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theCharrette tulane school of architecture

c

january 2011

AIAS FORUM

URBANbuild

CITY CENTER


CONTENTS

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Letter from the Editor

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A Moment with Ken

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Alumni Webzine

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Tutorial Man

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Faculty Profile: Cordula

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AIAS FORUM 2010

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URBANbuild + Design-build

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Tulane City Center

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Misconnections

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Mies on the 1’s and 2’s

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9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 peter gluk lecture

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feb. 7

francisco javier rodriguez aia

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8AM workshop ft. james p. cramer. LBC

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parallels lecture series ft. marion cage mccollar and suzanne tick 6:00PM at 2138 Magazine St.

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citizen architect screening, 6PM room 201

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front cover photo. downtown toronto on december 30, 2010. photo credit austin frankel.

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Letter from the Editor | Kevin Michniok We should all attempt to understand the power of the written word. The original three founders of theCharrette created this publication to bridge the relationship between student and faculty and provide a creative voice with the ambition to broadcast TSA’s tremendous work. With this platform, we can express a passion for many inter-disciplinary realms and provide a forum for debate. That was evident then as it is now. This January Issue of theCharrette is particularly dedicated to our three founding editors: Naomi Homison (originally from Pittsburgh, currently engaged in the Peace Corp in Trujillo Peru), Carter Scott (owner of his own firm Beatha Studios in his hometown of Louisville) and Nick Vann (from Tempe currently working in New Orleans for Trapolin Peer Architects). We’ve evolved a lot since their leadership but they began the spark with which we now possess. As theCharrette continues to change, more and more people are reading our work and we appreciate your input on all levels and aspects. theCharrette is as much writing as it is design; the two are intertwined

and the success of our journalistic work must be complimented by solid graphics that represent the diversity of each article we write. Not only are we currently engaged in journalism as many of are alumni are but so too is Kevin Frank TSA ‘05. As Editor in Chief, he founded with fellow alumni Jenny Pelc TSA ‘05, Breeze Glazer TSA ‘06 and three others the online magazine “Archilepsy”. Congratulations to Kevin on a successful IssueZero (with already 1153 views on Issuu.com). Particularly interesting is the diagram on pages 28-29 explaining the interconnections of their editorial squad. Best of luck to the entire staff as they roll out new issues and I’m keen on reading their upcoming article about “An Architect’s Guide to Schmoozing at Cocktail Parties.” Read further into this issue for my fellow editor Hannah and her conversation with Kevin on Archilepsy thus far. Send us emails at theCharrette@gmail.com and please share our work with others.

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A Moment with Ken | Career Service & Publications As we gear up for the Career Expo, how important is it to think about providing an in-house career service at TSA? We are already doing quite a few things to support students in this regard.  Individual faculty and Assistant Dean Wendy Sack are much more active in this arena than most students realize. We are also working on a strategy to develop these support roles in a more coordinated and transparent way.   I anticipate that we will be making real progress in this regard during the next academic year. It takes money to “provide an in-house career services” unit at TSA, and there are always competing demands for resources.   We have invested heavily in digital technologies, personnel to support these efforts, and we have also invested significantly in new faculty (both full-time professors and numerous adjunct faculty). Nonetheless, I am committed to making progress “in house” as a complement to the resources that students can pursue in the Central Tulane Career Office.

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How close is TSA to producing a publication specifically with student work to further exhibit our student’s skills to prospective students and others? We are on tract for the Review to come out in the summer of 2011, covering two academic years.  Students and faculty have been tremendously cooperative and indeed enthusiastic about this work. Jill Stoll has played a key role in pulling the material together for us, and the book is already designed.  We just need to plug work from fall, 2010 and spring, 2011 into it and we will be printing it once we do.  It will also be available online.


