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Celebrate Canada Day locally!

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a busy day in the counties as we celebrate Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 146th birthday. In North Dundas, celebrations begin at 2 p.m. at the South Mountain fairgrounds. With free admission, there are going to                 XXX T U PS N D B  be plenty of activities to fill PM40050631R8905 120, Number 49 Chesterville, Ontario Wednesday, June 26, 2013 Single Copy $1.00 Volume (HSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;included) the day. Starting at 4 p.m. enjoy a delicious chicken dinner hosted by the St. Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Knights of Columbus. Meal is $12. For advance tickets contact 613Musical 989-2367. entertainment will be provided and there will be refreshments served from 2 p.m. until 10 p.m. in the tent WILLIAMSBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; It looks as and the evening ends with a if all that dedication and fireworks display. perseverance paid off for the Save South Dundas will be the Williamsburg Library Branch celebrating at Earl Baker committee, as the SD&G library Park in Morrisburg. Opening voted four to three in favour board ceremonies start at 2 p.m.. of keeping the branch open. There will be a play area, However, it remains conditional amusement park rides, petting zoo and the upon whether the administrations of Morrisburg Lions BBQ. the Counties library and South Expect to hear music all day Dundas can come up with a suitable in the park with local bands. location as the library must vacate At the Legion there will be the current space in the municipal several tournaments, a BBQ building by August 1. In a last impassioned plea to the and music. And of course, board, committee member Pam fireworks at dusk. Rodrigue asked them once again to Avonmore is where reconsider the decision to close the festivities will be in North branch. Stormont. They are starting Rodrigue stated that the the day with breakfast from 8 committee members were ready to a.m. until noon. Also the 6th start up a Friends of the Library Annual Run to Get it Done group for the Williamsburg branch registration begins at 8 a.m. should the decision be reversed. From 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. the â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Save the Williamsburg pool will be open and Arts in Library committee have over nine the Park will be on display. On Sunday, members of the Chesterville Rotary Club dedicated their completed waterfront committed individuals who are From 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. gazebo project to one of their own, the late Jim Townson (pictured in the poster at centre). there will be musical eagerly waiting for a positive On hand for the posthumous recognition were the honoureeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s widow Betty Townson (left) entertainment and a canteen. outcome,â&#x20AC;? said Rodrigue, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are and daughter Jane Leblanc of Ottawa, posing here with incoming Chesterville Rotary Fireworks begin at dusk at looking forward to the seventh President Eric Duncan (since installed to the position) and outgoing President Martin Friends of the Library Group of the fairgrounds. Schoones, who stands beside the plaque recognizing Jim Townson â&#x20AC;&#x201D; longtime Club secreThe Lost Villages SD&G.â&#x20AC;? Zandbergen photo tary â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for his contribution to the club. See the article on page 11. Continued on page 3 Museum in Long Sault is the place in South Stormont. Starting at 10 a.m. the day will be filled with entertainment, a silent century mark this weekend, but the new high school at Maple Ridge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; old Winchester High School on auction, strawberry social Nelson Zandbergen Record Staff political process that led to the in neither Chesterville nor Feb. 13, 1962 were the decisionand a BBQ. Also in Long CHESTERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; It may be schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction 50 years ago Winchester â&#x20AC;&#x201D; came after a tortuous makers sparked to concrete action, Sault at the plaza, you are process of indecision, contention ending the debate over erecting one all but forgotten today as North was neither joyous nor festive. invited to a day filled with Judging from this newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and local controversy that had school â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with at least three sites activities and entertainment. Dundas District High School dragged on from the late 1950s. contemplated through the years â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or Fireworks start at dusk on the prepares to celebrate the half coverage of events at the time, the And only when fire destroyed the Continued on page 5 final decision to build a â&#x20AC;&#x153;centralâ&#x20AC;? waterfront. STORE HOURS: SUNDAY 9AM TO 6PM - MONDAY TO THURSDAY 8AM TO 9PM - FRIDAY 8AM TO 11PM - SATURDAY 8AM TO 8PM

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June 26 Page 02_Layout 2 13-06-25 12:04 PM Page 1

Page 2 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Timothy Christian celebrates 50 years TCS celebrates this weekend Nelson Zandbergen Record Staff BOUCKS HILL — The latest crop of Grade 8 students graduated from Timothy Christian School last week. Since 1963, there have been more than 500 of us — the products of an otherwise modest elementary school that owes its existence to countless personal sacrifices made by a community of supporters and parents committed to Christian education. This weekend, that community will celebrate the 50th anniversary of an institution that has managed to outlive every other rural

elementary school in the Township of South Dundas. Enrolment from Junior Kindergarten through Grade 8 currently stands at close to 100 — having been as high as 167 in some years — but it was all just a twinkle in the eye of a few parents at Williamsburg Christian Reformed Church when they formed the Christian School Society in 1955. The post-war Dutch immigrants, who had established the church in Williamsburg just a few years earlier, were sending their children to the old fashioned one-room public

school houses that dotted the landscape in Dundas and Stormont counties during that era. Still, some of them couldn’t forget how, back in Holland, their children could attend publicly-funded Protestant Christian Schools. They also knew that more Dutch established immigrant communities in Canada were taking the next step and building their own private Christian schools. Being mostly farmers with large families and little cash, one of their early fundraising efforts focused on the shared raising of cattle. Somebody would donate a bull calf or two, and others in the congregation with feed and

Longtime Timothy Christian School Principal James Kooistra (retired) poses with a few of his Grade 8 graduating classes through the decades — top photo, 1971 (Grade 7 included in that case); middle, 1981: bottom, 1991.

space in the barn to spare would take turns raising them for slaughter. “It all helped, eh?” said Bill Harbers of Glen Stewart, who recalled shuttling the calves around in an old Ford truck with the help of the late John Bosman of Brinston. “It was a lot of work, but it did help us to get started,” said Harbers, who spoke to The Record in the leadup to Timothy Christian’s last big milestone — the 40th anniversary — a decade ago. Harbers and his wife, Myntje, were early supporters of the Society, later known as the Timothy Christian School board. Married in Canada in 1955, the couple’s six children are all graduates of TCS, as are more than a dozen grandchildren. Harbers served on the board in 1962-3, and for several years during the 1970s. “As parents we felt that we needed Christian education, so our children could grow up in a Christian environment ... the school was an extension of the home,” he explained, adding with simple logic: “At baptism, we promised to do our utmost to bring the children up in the fear of the Lord, so there wasn’t a choice, really.” He remembered how the idea for the school was not without controversy. “We had, even in our own circles, some opposition, some people who thought we were reaching too far — ‘You can’t do it.’ “In those days we were all struggling just for survival, to keep our farms going. You don’t remember how hard it was in the 50s and 60s. I think we got three dollars and something per 100 pounds of milk.” Rev. Cecil Tuininga, the minister at Williamsburg CRC, and other Christian education advocates helped persuade the congregation, he said. In 1963, the board purchased an old clapboard schoolhouse in Dixons

Off to high school The TCS graduating class of 2013 celebrated with parents and family at the McIntosh Inn in Morrisburg on Fri., June 21. Ready to begin the next chapter of their education are Gwen Knight, Jade VanDyke, Kyle Havenaar, Emily Tibben and Cilicia Pol. Baker photo

Corners, which was vacated when the Public School Board built the existing brick school in the hamlet — since closed. Classes began that September, with two teachers serving 42 students from grades 1 to 8. The school was christened Timothy Christian School, named after St. Paul’s student in the New Testament. The whole enterprise was carried by annual tuition fees, fundraisers and voluntary elbow grease, much as it is today. Mothers cleaned the school afterhours and laundered hand towels from the washrooms at home. Within two years they were running out of room, and grades 4 and 5 were hived off to the basement at Williamsburg CRC. The current site in Boucks Hill was purchased for $2,000 in 1965. Acquiring the old gravel pit nestled amid farm fields forever concluded an internal debate that had divided the TCS founders. Only three years earlier, the membership voted for the construction of two schools, one east and one west of Williamsburg — but it never happened. Others had wanted one school in a central location all along. “For a long time we teeter-tottered between one or two schools, but finally the decision was made,” said Harbers. While some had pushed to build the school on the same lot as Williamsburg CRC, one kilometre west of the existing site, it was providential the idea never took hold, given the ecumenical nature of the school today. The school is not an appendage of the Christian Reformed Church, and supporters are apt to cringe when they hear old-timers in the neighbourhood refer to the “Dutch school.” The heart of the current structure was constructed between 1968 and 1969 for about $53,000. Local MPP Fred Cass unveiled the plaque on the north wall when the doors opened for the first time that September. Although founded by Dutch immigrants, surnames from a variety of ethnic backgrounds were a fixture in the student roster by the 1970s. Today, approximately a quarter of all students are of neither Dutch descent nor Christian Reformed tradition. A gymnasium was built in 1979, and since then, three classrooms have been added to the school’s east side, supplementing the original four. Tuition has always been priced per family — a popular carry-over from the days when fertile Dutch couples sent five, six or even 10 offspring through

the doors at TCS. The average these days is slightly more than two children apiece. Not as many parents are involved in farming anymore, either. Given the history of the place, anyone who thinks TCS is the preserve of privileged rich kids would be sorely mistaken. Some parents are assisted with their annual tuition costs through a program the school offers. And it actually costs the organization somewhat more than the per-family tuition price to run the school. The school makes up the difference with a collective approach that has characterized operations since the beginning. Annual funding drives, donated labour and a number of fundraising events are staples in the TCS economy, including the school’s longrunning bazaar held every March. Timmy’s Place, a used clothing store manned by volunteers in Morrisburg, has grown into the school’s largest single contributor. Including transportation in the cost of tuition was a hallmark of TCS from its earliest days, when parents would organize car-pools. By the mid-60s, they were buying and operating buses. Not even the back seat Bill Harbers recounted there was a brief possibility about sharing space on buses operated by the public school board back in the early years, when a bus contractor had contacted him with the idea of including TCS students on the board’s bus routes. (Their parents, after all, still paid taxes.) However, the public board quickly nixed the idea when they got wind of it. Transportation accounted for 25 percent of the school’s total annual budget, until the service was finally shed as a costcutting measure several years ago. But in its heyday, TCS’s contracted bus fleet picked up students almost as far west as Kemptville and Ventnor, up to Morewood in the north and Ingleside to the east. Parents now arrange their own transportation for their children. Golden Anniversary Fiftieth anniversary celebrations kick off this Fri., June 28 at the school, which invites the community to check out special displays of memorabilia. The school remains open for perusal on Sat., June 29, and a car rally disembarks that morning (registration from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.). The celebrants will head to the Matilda Hall for a social and dinner beginning at 6 p.m. Sun., June 30, will complete the weekend with a 9:30 a.m. celebration worship service at Williamsburg Christian Reformed Church.


June 26 Page 03_Layout 2 13-06-25 4:01 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 3

High bids delay arena project CHESTERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Further progress on the Chesterville Arena overhaul will wait a little longer as the township ponders its next move after tenders for the work clocked in substantially higher than expected. Council considered three bids June 18 but put off awarding tender until next meeting to allow township officials to return with suggested project cuts.

Guy Saumure tendered $1.111-million, MBC MacDonald Bros. $1.472million, and Frecon $1.588million. Saumure and Frecon broke down submitted costs into three project components: slab and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dasher â&#x20AC;&#x2122; boards; dressing rooms; and bleachers. Saumureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s respective prices for those items was $523,800, $464,800, and $122,400. Freconâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equivalent price

Library board reversal Continued from the front younger â&#x20AC;&#x153;The generations are the future crusaders who will continue to promote growth in the libraries of the SD&G counties,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We plan to revitalize the importance of a library hub in Williamsburg by showcasing it not only as a library and educational centre, but also as a cultural and socialization centre.â&#x20AC;? Rodrigue went on to say she felt the people of Williamsburg had not been treated fairly throughout this whole decision-making process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were never consulted about the plans with regards to the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The industrious and dedicated individuals of Williamsburg and surrounding area are asking you today for a positive reversal of the library closure. We are asking you to provide a vote in favour of retaining a local library in Williamsburg with the same amount of hours and the same services that we now receive.â&#x20AC;? Rodrigue added that with the onslaught of all the electronic devices and social media that we have become a â&#x20AC;&#x153;meâ&#x20AC;? society and suggested that as a group, they were duty-bound to children and future generations to awaken them to the idea that they are not just one person but a member of a family of people in a community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, please let us, alongside South Dundas council, help you to engage, enliven and educate our community by keeping our library in the town of Williamsburg. The library to us is the cornerstone of our vibrant and ever-changing community,â&#x20AC;? she concluded. Discussion by board members started off with board member Chris McDonell saying he was in favour of reversing the decision. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the role of the library board to promote libraries,â&#x20AC;? he said. South Dundas Deputy Mayor Jim Locke admitted to being conflicted over the decision as it affects his own township, however he did say the position of South Dundas council was clear in a letter sent to the library board asking for them to reconsider the closure in

