the  door to his office.  He and I spoke many times as I took every advantage of opportuni‐ ties to learn from him. I still recall a framed letter he had from anoth‐ er  very  famous  social  scientist, Aaron  Wildavsky.  The  letter  opened  by congratulating Golembiewski on some photograph that had been  taken of him and subsequently appeared somewhere notable. ”What  an excellent likeness, Bob.” In the second paragraph, Wildavsky an‐ nounced that he had cancer and would not live very long.  On the occasion of one of my visits, I was excitedly discussing the  book Reinventing Government by Osborne and Gaebler and the corre‐ sponding  Clinton  reform  initiative,  the  National  Performance  Re‐ view. I was surprised to hear Golembiewski dismiss the initiative as  “just  another  management  sheep  dip.”  The  conversation  didn’t  go  much further because I had no idea what sheep dip was. I have since  110


S P R I N G   2012   

figured out that he was referring to a veterinary treatment for sheep  similar to the bath dogs get to keep fleas and other pests at bay.  Today,  I  was  thinking  about  Golembiewski  and  “management  sheep dip.” I think his critique was that most managerial reforms are  like a coating that appears to work for a while, but doesn’t change the  essence underneath. The conversation came home to me as I took my  class through a case study about education reform in Denver during  the  last  decade.  Michael  Bennet  managed  to  become  a  U.S.  Senator  after  his  purported  turnaround  of  the  schools  in  Denver.  It  is  clear  that  he  worked  hard.  I  am  less  sure  whether  his  reforms  were  suc‐ cessful.  It  mostly  seems  that  the  force  of  his  personality  was  im‐ portant, but now he is gone.  We frequently hear about new plans for big reforms. People make  much  of  them,  although  those  of  us  who  understand  PR  appreciate  that  the  gains  get  pumped  up  larger  than  they  really  are  and  the  problems  are  minimized.  We  get  catchy  labels  such  as  Scientific  Management, Total Quality Management, Lean Six Sigma, Reinvent‐ ing Government (which is my favorite for what it’s worth), and oth‐ ers. A number of people make a lot of money promoting these ideas,  writing,  consulting,  etc.  But  what  it  really  comes  down  to  is  a  few  things.  Do  political  leaders,  administrators,  and  employees  care  about their work? Are they honest? Do they have integrity? Are they  competent? I would submit to you that if those things are true, then it  not  so  much  the  managerial  sheep  dip  that  we  are  proposing  that  matters so much as it is the soul with which we approach the work.  Here’s  the  really  terrible  side  of  that  truth.  If  you  have  political  leaders who just care about moving up to the next job, administrators  and other employees who are primarily worried about getting more  money  and  better  benefits  and  having  an  easy  life,  then  whatever  sheep  dip  you  apply  will  make  things  look  and  smell  better  for  a  short while, but you’ll go right back into mediocrity or worse, decay.  Fundamentally, if you have competent, conscientious people work‐ ing in good faith, then the system you have is a matter of secondary  importance. This is an awful thing to understand, because it means if  you have a bad culture, if your people lack character, if families aren’t  raising children well ... then you don’t have a great chance of turning  things around.  We basically have two hopes for making things better. One is that  technology  improves  so  much  that  we  can  afford  our  many  social  111


THE CITY 

pathologies.  (Of  course,  that  road  may  lead  to  the  kind  of  human  existence we see portrayed in WALL‐E.)  The other lies with spiritual renewal. And that road is the tougher  one  by  far.  In  fact,  you  have  to  die  first. And  then  you  have  to  live  again. 

:

he public schools are going all out to stop bullying these days.   My children both attend a public elementary school, so I hear  a lot about it. Yesterday, though, my six year old daughter put  together what she is hearing in school with what she has learned  about the Christian faith. I was astonished and touched by the truth  and clarity of it. Sitting across the kitchen table while I read and she  did her homework, she said, “You shouldn’t be a bully because God  didn’t make you to be mean to people. He made you so people  wouldn’t be lonely.” 

:

hen I was a child (probably around the year 1979), I once  asked  my  father  to  tell  me  who  was  the  most  beautiful  woman  in  the  world.  He  instantly  replied  that  it  was  my  mother.  I  then  asked  him  to  tell  me  who  was  the  most  beautiful  woman other than my mother. He replied nearly as quickly that the  answer to my question was Raquel Welch.  I clipped the following section from a very interesting interview be‐ tween Raquel Welch and Men’s Health magazine. Her comments are  worth  carving  into  the  face  of  a  mountain  somewhere.  Take  special  note  of  how  her  interviewer  goes  from  flip  to  serious  as  she  makes  herself clear.    MH: You once said that you think sex is overrated. Could you elaborate?  Raquel Welch: I mean just the sex act itself.  MH: Really? Are you sure you’ve been doing it right?  Raquel Welch: I think we’ve gotten to the point in our culture where we’re  all  sex  addicts,  literally.  We  have  equated  happiness  in  life  with  as  many  orgasms as��you can possibly pack in, regardless of where it is that you depos‐ it your love interest.  MH: Okay, admittedly that doesn’t make sex sound very appealing at all.  112