AIAS Tulane Career Expo AIAS Tulane once again is putting on the annual Career Expo, this year moved back into Richardson Memorial. A month long workshop series and panel discussion will culminate into the event on March 25. Look for more information in the coming weeks and start preparing your resumes and portfolios. Poster by Scott Heath, Co-Chair Career Expo.

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ALUMNI WEBZINE tsa alumni launch online magazine: archilepsy

hannah ambrose

editor and chief: kevin frank

At the beginning of the year you may have read Dean Schwartz’s email congratulating Kevin Frank, TSA ‘05, Jenny Pelc, TSA ‘05, and Breeze Glazer, TSA ’06 on the launch of their online architectural magazine, Archilepsy.

professional” and “progressing as a designer”.  Ultimately, it’s up to you make sure you don’t end up like the designosaur sitting in the cubicle next you, ripping off old Morphosis projects that haven’t been relevant for a decade.

I recently had the chance to interview Kevin Frank (editor and chief of Archilepsy) on his decision to pursue journalism in addition to architecture, and the content of his informative, yet mischievous webzine. His responses were insightful, witty, and thought-provoking… which, if you’ve read IssueZero, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

One issue that seems to be particularly “hot” with students right now is that of the unpaid internship. Do you think that foregoing a summer’s worth of income for the “prestige” of working for a talented architect is ethical and worth the risk/effort?

On page 3 of Issue Zero, you talk about your motives for creating the webzine. You list: “Frustration with the glaring disconnect between academia and the design profession, the lack of critical discussion in the design industry” and, “Just being pissed off at having to be grown-up.” Can you remember a situation that sparked this discontent for you? I wouldn’t necessarily classify my attitude as discontent. It’s more of a restlessness…an overwhelming and anxious desire to spend my time and energy doing meaningful things that actually contribute to the ongoing evolution of Architecture…instead of contributing to the quarterly figures of some faceless client and the ongoing evolution of a corporate design firm’s marketing brochure. Okay, so maybe it is discontent. You nailed it. On page 3 of Issue Zero you ask, “Are you exceedingly frustrated  with the glaring disconnect between academia and the design profession?” I suppose I’d like to know what advice you would give to a student who feels this way.  For those students who are entering the professional realm, I have a salient piece of advice. If you are dedicated to maintaining critical, academic rigor in your design process, you can’t rely solely on your workplace for opportunities.  Seek out other like-minded designers and engage in design dialogue on a regular basis.  Find outside design competitions to challenge you in ways that your company can not.  Keep in touch with professors who pushed you to dig deeper into the theoretical basis for your designs. Investigate contemporary designers that interest you and keep current on their recent work.  There is a vast difference between “developing as a 6

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Full disclosure: I worked for Office dA in Boston and for Allied Works in Portland as a voluntary, unpaid intern. Personally, I chose to offer my services to those firms because I was utterly fascinated by the work they were doing, and I wanted to see for myself how to execute such sophisticated projects in a real-world setting. I worked nights and weekends at J Crew (yes ma’am, that pink seersucker jacket perfectly accentuates those Nantucket Red chinos) to pay the bills. And I have absolutely no regrets. Do I think “prestigious” firms should solicit unpaid interns? No. Do I think students should spend their valuable time doing grunt work for free just to get a recognizable name on their resumes? Of course not. But if you’re willing to work your after-hours-ass off for a summer serving food or peddling shoes so that you can get firsthand experience working alongside some of the best minds in the industry… by all means, I would encourage you to go for it. Basic rule of thumb: the smaller the firm, the better your experience will be. Your editorial in Issue Zero is focused on your love for travel. How important do you think it is for young designers to get out of their “comfort zone” and experience the world? Do you have any future travel plans that we might hear about in issues to come? Funny you should ask…I’m actually writing this from Shanghai. One of the perks of working for an international corporate firm is the opportunity to travel (in the past two years, by way of design competition or traveling fellowship, I’ve been to Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Brussels, Cologne, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Washington DC, Dallas, and Los Angeles). I can’t stress enough how important it is for young designers to get out there and experience the world. From complex urban solutions


