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Fall Arts Festival 2017: Something old, something new and a lot of wonderful

Page 2 Violet Oakley’s “Grand Vision” opens Sept. 30 at Woodmere

Page 8 3-part series on Philly art and collecting at Kismet CoWork

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CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Hill Arts Festival – something old, new and wonderful

A family enjoys a stroll through last year’s Fall for the Arts festival in Chestnut Hill. (Photo by Wendy Concannon)

by Ruth R. Russell

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aving something “old” as well as something “new” is part of an old adage advising couples about to wed. This year Chestnut Hill will experience good fortune with this combination for the annual arts celebration. “Old” is the popular Fall for the Arts Festival, coming on Sunday, September 24, under the auspices of the Chestnut Hill Business Association (CHBA). “New” is the recently named marketing and events coordinator, Caché Hall, who is taking over the reins this year from Peggy Miller, who has led the festival since its start 32 years ago. Hall is very excited about her new job. “I am looking forward to the festival and the chance to work with the people of the Chestnut Hill community,” she told the Local recently. Miller, who will continue with the CHBA, coming in once a week, said she felt it was time “to hang up my hat.” Hall seems to be well suited to this job. She has a degree from Penn State Abington, majoring in corporate communications, and has worked at Eastern State Prison as a historic site, handling admission for visitors, and also served

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recently as events and operations coordinator for Please Touch Museum. This year Fall for the Arts will again run along Germantown Avenue from Willow Grove to Rex Avenues from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. As usual, the street will be closed to vehicular traffic. Also, as usual, featured will be talented craftsmen specializing in oil and watercolors, sculpture, photography, drawing and fine crafts. Among them, from this area, are Melvin Chappell, of Mt. Airy, with photography; Emily Clark, of Chestnut Hill, with painted furniture; 13 Degree Studio, of Mt. Airy, with photography; Chiara Lattanzio, of Chestnut Hill, with oil/acrylic painting; Gideou F. Boerick, also of Chestnut Hill, with oil painting, and Lewis M. Smith, of Flourtown, with handcrafted jewelry. Others, who are willing to come a distance, include Georganna Lensen, of Honeybrook, with works in oil, acrylic and watercolor; Carol Ann, of Gladwyne, with her pottery; and Dar Hosta James, of New Hope, with 2D paintings. Returning for the third year is the popular Makers Village. Look for this unique display at 8200(Continued on page 10)


Thursday, September 21, 2017

CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

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CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Celebrate the Korean Har vest Festival at Morris Arboretum

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elebrate traditional and modern Korean culture at Morris Arboretum on Saturday, September 30, from 11 a.m.3 p.m. Discover this Asian country’s lifestyle through music, garden tours, and food sampling. Experience Korean music performed by two University of Pennsylvania student groups; both with a unique sound expressing the soul of the nation. Penn DuRe, a traditional drum troupe, will perform two 15minute sets at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Penn Sori, an a capella singing group of Penn students will perform two 15-minute sets at 12 noon and 2 p.m In between music sets, learn about plants that are native to Korea on a 45 minute tour of the 92-acre botanical collection. Led by Arboretum Guides, tours begin at 11:30am and 2pm. Featured trees include: • Zelkova serrata, which towers over the Springhouse by the Azalea Meadow. In Korean folklore, the tough trunk of the Zelkova symbolizes a strong will and the attractive leaves symbolize politeness; these Bring your family and friends to Morris Arboretum on September 30, 11am-3pm, to celebrate traditional and modern Korean culture. Discover this Asian country’s lifestyle through music, garden tours, and food sampling. One of the groups scheduled to perform is Penn Sori, an a capella singing group of Penn students pictured trees are known as “good spirit” here at the 2015 event. This event is made possible by a grant from the University of Pennsylvania’s Provost Interdisciplinary Arts Fund. Included with garden admis- trees. • Pinus densiflora, the national sion. For more information, visit www.morrisarboretum.org. tree of Korea, will also be on the tour. Hear stories about this tree’s spiritual and material influence on the Korean people for 5000 years. Before and after the walking tour, sample complimentary Korean food favorites, such as kimchi and Asian pears, while supplies last. For a full lunch of Asian flavors, eat at the Compton Café, the Arboretum’s on-site restaurant that will feature Korean BBQ and kimchi guk, a traditional Korean soup. This event is made possible by a grant from the University of Pennsylvania’s Provost Interdisciplinary Arts Fund. Included with garden admission. The Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania is located at 100 East Northwestern Avenue in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia. The 92-acre horticulture display garden features a spectacular collection of mature trees in a beautiful and colorful landscape. The Arboretum includes numerous picturesque spots such as a formal rose garden, historic water features, a swan pond, and the only remaining freestanding fernery in North America. The arboretum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is also the official arboretum of Pennsylvania. A permanent nationally award-winning exhibit, Out on a Limb – a Tree Adventure Exhibit adds to Morris Arboretum’s allure by transporting visitors 50 feet up into the treetops on a canopy walk that requires no climbing. Open weekdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and weekends 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Apr-Oct). Open late on Wednesdays in June, July and August until 8pm. For more information, visit www.morrisarboretum.org.