Williamsburg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can only respond to how I honestly feel and that is that there were two failures (over the decision to close the library),â&#x20AC;? said Locke, â&#x20AC;&#x153;First I truly believe that when South Dundas sent out the notice the library had to leave, we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offer an alternative location. Add when the board took up the challenge with the strategic plan with renovations at Morrisburg, we did not take a look at the usage of the Williamsburg library.â&#x20AC;? Board chair Bill McGimpsey responded that they spent six months looking at the strategic plan and while it would be a challenge to close branches, the worst thing to do would to do nothing. be McGimpsey added that while the physical library branch would not be in Williamsburg, alternative delivery methods of books had been arranged. Books could be ordered online and local merchants will act as delivery sites for picking up or dropping off books. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The original plan was to supplement what was being taken,â&#x20AC;? he said. Board member Janet Milnes felt that the decision to close had been made mostly due to the lack of a building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the time I really felt we had no building. I thought no building, no library,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to be big enough to admit we made a mistake.â&#x20AC;? Vice-chair Jeannie Gagnon asked how they could reverse the decision when they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a facility to house the library as of August 1 and McGimpsey said that any resolution put forward that night would have to include a provision that a suitable place was found. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The resolution has to make sense. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a library in the middle of the street. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offer services if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a facility. If we were to proceed, it has to be our admin working with South Dundas admin to find something suitable and appropriate,â&#x20AC;? said McGimpsey, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just set up in an unsafe, unairconditioned, un-heated spot just because people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to drive nine kilometres to the nearest

list came to $88,000, $400,000, and $300,000. No similar breakdown was shown in the MBC MacDonald Bros. submission. Mayor Eric Duncan pointed out that council had previously discussed the possibility of chopping plans for new dressing rooms on the east exterior wall. Duncan had previously expressed optimism that

tenders would arrive at around the $700,000 mark or less. But he remains optimistic that a new concrete pad, dasher boards and ice surface will be in place for the upcoming winter season. The concrete and boards were ripped out earlier this spring in advance of the upcoming renovations.

library.â&#x20AC;? The original resolution passed said they would be moving in upon completion of the other branch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reasons were monetary back then. We have increased the budget from $1.3-million to $2-million in the last eight years and we have been getting less and less users. So, what is the solution?â&#x20AC;? said McGimpsey, adding that the threat of closure brings the branch into the spotlight and spurs people into action, but what happens to circulation after families grow up and move. Because they have been notified that they must vacate the current building by August 1, further discussion took place about what will happen to the library in the interim while administration is searching for a suitable location and McGimpsey warned that once a library is closed, it is very hard to get back the circulation that was

there.â&#x20AC;?People just dissipate and go somewhere else. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait at the door for you. You saw what happened in Finch. They closed for six months for renovations and lost half their membership. They went elsewhere.â&#x20AC;? North Dundas Mayor Eric Duncan spoke out in opposition to reversing the closure decision stating it was a matter of principle as the board had invested both time and money for a strategic plan that gives them an objective view of how things should proceed to make the SD&G library system successful. Duncan further suggested that a reversed decision could affect the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to deal with other possibly unpopular decisions in the future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m kind of going down with a sinking ship but I have maintained the same thing the whole time,â&#x20AC;? he said.

STRAWBERRIES Ready Now! U-Pick or Ready Picked OPEN DAY DA 1 CANAday, July M Mon -5:30 P 8 AM

Open Monday to Friday 8 am-8 pm; Saturday 8 am-5:30 pm; Closed Sundays

Dentz Orchards and Berry Farm 4766 County Rd. 16 / Brinston Rd., Iroquois â&#x20AC;˘ 613-652-2397

P.O. Box 489, 636 St. Lawrence Street Winchester, Ontario, K0C 2K0 Tel. 613-774-2105 Fax 613-774-5699 www.northdundas.com info@northdundas.com

Holiday Closure The Boyne Road Landfill site will be

CLOSED MONDAY, JULY 1. Regular curbside pick-up of garbage and recycling remain unchanged. Thank you. Doug Froats Director of Waste Management 613-774-5157

WK$QQXDO

N. Dundas recreation A column by the Township Recreation Department We hope your kids have enjoyed an exciting (and educational!) school year and are now gearing-up to participate in some of our North Dundas Summer Camp programs. As always, our nine-week camp line-up includes exhilarating field trips, action packed games and sports, creative crafts, swimming, and so much more. There is something for every interest! The camp that is scheduled for the week of July 8th, in Winchester, is called The Wild Side and teaches campers about the exciting worlds of wildlife & insects. Jr. Explorers will visit Papanack Zoo to see the animals from around the globe and will be able to feed animals and visit tigers and snow leopards. With the renovations to the Winchester Centennial Pool now complete, Session 1 of Winchester swim lessons are now underway and will be complete on Friday, July 5th. Session 1 lessons at the Chesterville Public Pool, are scheduled to be complete this Friday. Session 2 at both pools will commence on Monday, July 1st. Spaces are still available for select Session 2 programs, but please be advised that the last day to register for this session is June 28th. Aqua fitness programs will begin the week of July 1st at both pools. For information on these programs or to register, please visit the Recreation & Culture web page at www.northdundas.com, call the Township Office at 613-774-2105 or stop in to the Township Office, located at 636 St. Lawrence St. Registration is now taking place at the Chesterville Public Pool for the Chesterville Rippinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Racers swim team. The first practice will be held on July 1st. Both pools will host the free, annual Schools Out Public Swim on Thursday, June 27th. Please note that there will be no adult lane swims from 6-7 pm or public swimming from 7-9 pm at either pool on July 1st. There will also be no family swim in Chesterville from 5:30-6 pm on July 1st. Additionally, evening public swimming times will be cancelled at the Winchester Pool only, for the week of July 1st due to evening swim lessons. Canada Day festivities will once again be hosted by the North Dundas Canada Day Committee, at the South Mountain Fair Grounds on Monday, July 1st.

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June 26 Page 04_Layout 2 13-06-25 1:35 PM Page 1

Page 4 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Bill Davis opens NDDHS

Be prepared Montreal is looking for a new leader now that the mayor has been arrested on corruption charges and stepped down from his post. And who can forget all the problems that Toronto is having with their mayor, Rob Ford. Ford has been in the headlines almost every day with one scandal after another. Provincially the dust is just starting to settle on the fiasco that was Dalton McGuinty’s leadership. These are all good examples of bad leadership, and unfortunately we only have ourselves to blame. We voted these guys in, after all. Every four years we get the opportunity to voice our opinion on how we want our towns, municipalities and provinces to be run. New candidates we have to take at face value, but what about the ones that are running that are already in office. Every voter should go to a few council meetings in their municipality or city to see for themselves which candidates are worthy of re-election and which ones should be booted out. It is around the council table where the important issues are raised that affect us all are discussed, dissected, discussed again and voted on. It is during those discussions that residents can see their councillors and mayors at work doing what they have been hired to do, running our municipalities the way we expect them to run. It’s hard to decide on a candidate that you haven’t seen in action and all you have to go on are campaign promises and pretty speeches. The media usually only reports on the outcome of an issue raised at these meetings and by attending just a few meetings you can see what the process is and where each candidate stands on the issues. Just because a motion is passed, does not mean everyone around the council table agrees. There are often issues that get passed by one vote and the discussions surrounding those issues are how you can see where the elected official stands and why. You can also see which candidates tend to sit on the fence or are after their own agenda and don’t have the municipality’s best interests at heart. We are due for a municipal election in the coming year, so take this as a reminder to go out to those council meetings and see how the councillors really feel on the issues that affect us all. Because remember, once they are elected to office, there is little we can do until the next election and a lot of damage can be done in four years. Lois Ann Baker

Happy Canada Day! This being Canada Day weekend, get out there and join in on any one of the many celebrations around our great counties. But remember with all the celebrating and festivities to be careful on our highways and waterways and make this a safe and happy holiday.

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Taken from our front page of Oct. 24, 1963, the official opening of North Dundas District High School. Among the dignitaries for the occasion 50 years ago was Ontario Education Minister Bill future Davis, premier, with local high school board members and the local MPP. Photo from l e f t : E r i c Casselman, Davis, MPP and Attorney General Fred Cass, Ralph Allison, and Carl Rice.

1983 June 24, 1983 Construction of a long-awaited fire hall for Williamsburg Township could begin within the next few weeks with the announcement last week that the municpality has been successful in its application for a federal- provincial job creation grant. Stormont-Dundas MP Ed Lumley

announced last Wednesday that the township will receive $226,292 under the new Employment Expansion and Development (NEED) Program for the construction of the new building.

1953 June 25, 1953 Something new is being tried this year by Chesterville Driving Club in

the choice of the evening for their races. Saturday p.m. is the choice and a large crowd is anticipated for the event. The usual three classes will be on the card with those in a betting mood able to take advantage of the parimutuel facilities on the grounds. A very successful and enjoyable rally was held in the United Church, Elma, on Saturday, June 13th, under the very capable leadership of Mrs. T. D. Ross of Chesterville, assisted by other leaders.

Commemorating the Skirmish of Hoople Creek The Editor: The Lost Villages Historical Society, which promotes and preserves the history of the villages and hamlets that were lost during the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway, is presenting the “Bicentennial Commemoration of the Skirmish at Hoople Creek” on June 30, 2013 at the Lost Villages Museum on County Rd. 2 between Cornwall and Long Sault. The Skirmish at Hoople Creek occurred on November 10, 1813, on a now submerged area just west of the former village of Dickinson’s Landing, between members of the American invasion force and the 1st and 2nd Stormont Militia. Between November 8th and 9th 1813, members of an American invasion force, which included the Forsythe Rifles, landed near Doran’s Bay between Iroquois and Cardinal. Over 4,000 American soldiers continued their way towards the military stores in the small garrison town of Cornwall by land and by river. The British military commanders located in Prescott at what is now called Fort Wellington, ordered LCol Morrison and an

observation force to follow them and report on their movements. At the Long Sault rapids, now below the flooded waters of the St. Lawrence, the American naval advance had to portage around them and near Hoople Creek were met with force by members of the 1st Stormont and 2nd Glengarry Militia. While our brave militia soldiers met with defeat and retreated, many travelled to and fought at the Battle of Crysler’s Farm the next day, this skirmish provided enough time to begin the successful movement of important military stores from Cornwall northward to St. Andrew’s West on the way to the secure garrison at Coteau du Lac, before the occupation of this town by American military forces later that day. It also allowed LCol Morrison at his headquarters in the home of LCol John Crysler, UEL, the time to plan the successful routing of the American forces at the Battle of Crysler’s Farm. This halted the American march on Montreal and resulted in the British retaining control of the St. Lawrence River which was used to move supplies westward.

On Sunday June 30th at the Lost Villages Museum, there will be an action packed day commemorating this important event in Canadian History. Beginning at 10am and continuing throughout the day there will be something for everyone with displays, a settler’s market and live entertainment featuring local entertainers such as Tammy McCrae and Candy Rutley. The day concludes with a military style “Tattoo at Two” featuring local cadet and pipe bands, Sine McKenna, the McCulloch Dancers and the Glengarry Light Infantry Fencible troop from Fort Wellington and the 1st Grenville 1812 Militia. At the conclusion of the Tattoo, there will be a Beef on a Bun dinner with all the trimmings for $12 per person, advance tickets only. Thanks to our sponsors including Canadian Heritage, Ontario Power Generation and the Township of South Stormont. For more information please contact carol.goddard@sympatico.ca or the Lost Villages Historical Society. Carolyn Goddard, UE Cornwall


June 26 Page 05_Layout 2 13-06-25 2:38 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 5

NDDHS Continued from the front schools, one in Chesterville and one in Winchester. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Decision settles site seesaw,â&#x20AC;? read The Recordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sub-headline above the report of the pivotal North Dundas High School District Board meeting, held in Chesterville days after the blaze in the neighbouring community. The district board had been formed a decade prior, in the early 1950s, to local according Chesterville history book The Time That Was. It comprised representatives from several local municipalities that collected taxes to pay for the high school education of their children attending secondary schools in the northern part of Dundas County. The boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;North Dundas Districtâ&#x20AC;? title stuck as the name of the new single school that was ultimately built on the north side of County Rd. 43 on property purchased from Bert Fulton. Village of Chesterville representatives John Coyne and Leonard Moriarty abstained from the decisive meetingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key motion to build at the site, which passed 4-3 with chairman Eric Casselman (representing Winchester Township) casting the deciding vote in favour. Also in the affirmative were

J.Frank Casselman (United Counties of SD&G); Wilfred McMillan (Williamsburg Township); Ralph Allison (Mountain Township). Against were Davidson Eldon (Winchester Public School appointee); another Winchester representative; and Dalton Coons (Matilda), according to The Record account of the meeting. The vote also survived a rejected lastditch plea from the Winchester reps to call in a Department of Education arbitrator, Matters progressed from there, and The Record reported Sept. 13, 1962, that Angus Robertson Limited was awarded tender to construct the school at a cost of $958,290. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The central school on the Ridge is going to rise and confound a few diehards,â&#x20AC;? declared the opening paragraph of the article. Seesaw The policy makers had effectively come nearly full circle from where they were in 1959, the end of a decade that saw the swelling

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population of baby boomers just beginning to enter high school and already exceeding the available classroom space. In November of that year, the board optioned 12 acres of land owned by Frank Schwerdtfeger at Maple Ridge, but on the south side of County Rd. 43. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another big step has been taken for a central high school has been taken,â&#x20AC;? The Record declared at the time. But by the summer of 1960, the board had officially reversed itself and requested the Department of Education for permission to build two schools, one in each village. The wheels had fallen off the one-school idea earlier in the spring, when the board voted 4-3 in favour of a motion by Coyne, seconded by Casselman, expressly forbidding construction of a central facility. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would appear the central school idea has foundered,â&#x20AC;? The Record, then headed by publisher and editor H. K. Allison, observed in a front-page

editorial on May 26, 1960. would appear â&#x20AC;&#x153;It Chesterville and Winchester can work in harmony only so long. After a certain period, old rivalries, old beefs, crop up to poison the atmosphere of sweet reasonableness and cooperative action on school matters begins to slant to one direction or the other depending on special interests.â&#x20AC;? By 1961, the board was hashing out the costs of two

Changes This will be my final article and I just wanted to say thank you to all my readers. There were a couple of

schools versus one, concluding the slightly higher price of building the pair would be offset by lower transportation costs. There was also considerable consternation over the ongoing wait for provincial approval to build individual schools, but the Ontario Municipal Board did finally grant Chesterville Council approval to call for tenders that fall. But that step needed the approval of the North Dundas High School important dates in June. Grade 9 students were put to the test when they were faced with the secondary test on EQAO Wednesday, June 12th and Thursday, June 13th. Exams started June 19 and ran till June 24. Good luck to everyone who wrote them. Next, the grade 12 graduation is on June 26th at the high school. The grade 8s have their graduation on June 25th also at the high school. With this year ending,

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District Board â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which around that time was being wooed by a provincial bureaucrat with notions of an even bigger central school at Winchester Springs that would draw high schoolers from all over Dundas and part of Stormont. But that idea fell flat in places like Finch. Then the fire in happened, Winchester leaving students in that village to attend classes in local church halls and temporary facilities for the forseeable future unless something was done. It broke the logjam, and Education Minister (and future premier) Bill Davis was on hand for the official October 1963 opening of North Dundas District High School, alma mater to 50 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; worth of graduating classes.

it brings lots of changes for some kids. The grade 6 students attended a transition day on June 11th to help these students ease into grade 7. Grade 8s start high school next year and the grade 12s go off and face new adventures. I would like to say thank you to the Winchester Press and The Chesterville Record for allowing me to write for them. It has been a joy and pleasure that I will never forget.