IssueZero of Archilepsy. Images courtesy of Archilepsy Magazine.

to thoughtfully responsive local vernaculars…your eyes are opened to so much when you see how other cultures solve design problems. My first trip outside the lower 48 was by way of the Tulane Class of ‘73 Traveling Fellowship. I traveled to Switzerland to study the work of Peter Zumthor and Herzog & deMeuron. I was absolutely blown away by the quality of their details and their sensitivity to the surrounding cultural and geographical landscapes. As far as future travel, I’m sure I’ll be making my way back to China soon, as well as a brief trip to the Middle East. A writer for theCharrette described Archilepsy as a fusion of magazine and comic book. Do you agree or disagree with this description? I completely agree. I hope that by featuring Bjarke Ingels Group in IssueONE, we make it clear that we were inspired by BIG’s recent monograph, Yes Is More, in developing the format of ARCHILEPSY. When discussing the graphic personality of our magazine, it became clear very early that we wanted to eschew the traditions and standards set by the industry magazines. Instead we looked to Wired, Esquire, Popular Mechanics, our favorite websites, various iPad apps, and yes—comic books—to provide inspiration. Do the editors of Archilepsy (yourself included) practice architecture in addition to producing your webzine? If so, how do you balance the demands of both ventures? Yes, we all work for relatively large design firms. I’m a designer with RTKL, an international corporate firm with offices around the world. Bryan Finnegan is also a designer there. Alexi Karavokiris works for the Los Angeles office of RTKL. Dominick Gallegos is a designer for HOK in Chicago. Breeze Glazer is the Research Knowledge Manager for Healthcare Sustainability at Perkins+Will in New York. Jenny Pelc is an associate at Eskew Dumez Ripple in New Orleans. Balancing both ventures has been challenging, but with the help of several online collaboration tools we’ve managed to stay connected. We use Skype regularly for visioning discussions, editorial critiques, and brainstorming sessions. We also have a Yammer network that we use like a private Facebook wall to post article ideas, suggestions, leads, and progress updates. Dropbox hosts our online file network, and of course, we send each other dozens of emails and texts every day. January 2011

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Part of page 30 is dedicated to covering your graphic decisions when making Archilepsy. You chose Adobe Caslon Pro, Myriad Pro, and ITC Avante Garde Gothic for the majority of text, but chose to design your own font for the masthead and logo. Why was designing a signature font important to you? Have you always been interested in typography? One of the most significant lessons that we’ve learned working for corporate firms is the importance of branding. Finding the right family of typefaces to embody both the serious and tongue-in-cheek sides of our personality was critical. Even more critical was establishing that identity through a logo. Bold, broad-shouldered characters, with perfectly aligning cross bars send a clear message: “I mean business.” Rounded corners, and a constantly evolving hatch pattern says “Take it easy pal…I don’t take myself that seriously”. It’s basically the mullet of typefaces. On page 5 you insist that Archilepsy will not be defined by “The glossy snapshots dwelling next to the checkout counter at Whole Foods.” Let’s say Archilepsy’s quirky-yet critical voice becomes a smash-hit with the young, hip community that frequents such establishments. Would you accept an offer to be published on paper or decline and maintain Archilepsy’s identity as a web-only publication? I wouldn’t say we have anything against the printed format, per se. We do, however, have plenty to say about the absolute trash that’s printed on the majority of printed formats. And while we certainly couldn’t manage a print publication ourselves (spot color vs. process color, costly advertising proofs, national distribution, subscription tracking, etc.) we would definitely consider any reasonable partnership that wouldn’t effect or limit our journalistic integrity in any way.