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

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KING OF PANES: Mt. Airy resident Charles Ziegler Lawrence, 82, is an acclaimed master of American stained glass whose hundreds of works are throughout the U.S. (including the National Cathedral in D.C.) and Europe. Lawrence created this window for the Peachtree Road United Methodist Church in Atlanta. More information at czlsg@earthlink.net or czlawrence.com.


Thursday, September 21, 2017

CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

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‘On Golden Pond’ kicks of f 89th season at The Stagecrafters theater

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he Stagecrafters theater in Chestnut Hill begins its 89th season of standout plays with the production of the moving, tender, and funny “On Golden Pond.” The action centers on an older couple, Ethel and Norman Thayer, who are spending their 48th summer at their Maine home on a lake called Golden Pond. An unexpected visit from their daughter Chelsea, with her new fiancé and his son from a prior marriage, sets the stage for turbulent confrontation between father and daughter, fueled by long-buried memories. This is a poignant and perceptive story of a family coming to terms with their past, life, and legacy. Production reviews reflect high critical and popular acclaim: “… a work of rare simplicity and beauty, … [the author] a fresh new voice.” – (New York Daily News); “… a rare and memorable theatrical experience …” – (Variety). Ernest Thompson (b. 1949) has enjoyed a long career as a playwright, actor, lyricist, and screenwriter for film and television. His most well-known plays are “On Golden Pond” and “The West Side Waltz.” On “Golden Pond” opened Off Off Broadway in 1978, then moved to Broadway, where it ran for close to 400 performances. It was nominated for several Drama Desk Awards, including Outstanding New Play. The film

LEARN BALLROOM DANCING: Debbie Klinger, who has been teaching dance throughout the Delaware Valley for many years, will be teaching three courses in ballroom dancing, seven weekly sessions each, starting on Thursday, Oct. 5, 6:45, 7:45 and 8:45 p.m., respectively, for Mt. Airy Learning Tree at Summit Presbyterian Church, Greene and Westview Streets in Mt. Airy. More information: 215-843-6333.

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version, released in 1981, with Henry Fonda, Katherine Hepburn and Jane Fonda in the leading roles, garnered many awards, including that of Best Adapted Screenplay for Thompson. A live television adaptation was aired in 2001, featuring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The 2005 revival on Broadway featured as its leads James Earl Jones and Leslie Uggams. On Golden Pond was previously presented by The Stagecrafters in 1983. Performance dates are Sep. 14-16, 21-23, 28-30 at 8 p.m., Sep. 17, 23 at 2 p.m. Tickets are available for $21 online (no service charge), $25 at the door. (Thursday and Friday. evening performances 2-for-$32 online, 2-for-$35 At-door). Students with valid ID $15 at the door. Groups of 15 or more are offered a reduced rate of $15 a ticket, paid in advance. Subscriptions are still available for the entire season, at $75 each, and may be purchased online, or at the box office when attending a show in the current production. The box office opens 45 minutes before each performance. For information call 215-247-8881; for reservationsdirect call 215-247-9913. The theater is located in the heart of Chestnut Hill at 8130 Germantown

Poster for “The Miser,” opening at Stagecrafters on Nov. 24.