S P R I N G   2012   

Raquel Welch: It’s just dehumanizing. And I have to honestly say, I think  this era of porn is at least partially responsible for it. Where is the anticipa‐ tion  and  the  personalization?  It’s  all  pre‐fab  now.  You  have  these  images  coming at you unannounced and unsolicited. It just gets to be so plastic and  phony  to  me.  Maybe  men  respond  to  that.  But  is  it  really  better  than  an  experience with a real life girl that he cares about? It’s an exploitation of the  poor male’s libidos. Poor babies, they can’t control themselves.    MH: I cannot dispute any of what you’re saying.  Raquel  Welch:  I  just  imagine  them  sitting  in  front  of  their  computers,  completely annihilated. They haven’t done anything, they don’t have a job,  they barely have ambition anymore. And it makes for laziness and a not very  good sex partner. Do they know how to negotiate something that isn’t pre‐ fab and injected directly into their brain? 

:

he primary point of my first book, The End of Secularism, was  to demonstrate that secularism doesn’t do what it claims to do,  which is to solve the problem of religious difference. As I look  at the Obama administration’s attempt to mandate that religious em‐ ployers pay for contraceptive products, I see that they have con‐ firmed one of my charges in the book.  I wrote that secularists claim that they are occupying a neutral po‐ sition in the public square, but in reality they are simply another  group of contenders working to implement a vision of community  life with which they are comfortable. And guess what? They are not  comfortable with many of the fundamental beliefs of Christians. Re‐ grettably, many secularists are also statists. Thus, their discomfort  with Christian beliefs results in direct challenges to them in the form  of mandatory public policy. 

Collectivism is often very appealing to Christians who want to do  good for their neighbors. Unfortunately, collectivism is frequently a  fellow‐traveler of aggressive secularism with little respect for reli‐ gious liberty. The veil has slipped. I hope we do not too quickly for‐ get what was revealed in that moment. Collectivism gives. But it also  takes. And what it takes is very often precious and irreplaceable. 

: 113


THE CITY 

ost readers will recognize Peter Drucker’s name as the au‐ thor of many books about management. The Austrian im‐ migrant was revered in that field and sold millions of  books. Few realize, though, that his academic training was actually in  international law and that he moved toward business out of his con‐ viction that management is a liberal art. I have embarked upon a re‐ search project to read and understand his social thought. In the pro‐ cess of reading his first book, The End of Economic Man, I have run  into many gems, including this one:   

Realization of freedom and equality was first sought in the spiritual  sphere. The creed that all mean are equal in the world beyond and free to  decide their fate in the other world by their actions and thoughts in this one,  which, accordingly, is but a preparation for the real life, may have been only  an attempt to keep the masses down, as the eighteenth century and the  Marxists assert. But to the people in the eleventh or in the thirteenth centu‐ ry the promise was real. That every Last Judgment at a church door shows  popes, bishops, and kings in damnation was not just the romantic fantasy of  a rebellious stonemason. It was a real and truthful expression of that epoch  of our history which projected freedom and equality into the spiritual sphere. 

:

 was recently standing on a covered porch talking to a man who  is  legitimately  psychotic.  He  explained  to  me  that  he  has  won  several  major  literary  prizes,  holds  a  number  of  important  pa‐ tents, and traveled around the world in a dirigible for years. Trying  to find a way to make conversation, I confided to him that I am afraid  of flying. His mania seemed to subside as he looked at me, took my  measure, and said, “You know, flying is a lot safer than other meth‐ ods of transportation.” 

:

e  are  hearing  a  great  deal  at  the  moment  about  govern‐ ment  austerity,  especially  in  Europe,  as  various  states  at‐ tempt to deal with massive budget crises resulting from a  combination of low growth, bad demographics, and overly rich wel‐ fare  programs.  European  Central  Bank  president  Mario  Draghi  re‐ 114


S P R I N G   2012   

cently gave an interview to the Wall Street Journal in which he made  things quite clear:    WSJ: Austerity means different things, what’s good and what’s bad aus‐ terity?   Draghi:  In  the  European  context  tax  rates  are  high  and  government  ex‐ penditure is focused on current expenditure. A “good” consolidation is one  where  taxes  are  lower  and  the  lower  government  expenditure  is  on  infra‐ structures and other investments.   WSJ: Bad austerity?   Draghi:  The  bad  consolidation  is  actually  the  easier  one  to  get,  because  one  could  produce  good  numbers  by  raising  taxes  and  cutting  capital  ex‐ penditure,  which  is  much  easier  to  do  than  cutting  current  expenditure.  That’s the easy way in a sense, but it’s not a good way. It depresses potential  growth.    Draghi’s insight is one American policymakers need to understand.  If  the  government  is  spending  a  great  deal  of  money  simply  to  put  dollars in people’s pockets, pay salaries, etc., then we are not getting  nearly  the  good  we  could  obtain  with  better  government  spending  and  we  go  bust  trying  to  afford  it.  The  superior  situation  is  one  in  which you can keep taxes low and government spending is on items  that last and have the potential to spur growth into the future.  For example, consider the difference between a government paying  for things like the interstate highway system or the Tennessee Valley  Authority  mechanisms  of  energy  generation  versus  a  government  that sends out a lot of entitlement checks. The first government will  see  substantial  returns  over  the  long  run.  The  second  one  is  mostly  just poorer at the end of the year.  In America, we used to have a government of the first type, but we  increasingly  have  a  government  of  the  second  type.  I  opposed  the  president’s  nearly  $1  trillion  stimulus  package,  but  it  would  have  been a lot easier to swallow if it had been aimed at some truly valua‐ ble  investment  such  as  reinforcing America’s  physical  infrastructure  (highways, electrical grid, etc.) rather than simply trying to push out  cash as quickly as possible. 