l Tulane alumni staff Kevin Frank Editor in Chief, Chicago, IL

Breeze Glazer Associate Editor, New York, NY

Jenny Pelc Associate Editor, New Orleans, LA

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Finally, Can you share with us a memorable moment from your time here at TSA? I’ll never forget the night I walked into Richardson Memorial to find that my good friend Patrick Horigan (TSA ’05) had started a smear campaign against me for 5th Year Class Representative. I had just finished my term as President of the Architecture Student Government, and was preparing to hand over my responsibilities so that I could focus on my thesis during 5th year. But as soon as I saw the amateur Photoshop jobs that Patrick had cobbled together and plastered all over the building…I had to retaliate. I proceeded directly to the print lab and spent the next 6 hours crafting revenge-themed Anti-Patrick campaign flyers as a counter strike. When the next morning rolled around, as dozens of prospective students strolled through the building on their official campus visit, they were greeted by hundreds of inappropriate flyers with crude humor, questionable language, and regrettable usage of clip-art. As it turned out, our campaigns were successful…we both lost. We celebrated our joint success/failure together that evening at the Avenue Pub over a few pints of Guinness and a basket of Mini-Tacos. We are still great friends. If you haven’t already, make sure to subscribe to Archilepsy at archilepsymagazine.com and join their facebook group online! Thanks Again to Kevin Frank for providing us with such an in-depth interview. Kevin also asked that I extend an invitation for all interested faculty/students to collaborate with the Archilepsy team. If you have an unpublished critique or particularly compelling thesis, SEND IT IN with your resume to editor@archilepsymagazine.com.


Tutorial Man l Live Paint is Nothing to be Scared of Tyler Guidroz

Illustrator works well with PDFs plotted from AutoCAD, and with its “Live Paint” feature you can quickly render solid the walls, floor plates, and programmatic areas of your printouts in time for your fast approaching desk crit. Start by opening Illustrator and loading the desired PDF file plotted from CAD. It may be important to delete the viewport box from the file’s AutoCAD paper space layout, something that is not seen in illustrator but may interfere with grouping objects later on. First, select all the lines of your drawing. Next, find the live paint bucket tool on the toolbar (Figure 2), or just use shortcut: K. Make sure your fill and stroke swatch selector (Bottom left corner) is set to the desired colors, and click inside the first area to be shaded in order to create a “live paint group” of the selected lines. Illustrator detects boundaries automatically and creates areas (outlined in red when hovered over), which can be pochéd simply by clicking. NOTE: Illustrator can only detect the boundaries of linework that actually meets. While it is possible to edit gaps in Illustrator, the AutoCAD work brought in needs to be as precise as possible. Selecting something lines that do not meet prompts the infamous “fish” dialogue box (Figure 1). Once all areas have been shaded, a crucial step is necessary which is often overlooked. A common aspect that deters users from using live paint is the strange grouping that occurs once lines are made into “live paint groups”. The selection boxes now have strange squares with stars inside them, and you may notice that if a boundary line is moved, the shading it bounds is deleted. This is because Illustrator is operating in a sketch mode of sorts. It thinks that you are not finished live painting, and is continuously reading the file and determining boundaries. It is important to tell the program you are done and detach the shading from the linework. If you are finished, or wish to edit the linework without losing your shadings, select the live paint group and click on “Expand” in the live paint toolbar. (Figure 3) This important step tells Illustrator that you are done and converts your shaded areas into independent objects while returning your linework into individual objects as well. Select one of your new objects (indirect select), then go to Select, Same, Fill Color to get all of them (Figure 4). Move the objects to a new layer to put them above or below your linework, or to turn them on or off (Figure 5). This process can be repeated multiple times with the same file as long as the groups are being expanded each time. When used properly, the Live Paint tool is one of the quickest ways to enhance line drawings and reinforce design intentions.