Ave. Visit website for details: www.thestagecrafters.org. Next for Stagecrafters is Molière's classic comedy, “The Miser,” which opens at The Stagecrafters on November 24 and continues to December 10. Full of hilarious twists and turns, this immortal classic is brought to life in an uproarious new translation by David Chambers. “The Miser,” Harpagon, suspecting that everyone is out to steal his money, will go to any lengths to thwart everyone including his children. First performed in 1668, “The Miser” continues to delight audiences with its comedy and universal truths about human nature. The cast of The Miser in The Stagecrafters' production has a wide range of theatrical experience. Lenny Grossman, playing the lead role of Harpagon,studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York. Jen Allegra, playing Frosine the Matchmaker, holds a BA degree in Theater from George Washington University and has played roles in ten productions at The Stagecrafters. The show is directed by Barbara Mills. See http://www.thestagecrafters.org/themiser/ for show times.


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CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

Thursday, September 21, 2017

A Grand Vision: Violet Oakley and the American Renaissance exhibit opens Sept. 30

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oodmere Art Museum presents A Grand Vision: Violet Oakley and the American Renaissance from September 30, 2017 to January 21, 2018. The most ambitious exhibition of the work of Violet Oakley (1874–1961) to date, this retrospective highlights Oakley’s spirit of civic humanism and her prolific accomplishments as a painter, muralist, portraitist, stained-glass designer, and illustrator. At a time before women had the right to vote, she achieved international fame for her prestigious government commissions for the Pennsylvania State Capitol. The exhibition will also explore Oakley’s evolving vision of the interplay between Quaker principles, civic engagement, and world peace through the international cooperation of nations and diverse peoples. This exhibition follows Oakley’s career through the 20th century, documenting her extensive contributions to Philadelphia institutions and to the American Renaissance revival. She fashioned herself to be an artist-diplomat, promoting world peace as she created portraits of the delegates to the League of Nations and to the United Nations. The exhibition will also highlight the artists, architects, designers, and patrons with whom Oakley collaborated, with particular attention to her work with Edith Emerson, her life partner and Woodmere’s director from the early 1940s through 1978. Guest curator Dr. Patricia Likos Ricci is an art historian and director of the Fine Arts Division at

Man and Science (detail), from the mural series “The Building of the House of Wisdom,” 1910–11 Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of the South Eastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Red Cross, 1963

Elizabethtown College. In the late 1970s, she worked with Emerson, who had founded the Violet Oakley Memorial Foundation at Cogslea to organize the artist’s remaining works and reconstruct the trajectory of her career. Dr. Ricci worked with curators Anne D’Harnoncourt and Anne Percy in

1979, writing the essay and participating in the organization of the first major exhibition of Oakley’s work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1979. About Woodmere Art Museum Housed in a 19th-century stone mansion on six acres in the Chest-

nut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, Woodmere offers a unique museum experience that centers on the art and artists of Philadelphia. The Museum first opened its doors to the public in 1910. The building, grounds, and core of the permanent collection are the gifts of Charles Knox Smith (1845 – 1916). A passionate collector of contemporary art in his day, Smith was a civic leader of wealth and stature, serving on Philadelphia’s Common Council (the precursor to today’s City Council). Born of modest means, Smith’s first job was that of “grocer’s boy,” but he eventually built a successful mining company that was active in Mexico. He lived in urban Philadelphia most of his life and purchased the Woodmere estate in 1898 with the grand ambition of creating a spiritual experience through encounters with great works of art in the context of the green beauty of the Wissahickon and Chestnut Hill. Woodmere continues to honor and interpret Smith’s vision of bringing art and nature together, and in recent years has acquired important examples of outdoor sculpture. Woodmere’s collection consists of more than 6,000 works of art with strengths in Hudson River painting, the circle of Violet Oakley, Pennsylvania Impressionism, the circle of Arthur B. Carles, and Philadelphia’s unique brand of modernism and contemporary art. The collection can be viewed online, and Woodmere encourages artists and their friends and families to share information about works in the collection through the museum’s website. Studio classes,

family activities, tours, lectures, music and film programs, and other special events are scheduled throughout the year. The Museum is open to the public Tuesday – Thursday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 8:45 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission is $10; FREE on Sunday. For more information: woodmereartmuseum.org.

Upcoming events at Woodmere Straw Maze is open through Oct 29 - Saturdays 10-6, Sundays 10-5 Cutting Edge: Recent Acquisitions in Woodcut

and Cut Wood exhibition is on view through Oct 29 Movie Nights begin Oct 3 (Tuesdays 7:309:30pm) Friday Night Jazz begins Oct 6 (6-8 p.m.) Community Open House for A Grand Vision: Violet Oakley and the American Renaissance - Free and open to the public, Oct 7, 4-6 p.m. Saturday Art Making (Saturdays Sept 9 - Oct 28, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.)