: 115


THE CITY 

t  is  interesting  to  note  that  religious  people,  of  a  variety  of  per‐ suasions, tend to naturally understand how serious a problem the  HHS  mandate  presents.  What  the  department  did,  deliberately  and  with  full  knowledge  of  the  consequences,  was  to  create  a  very  real and urgent crisis for institutions with a religious identity (espe‐ cially the Catholic ones). We could call this kind of crisis a “God and  Caesar  crisis”  in  which  an  individual  or  a  community  must  choose  between  obeying  God  or  obeying  the  coercive  force  of  government.  ”Rape”  is  not  an  absurd  metaphor  to  employ  when  we  are  talking  about the use of raw power to force an action against conviction.   Now,  it  is  obvious  that  religious  belief  cannot  command  a  blank  check, but the old standard was essentially that religious belief (and  action) would remain undisturbed as long as it did not pose a threat  to the peace and safety of the community. It should be obvious that  declining to fund contraceptives in an insurance policy is far from an  affirmative  threat  to  either  peace  or  safety. After  all,  there  are  many  low cost ways to obtain contraceptives and no one is forced to work  for a religious employer. The coercion being employed is what is hy‐ perbolic. No one should be forced into a God and Caesar crisis with  so little regard for the alternatives and so little regard for conscience. 

:

A

s  many  of  you  know,  I worked  for Robert  Sloan  as  a  writer  while I was doing my doctoral work at Baylor and then as a  director of strategic planning and associate provost at Hou‐ ston Baptist University. Those jobs changed my life. They gave me a  vocation. I have not doubted my calling since it came to me so clearly  during those years.  I  felt  that  I  had  to  leave  HBU  in  order  to  be  closer  to  my  parents  (for a variety of reasons, mostly a debilitating health condition which  has troubled my mother) and found an opportunity at Union Univer‐ sity. Though it was extraordinarily difficult to leave (and I struggled  with an outpouring of emotion almost daily), I looked forward with  anticipation to learning from David Dockery just as I did from Robert  Sloan. God has been gracious. Union has been a good place for me.  The  years  at  HBU  were  tremendously  satisfying.  In  God’s  provi‐ dence,  we  put  together  a  strong  ten  year  plan  for  the  university,  re‐ formed  the  core  curriculum  (in  a  rigorous,  traditional  sense),  estab‐ 116


S P R I N G   2012   

lished  an  honors  college,  and  brought  about  substantial  growth  in  both the physical aspect of the campus and in the student body.  Change happens. I left for Union. Paul Bonicelli (once a key part of  establishing  Patrick  Henry  College,  too)  moved  on  to  an  executive  vice  presidency  at  Regent  University  (where  he  is  already  doing  good  things).  And  now  John  Mark  Reynolds  assumes  the  title  of  provost at HBU. He has exactly the right sensibility about academic  content  for  an  institution  that  seeks  to  be  a  truly  classical  Christian  liberal arts university. I look forward with great anticipation to seeing  him  establish  the  same  kind  of  loving  and  scholarly  association  at  HBU  that  he  brought  into  being  at  Biola  in  the  form  of  the  Torrey  Institute.  I should add that I hope John Mark does not merely take his gifts to  HBU, while Biola loses them. Rather, I echo his hope that the work at  Biola goes on while a new one takes root at HBU. Let the good work  multiply rather than simply transferring.  HBU has dared much these past several years. It is my prayer that  God  will  bring  greater  things  of  it  than  any  of  us  have  dreamed  or  intended. 

:

M

y  daughter  Grace  (age  6)  saw  me  looking  at  Europe  on  Google  Maps.  She  noticed  the  United  Kingdom  and  was  excited to see it, but then said, “That’s not a real place.”  

“Yes, it is,” I insisted. “And it has a queen and princes.”  “I don’t believe it,” she said. 

“Why?” I asked.  “Because you should never believe anything on the internet.”         