Command List Command (Control) O > Open desired file Delete viewport boundaries with indirect select tool (Shortcut A) Select all lines Live paint bucked (Shortcut K) Modify fill and stroke swatches Click to Create live paint group Click inside desired areas Escape to deselect Direct Selection tool (V), Select group In the Group Toolbar, click Expand Move new objects to new layer

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Faculty Profile | Frank Xiong

CORDULA

Rodin Museum Samsung Headquarters. one of gray’s projects with KPF. photo credits ken mccown

Tulane University is regarded as a leader in education due in part to the strength and diversity of its faculty. This month, the faculty profile series on international professors features Cordula Roser Gray, Professor of Practice at Tulane School of Architecture. Second years have experienced her teachings as a part of last semester’s team of studio professors and current fourth year students have the luxury of her guidance in their studio this semester. Cordula Roser Gray’s life started right outside the German metropolis of Frankfurt. Growing up, she spent the majority of her younger life attending an all-girls school. At the age of nineteen, Cordula moved to the Capital, Berlin, to study architecture in a technical university Technische Fachhochschule. “I chose architecture because it combines technical elements with art and culture, all the things that I enjoy” says 10

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Gray. During her schooling, she received a 6-month internship at the New York City firm Kohn Pedersen Fox. After graduation, KPF invited Cordula Roser Gray back for a permanent position. At the age of 25, Cordula Roser Gray left her home country for the bustling cultural hub that is New York City. As an ambitious young architect, Cordula Roser Gray worked for many different firms and designed a wide variety of buildings. Her repertoire of well-established firms includes Kohn Pedersen and Fox (KPF), Skidmore Owings Merril (SOM), and TEK Architects. One of her biggest projects was the Rodin Museum Samsung Headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, a building for which she saw almost the entire design process. The projects Gray worked on in New York varied from skyscrapers to smaller cultural projects to interior space designs.


Jack and Jake’s Market. New Orleans

After nine years in the Big Apple, Cordula Roser Gray made her move to New Orleans to begin a new chapter in her life. “I came to New Orleans mainly because my husband was from here,” explains Cordula. Since being in New Orleans, Gray has worked in the studios of Eskew + Dumez + Ripple and has been teaching at Tulane. She was even a part of the team that continued to instruct thesis students during the Katrinasemester in Phoenix, Arizona. Since then she has been teaching on and off, splitting her time with working with the Tulane City Center and her own practice, crgarchitecture. Since she has been in the city, Cordula has been involved in various projects including the Hollygrove Farmer’s Market, the A.L Davis Park, smaller scale residential housing, and a prototype for a local supermarket chain. Cordula believes it is key to discover your own strengths and weaknesses

in school. “You don’t have to be a designer,” explains Cordula, “there are so many professions that aren’t in the immediate realm of architecture.” Since it’s a universal education, Gray argues that students shouldn’t be intimidated by exploring other career paths after architecture school. Cordula encourages students to branch out by seeking internships, travelling and experiencing living in a big city to understand its offerings, competitiveness, and the level of productivity unique to larger-scale urban environments. Fun fact: Cordula played bass guitar in a band called The Cogs which can be found on iTunes.

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TASTE OF TORONTO AIAS FORUM Conference. Toronto, ON Sanaa Shaikh

This past winter break, fourteen TSA students made their way to Toronto, Ontario for the 55th annual AIAS FORUM. FORUM is the largest AIAS conference and is composed as a gathering of architecture and design students from across the world. The assembly is dynamic. The lectures are riveting. The experience is one of great merit. Spread over a series of four days, FORUM was held at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel seated in a prime location of Toronto, directly across from Union Station. Each day focused on a clear issue or idea prevalent in the contemporary design industry; technology, sustainability, social consciousness, and globalization were such topics explored. Along with seminars, discussing topics such as Urban Culture, Selling Yourself Without Selling Out and Working Your Words: Getting Published, the event hosts firm crawls, a design competition, and provides several workshops on professional development and software skills. Keynote speakers including James Timberlake, FAIA, who lectured at TSA in September, were crucial moments in the conference. An Architecture College + Career Expo was held in which companies like Autodesk and fellow schools like USC helped students explore opportunities present in academia. TSA‘s own table reflected positively on the school as many students heeded the strong curriculum and dedication to social justice.