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June 26 Page 06_Layout 2 13-06-25 2:26 PM Page 1

Page 6 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Opposing sides to wind farm issue address SD council Lois Ann Baker Record Staff WILLIAMSBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; South Dundas council had the opportunity to hear from opposing sides of the South Branch Wind Farm project at last council meeting held June 18. EDP Renewables representatives Brian Brown and Ken Little advised council of the progress they have been making on the project. Little said they have completed six milestones since the last advisory meeting in February. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the biggest things that has happened is we now have H B White Canada as our interviewing, procurement and construction contractors,â&#x20AC;? said Little, â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are overseeing all of our subcontractors and doing some of the construction work themselves. They are now mobilizing the management team and doing some activities like survey work.â&#x20AC;? Little added that they have not yet moved any earth and all the work being done now is preliminary. The turbine supplier has

also been chosen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official that we will be using Seimens as our wind turbine supplier,â&#x20AC;? said Little, adding the turbines are 3 megawatt, stand 99.5 meters with an arm span of 113 meters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are still working through the renewable energy approval with the Ministry of the Environment,â&#x20AC;? he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been told that approval is imminent. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping that it gets issued and posted with the environmental registry.â&#x20AC;? Little added that they also had to notify all levels of local governments and residents once it gets posted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are also working through the road users agreement,â&#x20AC;? said Little, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is something we have been in discussion with South Dundas and SD&G for about a year, and starting to talk with North Dundas as well.â&#x20AC;? Little said they had to determine the overall agreement of how the roads would be upgraded or fixed if needed throughout the lifetime of the project. Little said they were

also working through the Endangered Species Act with the Ministry of Natural Resources. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Specifically we are looking at the habitat for the bob-o-link,â&#x20AC;? said Little, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping to have that finished up in the next few weeks.â&#x20AC;? Little said they were also working through other permits with South Nation Conservation, building permits with South Dundas and other permits that will be required. Little announced a public proposed information meeting before construction kicks off to be held July 17 at Matilda Hall. Leslie Disheau of the South Branch Wind Opposition Group then asked council to consider a resolution to place a moratorium on the project until an independent study on the health effects of wind turbines on humans, animals and wildlife and the effects on property values. The resolution also asks that the province and the Ministry of the Environment be notified that South Dundas is not a

willing host for IWTs. However, rather than pass the resolution that night, Disheau requested that a meeting take place to further discuss the resolution and the SBWOGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opposition to the wind farm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are specific areas of concern which cannot be addressed tonight but need to be addressed and information shared so council will be in a more informed position to properly deal with this resolution,â&#x20AC;? said Disheau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do understand that this council is under the belief that because the GEA has stripped you of your municipal powers you feel your hands are tied and that because this project is so far along with a FIT contract that there is nothing you can do. Well Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here tonight to inform you that you still do have municipal powers and to dispel some of the myths around the South Branch wind project,â&#x20AC;? she said. The first myth was that councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands are tied, however Disheau noted that several councils across Ontario are using legal

framework for action to be used in regulating wind projects. second myth The surrounds the monetary aspect of the wind farm. Disheau said the idea was out there that a lot of money has been spent already on the project making it impossible to back out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As far as we can determine there has been no private individual spending their own dollars on this project. And, as far as taxpayers know, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think the municipality has spent any dollars on this project either,â&#x20AC;? said Disheau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only money that has been spent is that of the wind developers. Big businesses spend dollars everyday and assume the risks involved when dealing with their projects.â&#x20AC;? Disheau noted that the third myth was that it is a done deal. However she pointed out that as of June 14, the Renewable Energy Approval website claimed the project is still under technical review and there is still time for council to register as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not a Willing Hostâ&#x20AC;? along with 50 out of

90 municipalities in Ontario. The last myth was that there was no negative impact on the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Superior Court of Ontario ruled earlier this year, in May, that yes receptors could bring civil litigation suits against landowners once a wind project receives final REA approval, because the evidence showed a decrease in value of property anywhere from 22% to 50%,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not prepared to sit back and have the actions of someone else reduce my property value by up to 50% because they wish to pursue the cash flow of green energy dollars.â&#x20AC;? Disheau then formally asked council to consider a meeting to further discuss all the implications and possible avenues of protest for the South Branch Wind Farm. Council felt that it was a lot of information to process and agreed to a meeting which will be held at a date yet to be determined.

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June 26 Page 07_Layout 2 13-06-25 4:02 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 7

Toonders Farm open house

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell Financial Services open for business

Toonders Trio Among the crowd at their June 15 open barn, proprietors Brenda and Ron Toonders and their 18-year-old daughter, Jo.

The ribbon was cut and signalled the official opening of the Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell Financial Services office in Winchester. Joining the employees for the celebration were North Dundas Deputy Mayor Gerry Boyce, Mayor Eric Duncan, MPP Jim McDonell, Donna Lee Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell, Dermid Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell and MP Guy Lauzon. The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrells treated dozens of Winchester residents to a BBQ dinner and live entertainment in Sweet Corner Park on Thurs., June 20. The company is headquartered in Kemptville and has another office in Brockville. Baker photo

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Waiting her turn A cow placidly waits for her sister to finish up in the Lely A4 milker robot, one of two new units installed at Yolanda Farm, which has employed Lely robotic milkers for several years already.

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Business opportunities inside a barn Open barn events often double as trade shows in and of themselves. Here, Lezlee Byers of Byers Farm Equipment in Chesterville (right) chats with Dave and Barbara-Ann Zummach of Newington.

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Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to brush One of the Holsteins at Yolanda Farm enjoys the automated whirring brush, in a robotic barn thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about cow comfort. Zandbergen photos

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June 26 Page 08_Layout 2 13-06-25 10:11 AM Page 1

Page 8 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

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June 26 Page 09_Layout 2 13-06-25 12:35 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 9

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Renovations are well underway at the old Morrisburg Collegiate Institute, soon to be renamed the South Dundas Municipal Centre. CAO Stephen McDonald expects the municpality to be moving into their new offices by mid-August. Baker photo

On time and on budget Lois Ann Baker Record Staff WILLIAMSBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Right on schedule and right on budget. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Chief Administrative Officer of South Dundas Stephen McDonald is saying about the transformation of Morrisburg Collegiate Institute into the South Dundas Municipal Centre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are tentatively looking at mid-to-late August,â&#x20AC;? said McDonald, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have asked the library to vacate the building here on August 1, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not connected to our move out date.â&#x20AC;? McDonald said based on the most recent schedule for the high school renovation, he expects the second and third floors, which will be the ones the municipality occupies, to be completed somewhere between mid-tolate August.

When asked if this was on schedule, McDonald replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably better than we expected. The contractor has done a really good job. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a very aggressive schedule and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been for the most part meeting or exceeding it.â&#x20AC;? McDonald said they had done a lot of work on the exterior and that comments from the community have been favourable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to get a 90year-old building to look as good as they have been getting it to look,â&#x20AC;? said McDonald. Budget-wise, McDonald said they were still on budget. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the original budget we allowed for $100,000 in contingencies and we are still under that,â&#x20AC;? he said. Along with the newly renovated building and new road signs being ordered to

announce entrance into the and hamlets, region Township Council also passed a resolution to change the name formally from Township of South Dundas to Municipality of South Dundas but may face some legal issues with the name change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know Brenda Brunt, the township clerk, has been in contact with the Ministry of Municipal Affairs as well as our own solicitor and with the revisit to the Municipal Act which was done in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of left up to the municipalities as to what their status is and what their name is,â&#x20AC;? said McDonald. McDonald said there is a notice requirement under the Act and once that notice has been given it goes back to council to create a bylaw officially changing the name. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because of the domino

effect thing with our new signs and everything else, we just thought it would be timely to make the change. Anything that was going to have â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on it, we would be able to make the change to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;municipalityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; before it got to that point so we would not have to go back and do it again later,â&#x20AC;? said McDonald, adding they were trying to synergize everything and not duplicate any efforts. New tenants T.R. Leger School will be taking possession of the old municipal offices as of Sept. 1. While speculation was that they were agreeable to discussions with the library to retain services there, McDonald said he was under the understanding that they first needed to assess their space needs before they made any further commitments or decisions about leasing space out.





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PUBLIC WORKS WATER TRUCK OPERATOR/LABOURER The Township of North Dundas is currently seeking candidates to fill a twelve-week contract for the position of Water Truck Operator/Labourer. We are seeking a motivated individual to drive the water truck and assist with road construction for a twelve-week period. Applicants must possess a valid DZ driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s licence and a clean driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abstract. A full position description, including the skills and knowledge required is available on our website. To apply to become part of our team, please submit your resume and cover letter by Wednesday, June 26, 2013 to Dan Belleau, Director of Public Works Township of North Dundas 636 St. Lawrence St., PO Box 489 Winchester, ON, K0C 2K0 Fax: 613-774-5699 We appreciate the interest of all applicants, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

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June 26 Page 10_Layout 2 13-06-25 9:51 AM Page 1

Page 10 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

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June 26 Page 11_Layout 2 13-06-25 4:47 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 11

Latest technology boosts productivity Lois Ann Baker Record Staff WILLIAMSBURG – Always up on the latest technology, one local dairy farmer is making strides in milk production by recently upgrading his robotic milking machines to the latest model. Brabantia Farms, on County Road 18 just east of Williamsburg is owned by Robert and Donna Byvelds and is a third generation farm with approximately 220 head of milking cattle. In 2006, Byvelds installed his first robotic milking machine, the Lely A2, when they built a new facility on the farm. This year, he upgraded his milking machine to the Lely

Astronaut A4, one of the newest models put out by Lely. The farm is running with two of the A4 models. “The design is certainly more cow friendly,” said Byvelds, “There are fewer parts, making it easier to maintain.” Byvelds added that the design was a much better one than the older The main model. revolutionary feature, according to the Lely website, is the walkthrough design of the cow box. The feeding trough, the reason the cows go into the milking machine in the first place, swings out, prompting the cow to exit and allowing for the next one to take its place. “Also with these

machines, we updated the cow collars,” said Byvelds. The new collars record information like rumination. “We also use it as an early indicator to monitor any changes,” said Byvelds, “We didn’t have that with the old machine.” The collars monitor all cow activity including how often the cow is using the machine each day. As for breeding, it also acts as a tool indicating when the cow is ready to breed. Byvelds also said the machines have a greater capacity allowing him to milk more cows. “Today we are milking 116,” he said. “The machines work very well. Certainly without them we

wouldn’t be able to milk that many.” The software that comes with the A4 has also been upgraded. “These machines tell me how often cows have been milked and what daily production is,” he said, all of the things that used to be tracked manually. The software also indicates when a cow is not using the milking machine. “That’s basically my job now,” said Byvelds, “To track the few that are not milking and making sure they do get milked.” Byvelds said he has always been interested in the latest technology, especially when it comes to milking and feeding.

A cow is hooked up to one of the two Lely Astronaut A4 robots recently installed at the Brabantia Farms in Williamsburg. The latest model of the robotic milking machine is allowing dairy farmer Robert Byvelds to increase productivity by allowing more cows to be milked on a daily basis.