Hunter Baker is Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and Associate Professor of Political Science at Union University. He is the author of The End of Secularism (Crossway Books). You can read more at his website, endofsecularism.com. 117


The Word

+


S P R I N G   2012   

4THE`WORD`SPOKEN$  G.K. Chesterton In each volume of T HE   C I T Y , we reprint a passage or remarks from great leaders of the faith. In 1916, G.K. Chesterton penned an essay to be used as the introduction to The Book of Job. Chesterton (18741936) put, as always, a bracing tone to the lessons of the book and unpacking the “philosophical riddle” within it. Here is his essay.  

T

he Book of Job is among the other Old Testament Books  both  a  philosophical  riddle  and  a  historical  riddle.  It  is  the  philosophical  riddle  that  concerns  us  in  such  an  in‐ troduction as this; so we may dismiss first the few words  of general explanation or warning which should be said  about the historical aspect. Controversy has long raged about which  parts of this epic belong to its original scheme and which are interpo‐ lations  of  considerably  later  date.  The  doctors  disagree,  as  it  is  the  business of doctors to do; but upon the whole the trend of investiga‐ tion  has  always  been  in  the  direction  of  maintaining  that  the  parts  interpolated, if any, were the prose prologue and epilogue and possi‐ bly  the  speech  of  the  young  man  who  comes  in  with  an  apology  at  the  end.  I  do  not  profess  to  be  competent  to  decide  such  questions.  But  whatever  decision  the  reader  may  come  to  concerning  them,  there is a general truth to be remembered in this connection.     When  you  deal  with  any  ancient  artistic  creation  do  not  suppose  that  it  is  anything  against  it  that  it  grew  gradually.  The  Book  of  Job  may have grown gradually just as Westminster Abbey grew gradual‐ ly. But the people who made the old folk poetry, like the people who  made Westminster Abbey, did not attach that importance to the actu‐ al  date  and  the  actual  author,  that  importance  which  is  entirely  the  creation  of  the  almost  insane  individualism  of  modern  times.  We  may put aside the case of Job, as one complicated with religious diffi‐ culties,  and  take  any  other,  say  the  case  of  The  Iliad.  Many  people  have  maintained  the  characteristic  formula  of  modern  scepticism,  that Homer was not written by Homer, but by another person of the  same name. Just in the same way many have maintained that Moses  was not Moses but another person called Moses. But the thing really  to be remembered in the matter of The Iliad is that if other people did  interpolate  the  passages,  the  thing  did  not  create  the  same  sense  of  119


THE CITY 

shock as would be created by such proceedings in these individualis‐ tic times. The creation of the tribal epic was to some extent regarded  as a tribal work, like the building of the tribal temple. Believe then, if  you will, that the prologue of Job and the epilogue and the speech of  Elihu are things inserted after the original work was composed. But  do not suppose that such insertions have that obvious and spurious  character which would belong to any insertions in a modern individ‐ ualistic  book.  Do  not  regard  the  insertions  as  you  would  regard  a  chapter  in  George  Meredith  which  you  afterwards  found  had  not  been written by George Meredith, or half a scene in Ibsen which you  found  had  been  cunningly  sneaked  in  by  Mr.  William  Archer.  Re‐ member  that  this  old  world  which  made  these  old  poems  like  the  Iliad and Job, always kept the tradition of what it was making. A man  could almost leave a poem to his son to be finished as he would have  finished it, just as a man could leave a field to his son, to be reaped as  he would have reaped it. What is called Homeric unity may be a fact  or not. The Iliad may have been written by one man. It may have been  written by a hundred men. But let us remember that there was more  unity in those times in a hundred men than there is unity now in one  man. Then a city was like one man. Now one man is like a city in civil  war.   

ithout  going,  therefore,  into  questions  of  unity  as  under‐ stood by the scholars, we may say of the scholarly riddle  that  the  book  has  unity  in  the  sense  that  all  great  tradi‐ tional  creations  have  unity;  in  the  sense  that  Canterbury  Cathedral  has  unity.  And  the  same  is  broadly  true  of  what  I  have  called  the  philosophical  riddle.  There  is  a  real  sense  in  which  the  Book  of  Job  stands apart from most of the books included in the canon of the Old  Testament.  But  here  again  those  are  wrong  who  insist  on  the  entire  absence of unity.  Those  are  wrong  who  maintain  that  the  Old  Testament  is  a  mere  loose  library;  that  it  has  no  consistency  or  aim.  Whether  the  result  was achieved by some supernal spiritual truth, or by a steady nation‐ al  tradition,  or  merely  by  an  ingenious  selection  in  after  times,  the  books of the Old Testament have a quite perceptible unity. To attempt  to understand the Old Testament without realizing this main idea is  as absurd as it would be to study one of Shakespeare’s plays without  realizing that the author of them had any philosophical object at all.  120