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from left: st. lawrence market; old city hall; toronto’s flatiron building; CN tower; 60 richmond e. housing cooperative; TD building; fairmont royal york hotel; photo credit alicia zimmerman and austink frankel.


FORUM is not only populated by design students but is well attended by the leaders of the industry. National AIA President Clark D. Manus, FAIA gave crucial advice to AIAS Tulane’s Board of Directors on how to implement new ideas into Spring semester. “Kevin and I thought Mr. Manus energized our outlook on AIAS’s heightened role at Tulane” Vice President Michael Bosio said. Dean Schwartz attended with wife Juddith Kinnard, who was representing the American Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) as President-Elect. FORUM is not just a place to learn from peers but to gain connections within the industry and absorb the views of bright minds who are most active in the profession today. Though FORUM becomes a phenomenal source of information and networking opportunities, it is also an opportune moment to witness one of the most well organized student organizations in action. The elections for each Quad Director, Vice President, and President take place during the Council of Presidents meetings, a pivotal part of the AIAS as it determines the new year’s executive board and with it the confidence of new initiatives in place for the following year. Along with board elections, the FORUM location two years down the road is voted on. AIAS members will have the opportunity to attend FORUM next year in Phoenix, AZ and Savannah, GA the following year. “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” or so the saying goes. In the spirit of fun and games FORUM also hosts several tours of the

surrounding area. Tours to such places as Osgoode Hall, Casa Roma, and the CN Tower allowed conference-attendees investigation into the urban fabric of Toronto. Even the spirit of the students before lectures is festive. Schools will often times invent a “roll call” to perform or say as their school name is called before the start of each keynote speaker. With around 1,000 students attending FORUM, an equally intellectually stimulating, eye opening, opportunistic, and exciting experience unfolds in unique locations with place-specific architecture worthy of the analysis it gets. The 55th annual AIAS conference was a spectacular event, and the fourteen TSA students had a truly compelling and lively experience. These students devoted time over their break to fly to Toronto and that in itself speaks for the devotion these students have for TSA and making AIAS a continued successful national organization. In closing, Kevin Michniok, President of AIAS Tulane had this to say. “FORUM was phenomenal for those Tulane students who went because of the networking opportunities present. We are all ambassadors for the school so by interacting in conference programming, more architecture students are exposed to and understand the unique environment we have at TSA. Having Dean Schwartz and Professor Kinnard in Toronto as well reflected very nicely on the school and I appreciate their support of our organization.”

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AIAS Tulane traveled to many parts of Toronto during conference

casa loma bata shoe museum the devil’s martini royal conservatory of music 401 richmond street w. art gallery of ontario university of toronto the fairmont royal york hotel cn tower osgoode hall steam whistle brewery toronto dominion center royal ontario museumryerson university of architecture st. james cathedral daniel libeskind 2007 berkeley church evergreen brick works

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sharp centre for design ontario college of art + design will alsop 2004

art gallery of ontario frank gehry 2008

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FRAMEWORK IN PLACE URBANbuild breaks ground

Alexandra Bojarski-Stauffer

The Tulane School of Architecture is breaking ground, harnessing the talents of architecture students on actual design/build projects across New Orleans. The URBANBuild studio taught by Byron Mouton, now in its sixth consecutive year, spun off from the Tulane City Center last spring, and is now its own entity. Scott Bernhard, Abigail Feldman and Cordula Roser Gray are also teaching design/build option studios. Addressing these real world design problems takes the form of semesterlong studio projects with the potential to be built either during the semester or at some point in the near future. On the first day of class fourth years chose which studios they would prefer. Not every student got their first pick due to the size limitations of the studios, which range from eight to about twenty students. Each project addresses major issues facing New Orleans brought to the Nation’s attention in the five years since Hurricane Katrina. Construction of the URBANBuild single family house prototype is now in full swing. Students had already prepped and poured the foundation within the first two weeks of class. The house is located at 1821 Toledano St. in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans. The Neighborhood Housing Services of New Orleans partnered with Tulane once again to provide a site and construction budget for the project. Students developed several alternative designs in the fall semester. One design was chosen and finalized with a complete set of construction documents and schedules. Students must complete the entire house by May, giving them just four months to get the job done. Like a full time construction crew on a mission to meet a tight deadline, students are expected to work on the house “regularly and productively” Monday through Saturday from 8:00am to about 6:30pm. Work days 16