Baker photo

Rotarian memorialized — Aung Sang, his friend and de CHESTERVILLE According to his daughter, facto Prime Minister of that Jim Townson was a bit of a country. He was also the critic of the Chesterville father of Aung San Suu Kyi, waterfront project — particu- who grew up to become the larly its cost — though he did 1981 Nobel Peace Prize recipcome around on the subject ient. after seeing the final result. Jim’s family had no idea Still, there was more than a that he had written many lethint of irony when a smiling ters to the regime of Myanmar Jane Leblanc told local — as Burma was later called Rotarians on Sunday that her — demanding her immediate late father would be a little release from the lengthy house bemused to see a plaque of arrest for which she was interrecognition erected in his hon- nationally famous. our at the new waterfront Leblanc cast this activity gazebo. as part of her father’s general Reflecting on Jim’s per- empathy for others, which sonal catchphrase — very included championing many familiar to members of the causes through the Rotary Chesterville Rotary Club, Club in Chesterville, the vilwhich funded the gazebo — lage that Jim and Betty called Leblanc concluded her home after emigrating from speech: “You can be sure that Britain in the 1980s. wherever he is, he has a wry In 1964, he became a smile on his member of face, perthe Most haps with Excellent tongue and Order of cheek quietthe British ly chuckling Empire in to himself. Q u e e n So in this Elizabeth case, his II’s New saying of Ye a r ’s “Be reasonhonour list, able, do it for a career my way” that took does not him to a apply. number of Leblanc, far-flung accompaplaces. nied by her Betty Townson cuts a cake Betty m o t h e r , emblazoned with Jim a l s o Betty — offered her Jim’s wife Townson’s favourite say- thanks and of 66 years ing, ‘Be reasonable, do it w o r d s — preced- my way.’ were also ed the quip spoken by and her thanks to the commu- Rotary Club President Martin nity by offering insights into Schoones and incoming the life of her father, who died President Eric Duncan. March 6, 2011. Afterward, the crowd went A veteran of World War II for tea and a singsong at the — having served as a naviga- Garden Villa, where the tor with Tiger Command Townsons resided for a year Bomber Command in the after moving out of their reguMiddle East, Far East and lar place in Chesterville. Betty Africa — Jim was also sta- now lives in Blackburn tioned in Burma for a time Hamlet. after the war and was part of the crew that flew General U

at Morrisburg Canadian Tire sale starts Wednesday, June 26th til Monday July 1st Rain X Summer Washer Fluid

10x20 Tan Auto Shelter

Pr. # 29-4161

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Dewalt 18V Drill & bonus drill bit set

$

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2kg Lantic Sugar Pr. # 53-8311 $

149

20Litre Top Soil 19

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June 26 Page 12_Layout 2 13-06-25 9:58 AM Page 1

Page 12 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

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We’re Here For You ƚtŝŶĐŚĞƐƚĞƌŝƐƚƌŝĐƚDĞŵŽƌŝĂů,ŽƐƉŝƚĂů;tD,Ϳ͕ŽƵƌƉĂƟĞŶƚƐ ĂƌĞŶƵŵďĞƌŽŶĞ͘ĂƌŝŶŐĨŽƌƚŚĞŵŝƐĂƚĞĂŵĞīŽƌƚʹƚŽĞŶƐƵƌĞ every experience at the hospital is the best it can be. By focusing ŽŶũƵƐƚĂĨĞǁƉƌŝŽƌŝƟĞƐ͕ǁĞĐĂŶŚĞůƉŵĂŬĞƚŚĂƚŚĂƉƉĞŶ͘ In this year’s Report to our Community, we are pleased to share examples of how our commitment to quality and safety; our ƉĞŽƉůĞ͖ĐŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟŽŶ͖ĂŶĚĂĐĐŽƵŶƚĂďŝůŝƚLJŝƐŵĂŬŝŶŐĂĚŝīĞƌĞŶĐĞ͘ ,ĞĂůƚŚĐĂƌĞŝƐĐŽŵƉůĞdžĂŶĚŽƵƌŐŽĂůŝƐƚŽŵĂŬĞŝƚĞĂƐŝĞƌĨŽƌƚŚĞ ƉĂƟĞŶƚƐĂŶĚĨĂŵŝůŝĞƐǁĞƐĞƌǀĞ͘tĞ͛ƌĞŚĞƌĞĨŽƌLJŽƵ͘

QUALITY & SAFETY

OUR PEOPLE Living Our Values tD,͛ƐŐƌĞĂƚĞƐƚĂƐƐĞƚŝƐŽƵƌĐŽŵŵŝƩĞĚƚĞĂŵŽĨƐƚĂī͕ ƉŚLJƐŝĐŝĂŶƐĂŶĚǀŽůƵŶƚĞĞƌƐ͘ŶĚǁĞĐŽƵůĚŶ͛ƚďĞƉƌŽƵĚĞƌ of them. KƵƌŶĞǁValues Excellence Award celebrates their success. It recognizes individuals and teams who demonstrate a ĐŽŵŵŝƚŵĞŶƚƚŽtD,͛ƐĐŽƌĞǀĂůƵĞƐĂŶĚŽƵƌƉĂƟĞŶƚƐ͘dŚĞ WĞƌŝŽƉĞƌĂƟǀĞdĞĂŵƚŽŽŬƚŚĞĮƌƐƚŚŽŶŽƵƌƐ͕ŝŶƌĞĐŽŐŶŝƟŽŶŽĨŝƚƐ ƌĞƉƵƚĂƟŽŶĂƐĂǁĞůůͲŽŝůĞĚŵĂĐŚŝŶĞǁŝƚŚŝŶĐƌĞĚŝďůĞĞŶĞƌŐLJ͘ KƵƌǀĂůƵĞƐƌĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚŵƵĐŚŵŽƌĞƚŚĂŶĂƉůĂƋƵĞŽŶƚŚĞǁĂůůʹ they are how we conduct ourselves every day and are part of ǁŚĂƚŵĂŬĞƐtD,ƐŽƐƉĞĐŝĂů͘ŽŶŐƌĂƚƵůĂƟŽŶƐƚŽĂůůŽĨƚŚĞ ŚŽŶŽƌĞĞƐƚŽĚĂƚĞ͘

Quality is Job 1 ,ĞŶƌLJ&ŽƌĚƐĂŝĚƚŚĂƚƋƵĂůŝƚLJŵĞĂŶƐĚŽŝŶŐŝƚƌŝŐŚƚǁŚĞŶŶŽŽŶĞŝƐ ůŽŽŬŝŶŐ͘ƵƚĂƚtD,͕ǁĞǁĂŶƚƉĞŽƉůĞƚŽƐƚĂŶĚƵƉĂŶĚŶŽƟĐĞŽƵƌ ĐŽŵŵŝƚŵĞŶƚƚŽƋƵĂůŝƚLJĂŶĚƉĂƟĞŶƚƐĂĨĞƚLJ͘ŶĚƚŚĞLJĂƌĞ͘ This past year, we were honoured to be the most highly ƌĞĐŽŵŵĞŶĚĞĚŵĂƚĞƌŶŝƚLJƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŝŶKŶƚĂƌŝŽďĂƐĞĚŽŶƉĂƟĞŶƚ ƐĂƟƐĨĂĐƟŽŶ͘DŽŵƐƚĞůůƵƐƚŚĞLJĐŽŵĞƚŽtD,ďĞĐĂƵƐĞŽĨŝƚƐ ŚŽŵĞͲůŝŬĞ͕ĐĂƌŝŶŐĂƚŵŽƐƉŚĞƌĞʹĐůŽƐĞƚŽŚŽŵĞ͘KƚŚĞƌƉĂƟĞŶƚ ƐĂƟƐĨĂĐƟŽŶƌĞƉŽƌƚƐƚĞůůĂƐŝŵŝůĂƌƐƚŽƌLJ͘KǀĞƌĂůůƐĂƟƐĨĂĐƟŽŶĨŽƌ ŝŶƉĂƟĞŶƚĂŶĚƐƵƌŐĞƌLJƉĂƟĞŶƚƐŝƐϭϬϬй͊/ƚ͛ƐĂƚĞĂŵĞīŽƌƚĂŶĚǁĞ͛ƌĞ proud of these results.

tĞ͛ƌĞƉƌŽƵĚƚŽƐŚĂƌĞŽƵƌĞdžƉĞƌƟƐĞǁŝƚŚŽƚŚĞƌƐĂƐǁĞůů͘ tD,ǁĂƐƚŚĞĮƌƐƚƌƵƌĂůƚĞĂĐŚŝŶŐŚŽƐƉŝƚĂůŝŶĞĂƐƚĞƌŶKŶƚĂƌŝŽ ĂŶĚ͕ůĂƐƚLJĞĂƌ͕ŵŽƌĞƚŚĂŶϯϬϬƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐƐƉĞŶƚƟŵĞŚĞƌĞ͕ ƌĞƐƵůƟŶŐŝŶŵŽƌĞƚŚĂŶϱϬϬϬƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐĚĂLJƐ͘hƉŽŶŐƌĂĚƵĂƟŽŶ͕ ŵĂŶLJŽĨƚŚĞƐĞƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐƚƵƌŶƚŚĞŝƌĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂůŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚLJŝŶƚŽ ĂĐĂƌĞĞƌĂƚtD,͘

ƵƚǁĞǁŽŶ͛ƚƌĞƐƚŚĞƌĞ͘tĞĂƌĞĂůǁĂLJƐůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌǁĂLJƐƚŽĚŽĞǀĞŶ ďĞƩĞƌ͘ĂĐŚLJĞĂƌ͕ǁĞĚĞǀĞůŽƉĂYƵĂůŝƚLJ/ŵƉƌŽǀĞŵĞŶƚWůĂŶƚŽƐĞƚ ƚĂƌŐĞƚƐĂŶĚĐŚĂƌƚŽƵƌƉƌŽŐƌĞƐƐ͘EĞǁŝŶŝƟĂƟǀĞƐƐŚŽǁƉƌŽŵŝƐŝŶŐ results. &ŽƌĞdžĂŵƉůĞ͕͚ƚĞĂŵŚƵĚĚůĞƐ͛ĂƌĞŵĂŬŝŶŐĂĚŝīĞƌĞŶĐĞĂƐŐƌŽƵƉƐ ĐŽŵĞƚŽŐĞƚŚĞƌƚŽƐŚĂƌĞŝĚĞĂƐĂŶĚƐƵƉƉŽƌƚŽŶĞĂŶŽƚŚĞƌ͕ŽŌĞŶ ŵĂŬŝŶŐŝŵŵĞĚŝĂƚĞŝŵƉƌŽǀĞŵĞŶƚƐŝŶƋƵĂůŝƚLJĂŶĚƐĂĨĞƚLJ͘>ŝŬĞǁŝƐĞ͕ ŽƵƌŶĞǁEƵƌƐŝŶŐhŶŝƚŽƵŶĐŝůƐĂƌĞĞŵƉŽǁĞƌŝŶŐĨƌŽŶƚͲůŝŶĞĐůŝŶŝĐĂů ŶƵƌƐĞƐ͘dŚĞƌĞƐƵůƚŝƐĂďĞƩĞƌǁŽƌŬĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞĂŶĚƐĂĨĞƌƉĂƟĞŶƚĐĂƌĞ͘ dŽŐĞƚŚĞƌ͕ǁĞ͛ƌĞŵĂŬŝŶŐĂĚŝīĞƌĞŶĐĞ͘

dŽůĞĂƌŶŵŽƌĞĂďŽƵƚtD,͕ƉůĞĂƐĞǀŝƐŝƚŽƵƌǁĞďƐŝƚĞ Ăƚǁǁǁ͘ǁĚŵŚ͘ŽŶ͘ĐĂ͘tĞĂůƐŽǁĂŶƚƚŽŚĞĂƌĨƌŽŵLJŽƵ͘ /ĨLJŽƵŚĂǀĞĐŽŵŵĞŶƚƐŽƌƐƵŐŐĞƐƟŽŶƐ͕ƉůĞĂƐĞĐŽŶƚĂĐƚ ŚŽůůLJŽůĂŶĚ͕WƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚĂŶĚK͕ĂƚϲϭϯͲϳϳϰͲϭϬϰϵŽƌ by email at cboland@wdmh.on.ca.

chester Win

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UNPARALLELED COMMITMENT

ct Mem stri o Di

WDMH volunteers have once again set AUXILIARY the standard very high for giving back. This dedicated group has achieved milestones that exceed many urban centres - providing 13,000 hours of volunteer service; purchasing $300,000 ǁŝƌĞůĞƐƐ/sƉƵŵƉƐ͖ƌĂŝƐŝŶŐŵŽƌĞƚŚĂŶΨϲϬ͕ϬϬϬĂƚƚŚĞ'ŝŌ^ŚŽƉƉĞ͖ĂŶĚ ĐŽŶƟŶƵĂůůLJƐĞƌǀŝŶŐǀŝƐŝƚŽƌƐĂŶĚƉĂƟĞŶƚƐĂƐŝƌĞĐƚŽƌƐŽĨ&ŝƌƐƚ/ŵƉƌĞƐƐŝŽŶƐ͘ Thank you! ƵƚǁĞƐƟůůŶĞĞĚŵŽƌĞ͘dŚĞƌĞĂƌĞǀĂĐĂŶĐŝĞƐǁŝƚŚŝŶ ĞƐƚĂďůŝƐŚĞĚƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐƐƵĐŚĂƐƚŚĞ'ŝŌ^ŚŽƉƉĞ͕ ,>WW>ŽƩĞƌLJ͕ĂŶĚƉĂƟĞŶƚƐƵƉƉŽƌƚŝŶŽŵƉůĞdž ŽŶƟŶƵŝŶŐĂƌĞ͘dŚĞƌĞĂƌĞĂůƐŽŶĞǁŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ ƐƵĐŚĂƐƚŚĞŵĞƌŐĞŶĐLJĞƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚƐƵƉƉŽƌƚƌŽůĞ͘ Two to four hours per week may seem like a small commitment, but the volunteer impact is ĨĞůƚĂůůĂĐƌŽƐƐƚŚĞŚŽƐƉŝƚĂůĂŶĚƌĞŐŝŽŶ͘&ŽƌŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶŽŶŚŽǁƚŽŐĞƚŝŶǀŽůǀĞĚ͕ call 613-774-2422 ext. 6323. EĂŶĐLJ&ĂƌůĞLJͲ,ŽůŵĞƐ͕WƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚtD,ƵdžŝůŝĂƌLJ


June 26 Page 13_Layout 2 13-06-25 9:59 AM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 13

ACCOUNTABILITY

A Lasting Legacy

Responsible Care ĞŝŶŐĂĐĐŽƵŶƚĂďůĞŝƐŵƵĐŚŵŽƌĞƚŚĂŶďĂůĂŶĐŝŶŐƚŚĞďƵĚŐĞƚ͘tĞ must also follow through on what we say we are going to do.