S P R I N G   2012   

It  is  as  if  a  man  were  to  read  the  history  of  Hamlet,  Prince  of  Den‐ mark, thinking all the time that he was reading what really purport‐ ed  to  be  the  history  of  an  old  Danish  pirate  prince.  Such  a  reader  would not realize at all that Hamlet’s procrastination was on the part  of  the  poet  intentional.  He  would  merely  say,  “How  long  Shake‐ speare’s hero does take to kill his enemy.” So speak the Bible smash‐ ers, who are unfortunately always at bottom Bible worshippers. They  do  not  understand  the  special  tone  and  intention  of  the  Old  Testa‐ ment; they do not understand its main idea, which is the idea of all  men being merely the instruments of a higher power.  Those, for instance, who complain of the atrocities and treacheries  of the judges and prophets of Israel have really got a notion in their  head that has nothing to do with the subject. They are too Christian.  They  are  reading  back  into  the  pre‐Christian  scriptures  a  purely  Christian idea—the idea of saints, the idea that the chief instruments  of God are very particularly good men. This is a deeper, a more dar‐ ing, and a more interesting idea than the old Jewish one. It is the idea  that innocence has about it something terrible which in the long run  makes and re‐makes empires and the world.   But the Old Testament idea was much more what may be called the  common‐sense  idea,  that  strength  is  strength,  that  cunning  is  cun‐ ning, that worldly success is worldly success, and that Jehovah uses  these  things  for  His  own  ultimate  purpose,  just  as  He  uses  natural  forces or physical elements. He uses the strength of a hero as He uses  that of a Mammoth without any particular respect for the Mammoth.  I cannot comprehend how it is that so many simple‐minded sceptics  have  read  such  stories  as  the  fraud  of  Jacob  and  supposed  that  the  man who wrote it (whoever he was) did not know that Jacob was a  sneak  just  as  well  as  we  do.  The  primeval  human  sense  of  honour  does  not  change  so  much  as  that.  But  these  simple‐minded  sceptics  are, like the majority of modern sceptics, Christians. They fancy that  the patriarchs must be meant for patterns; they fancy that Jacob was  being set up as some kind of saint; and in that case I do not wonder  that  they  are  a  little  startled.  That  is  not  the  atmosphere  of  the  Old  Testament at all. The heroes of the Old Testament are not the sons of  God, but the slaves of God, gigantic and terrible slaves, like the genii,  who were the slaves of Aladdin.  The  central  idea  of  the  great  part  of  the  Old  Testament  may  be  called  the  idea  of  the  loneliness  of  God.  God  is  not  the  only  chief  121


THE CITY 

character of the Old Testament; God is properly the only character in  the  Old  Testament.  Compared  with  His  clearness  of  purpose  all  the  other wills are heavy and automatic, like those of animals; compared  with His actuality all the sons of flesh are shadows. Again and again  the  note  is  struck,  “With  whom  hath  he  taken  counsel?”  “I  have  trodden the wine press alone, and of the peoples there was no man  with  me.”  All  the  patriarchs  and  prophets  are  merely  His  tools  or  weapons; for the Lord is a man of war. He uses Joshua like an axe or  Moses  like  a  measuring‐rod.  For  Him  Samson  is  only  a  sword  and  Isaiah  a  trumpet.  The  saints  of  Christianity  are  supposed  to  be  like  God, to be, as it were, little statuettes of Him. The Old Testament he‐ ro is no more supposed to be of the same nature as God than a saw or  a hammer is supposed to be of the same shape as the carpenter.   

his is the main key and characteristic of the Hebrew scriptures  as a whole. There are, indeed, in those scriptures innumerable  instances  of  the  sort  of  rugged  humour,  keen  emotion,  and  powerful  individuality  which  is  never  wanting  in  great  primitive  prose  and  poetry.  Nevertheless  the  main  characteristic  remains;  the  sense not merely that God is stronger than man, not merely that God  is  more  secret  than  man,  but  that  He  means  more,  that  He  knows  better what He is doing, that compared with Him we have something  of  the  vagueness,  the  unreason,  and  the  vagrancy  of  the  beasts  that  perish.  “It  is  he  that  sitteth  above  the  earth,  and  the  inhabitants  thereof are as grasshoppers.” We might almost put it thus. The book  is  so  intent  upon  asserting  the  personality  of  God  that  it  almost  as‐ serts the impersonality of man. Unless this gigantic cosmic brain has  conceived  a  thing,  that  thing  is  insecure  and  void;  man  has  not  enough tenacity to ensure its continuance. “Except the Lord build the  house their labour is but lost that build it. Except the Lord keep the  city the watchman watcheth but in vain.”  Everywhere else, then, the Old Testament positively rejoices in the  obliteration of man in comparison with the divine purpose. The Book  of Job stands definitely alone because the Book of Job definitely asks,  “But what is the purpose of God? Is it worth the sacrifice even of our  miserable  humanity?  Of  course  it  is  easy  enough  to  wipe  out  our  own paltry wills for the sake of a will that is grander and kinder? But  is  it  grander  and  kinder?  Let  God  use  His  tools;  let  God  break  His  tools. But what is He doing and what are they being broken for?” It is  122