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sometimes extend beyond the scheduled hours, at times even into Sundays. The physical work is demanding and the weather will soon be hot and humid. Safety is of the utmost importance; students must wear hard hats at all times. The URBANBuild studio is coupled with a Professional Concerns course as well as a Structures course directly related to the program. Scott Bernhard and Abigail Feldman are teaching two option studios that focus on different aspects of the “Grow Dat Youth Farm”, a Tulane City Center urban agricultural facility to be implemented in New Orleans City Park. The project focuses on forming new concepts in urban land-use and development. “Urban Agriculture” is a concept that explores the productive farming of disused urban land. The project engages issues such as community health, providing youth facilities, micro-economic shifts and the ecological vitality of the City Park site. The facility will consist of classrooms, offices, covered walkways, an outdoor market/event space, and service components and will support the cultivation of 3.5 acres of urban farm land. The goal of the program is to provide internships for high-school-age students to work and learn on a productive urban farm, with particular focus on agricultural and health training. Scott Bernhard’s studio is structured as both a “research-base” and hands-on “design/build” opportunity. Students are working together to design a comprehensive site plan for the Youth Farm, and a schematic proposal for the adjacent City Park Horticultural facility (greenhouses, etc). They are also developing professional-quality detailed plans for the buildings involved in the “Phase 1 Construction” plans designed for conventional permitting and cost-estimation. Students will then have the


opportunity to actually construct the building components of the first phase on site. The studio will also be responsible for supporting fundraising efforts by producing a high quality graphic representation of the initial and final phases of the project. The facility is planned to open in January 2012. A second and third phase of construction is anticipated in the summer and fall of 2011 based on the initial schematic work completed this spring. Abigail Feldman’s studio is focusing on the landscape component of the “Grow Dat Youth Farm”. Students will produce a detailed site plan for the urban farm as well as a visioning document that will promote future phases of the project. The studio will concentrate on urban context, circulation to and through the site, the transition from the built structures to the landscape, long term maintenance strategies, a planting plan, and a lighting plan for the site. The studio will also work with engineers to address water management and will design a water collection system that will provide proper drainage and nourishment for the plants. Cordula Roser Gray’s studio is producing design strategies for a

Performing Arts Center to be located at Keller Square, a site in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans on the corner of Magnolia and St. Andrews. Students are working in collaboration with the New Orleans Neighborhood Development Corporation (NONDC), the ASHE Cultural Arts Center and other stakeholders invested in the project. Much of the surrounding properties are blighted and abandoned. The goal of the development is to reconfigure the existing buildings to provide an educational focal point within the neighborhood and the city that will host cultural activities for underprivileged youth from the surrounding area. In an effort to revitalize the community, the project aims to incorporate a dance theater, practice studios, a café/community center, exterior performance space and an outdoor recreational space with a potential playscape and/or growscape. At the end of the semester the design strategies will be presented to the City, with the intention to allocate funds in order to realize the project.

from the foundation to the final product, students hands are on the project.