WDMH has a place in all of our lives and our hearts. Just as we fondly remember lessons learned, experiences shared or favourite things, we treasure the legacy that our loved ones leave us. Legacies can be left in different ways, sometimes through talents or wisdom shared. A legacy gift represents both of these things, but also provides a financial benefit for your charity of choice. By planning for a legacy gift through the WDMH Foundation, you are imparting your wisdom on those around you and sharing the proceeds of your talents.

ƚtD,͕ŽƵƌƚĞĐŚŶŽůŽŐLJŝŶŝƟĂƟǀĞƐĂƌĞĂŐƌĞĂƚĞdžĂŵƉůĞ͘ dĞĐŚŶŽůŽŐLJŝƐĞƐƐĞŶƟĂůƚŽŝŵƉƌŽǀĞĐĂƌĞĂŶĚĚĞĐŝƐŝŽŶͲŵĂŬŝŶŐ͕ ĂŶĚƚŽƐƵƉƉŽƌƚŽƵƌĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂŶĚƌĞƐĞĂƌĐŚŝŶŝƟĂƟǀĞƐ͘tĞĂƌĞ working toward an electronic health record that will result in ŵŽƌĞĂĐĐĞƐƐŝďůĞĂŶĚƟŵĞůLJŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶƚŽĐĂƌĞĨŽƌŽƵƌƉĂƟĞŶƚƐ͘

Legacy gifts require preparation and planning, so you can imagine how touched we are to receive them. We especially love sharing the impact these gifts make at WDMH. Your legacy gift to the WDMH Foundation will have a lasting impact at WDMH, just as our loved ones stay with us in spirit. For more information about the Foundation’s Legacy Giving Program, please visit www.wdmh.on.ca/foundation or call us at 613-774-2422, ext. 6161.

COLLABORATION

tĞĂƌĞĂůƐŽǁŽƌŬŝŶŐŚĂƌĚƚŽĐŽŶŶĞĐƚǁŝƚŚŽƵƌĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƟĞƐ ʹƚŚƌŽƵŐŚƉĂƟĞŶƚƐƵƌǀĞLJƐĂŶĚŽƵƌƌĞĐĞŶƚƐƚƌĂƚĞŐŝĐƉůĂŶŶŝŶŐ ƉƌŽĐĞƐƐ͘/ƚ͛ƐŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚƚŽŚĞĂƌŚŽǁǁĞĂƌĞĚŽŝŶŐĂŶĚǁĞƚĂŬĞ that feedback very seriously.

Working Together ƚtD,͕ǁĞĚŽŶ͛ƚĚŽŝƚĂůŽŶĞ͘tĞĐŽůůĂďŽƌĂƚĞǁŝƚŚŵĂŶLJŚĞĂůƚŚ ĂŶĚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJŽƌŐĂŶŝnjĂƟŽŶƐƚŽďƵŝůĚƉĂƌƚŶĞƌƐŚŝƉƐƚŽƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ŚĞĂůƚŚLJƌƵƌĂůĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƟĞƐ͘

&ŝŶĂůůLJ͕ǁĞŚĂǀĞŶ͛ƚĨŽƌŐŽƩ��ŶĂďŽƵƚƚŚĞďŽƩŽŵůŝŶĞ͘tD, is proud to have balanced the budget for the past six years, ŽƉĞƌĂƟŶŐǁŝƚŚŝŶƚŚĞĮŶĂŶĐŝĂůƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐǁĞŚĂǀĞĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ͘tĞ ŬŶŽǁŽƵƌĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƟĞƐĞdžƉĞĐƚŶŽƚŚŝŶŐůĞƐƐ͘

&ŽƌĞdžĂŵƉůĞ͕ǁĞǁŽƌŬǁŝƚŚdŚĞKƩĂǁĂ,ŽƐƉŝƚĂůĂƐĂƐĂƚĞůůŝƚĞƐŝƚĞ ĨŽƌĚŝĂůLJƐŝƐĂŶĚĐŚĞŵŽƚŚĞƌĂƉLJƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐʹƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐƟŵĞůLJĂŶĚ ƐƵƉƉŽƌƟǀĞĐĂƌĞƌŝŐŚƚŚĞƌĞŝŶtŝŶĐŚĞƐƚĞƌ͘

^ƚĂī .......................................................................320 ƉƉŽŝŶƚĞĚ^ƚĂī;ƉŚLJƐŝĐŝĂŶƐ͕ĚĞŶƟƐƚ͕ŵŝĚǁŝǀĞƐͿ ...135 Volunteers .............................................................230 Emergency Visits ...................................................23,126 ^ƵƌŐĞƌLJ Ͳ/ŶƉĂƟĞŶƚWƌŽĐĞĚƵƌĞƐ ........................................557 ͲĂLJ^ƵƌŐĞƌLJWƌŽĐĞĚƵƌĞƐ ...................................4,327 Births .....................................................................646 ŝĂŐŶŽƐƟĐ/ŵĂŐŝŶŐWƌŽĐĞĚƵƌĞƐ .............................36,424 ĂŶĐĞƌĂƌĞ ͲKŶƚĂƌŝŽƌĞĂƐƚ^ĐƌĞĞŶŝŶŐWƌŽŐƌĂŵ ...................Ϯ͕ϱϮϴ

/ƚ͛ƐĂůůƉĂƌƚŽĨŽƵƌǀŝƐŝŽŶĨŽƌĂĞŶƚƌĞŽĨdžĐĞůůĞŶĐĞĨŽƌZƵƌĂů,ĞĂůƚŚ ĂŶĚĚƵĐĂƟŽŶ͘dŚŝƐĐŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟǀĞǁŝůůŚĞůƉĐŽŽƌĚŝŶĂƚĞƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐƚŽ ďĞŶĞĮƚƚŚĞƉĞŽƉůĞǁĞƐĞƌǀĞʹƉĂƟĞŶƚƐŝŶƚŚĞŚŽƐƉŝƚĂů͕ƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐŝŶ nursing homes, and clients of community services.

ZE Eh E VE

21% 10%

69%

$

'ůŽďĂůĨƵŶĚŝŶŐ WĂƟĞŶƚƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐĨƵŶĚŝŶŐ KƚŚĞƌƌĞǀĞŶƵĞ TOTAL

$

^ĂůĂƌŝĞƐĂŶĚďĞŶĞĮƚƐ Ψϭϵ͕ϳϭϰ͕ϴϰϵ DĞĚŝĐĂůƐƚĂīƌĞŵƵŶĞƌĂƟŽŶ Ψϰ͕ϲϮϰ͕ϯϳϬ ^ƵƉƉůŝĞƐĂŶĚĚƌƵŐƐ Ψϵ͕ϯϬϲ͕ϵϴϮ KƚŚĞƌ Ψϰ͕ϯϱϲ͕ϵϵϬ TOTAL $38,003,191

ŵďƵůĂƚŽƌLJĂƌĞsŝƐŝƚƐ ..........................................16,243

ΨϮϲ͕ϲϯϰ͕ϰϭϵ Ψϯ͕ϳϳϮ͕ϭϬϬ Ψϴ͕Ϭϰϴ͕ϲϳϭ $38,455,190

12%

E XP

E

E^

$

$

ͲŚĞŵŽƚŚĞƌĂƉLJsŝƐŝƚƐ ........................................ϭ͕ϵϭϭ

E^

Expenses

Revenue

ͲŽůŽŶŽƐĐŽƉŝĞƐ ..................................................ϭ͕ϵϭϯ

24%

52%

11%

By the Numbers

ŶĚƚŚŝƐLJĞĂƌ͕ǁĞǁĞƌĞƉƌŽƵĚƚŽǁĞůĐŽŵĞƚŚĞŚĂŵƉůĂŝŶŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ĂƌĞĐĐĞƐƐĞŶƚƌĞ͕ĂƐƚĞƌŶKŶƚĂƌŝŽ,ĞĂůƚŚhŶŝƚ͕:ŽďŽŶĞĚ͛ĞŵƉůŽŝ ĂŶĚƚŚĞKŶƚĂƌŝŽĂƌůLJzĞĂƌƐWƌŽŐƌĂŵƚŽŽƵƌŶĞǁ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJĂƌĞƵŝůĚŝŶŐ͘


June 26 Page 14_Layout 2 13-06-25 3:34 PM Page 1

Page 14 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Artist to be featured on Regional Contact CHESTERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A flip of a coin was what it took for one man to decide his fate, and he has never looked back. Finian Paibomesai was spending the summer renovating cottages in McGregor Bay when he finished high school and when his partner asked him what was his next step, he took out a coin and let fate decide whether he would go to college to study art in Ottawa or Construction in Sault Ste. Marie. Art in Ottawa won out and Paibomesai was on his way to Algonquin College. After college, he attended the University of Ottawa and then the Ottawa School of Art. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a long journey,â&#x20AC;? said Paibomesai, and that journey has lasted over 30 years. Paibomesai still

paints today and has an upcoming art exhibit in Brockville in December. Paibomesai paints with three things in mind, relationships, emotion and the environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little bit political, but not the main objective,â&#x20AC;? he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should be aware of our environment and what we are doing to it.â&#x20AC;? Paibomesai said he used to paint landscapes and birds and was more into realism, but felt that he was not satisfied and something was missing. His paintings are now more abstract and contemporary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In realism, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put your inner thoughts into the painting,â&#x20AC;? he said. Art isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only thing this talented man is involved with. He is also the owner of F/P Creative

Solutions which creates signs and custom apparel. He is also a freelance graphic artist. Still with running the company, he finds time to paint and usually can be found in his studio painting every night from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m committed to what I do,â&#x20AC;? said Paibomesai, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it (paint), I get restless.â&#x20AC;? Paibomesai said he would love to paint fulltime, but found that with the economy the way it was, art was a luxury and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be relied on as a steady income. Decemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art show at the Brockville Arts Centre has a river theme to it. Paibomesai said he invited painter Graham Buck to show with him and while Buck will be supplying landscape art, Paibomesai

Painter Finian Paibomesai presented one of his original pen and ink drawings to Regional Contactâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joel Haslam. Haslam interviewed the North Grenville artist for an episode to be aired in September. Baker photo

will be depicting the river dwellers. Paibomesai has been with the involved McCloskey Project since its inception and was recently interviewed by Regional

Contactâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joel Haslam. He is also currently a member of CARFAC, Canadian Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Representation/Le Front des artistes canadiens. Paibomesai said he was

pretty resilient and had no regrets about letting the coin decide his future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just go with the punches and enjoy the ride,â&#x20AC;? he said.