Thursday, September 21, 2017

CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

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Kismet Co-Work to host 3-part series on Philadelphia art and collecting

“Jellyfish Hashtag” by Philadelphia artist Alex Conner.

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ismet CoWork and Philly Stewards have partnered up this Autumn to offer three nights of lively conversation about the who, what and why of Philadelphia Art. Kismet CoWork is located at 12 W. Willow Grove Ave. Each lecture will run from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. For the first evening, on October 3, guests will explore the history of the Philadelphia Art Scene with University of the Arts Director of Exhibitions, Sid Sachs as well as the head of Philly Stewards, Alex Conner. The following evening, October the 17, will feature an interview with Tim Andreadis, 20th Century Design Department Head of Freeman’s Auction House to discuss the joys of living with amazing works of art and how to care for them. Our final evening, on November the 7, will be hosted by the members of Philly Stewards, Philadelphia’s first group dedicated to the collection, support and promotion of Philadelphia Art and Artists, to discuss why it is important to be a patron of your local Art Scene. These evenings will be a great

opportunity to learn more about the evolving Art Scene of Philadelphia as well as offer opportunities to ask questions about Art that you have always wanted an answer to! Conner, an artist from South Jersey who has been living and working in Philadelphia for the past 10 years and currently teaches at the Barnes Foundation, said the partnership with Kismet came up through a conversation with Hill artist Tom Judd, whose work is featured in the cowork space. “We were having coffee and he said he was working with Kismet CoWork. We thought it was a good opportunity.” Conner said that “All the public has to do is show up,” Conner said. “We see ourselves as an educational institution, where people can ask questions about art and collecting that might not otherwise ask. We’re really passionate about helping people find art that speaks to them.” Why collect Philadelphia art? “Art is of a certain place and time and is a conversation about that place and time,” Conner said. “By collecting art from Philadelphia, you’re taking part in the conversation that is going on in our city.”

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CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Hill Arts Festival – something old, new and wonderful

Thousands turn out on the Avenue for food, arts, and entertainment at Chestnut Hill’s Fall festival for the Arts. (Photo by Wendy Concannon)

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8300 East Southampton (between Paris Bistro and Jenks Arts & Science Academy). Here will be artisans demonstrating their crafts such as the KJ Metal Works, Fleischer Art Memorial Color Wheels, Toy Theaters & Paper Toys, J. C. Mudpuppy Pottery, Mad Hot Glass, Carol Jones Beading, East Falls Glass, Majeki Stained Glass, The Way of Words and Philly Typewriter. For the music lover, there will be opportunities to enjoy bands at the Buckley Park stage, 8200 block of Germantown Ave., where Variable Elements will perform from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and City Rhythm Band from 2 to 5 p.m. Music will be provided at the Bethlehem Park Stage, 8600 block of Germantown Ave., by the Rich Posmetier Ensemble from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and by Soul City Shakedown from 2 to 5 p.m. Kids will find opportunities for fun. Look for amusement rides in the 8500 block of Germantown Ave. and face painting all day at Germantown Ave. and Gravers Lane. Arts and story telling will be in the 8100 block of Germantown

Ave., where the popular Peanuts Express will run from noon to 5 p.m. For those who want to sit down and eat and rest tired feet there are many places along Germantown Avenue as follows: 8600 block — McNally’s Outdoor Cafe, Tavern on the Hill, Mica, Cosimo’s Pizza Café, Thai Kuu, Banjara, Trade Winds and Osaka and Bredenbeck’s Ice Cream; 8500 block — Starbuck’s Coffee, Chestnut Hill Cheese Shop and A Taste of Olive Oil; 8400 block — Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant and Weavers Way Co0p; 8300 block —Fiesta Pizza, Campbell’s Place, Old Fashioned Kettle Korn; 8200 block — Chestnut Grill, King’s Garden, Poppy’s Café, Paris Bistro, Fresh Market, Green Soul, El Poquito, Cin Cin, Night Kitchen Bakery & Café; 8100 block —Bredenbeck’s Bakery and Ice Cream Parlor. Admission to the festival is free, and parking will be available for a modest fee at select Chestnut Hill parking lots. For more information, or directions to Chestnut Hill, visit www.chestnuthillpa.com or call 215-247-6696