S P R I N G   2012   

because  of  this  question  that  we  have  to  attack  as  a  philosophical  riddle the riddle of the Book of Job.  The present importance of the Book of Job cannot be expressed ad‐ equately  even  by  saying  that  it  is  the  most  interesting  of  ancient  books. We may almost say of the Book of Job that it is the most inter‐ esting  of  modern  books.  In  truth,  of  course,  neither  of  the  two  phrases covers the matter, because fundamental human religion and  fundamental human irreligion are both at once old and new; philos‐ ophy  is  either  eternal  or  it  is  not  philosophy.  The  modern  habit  of  saying,  “This  is  my  opinion,  but  I  may  be  wrong,”  is  entirely  irra‐ tional. If I say that it may be wrong I say that is not my opinion. The  modern habit of saying “Every man has a different philosophy; this  is  my  philosophy  and  its  suits  me”;  the  habit  of  saying  this  is  mere  weak‐mindedness.  A  cosmic  philosophy  is  not  constructed  to  fit  a  man; a cosmic philosophy is constructed to fit a cosmos. A man can  no more possess a private religion than he can possess a private sun  and moon. The first of the intellectual beauties of the Book of Job is  that it is all concerned with this desire to know the actuality; the de‐ sire  to  know  what  is,  and  not  merely  what  seems.  If  moderns  were  writing the book we should probably find that Job and his comforters  got on quite well together by the simple operation of referring their  differences  to  what  is  called  the  temperament,  saying  that  the  com‐ forters  were  by  nature  “optimists”  and  Job  by  nature  a  “pessimist.”  And  they  would  be  quite  comfortable,  as  people  can  often  be,  for  some time at least, by agreeing to say what is obviously untrue. For if  the word “pessimist” means anything at all, then emphatically Job is  not a pessimist. His case alone is sufficient to refute the modern ab‐ surdity of referring everything to physical temperament. Job does not  in any sense look at life in a gloomy way. If wishing to be happy and  being quite ready to be happy constitute an optimist, Job is an opti‐ mist. He is a perplexed optimist; he is an exasperated optimist; he is  an outraged and insulted optimist. He wishes the universe to justify  itself, not because he wishes it to be caught out, but because he really  wishes  it  to be  justified. He  demands  an  explanation  from God,  but  he does not do it at all in the spirit in which Hampden might demand  an explanation from Charles I. He does it in the spirit in which a wife  might  demand  an  explanation  from  her  husband  whom  she  really  respected. He remonstrates with his Maker because he is proud of his  Maker.  He  even  speaks  of  the Almighty  as  his  enemy,  but  he  never  123


THE CITY 

doubts,  at  the  back  of  his  mind,  that  his  enemy  has  some  kind  of  a  case which he does not understand. In a fine and famous blasphemy  he says, “Oh, that mine adversary had written a book!” It never real‐ ly occurs to him that it could possibly be a bad book. He is anxious to  be  convinced,  that  is,  he  thinks  that  God  could  convince  him.  In  short,  we  may  say  again  that  if  the  word  optimist  means  any  thing  (which I doubt) Job is an optimist. He shakes the pillars of the world  and strikes insanely at the heavens; he lashes the stars, but it is not to  silence  them;  it  is  to  make  them  speak.  In  the  same  way  we  may  speak  of  the  official  optimists,  the  Comforters  of  Job.  Again,  if  the  word pessimist means anything (which I doubt) the comforters of Job  may  be  called  pessimists  rather  than  optimists.  All  that  they  really  believe  is  not  that  God  is  good  but  that  God  is  so  strong  that  it  is  much more judicious to call Him good. It would be the exaggeration  of censure to call them evolutionists; but they have something of the  vital error of the evolutionary optimist. They will keep on saying that  everything  in  the  universe  fits  into  everything  else:  as  if  there  were  anything  comforting  about  a  number  of  nasty  things  all  fitting  into  each other. We shall see later how God in the great climax of the po‐ em turns this particular argument altogether upside down.  When, at the end of the poem, God enters (somewhat abruptly), is  struck the sudden and splendid note which makes the thing as great  as  it  is. All  the  human  beings  through  the  story,  and  Job  especially,  have been asking questions of God. A more trivial poet would have  made God enter in some sense or other in order to answer the ques‐ tions. By a touch truly to be called inspired, when God enters, it is to  ask a number more questions on His own account. In this drama of  scepticism God Himself takes up the role of sceptic. He does what all  the  great  voices  defending  religion  have  always  done.  He  does,  for  instance,  what  Socrates  did.  He  turns  rationalism  against  itself.  He  seems  to  say  that  if  it  comes  to  asking  questions,  He  can  ask  some  questions  which  will  fling  down  and  flatten  out  all  conceivable  hu‐ man  questioners.  The  poet  by  an  exquisite  intuition  has  made  God  ironically  accept  a  kind  of  controversial  equality  with  His  accusers.  He is willing to regard it as if it were a fair intellectual duel: “Gird up  now thy loins like a man; for I will demand of thee, and answer thou  me.” The everlasting adopts an enormous and sardonic humility. He  is  quite  willing  to  be  prosecuted.  He  only  asks  for  the  right  which  every  prosecuted  person  possesses;  He  asks  to  be  allowed  to  cross‐ 124