Singing the blues... The McCloskey Hotel was alive with blues music featuring Morgan Davis (at right) with special guest Jeff Hagerman (left), originally of Chesterville on Thurs., June 13. Davis is in the middle of a 100-day tour that started in Nova Scotia and is travelling through Ontario. He stopped in at the McCloskey Hotel to perform his music which draws from a rich tradition of country blues. His own contemporary songs are infused with wit and a large dose of humour. Originally from Detroit, Davis moved to Canada in 1968 and immersed himself in the study of Delta Blues. He has been calling Nova Scotia home since 2001 and paid homage to Atlantic Canada with his recording At Home in Nova Scotia. Zandbergen photo

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Rustic Comfort or Modern Glow... The Stove Store is the Place to Go! 6 Beverly St., Spencerville

613.658.3101 â&#x20AC;˘ 1.888.370.9859

thestovestore.net

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June 26 Page 15_Layout 2 13-06-25 3:28 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 15

E. Ontario country music artist promotes new song NASHVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Finch native Greg Hanna has released another country single, It Rained, in advance of a second album due to be released later this summer. Hanna, who has played twice at the Russell Fair â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the first in 2010 opening the act for fellow Canadian Terry Clarke and again in 2012 for April Wine, has just finished a cross-Canada tour promoting the single. Although having lived in Nashville since 2005, and working with some of the top writers and producers in the business, his independent spirit is infused in the songs he writes, performs and records. And sticking to his guns has paid off. Four of his previous singles have had chart success across North America, and all four made it to the top 10 in his home and native land of Canada. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have been fortunate enough to share the stage with a whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who of Country music at festivals throughout North America. With the launch of Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Job I toured with Jeff Foxworthy across Western Canada playing arenas as his musical guest. And I toured Central and Eastern Canada with my good friends Emerson Drive on their â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Countrifiedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tour,â&#x20AC;? said Hanna, with justifiable pride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the largest scale tour was with Toby Keith on his â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;American Rideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tour, which also featured Trace Adkins. Working alongside his primary creative partner, the much sought after songwriter/producer Kim Tribble (Jason Aldean, Martina McBride, Randy Travis, Shania Twain), Hanna produced his new single himself and has released it on his own label, Pheromone Records LLC, an imprint of Megaforce Sony. Tribble also worked closely on Hannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s selftitled debut album in 2008 featuring a number of singles such as She Means Everything to Me, What Kind of Love are You On, and Makinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Love Real. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My whole way of making music is that if I can convey something to someone who I have never met, and leave

them with a smile on their face and feeling good, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done my job. With It Rained and some of the other rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tunes on the new album, if we can get people enjoying it and wanting to turn it up and listen to it again and again, then we have it on stage for a live show, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about â&#x20AC;&#x201C; making people feel something genuine and making them say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;yeah, I get it. This speaks to me. This is really good.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Earthy, rootsy country music is in Hannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blood. Growing up in the small rural community â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;down homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; music was not just a catchy phrase â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it was a way of life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The town had about 500 people and, shoot, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you this, all I ever knew growing up, until I got to high school, was country music. The Family Brown and Tommy Hunter were all you saw on TV and all you needed. It was a pretty close knit place growing up, and the Ottawa Valley has always been known for its music scene. It never mattered what was going on in the outside world, they always had their own thing going on, and I think I appreciated that, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I have sort of charted my own course in the music business,â&#x20AC;? Hanna said, adding that once he began to broaden his musical horizons as a teen, a Canadian rock icon known for his combination of gritty authenticity and remarkably potent pop sensibilities became a major creative touchstone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bryan Adams was a huge influence on me. And actually, if you really listen to this new album, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real Bryan Adams pull to it.â&#x20AC;? Hanna also comments on his love of live performance stating, â&#x20AC;&#x153;These days there are so many ways to make things sound good, but the one thing about live performances is thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only so many tricks you can pull out of the bag to make it sound great. When you go to see a live show, the proof is in the pudding. An artist is either great or not great. I really feel that if you get blown away at a live show, then you know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Promoting his new single It Rained, Finch native Greg Hanna recently performed on CTV Morning Live Ottawa as part of his cross-Canada media tour. Photo from www.greghanna.com

the real deal. People can tell when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authentic or when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just overproduced hype. And I always make sure that people walk away from my shows knowing they had a real have experience,â&#x20AC;? It Rained and other tunes from his forthcoming album were recorded at studios in both Canada and the U.S., and Hanna said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important for him to stay in touch with his â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Northern Hillbillyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roots.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even though I live in Tennessee and have immersed myself in the industry here, I am flying the Canadian flag at all times. I am proud to be red and white, and It Rained has been released in Canada first for that very reason. With the new album, he is planning on pulling out all the stops as he promotes it in the Great White North.

Cherry Suede booked for Dairyfest barn dance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; WINCHESTER Dairyfest 2013 is going to be a special celebration as it is the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25th anniversary, as well as the 125th birthday of the village of Winchester. The annual Dairyfest Barn Dance on Sat., Aug. 10 will be rocking to the sounds of Ottawa band Cherry Suede. With a high-energy live show, the band is fresh off a European tour supporting their new album, Between Here and There. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have a pretty big local following,â&#x20AC;?said Dairyfest committee chair Gina Welch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to have them and think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a great show with music everyone will enjoy.â&#x20AC;? Dairyfest 2013 will combine new events with old favourites. The Casino Night will return on Fri., Aug. 9 with a lower ticket price. Guests will be able to play poker, roulette and blackjack with Dairyfest dollars and the top five winners of the night will select from a prize board. For those who like to shop, there will be a vendor fair with booths downtown on Sat., Aug. 10

and on the arena ice surface on Sun., Aug. 11. Saturday will also feature a sidewalk sale by local businesses, local entertainment at Sweet Corner Park, and a youth performance of Alice in Wonderland by Dundas County Players. The arena grounds will once again be home to a variety of air bounce amusements, Vanderlaand Barnyard Petting Zoo, LEGO car racing, the Back it Up! truck and trailer contest, and the vintage tractor display. New this year will be a focus on the local arts community with various artists demonstrating their techniques in the gazebo near the pool. Winchelsea Events will share some of its culinary expertise with a dairy-themed cooking demo. There will also be something new for horse lovers on Sat., Aug. 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;a show by Alingsview Stables from Chesterville. Keep an eye on the Dairyfest website at winchesterdairyfest.com for schedules, news, and volunteer opportunities.

1M\IH7XEK HAPPY 50TH ANNIVERSARY June 29, 2013

CORY AND IRENE VANDELST 7GSXX1G4LEMP WSRSJ0ISREVHERH:IVSRMGE1G4LEMPERH

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This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feature homes

Jg[c]lk?gd^LgmjfYe]fl $259,000, Crysler: Family ready 5-bedroom, 3-bath brick bungalow. Living room with fireplace, gourmet oak kitchen, island, lunch counter, family room. Bar, decks, pool. Double garage.

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$249,000, Chesterville: A touch of country â&#x20AC;&#x201C; features open concept main living area, white kitchen with island, builtin appliances. Family room, deck, pool, garage, private treed lot.

Your first move when buying or selling...

Alan LaPierre Sales Representative

613-448-3306 RE/MAX METRO-CITY REALTY LTD. 24-hour pager: 613-737-7200

www.remaxottawa.com www.ottawarealestate.org


June 26 Page 16_Layout 2 13-06-25 2:33 PM Page 1

Page 16 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

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The Chesterville Record Page 17

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June 26 Page 18_Layout 2 13-06-25 2:45 PM Page 1

Page 18 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

RECORDClassiffieds

Deadline Monday 5 P.M. $ Plus (ST minimum for 2 words. Additional words 3¢ each. AUCTIONS 45 MINUTE TWILIGHT AUCTION SALE THURSDAY, JULY 4 AT 5:30 P.M.

To be held on site at 12551 Glen Becker Rd. (Cty. Rd. 28), turn East, travel approx. 1 km. Watch for signs!

LATE MODEL COMPACT TRACTOR - ANTIQUE TRACTOR - SMALL MACHINERY - TOOLS AND SOME HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS

TRACTORS: 2007 28 hp., 4WD. JinMa diesel compact tractor with front end loader, down pressure and only 80 hrs. (very nice), 1950â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Allis Chalmers D-14 gas tractor with Allied front end loader, 52â&#x20AC;? bucket, 3pth, wide front end, high and low trans, live pto., and original sickle bar mower, J.D. #160 riding lawn mower. Other items to include: Ford #930A 3 pth. finishing mower (new belt and blades), 3 pth. scraper blade, I.H. cultivator on rubber, cement mixer, Craftsman 11 p. 24â&#x20AC;? walk behind snow blower (like new), older snow blower, qty. of tools, some household effects and more. Owner and Auctioneer not responsible for loss or accident. Terms: Cash or good cheque with I.D. Props.: Belinda & Man Lok Choi Reason for Auction: Farm has been sold. NOTE: Plan to attend on time for this auction will definitely not exceed 45 minutes.

AUCTIONEER PETER ROSS AUCTION SERVICES Ingleside, ON. 613-537-8862. www.theauctionfever.com 49-1 AUCTION THURSDAY, JULY 4 AT NOON Ottawa Livestock Exchange, Greely, Ontario. Herd of 25 Holstein dairy cows, artificially bred, good for year round milking, S.C.C. 147,000 average for the last 3 months, 7 open heifers to be sold. Info: 613-821-2634.

OTTAWA LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE ROBERT BRAZEAU 613-821-2634 49-1

613-448-2321 FAX: 613-448-3260

FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

IN MEMORIAM

FOR SALE Ritchieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 14% Beef Grower Pellets - 40 kg. bag $18.99. Winchester location - Ritchie Feed & Seed, 685 St. Lawrence St. 613-7743538. 30tfc

HELP WANTED Looking for licensed 310T mechanic or advanced apprentice for fleet maintenance in the SD&G area. Experience in hydraulics, heavy equipment, trailers and aerial devices would be a great asset. Please email resume to nationviewsc@gmail.com with phone number and email for return inquiries. Only those selected will be contacted. 50-2

HELMER, Earl. In loving memory of Earl Helmer, who passed away 25 years ago June 24th, 1988. Eileen and family 49-1

BOOKS FOR SALE For serious readers. Open Sunday 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. 4037 County Rd. 7, Elma. 613-448-3787. 7tfc/stf

FARM CHAROLAIS BULLS FOR SALE Full french and purebred with french influence from porven AI sires. 613-4732636, 613-813-2494. 49 FOR SALE 54 bales of wrapped Timothy and clover hay. 613-3630087 or 613-537-2107. 49

AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLE FOR SALE Credit problem? In-house finance is easy. Just apply online & become pre-approved. For clean low mileage vehicles. www.car-o-line.com. Or call Car-o-line Autos @ 1-877820-5598 or 613-448-2488. tfc

NOTICES NOVENA TO SACRED HEART Say 8 times for 8 days. Ask for your petition to be granted and promise publication. May the sacred heart of Jesus be praised, adored and glorified throughout the whole world forever and ever. Amen. Thanks to Sacred Heart for favours received. T.M. 49

WANTED

WORK WANTED

WANTED FOR SCRAP Cars - Trucks - Vans Machinery - Appliances, etc. Call 613-543-9071. 50

WORK WANTED Have you wanted a mature, educated and experienced mother to care for your own children or seniors? I am available for occasional babysitting or respite. Ann 613-724-1617. 50

WANTED TO RENT Land to grow organic soy, beans, buckwheat, corn etc. Tiled or untiled, big or small fields or will clean up. 613535-2382. 06

FOR SALE STRAWBERRIES Old fashioned sweet and flavourful strawberries are back! Pick-your-own and pre-picked strawberries. Open till dusk at Barkleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Robertson Rd., one mile north of Morrisburg, east off Hwy. #31. 613-543-0491 for details. 49-3 MIEL VILLENEUVE HONEY Liquid and cream honey available year round! Gift containers and molded beeswax candles available. Please call first. 613-9875290. Bring your own fancy jars to be filled as gifts! 07tfc

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Help wanted PICKING STRAWBERRIES near Morrisburg. Experience preferred but not essential. Call Bill at Barkleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 613543-0491. 49-3 HELP WANTED Full or part-time help wanted on free stall dairy farm. Crysler area. 613-987-5332 or fax 613-987-1085. 49 HELP WANTED Summer student to work on farm doing yard cleanup, weed trimming and other jobs. Valid G2 or G licence an asset. 613-543-2312. 49

HELP WANTED Driver, waitresses and bartender. Experience an asset. Apply at Papa Gus Bar & Grill, 160 Queen St., Chesterville. 613-448-1444. 51-4

Custom Assembled New & Gently Used

GOLF CLUBS PUTTERS, IRONS AND WOODS Ranging from

Advertising Pays 5PN=S>ANNEAO 4'#&;

613-448-9061 613-880-0022

$20 & up

Re-gripping & club repair

Farm and Home Renovations/Repairs or Additions

Call 613-223-3050

Darren Chambers

preferably after 5 pm

Licensed and Insured

GOT A SPORTING EVENT?

LET THE SPORTS EDITOR KNOW! 613-448-2321, ext. 110 chestervillerecord@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @dcmatte

FOR RENT DUPLEX FOR RENT 28 Church St., Chesterville. Available August 1. $700.00 plus utilities. Call weekends or evenings after 6:00 p.m. 613-448-2159. 49 FOR RENT 2 bedroom apartment. All appliances. All inclusive. In Chesterville. $850 a month. 613-448-2494. 38tfc FOR RENT 3 bedroom apartment. $900.00/month plus utilities. Available immediately. 613448-2806. 42tfc

CARD OF THANKS THANK YOU We would like to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thankâ&#x20AC;? everyone for the many beautiful cards and gifts and also for joining us on the special occasion of our 50th Anniversary. Thanks to the U.C.W. ladies for the delicious luncheon provided and also to the Chesterville Legion. Thanks to our families for making our day so â&#x20AC;&#x153;Very Specialâ&#x20AC;?. Bob & Ruby Miltimore 49

TREE SERVICE LTD. â&#x20AC;˘ Efficient removal of large, difficult and dangerous trees â&#x20AC;˘ Stump grinding â&#x20AC;˘ Brush chipping â&#x20AC;˘ Cabling and bracing â&#x20AC;˘ Pruning â&#x20AC;˘ Deadwooding â&#x20AC;˘ Lot clearing

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613-984-0743

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Employment Opportunity

LICENSED MECHANIC WANTED Excellent working conditions, must be a self-starter, able to work with minimum supervision, mainly safety and service work. Hours: 8:30 am-5:00 pm Monday to Friday Call for more details:

1-877-820-5598 or 613-448-2488

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READY MIX LTD.

Moose Creek, Ontario K0C 1W0 Tel.: 613-538-2271 Fax 613-538-2786

JOB OFFER Batcher/Dispatcher Location: St-Albert, ON

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SUMMARY: Reporting to the Plant Manager, the successful candidate will be responsible for all aspects of operating the concrete batch plant and dispatching the daily workload. RESPONSIBILITIES: - Batch concrete loads according to mix design specifications - Order and maintain supply inventory - Perform other production and maintenance duties as required - Track and report information on plant operations and product quality SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS: - Bilingual is necessary - Good customer service skills - Good computer skills with the ability to learn new systems - DZ drivers licence is an asset - Experience in construction, formwork, or other concreterelated position an asset - Ability to operate heavy machinery. CONTACT: Email resumes to jonblair@alblairconstruction.com or justincouture@alblairconstruction.com or call 613-538-2271


June 26 Page 19_Layout 2 13-06-25 2:46 PM Page 1

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 19

RECORDClassiffieds

Deadline Monday 5 P.M. $ Plus (ST minimum for 2 words. Additional words 3¢ each.