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

DESIGN A SCARECROW: They’re baaaack! We’re talking about more than 30 scarecrows in Morris Arboretum’s annual Scarecrow Design Contest.This year participants may create a scarecrow for the theme Halloween Spooky Favorites. The new contest end date is Oct. 31. Anticipated scarecrow creations are witches, ghosts, skeletons and fictional characters such as Edward Scissorhands. Signup by Sept. 27 to ensure a place in the contest. Details and on-line registration at www.bit.ly/MAcrows (Photo by Susan Crane)

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

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on paintings of multiple mediums, including oil, watercolor and acrylic, and multi-media and silvergel photographs. Chestnut Hill Gallery has new exhibits every two months. The gallery has worked with artists such as Chuck Connelly, featured by HBO, and Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts student, Phil Cohn. On exhibit opening nights, visitors are encouraged to admire the art and mingle with the artists. CAROL SCHWARTZ 1 E. Gravers Lane GALLERY www.chestnuthillgallery.com Since 1979, after her first trip to 215-248-2549 Israel, Carol Schwartz began importing and representing Israeli artists. This was her way of being WENDY CONCANNON PHOable to give back. By 1990, she TOGRAPHY GALLERY The Wendy Concannon Photogestablished a gallery in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia, raphy Gallery specializes in art which grew into an eclectic collec- photography, especially bold, tion of fine art, vintage posters, graphic and abstract photographs. judaica, and jewelry by local, The gallery’s artwork often focuses national and international artists. on everyday items and objects takElliot, Carol’s husband carries on en from nature. Wendy Concannon’s art has been featured in a the tradition of her vision. variety of publications, such as The 101 Bethlehem Pike Washington Post and U.S. News www.carolschwartzgallery.com and World Report. 215-242-4510 8001 Germantown Avenue wendyconcannon.com/index.php GRAVERS LANE 215-767-4171 Since its opening in 2011, Gravers Lane Gallery has been committed to bringing contempo- WOODMERE ART MUSEUM Open since 1940, the Woodmere rary art of multiple mediums to the Chestnut Hill community. Gravers Art Museum features a permanent Lane exhibits decorative and fine collection of over 3,000 works of art, as well as studio art such as jew- art, primarily showcasing Philadelelry, glass, furniture, ceramics and phia region artists. The museum mixed media art. The gallery draws has nine galleries and salons and a artwork from local emerging artists, spacious rotunda, all of which as well as established artists and house a variety of rotating exhibifeatures about eight special salon- tions. For younger visitors, there is style exhibitions a year, which are the Helen Millard Children’s Gallery, which features special colopen to the community. lections for children. The Wood8405 Germantown Ave mere Art Museum is committed to www.graverslanegallery.com serving the Chestnut Hill commu215-247-1603 nity through its art by offering art Joe Borelli’s CHESTNUT HILL and music classes, programs and events for visitors of all ages. GALLERY 9201 Germantown Avenue The Chestnut Hill Gallery houswoodmereartmuseum.org/about/ es diverse collections of renowned 215-247-0476 and emerging artists, as well as a mixture of traditional and contemporary pieces. Their exhibits focus THE LUCIEN CRUMP GALLERY Founded by African American artist, James Lucien Crump, the Crump Gallery seeks to introduce visitors to the art of other local and national African American artists. After Crump’s passing in 2007, the gallery has become an education resource center, providing art education for at-risk youth in the Germantown area. The programs focus heavily on promoting self-esteem through art. 6376 Germantown Avenue crumpgallery.org 215-843-8788

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he Chestnut Hill area is home to a variety of highquality art galleries, featuring diverse art styles and mediums. The community’s passion for art supports and contributes to Chestnut Hill’s rich art scene. The following are the most notable galleries in Chestnut Hill and elsewhere in Northwest Philadelphia:

IMPeRFeCT GALLERY The IMPeRFeCT gallery is committed to giving viewers the opportunity to view a multitude of artworks in unique ways. The gallery emphasizes the transformative role of art in people’s lives by giving their artists freedom in how they present their art. IMPeRFeCT has monthly exhibitions and gallery events, as well as sponsoring art creation in public spaces. 5601 Greene Street, Germantown imperfectgallery.squarespace.com 215-869-1001


Thursday, September 21, 2017

CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

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‘Long Days Journey into Night’ begins run at Quintessence Group

The cast of Quintessence Theatre Group’s recent production of “Love’s Labor’s Lost.”