S P R I N G   2012   

examine the witness for the prosecution. And He carries yet further  the correctness of the legal parallel. For the first question, essentially  speaking, which He asks of Job is the question that any criminal ac‐ cused  by  Job  would  be  most  entitled  to  ask.  He  asks  Job who  he  is.  And Job, being a man of candid intellect, takes a little time to consid‐ er, and comes to the conclusion that he does not know.   

his  is  the  first  great  fact  to  notice  about  the  speech  of  God,  which  is  the  culmination  of  the  inquiry.  It  represents  all  hu‐ man sceptics routed by a higher scepticism. It is this method,  used sometimes by supreme and sometimes by mediocre minds, that  has ever since been the logical weapon of the true mystic. Socrates, as  I  have  said,  used  it  when  he  showed  that  if  you  only  allowed  him  enough sophistry he could destroy all the sophists. Jesus Christ used  it when He reminded the Sadducees, who could not imagine the na‐ ture of marriage in heaven, that if it came to that they had not really  imagined  the  nature  of  marriage  at  all.  In  the  break  up  of  Christian  theology  in  the  eighteenth  century,  Butler  used  it,  when  he  pointed  out that rationalistic arguments could be used as much against vague  religion as against doctrinal religion, as much against rationalist eth‐ ics as against Christian ethics. It is the root and reason of the fact that  men who have religious faith have also philosophic doubt, like Car‐ dinal  Newman,  Mr.  Balfour,  or  Mr.  Mallock.  These  are  the  small  streams  of  the  delta;  the  Book  of  Job  is  the  first  great  cataract  that  creates the river. In dealing with the arrogant asserter of doubt, it is  not the right method to tell him to stop doubting. It is rather the right  method to tell him to go on doubting, to doubt a little more, to doubt  every  day  newer  and  wilder  things  in  the  universe,  until  at  last,  by  some strange enlightenment, he may begin to doubt himself. This, I  say, is the first fact touching the speech; the fine inspiration by which  God  comes  in  at  the  end,  not  to  answer  riddles,  but  to  propound  them. The other great fact which, taken together with this one, makes  the whole work religious instead of merely philosophical, is that oth‐ er  great  surprise  which  makes  Job suddenly  satisfied  with the  mere  presentation  of  something  impenetrable.  Verbally  speaking  the  enigmas of Jehovah seem darker and more desolate than the enigmas  of  Job;  yet  Job  was  comfortless  before  the  speech  of  Jehovah  and  is  comforted after it. He has been told nothing, but he feels the terrible  and tingling atmosphere of something which is too good to be told.  125


THE CITY 

The refusal of God to explain His design is itself a burning hint of His  design. The riddles of God are more satisfying than the solutions of  man.  Thirdly,  of  course,  it  is  one  of  the  splendid  strokes  that  God  rebukes  alike  the  man  who  accused,  and  the  men  who  defended  Him;  that  He  knocks  down  pessimists  and  optimists  with  the  same  hammer. And  it  is  in  connection  with  the  mechanical  and  supercili‐ ous  comforters  of  Job  that  there  occurs  the  still deeper  and finer  in‐ version of which I have spoken. The mechanical optimist endeavours  to justify the universe avowedly upon the ground that it is a rational  and consecutive pattern. He points out that the fine thing about the  world is that it can all be explained. That is the one point, if I may put  it so, on which God in return, is explicit to the point of violence. God  says, in effect, that if there is one fine thing about the world, as far as  men are concerned, it is that it cannot be explained. He insists on the  inexplicableness  of  everything;  “Hath  the  rain  a  father?  ...  Out  of  whose womb came the ice?” He goes farther, and insists on the posi‐ tive and palpable unreason of things; “Hast thou sent the rain upon  the desert where no man is, and upon the wilderness wherein there  is no man?”     God will make man see things, if it is only against the black back‐ ground of nonentity. God will make Job see a startling universe if He  can only do it by making Job see an idiotic universe. To startle man  God becomes for an instant a blasphemer; one might almost say that  God  becomes  for  an  instant an  atheist.  He  unrolls  before  Job  a  long  panorama of created things, the horse, the eagle, the raven, the wild  ass,  the  peacock,  the  ostrich,  the  crocodile.  He  so  describes  each  of  them that it sounds like a monster walking in the sun. The whole is a  sort  of  psalm  or  rhapsody  of  the  sense  of  wonder.  The  maker  of  all  things is astonished at the things He has Himself made. This we may  call  the  third  point.  Job  puts  forward  a  note  of  interrogation;  God  answers with a note of exclamation. Instead of proving to Job that it  is  an  explicable  world,  He  insists  that  it  is  a  much  stranger  world  than  Job  ever  thought  it  was.  Lastly,  the  poet  has  achieved  in  this  speech, with that unconscious artistic accuracy found in so many of  the  simpler  epics,  another  and  much  more  delicate  thing.  Without  once  relaxing  the  rigid  impenetrability  of  Jehovah  in  His  deliberate  declaration,  he  has  contrived  to  let  fall  here  and  therein  the  meta‐ phors, in the parenthetical imagery, sudden and splendid suggestions  that  the  secret  of  God  is  a  bright  and  not  a  sad  one  semi‐accidental  126