613-448-2321 FAX: 613-448-3260

COMING EVENTS COMING EVENTS YARD SALES MIXED PARTY For Steven Johnson and Alyssa Sheppard. Winchester Lions Hall. June 29, 2013. 8:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m. Light lunch and DJ. Tickets $5.00 or $8.00 per couple. Available at the door. 49 STRAWBERRY SOCIAL St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church Hall, Mill Street, Chesterville. Wednesday, June 26, 2013, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Assorted fresh sandwiches, pickles, veggies and dip, white cake with strawberries and ice cream, coffee or tea. $7.00 per person. (Take-outs available at 11:00 a.m.) Everyone welcome! 49-2 ANNUAL HILLCREST CEMETERY SERVICE Newington. 2:30 p.m., Sunday, June 30. In event of rain, Newington Wesleyan Church. 49-2

RIVERCRUISING Learn about rivercruising with Kelly Graves of AMA Waterways. Wednesday, July 17th, 7:00 p.m. McIntosh Inn, Morrisburg. Focus on upcoming Vietnam, Cambodia, Riches of Mekong group. See you there! www.THOMTRAVEL.com. Please RSVP (613) 5432133 or sales@thomtravel.com. TICO 1258982. 51-3

MULTI-FAMILY BAKE & YARD SALE Saturday, June 29. 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 2420 Ball Road, Chesterville (just east of NDDHS). Something for everyone. 49

YE OLDE BARGAIN SHOPPE BAG SALE Wednesday, June 26 from 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Thursday, June 27 from 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m and 6:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, June 29 from 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. A great place to shop for good used items and clothing. Unbelievable prices. St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian C h u r c h basement, 34 Mill St., Chesterville. All greatly donations appreciated. tfc

New Prices for Services offered at The Chesterville Record. Photos

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7 King St., Chesterville Ph.: 613-448-2321 Fax: 613-448-3260 e-mail: record@storm.ca

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June 26 Page 20_Layout 2 13-06-25 4:49 PM Page 1

Page 20 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The last Newington United Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting was attended by: back from left Kirsty Hayward, Elmer Stewart, Rev. Dan Hayward, Karen Woodside, Heather Stewart, Carolyn Watson, Joyce Helmer, Ruby Presley, Gloria Milley, Inez Simpson, Elaine Hutchinson, Anne Wereley, Kate Bush. Front: Melvin and Dorothy Waldroff.

Declining numbers force closure NEWINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Newington United Church Women and other church members were guests of Riverdale Terrace and Dorothy and Melvin Waldroff on May 9. This was the last meeting of this group as their churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closing service was on May 26. When the Ladies Aid and The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Missionary Society joined together Jan. 14, 1962 to

form the United Church Women there were fortyfive members, Dorothy Waldroff was the first president, Dora Vance vice president, Mrs A. Boal treasurer, Mrs William Pettit recording secretary, and Mrs A.W. Loverin, corresponding secretary. Declining numbers and rising costs have forced the closure. Newington United Church will amalgamate with Ingleside United

Church and be called Ingleside-Newington United Church. Shortly thereafter InglesideNewington will join with Long Sault United Church and be call South Stormont Pastoral Charge. Rev. Dan Hayward minister of Newington and Ingleside will be the minister. As with so many churches the U.C.W. has played a big role in the

church life. Visiting shut ins, sending cards, preparing many meals after funerals, turkey dinners, pancake breakfasts, teas, the annual fair board dinner, etc. The U.C.W. also joined with the Villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Institute to deliver goodies at Christmas time to shut ins. Money was also raised to donate to local charities.

Morewood Unitedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final service held

Rev. Wendy Wright MacKenzie and husband Alan MacKenzie are shown after Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final service at the church with Mayor Eric Duncan (left), local MP Guy Lauzon (second from left) and local MPP Jim McDonell. The politicians thanked the congregants for their 88 years of service in the community and urged them to keep their faith, wherever they may choose to worship in the future.

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 21

West Ottawa @ NDU WR4, June 27, 8 p.m., Chesterville Fairgrounds.

ND WR4 take tough loss in OCSL; MR6 and MR3 win John Hilborn Special to the Record OTTAWA— The North Dundas United WR4 soccer team played a hard fought game in Ottawa on June 20, but were unable to come up victorious against the Ottawa Internationals, losing 1-0. The North Dundas team had strong play throughout the game, controlling the ball and peppering the Ottawa team with numerous shots. The game began as a sparring match with both teams going back and forth for the first 10 minutes. However, after this initial feeling out phase, the North Dundas women began to gather steam and mount numerous attacks on the Ottawa goal. The strong offensive play was complemented with equally strong defensive play with the midfield clogging any possible outlets and the defense cleaning up whatever remaining chance there was. The only offence that the Ottawa team was able to generate came off long, searching balls, which the defense were able to chase down. It was one of these long searching balls that stung the North Dundas team as in the 35th minute, the Ottawa attacker was sprung up the right wing and was able to squeak a rolling shot past the North Dundas keeper. After this goal, the North Dundas team was still able to finish strong with strong pressure on the Ottawa

defense when the referee called for half time. The second half began much like the first, but with some significantly stronger play from their opponents. It was the first real test for the North Dundas defense but they were up to the task shutting down the Ottawa offence. North Dundas responded by controlling the play and the ball for the rest of the game. Lindsay Allen and Kaitlyn Hay were all over the defense, but were unable to capitalize on shots. The 70th minute saw the biggest opportunity for North Dundas as a shot came off the crossbar and the resulting shot hit the side of the net. The women continued the strong play up until the final whistle but were unable to put the ball behind the Ottawa keeper. It ended in a disappointing result, for such a strong performance by the team. This week the team is back in Chesterville on July 27 to take on West Ottawa; kickoff is at 8 p.m.

Strong week for ND teams in OCSL MR6 The MR6 squad continued their hot start to the season, picking up win number four on June 19 in Chesterville against Carleton Place. Once again, North Dundas had no trouble scoring as they netted five goals in a 5-1 victory.

Cameron Hunt Hedge led the way with a pair of goals, Alex Porteous, Garrett Milne and Spencer Corkery had the others. This week, the team heads out on the road for a match with the Westboro Wolves on June 26 in Ottawa. MR3 (Sonics) It was a statement win for the MR3 Sonics as they beat RUSC 5-0 on June 19 to kick off a four-game home stand in Mountain. David Mathers found the scoring touch as he contributed three goals. Matthew Holmes and Jonathan Bouwman had the others. This week, June 26, the Sonics host the Lynwood Barrhaven Bulls starting at 8 p.m. MR4 (Warriors) The MR4 Warriors suffered a close 4-2 loss on June 18 at the hands of West Ottawa in Richmond. Tyler Hunt and Kyle Hume each found the net for the Warriors, but it was not enough to propel the team to the win. Next week, July 2, the Warriors will be in Ottawa to take on the Lynwood Rangers. OT5 Scott MacDougall’s twogoal night wasn’t enough for the North Dundas OT5 team who fell 5-2 at the hands of Aylmer Les Cousins on June 21, in Aylmer. The squad will look to find a win this week, June 28, as they return to Chesterville to host the Falcons; game time is at 7 p.m.

Pecore wins feature on WOO Late Model’s night CORNWALL— St. Andrew’s West driver Shane Pecore picked up his first win of the season at the Cornwall Motor Speedway on June 23 after leading the 12- lap Sportsman Novice feature from start to finish. The night also saw the track get a visit from the World of Outlaws Late Models, where Darrell Lanigan took the checkered flag. “The track was pretty fast but we had a good track position and we just put the hammer down and went to the front,” said Pecore. Louie Jackson Jr., Billy Cook, Devin Caron and Thomas Cook completed the top five. The win may have been Pecore’s first in Cornwall this season, but he has been exceptional during the young campaign in Brockville. “We

have won four out of six in Brockville so we are the points leaders up there. We are having a really good season. We are going to do the Mr. DIRT Series and the Seaway Series and are going to see if we can win those championships.” The evening also marked the return of the WOO Late Models where Lanigan got out in front off a caution, with three laps to go, of the 50-lap WOO feature, and held on to grab the victory. Clint Smith, Bub McCool, Billy Decker and Shane Clanton rounded out the top five. In the 30-lap Modified feature, Morrisburg’s Kyle Dingwall kept getting his car to the front. Even with a few lead changes, he was able to be at the front of the pack when the yellow lights came on with 11 laps to go as rain

caused slippery track conditions. Dingwall took the win followed by Danny O’Brien, Stephane Lafrance, Chris Raabe and Iroquois’ Luke Whitteker. The 15-lap Semi-Pro Feature event was the first feature of the evening and saw Pascal Racette win his first event of the season over Steve Billings, Junior Delormier, Alex Gagnon and Ingleside’s Wes Bilmer. This week, June 30 and July 1, a big program is planned at the track. The Super DIRTcar Big-Block Series will be on hand on Sunday night with a 100-lap feature race, along with a complete race program. The following night, it will be a DIRTcar tripleheader with the 358-Modified, Sportsman and Pro-Stock Series’ all in action. 

Kaitlyn Hay races to win possession of the ball for the North Dundas United WR4 team in their match on June 20 against the Ottawa Internationals in Ottawa. Despite North Dundas dominating the play, the Internationals scored the only goal of the game and won 1-0. Hilborn photo

ND U18s undefeated in Southside Soccer League CHESTERVILLE— It has been a solid start to the season for the North Dundas United U18 squad as they find themselves unbeaten and atop the standings in the Southside Soccer League. ND 9 Nepean City 2 North Dundas opened their season with a 9-2 win over Nepean City on June 3 in Chesterville. Shaun Crook led the way with a trio of goals. Bradley Scheepers scored two, Ben Schoones, Dan Trumper, Mathew Laflamme and Patrick Gibson all added one. ND 3 Ottawa Internationals 1 North Dundas earned their second win of the season on June 10, in Chesterville, against the Ottawa Internationals 3-1. Crook, Bryden VanKessel and Travis Marshall had the markers.

ND 4 Seaway 0 On June 15 the team took part in the Southside Soccer League Festival, a trio of games in Ottawa. The team began with a 4-0 win over Seaway thanks to goals by Crook, Will Pietersma, Gibson and Dylan Marshall. ND 3 Nepean (2) 1 Up next was a 3-1 victory over Nepean. Gibson, Crook and Matt Nightingale all found the net for North Dundas in the win. ND 2 Nepean (1) 2 The final game of the Festival saw North Dundas earn a 2-2 draw against another Nepean squad. Crook continued his scoring streak with his fifth straight game with a goal; Gibson made it three straight with a marker. ND 9 Seaway 1 The team was back on the pitch on June 20 when they

hosted Seaway. North Dundas came away with yet another win, blowing out the Seaway Kickers 9-1. Crook scored three goals to add to his team lead, Gibson extended his goal-scoring streak, Scheepers, Kale MacDonald, Laflamme, Nightingale, and Travis Marshall also all found the net. Coach Bill Crook has been impressed with the team so far this season. “I am very proud of the team as they are playing in the U18 division, however the players range from 14-18 as the U15 team and U18 team merged this year due to smaller numbers. The team has shown fantastic teamwork and drive during the early part of the season particularly since this is a newly formed team.” North Dundas plays tomorrow night, June 27, in Ottawa against Nepean (1).

Uncatchable!

St. Andrew’s West resident Shane Pecore led wire to wire in the 12lap Sportsman Novice feature and captured the checkered flag on June 23 at the Cornwall Motor Speedway. S. Lauwers photo

Yellow moves into tie for second WINCHESTER— The Yellow team moved into a tie for second in the Winchester/Chesterville Ladies Ball Hockey League thanks to a shutout win over Red on June 13. In other action, it was Blue and Green tying. Yellow 4 Red 0 Yellow opened the scoring early in the first period on a goal by Marlee Grady. In the second period they added to their lead. With 4:34 to go in

the frame, Jessica Winters made it 2-0. Winters netted her second of the game with just 1:38 to go and it was 3-0 heading to the third. In the third, Cinnamon Boulanger extended it to 4-0 and Yellow was able to shut the door from there as Jaclyn Crump earned the shutout and Yellow won 40. Green 2 Blue 2 Blue opened the scoring with the only goal in the first period. Brooke Cummins net-

ted the marker and it was 1-0 Blue after one. In the second, Blue made it 2-0 when Cummins scored her second goal of the game. However, Green mounted a comeback, something that is becoming a trademark for the team this season. With 4:21 to go in the second, Kaila Beckstead scored to cut Blue’s lead to 21. Then in the third, Jen Whitteker found the tying goal and this one ended in a 22 tie.