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uintessence Theatre Group brings Eugene O’Neill’s masterpiece “Long Day’s Journey into Night” to life as the second show of its 8th Season. The company’s first modern American classic takes center stage at the Sedgwick Theater, October 422. Opening Night is Saturday, October 7 at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $15$35. Opening Night costs $50. Tickets are available online at

www.quintessencetheatre.org or at the Box Office at time of performance. The Sedgwick Theater is located at 7137 Germantown Avenue in Mt. Airy. Considered one of the finest American plays of the 20th Century, “Long Day’s Journey into Night” is an unashamedly autobiographical account of O’Neill’s own life “written in tears and blood.” In this powerful marathon of a play (it clocks in

at 3 hours and 45 minutes with an intermission and a pause), the Tyrone family gathers in New London, Connecticut, one fateful summer day, bound to a past they are unable to forgive or forget. James and Mary Tyrone and their two sons fight for the stability and survival of their family, but are caught in a hopeless cycle of love and resentment. As day turns to night and the family indulges in its vices, the truth unrav-

els, leaving behind a quartet of ruined lives. The production is directed by Alexander Burns, Quintessence's Artistic Director. “The Grandfather of modern American drama, O'Neill translated America's larger spiritual crises into epic works of dramatic art. In O'Neill's timeless family drama, the central characters are stuck in an endless cycle of regret and recrimina-

tion,” said Burns. “As many Americans are today, “Long Day's Journey” explores how to address a complex past, while also seeking forgiveness and understanding for the future." This production stars Barrymore Award Winner E. Ashley Izard as Mary Tyrone. Paul Hebron plays James Tyrone. Josh Carpenter and James Davis are cast as James Jr. and Edmund Tyrone. Cassandra Nary is cast as Cassandra. Quintessence continues to establish an ensemble of actors devoted to the classics in Philadelphia. As they present their first modern American classic, the theatre is showcasing the work of four of the ensemble’s finest actors: E. Ashley Izard, Josh Carpenter, Paul Hebron and James Davis. Outside of productions at Quintessence, Davis appeared in “The House of Blue Leaves” on Broadway and was in the OBIE winning cast of “We are Proud to Present.” Hebron, much like the Tyrone patriarch, is a noted Shakespeare actor, a member of the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, and has performed in Shakespeare productions around the country. At Quintessence, Herbron performed in “Henry V” and “As You Like It.” The release is below. The show is available to review. The artists are available for interview. Let me know if you need anything.

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

44th annual ‘Tuesday Night at the Movies’ begins Oct. 3 OCTOBER 24 – GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933 (1933 / 96 minutes) Ruby Keeler, Joan Blondell and Ginger Rogers star in this saucy pre-Code backstage musical with songs by Harry Warren (music) and Al Dubin (lyrics) and dazzling staging and choreography by the legendary Busby Berkeley. Set pieces include: "We're In the Money," "Pettin' in the Park," "The Shadow Waltz" and "Remember My Forgotten Man."

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ince 1973, the Chestnut Hill Film Group has hosted two seasons of “Tuesday Nights at the Movies” in Chestnut Hill. The fall season runs from Oct. to Dec. and the next season resumes in February and runs through May For nearly 40 years, those films were a feature of the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library. In 2013, the series moved to Woodmere Art Museum and have been turning out large crowds for the group’s selection of cult films and classics. The following is the complete schedule for the film group’s 2017 – 2018 season. OCTOBER 3 – CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT (1965 / 119 minutes) Orson Welles’ bittersweet amalgam of William Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1 & 2, Richard II, Henry V and The Merry Wives of Windsor practically constitutes a new text in the Shakespeare canon. Welles’ rotund Falstaff drives the action and is surrounded by the likes of Jeanne Moreau’s Doll Tearsheet, Margaret Rutherford’s Mistress Quickly, John Gielgud’s Henry IV and Keith Baxter’s Prince Hal. OCTOBER 10 – TWILIGHT (1998 / 94 minutes) - ***NOT THE VAMPIRE MOVIE*** Excellent Hollywood-set mystery and one of the best American movies of the 1990s. Susan Sarandon is a fading movie star sex symbol, Reese Witherspoon is her wild child daughter, and Gene Hackman is her dying husband. Paul Newman gives one of his final performances as an aging private detective caught up in the glamourous intrigue in Robert Benton's