S P R I N G   2012   

suggestions,  like  light  seen  for  an  instant  through  the  cracks  of  a  closed door. It would be difficult to praise too highly, in a purely po‐ etical  sense,  the  instinctive  exactitude  and  ease  with  which  these  more optimistic insinuations are let fall in other connections, as if the  Almighty Himself were scarcely aware that He was letting them out.  For instance, there is that famous passage where Jehovah with devas‐ tating  sarcasm,  asks  Job  where  he  was  when  the  foundations  of  the  world  were  laid,  and  then  (as  if  merely  fixing  a  date)  mentions  the  time when the sons of God shouted for joy. One cannot help feeling,  even  upon  this  meagre information,  that  they must  have had  some‐ thing  to  shout  about.  Or  again,  when  God  is  speaking  of  snow  and  hail in the mere catalogue of the physical cosmos, He speaks of them  as  a  treasury  that  He  has  laid  up  against  the  day  of  battle–a  hint  of  some huge Armageddon in which evil shall be at last overthrown.  Nothing  could  be  better,  artistically  speaking,  than  this  optimism  breaking  through  agnosticism  like  fiery  gold  round  the  edges  of  a  black cloud. Those who look superficially at the barbaric origin of the  epic may think it fanciful to read so much artistic significance into its  casual  similes  or  accidental  phrases.  But  no  one  who  is  well  ac‐ quainted with great examples of semi‐barbaric poetry, as in The Song  of  Roland  or  the  old  ballads,  will  fall  into  this  mistake.  No  one  who  knows what primitive poetry is, can fail to realize that while its con‐ scious form is simple some of its finer effects are subtle. The Iliad con‐ trives  to  express  the  idea  that  Hector  and  Sarpedon  have  a  certain  tone or tint of sad and chivalrous resignation, not bitter enough to be  called  pessimism  and  not  jovial  enough  to  be  called  optimism;  Homer could never have said this in elaborate words. But somehow  he contrives to say it in simple words. The Song of Roland contrives to  express the idea that Christianity imposes upon its heroes a paradox:  a paradox of great humility in the matter of their sins combined with  great ferocity in the matter of their ideas. Of course the Song of Roland  could  not  say  this;  but  it  conveys  this.  In  the  same  way  the  Book  of  Job must be credited with many subtle effects which were in the au‐ thor’s soul without being, perhaps, in the author’s mind. And of these  by  far  the  most  important  remains  even  yet  to  be  stated.  I  do  not  know,  and  I  doubt  whether  even  scholars  know,  if  the  Book  of  Job  had  a  great  effect  or  had  any  effect  upon  the  after  development  of  Jewish thought. But if it did have any effect it may have saved them  from an enormous collapse and decay. Here in this Book the question  127


THE CITY 

is really asked whether God invariably punishes vice with terrestrial  punishment  and  rewards  virtue  with  terrestrial  prosperity.  If  the  Jews  had  answered  that  question  wrongly  they  might  have  lost  all  their  after  influence  in  human  history.  They  might  have  sunk  even  down  to  the  level  of  modern  well  educated  society.  For  when  once  people have begun to believe that prosperity is the reward of virtue  their next calamity is obvious. If prosperity is regarded as the reward  of virtue it will be regarded as the symptom of virtue. Men will leave  off  the  heavy  task  of  making  good  men  successful.  They  will  adopt  the  easier  task  of  making  out  successful  men  good.  This,  which  has  happened throughout modern commerce and journalism, is the ulti‐ mate Nemesis of the wicked optimism of the comforters of Job. If the  Jews could be saved from it, the Book of Job saved them. The Book of  Job  is  chiefly  remarkable,  as  I  have  insisted  throughout,  for  the  fact  that it does not end in a way that is conventionally satisfactory. Job is  not  told  that  his  misfortunes  were  due  to  his  sins  or  a  part  of  any  plan for his improvement.  But  in  the  prologue  we  see  Job  tormented not because  he  was  the  worst  of  men,  but  because  he  was  the  best.  It  is  the  lesson  of  the  whole  work  that  man  is  most  comforted  by  paradoxes.  Here  is  the  very  darkest  and  strangest  of  the  paradoxes;  and  it  is  by  all  human  testimony  the  most  reassuring.  I  need  not  suggest  what  a  high  and  strange  history  awaited  this  paradox  of  the  best  man  in  the  worst  fortune. I need not say that in the freest and most philosophical sense  there is one Old Testament figure who is truly a type; or say what is  prefigured in the wounds of Job.             

+++ We encourage you to visit   T H E   C I T Y  online at C I V I TAT E . O R G . 

128



The City Spring 2012