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Page 22 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

White still unbeaten in Dundas Roller Hockey League

And The Winners Are…

Tagwi Secondary School handed out their annual year-end athletic awards at a banquet on June 17. The event took the time to present team honours as well as the major award winners. Here the major award winners pose on stage. Front, from left: Brett Ouderkirk, Junior Boys Athlete of the Year; Brittany McIlwain, Junior Girls Athlete of the Year; Charles Douglas, co-winner of the Athletic and Academic Excellence Award; Robyn Campbell, co-winner of the Athletic and Academic Excellence Award and Senior Girls Athlete of the Year; Connor MacLeod, Senior Boys Athlete of the Year; back: Wendell Peabody, Spirit Award for Football; Michaela Buhr, co-winner of Athletic Council Award; Katelyne Konink, co-winner of Athletic Council Award; and Cody Quan, Football MVP. Missing from the photo are: Dylan Hamilton, Football Offensive Lineman of the Year; and John Nobert, Top Junior Football Player. Matte photo

Standings cluttered in Sr. Ball Hockey; separation starting in Jr. division WINCHESTER— There are four teams who all find themselves within one win of top spot in the senior division of the North Dundas Coed Ball Hockey League, thanks to the results on June 18. After eight games this season the Leafs lead the way with 12 points. However, right behind them are the Hawks and Sens who are tied with 11. Not far in the distance are the Habs who have 10 points and could vault into first with a win. It is a different story in the junior division, who were in action on June 19, as the Rockets continue to lead, while the Oilers and Leafs continue to jock for second place. Senior Hawks 4 Rockets 2 The teams traded goals in the first period and it was 2-2 at the break. The Hawks found the only goals in the second and took the game 4-2. Scoring for the Hawks were: Travis McInnis (2), Dylan Marshall and Jason Buma. As for the Rockets, it was Marc Thurler and Mason Durant who picked up the markers. Leafs 6 Sens 4

The Leafs got out to a great start and led 3-0 at the break. The Sens tried to fight back in in the second and the game was tied at four with two minutes to play. However, the Leafs scored two in the final two minutes and took the win 64. Bryden VanKessel led the way with four goals for the Leafs, Brody Barkley and Braden Findlay netted the others. Scoring for the Sens were: Thomas Fingler (2) and Owen Guy (2). Habs 6 Oilers 1 The Habs took the lead in the first thanks to a fourgoal period. They extended their lead to 6-0 in the second before the Oilers broke the shutout bid. The Habs were able to hang on and took the win 6-1. Matthew Laflamme scored a pair for the Habs, Corey Ross, Cody Ellis, Spencer Kelly and Dayton Kelly had the others. Drew Cotnam potted the only goal for the Oilers. Junior Rockets 8 Hawks 4 The Rockets continued their great play this season in this one by taking a 4-1 lead after one. In the second they added another four while holding the Hawks to

just three, doubling them up 8-4. Cameron Cotnam scored four goals for the Rockets, Brennen McCabe had two, Cole Doornward and Tyrel Luchies had singles. Ben Fingler scored all four of the Hawks’ goals. Leafs 6 Sens 5 The Leafs and Sens had a close battle in this one. It was 2-2 after the first and the teams continued to trade goals in the second. With just 51 seconds to go the Leafs found the goahead goal and took the win 4-1. Nick Brugmans scored the hat trick for the Leafs, Bradley McLean, Elyssa McLeod and Sean DeVries all added goals. Ethan Guy scored a hat trick for the Sens and Justin Dagenais had a pair. Oilers 6 Habs 1 The Oilers split their scoring between the two periods against the Habs. They led 3-0 after the first and then, after the Habs scored their lone marker, added three more in the second to take the game 61. Jacob Zandbelt led the way with four goals, while Travis Ouellette scored the other two for the Oilers. Branden Lovely had the only goal for the Habs.

MORRISBURG— The White team remains on top of the Dundas Men’s Roller Hockey League after a win this past week, June 13 over Blue. In the other game, Red continued to keep pace with White thanks to a victory over Black. White 9 Blue 7 White got out to a big lead in the first period as they put up five goals and surrendered just one and it was 5-1 after one. The second was much lower scoring, but Blue did make up some ground and it was 6-3 heading to third. In the third, White added three more, ending any comeback hopes, even though Blue did get four in the frame. White won by a final score of 9-7. Scoring for White were Steve Mattice (2), Brandon Buma (2), Josh Stubbings (2), Aron Sherrer, Tyler

Brown and Bill Henderson. As for Blue, Travis Rowe led the way with a hat trick, Darrell Moore had two and Dean Moore also added a goal. Red 11 Black 5 The second game was even early, but eventually became all Red. They took a slight lead in the first, 2-1 and then it was 5-3 after two. However, in the third they found the net six times and limited Black to just two as Red took the win 115. Chris Phifer led the way for Red with four goals, Connor Hodgson had three, Nick McGill, Jamie MacIntosh, Tyler Hodgson and Randy Markell all scored one. Scoring for Black were Ryan Thompson and Dustin Tinkler with two apiece and Jake Byers had the single.

Ottawa District Hockey Association becomes Hockey Eastern Ontario OTTAWA— At the ODHA Annual General Meeting, on June 8 in Ottawa, a motion was passed by the delegates to change the name of the Ottawa and District Hockey Association (ODHA) to Hockey Eastern Ontario (HEO), starting July 1, 2013. The name change will become more consistent with what is used by the other branches of hockey associations across Canada. The goal of the name change will be to clearly define the area serviced and will provide for increased marketability and branding opportunities. The ODHA was founded in 1920 by Captain Edward Archibald and is one of 13 branches of Hockey Canada. The participant

base consists of associations, leagues, players, coaches, trainers, officials, and volunteers. The ODHA has jurisdiction over the part of Ontario lying east of, and including the counties of Lanark, Renfrew, and all of Leeds (except the town of Gananoque) right up to the Quebec border, including the city of Ottawa. The ODHA is the voice of all its members and participants at the Hockey Canada level. As a not-for-profit organization, a Board of Directors guides the ODHA. The ODHA also is the governing body that oversees the three tier two junior leagues in the area: the Central Canada Hockey League (Junior A), Eastern Ontario Junior Hockey League (Junior B) and National

Cedar Glen Men’s Night WILLIAMSBURG— Kurtis Barkley led the way at the June 20 Cedar Glen Men’s Night with a low gross of 36 and was closest to the pin on hole 12. Greg Vandellen had the low net

at 36. In class ‘B’ Jeff Whitteker had the low gross with 41 and Mitch Hunt the net at 32. Ron Rutley’s 46 was the low gross for class ‘C’ and Byron Brunt’s 37 was the

Capital Junior Hockey League (Junior C). The objectives of the Association are: to promote and improve the sport of Amateur Hockey within the territory under its control; secure the enforcement of the rules of the game as adopted by the ODHA; conduct elimination competition for the different Association Champions as well as Challenges for Inter-Branch and C a n a d i a n Championships; adjudicate on all questions arising from and pertaining to Amateur Hockey within this branch of Hockey Canada. The delegates also announced that a new logo depicting the name change will be produced, and unveiled at a later date. net. Josh Freak had the low gross for class ‘D’with 36. In the other closest to the pin competition, on 15, Rutley took the honours. Skins winners on the night were: Barkley, Hutt, Jim Boyd, Larry Barlow, Byron Brunt and Jim Casselman.


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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

The Chesterville Record Page 23

Berwick Rec. Golf Tourney

At left, North Stormont Mayor Dennis Fife tees off on the first hole at Cedar Glen as part of the sixth annual Berwick and Recreation MacIntosh Park Golf Tournament on June 22. The event had 72 participants and this year the funds raised will go towards benches for the park, along with general maintenance. Last year the tournament raised close to $7,000 and organizers were hoping to equal that mark this year. Below, Tony Luykx, one of the participants in the tournament, chips from the fringe as another member of his foursome, Howard McKell, looks on.

Crysler Golf Tournament

The 13th annual Crysler Community Centre Golf Tournament was held on June 15 at Cloverdale Links in Winchester. There were 57 participants for the shotgun-start tournament. The tournament raised money for the John Crysler Memorial Park that has undergone some incredible changes, making the park bigger and better for all age groups. Here, participant Luc Breton stands with Event Coordinator Christy McDermid and Crysler Recreation President Pierre Thibeault. Courtesy photo

Brad Fritsch named Honourary Chair of Great Waterway Classic MORRISBURGâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; The PGA TOURCanada is coming back to the region this summer for the second Great Waterway Classic. From Aug. 19-25 the pros of the Canadian tour will be descending on the Upper Canada Golf Course, in Morrisburg, for the fourround event, operated by the Canadian Junior Golf Association. On June 11, an announcement was made that current PGA pro and Manotik native, Brad Fritsch, will be the Honourary Chair for the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am honoured to be associated with The Great Waterway Classic,â&#x20AC;? said Fritsch.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The launch of PGA TOURCanada is great for golf and players alike.  The time I spent on the Tour was instrumental to my development as a professional. I am confident the Tour and The Great Waterway Classic will showcase the talents of the players to the many golf enthusiasts across the country, and especially in The Great Waterway region.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Waterway Classic is delighted to have

Brad throw his support behind the event that is certain to showcase a full field of talented professionals as they begin their journey to golfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pinnacle, the PGA TOURâ&#x20AC;? said Brad Parkins, Tournament Director for The Great Waterway Classic.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brad used PGA TOURCanada as a stepping stone to get to where he is today and for him to support this event shows his dedication to giving back to where he came from.â&#x20AC;? Fritsch competed on the tour, formerly known as the Canadian Tour, from 2001-06 before moving up the ranks to the PGA Tour. Last year, The Great Waterway Classic was played at Smugglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Glen Golf Course in Gananoque and was won by Vancouverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eugene Wong by one shot over Daniel Im, also from Vancouver. The event will feature open qualifying on Aug. 19 at the Cornwall Golf and Country Club. It is open to professionals and amateurs with an approved handicap of two or less. There will be a minimum of 10 spots up for

Scramble and Ladies Night at Cedar Glen WILLIAMSBURGâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; At the weekly Cedar Glen Scramble on June 18, it was Derek and Shelly Whitteker who led the way with the low net, on the round, of 24.75. Merle and Pat Reaney were next with a second low net of 25.25. Kurtis Barkley and Duane Young posted the low gross of the day with a 31. In skins competitions, Tyler Lafortune and Chris Phifer grabbed 2 on 9 and Lyle Schell and Roger March took 3 on 4. At the Ladies Night, June 19, it was Cheryl Lowe who again led the way with the low gross of 44, Lynn Shaw had the second low gross with 46. Shelia Bush posted the low net of 36, followed by Pat Reaney at 37. In class B, Christina Yelle had the low gross of 45, followed by Sue McMillan at 51. Barb Barkley had the low net of 36 and Ann Cook the second low net of 38. Sandra Julien turned in the low gross for class C at 55. Cory Witteveen had the low net with 36. Jane Hess finished with the low gross in class D at 62. In closest to the pin competitions, Gerry McEwan was closest on six and Sue McMillan on nine.

Matte photos

grabs. Junior golfers will also have a chance to draw into the event through a junior qualifying series. On Aug. 20, the event will have a pro-am round. More information on this event can be found on the website at http://www.thegreatwaterwayclassic.ca. It was also announced last month that a portion of proceeds from the event will go to the Cornwall Hospital Foundation. Funds will be raised in different ways throughout the course of the event and put towards the purchasing of equipment for the hospital.

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North Dundas Co-Ed Ball Hockey Junior Division, June 26. Game times: 6, 7 and 8 p.m. Winchester

North Dundas United (OT5) vs. Falcons June 28, Chesterville Fairgrounds, 7:00 p.m.

Chesterville/Winchester Ladies Ball Hockey June 27, Winchester

The Carkinator Car Rally July 6, Winchester 11:00 a.m. www.carkinator.ca

Dundas Mens Roller Hockey June 27, Morrisburg North Dundas Sonics (MR3) vs. Lynwood Barrhaven Bulls June 26, Mountain Park, 8 p.m. North Dundas United (WR4) vs. West Ottawa June 27, Chesterville Fairgrounds, 8:00 p.m.

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Page 24 The Chesterville Record

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Chesterville Public School’s Grade 6 class has graduated. Next year many will be attending North Dundas Intermediate School in Maple Ridge. The graduating class is front from left: Colby These two ladies were among the 184 participants in the 15 km Walk for the Fight Vanoosterom, Zane Mark, Keegan Fawcett, Cameron Cotnam, Kurtis Irven, Braedon Gordon, Joshua Against Childhood Cancer. The walkers went Miller, unidentified student, Foster Toll. Back from left: Mrs. Wade, Summer Lavoie, Jasmine Harris-Sharko, Eletha Caza, Erin Weegar, Desiray Clemen, Grace Cave, Shaye Vanden from St. Albert to Crysler and back again. The group raised $27,000 for the Children’s Bosch,Samantha Wiebe Abby Geertsma, Kaitlin Wicks, Sierra Simser, Brianna Saucier and Mrs. Baker photo Greer. Hospital of Eastern Ontario.

Walking for CHEO

Zandbergen photo

Cooler haircut for summer Grade 1 student from St. Mary’s Aiden Francis gets his head shaved by fellow student Liam Veinotte. Francis raised $1,200 for children’s cancer in honour of his friend Luke Hyland of South Mountain who is currently battling cancer. Veinotte had his head shaved for cancer research in April of this year. Baker photos

St. Mary’s Fun Day Kindergarten students Dylan Carkner and Patrick Guy were enjoying the nice weather and fun activities at St. Mary’s Catholic School’s Fun Day. The kids enjoyed face painting, karaoke, swimming and many other activities. Below: Saoirse McNamara gets her face painted by Katherine McLeod.


The Chesterville Record-June 26, 2013