Cary Grant and Priscilla Lane in Frank Capra’s 1944 classic,“Arsenic and Old Lace.”

tight and intriguing neo-noir mystery. Superlative cast also includes Stockard Channing and James Garner. OCTOBER 17 – THE SECRET CINEMA PRESENTS STORY OF A THREE-DAY PASS (1968 / 87 minutes) Blaxploitation meets the French New Wave in Melvin Van Peebles'

legendary political allegory—one of the most remarkable, lost films of the 1960s. In this seminal work, an African-American GI stationed in France confronts the dangers of cavorting with a white woman while on a short leave. Projected by The Secret Cinema, using an archival 16mm print (…with surprise short subjects preceding the feature).

about Goltzius staging a series of erotic Biblical tableaus for a rich and corrupt nobleman (F. Murray Abraham). Screening introduced by art historian Nicole Elizabeth Cook, PhD.

NOVEMBER 21 – MAFIOSO (1962 / 105 minutes) Familiar tropes of Italian neorealist cinema—the working-class protagonist, the beautiful wife, the Mafia Don—are skillfully handled in director Alberto Lattuada’s comic story of a man who takes his famOCTOBER 31 – ARSENIC ily on a vacation back to his home AND OLD LACE (1944 / 118 town in Sicily only to become embroiled with the local mafia. minutes) In Italian with English subtitles. Cary Grant stars in director Frank Capra's movie of Joseph Kesselring's NOVEMBER 28 – THE LATE macabre farce about an eccentric family where the Aunts murder old men GEORGE APLEY (1947 / 93 minfor "charity" with elderberry wine. utes) Ronald Colman plays a stuffy, Uncle thinks he is Teddy Roosevelt, and brother is a sadistic career crimi- self-satisfied member of Boston's upper class. He's horrified to disnal who looks like Boris Karloff. cover that his children have fallen NOVEMBER 7 – TONIGHT'S in love with, gasp!, non-BostoniDirected by Joseph L. THE NIGHT [aka, Happy Ever ans. Mankiewicz and based on the novAfter] (1954 / 88 minutes) An unscrupulous cad (David el by J. P. Marquand. Niven) inherits an Irish estate, DECEMBER 5 – THE SILENT pursues Yvonne De Carlo and wears out his welcome with the PARTNER (1978 / 106 minutes) Suspenseful, twisting and thrilling locals in this charming country comedy—a huge hit upon its first Canadian neo-noir with meek bank release, but a movie that has been teller Elliot Gould playing mind games with unstable violent criminal woefully forgotten ...until now! Christopher Plummer. Co-written by NOVEMBER 14 – GOLTZIUS Curtis Hanson and especially recomAND THE PELICAN COMPA- mended for fans of his 1997 movie L.A. Confidential. NY (2012 / 138 minutes) Our Fall 2017 finale. Hendrick Goltzius (1558-1617) was the leading Dutch engraver of the early Baroque period. THE CHESTNUT HILL Writer/director/provocateur Peter FILM GROUP Greenaway dramatizes Goltzius' transition from engraver to painter (Continued on page 15) in this lush and layered fantasy


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CHESTNUT HILL LOCAL

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44th annual ‘Tuesday Night at the Movies’ begins Oct. 3 (Continued from page 14)

WINTER/SPRING 2018 FEBRUARY 13 – KISS ME KATE (1953 / 109 minutes) Art imitates life as a bickering couple plays the leads in Cole Porter's fantastic, witty and visually arresting musical of Shakespeare's problematic Taming of the Shew. Starring Kathryn Grayson, Howard Keel, Ann Miller and, in a supporting role, Bob Fosse. FEBRUARY 20 – THE PARALLAX VIEW (1974 / 102 minutes) Witnesses to the assassination of a political candidate are mysteriously dying one by one. Reporter Warren Beatty investigates and is dangerously caught up in a maelstrom of conspiracies and evil corporations. Alan J. Pakula's paranoid political thriller is a key American movie of the 1970s and one that disturbingly resonates with today's political theater. FEBRUARY 27 – SMILE (1975 / 117 minutes) Michael Ritchie’s sharp, ironic comedy hits a broad target—the ludicrous world of teen beauty pageants—but he does it with a good-humored satire that doesn’t demean the victims. The laughter comes from the many clever vignettes that fit together seamlessly in the excellent screenplay. Featuring Melanie Griffith, Barbara Feldon and, in a memorable turn, Bruce Dern as head pageant judge, "Big Bob." MARCH 6 – DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS (1995 / 102 minutes) 1948 Los Angeles is vividly recreated as Denzel Washington brings Walter Mosley's beloved sleuth "Easy" Rawlins to life with smoldering charisma in director Carl Franklin's 1990s neo-noir. Co-starring Tom Sizemore, Jennifer Beals, Don Cheadle and Maury Chaykin. MARCH 13 – SECRET CINEMA "B" PICTURE DOUBLE FEATURE YOUTH RUNS WILD (1944 / 67 minutes) Fresh from his landmark cycle of psychological horror movies at RKO, producer Val Lewton helped invent the modern juvenile delinquent movie with this sensational yarn of misbehaving adolescents lead by Bonita Granville and directed by Mark Robson. MADAME SPY (1942 / 63 minutes) A secret agent (Constance Bennett) goes undercover to infiltrate a clandestine ring of Nazi spies in director Roy William Neill's tight WW2-era thriller. Projected by The Secret Cinema, using archival 16mm prints (…with surprise short subjects preceding the feature). MARCH 20 – PATTERNS (1956 / 83 minutes) Conflicted Van Heflin locks horns with corrupt Everett Sloane as conscience and ambition war in Rod Serling's 1950s New York City boardroom melodrama, sucessfuly adapted from his TV play. Superb, stark black and white photography by Boris Kauffman establishes the frightening atmosphere. MARCH 27 – THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG [Les Parapluies de Cherbourg] (1964 / 95 minutes) Director Jacques Demy's swooningly romantic, heart-breaking sung-through musical by Michel Legrand about the love affair between 17-year old Catherine Deneuve and auto mechanic Nino

Casteinuovo. Lush, candy-colored the film features the appealing Joel (and much emulated) cinematog- McCrea as Earp and Vera Miles as his love interest. raphy by Jean Rabier. In French with English subtitles. APRIL 3 – THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY (1980 / 114 minutes) Gritty British gangster film starring Bob Hoskins as an underworld kingpin wooing American mobsters while fending off threats from the Irish Republican Army. Costarring a young, glamorous Helen Mirren. APRIL 10 – THE PASSIONATE THIEF (aka, Risate di Gioia] (1960 / 106 minutes) Italy's electric post-WWII boom and "economic miracle" is captured on screen as actress Anna Magnani, Comedian Totò and pickpocket Ben Gazzara paint Rome red one madcap New Year's Eve. In Italian with English subtitles. APRIL 17 – WICHITA (1955 / 81 minutes) Golden Globe winner Wichita is an intriguing romantic Western that pits an initially reluctant Wyatt Earp against a lawless town. Masterfully directed by Jacques Tourneur (I Walked with a Zombie, Cat People, Out of the Past),

APRIL 24 – INTERNATIONAL HOUSE (1933 / 70 minutes) A prototype for an invention not unlike television wreaks havoc at a Chinese hotel. WC Fields stars along with Bela Lugosi, George Burns, Gracie Allen and Cab Calloway (singing "Reefer Man") in this spunky, somewhat risqué precode comedy. MAY 1 – LE SAMOURAÏ (1967 / 105 minutes) Feral Alain Delon is an enigmatic and taciturn hit man who lives by his own austere code of ethics. He becomes dangerously enmeshed with an exotic nightclub singer in director Jean-Pierre Melville’s stylish psychological crime thriller soaked in rain, trench coats and fedoras. This hugely influential color neo-noir deconstructs the imagery of hardboiled Hollywood into a poetic and lucid dream often imitated but never duplicated. In French with English subtitles. CHEF AL PARIS, owner and proprietor of Paris Bistro and Jazz Café, 8229 Our 2017-2018 season finale. Germantown Ave., poses for a photo while at his restaurant’s Fall Arts Festival booth. (Photo by Wendy Concannon)


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