concrete pour

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spreading concrete

placing floor boards

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assembly of wood framing

aligning wood frame

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CIVIL ENGAGEMENT Tulane City Center gives back to the community Cameron Conklin

a.l. davis site plan. photo credit a.l. davis project team

One of the most distinct characteristics of Tulane University is the continuous passion for service through learning, by helping the local community of New Orleans. Many are involved in this effort throughout campus, and here at TSA, we have a great example of this on our 4th floor. The Tulane City Center, which was created directly after Katrina, is stationed right next to first year studio. The City Center is brought to life through the direction of Scott Bernhard, Dan Etheridge, Emilie Taylor, and Carey Clouse. Together they form TCC, the “research and outreach” branch of TSA. TCC is based on the use of design to “empower and engage” with New Orleans. They strive to improve communities inhabited by individuals who would otherwise be unable to afford design services. In doing so, they also give students and faculty unique design experiences. The City Center works primarily with community partners who seek design expertise. Many of the designs that the City Center creates, such as the Covenant Farms project, do not actually get build by TCC. Instead, they make “visioning booklets”, which lay out the design concepts and logistics of a project. This booklet is most often used as a marketing tool for the community partners to generate donations for development. TCC offers these booklets free of charge in hopes it will encourage donors to support the idea. However, the City Center has also participated in the construction of certain designs. For example, the Hollygove Grower’s Market and Farm is an idea that is being fleshed out through the New Orleans Food and Farm Network, the Carrolton-Hollygrove Community Development Corporation and Tulane City Center. Although TCC is no longer connected with the URBANBuild design studio, students and faculty play a vital part in fulfilling the goals of the Center, specifically when the project is developed past conception. Faculty members are asked to be project leaders for specific projects such as Sam Richards and Cordula Roser for Hollygrove and Jonathan Tate for the Backstreet Cultural Museum. As students in TSA, involvement in TCC is often contingent on design work. If a project leader finds your work in studio to be exceptional, they may ask you to participate in their project. TCC also has a running list 20

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of applications that project leaders may view to see who is interested in the program. The center has received 40 to 50 applications, but only six to twelve positions have been allocated. The competition for these positions is high because students are given the opportunity to see their own ideas at work in their community. Also, it provides the chance to work on a project that wouldn’t be feasible in a traditional firm due to monetary limits. Students working with TCC take on numerous aspects of the design and development process. Students have worked on the graphic and computer aspects of design, helped with writing and research, gone on site visits, and also met face to face with clients. If you want to work with TCC then stop by their office and fill out a short application, but don’t forget, you have to work hard in studio! With the help of dedicated faculty members and students, The Tulane City Center is constantly finding new projects and pursuing new ideas to help New Orleans grow. Recently, they have begun to offer Request For Proposals (REP’s), to non-profit organizations. This is an invitation for these organizations to apply for City Center services. Through REP’s, organizations are given a chance to see their idea pan out, and TCC can decide which projects will be most beneficial to the community. The most recent new project the City Center is working on is called the Grow Dat Youth Farm. TCC is working with the support of City Park to create a four-acre educational farm. The A.L. Davis Park project with Cordula Roser Gray as project lead seeks to encourage neighborhood development by redeveloping the park into an urban center for recreational activity. As an activator for social engagement, the park will be used in a multi-purpose fashion with performance space also being allocated for mardi gras indians. Its an optimistic approach that currently seeks the financial backing of private investors who can ensure these proposals see their completion. These projects are extraordinary examples of Tulane City Center’s ability to give to the community, facilitate learning within Tulane School of Architecture, and expand Tulane University’s outlets for continued service and participation in this city during the post-Katrina years and long term.


A.L. Davis renderings. photo credits a.l. davis project team

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Misconnections Sultry Stair Walker We shared a passionately brief gaze this morning on the staircase before class. Your slicked back hair reminiscent of the Iceland hockey coach from the Mighty Ducks 2 and incredibly flattering hipster jeans are exactly what I need to start my day. Love at first sight. Hot Historian I never thought I could be so stricken by a man with a case for his banana. Your rugged smile and black Etnies compliment your smooth Pierce Brosnan-esque accent ever so romantically. Contemporary architecture has never looked so good. Beetle Beauty It was a cloudy morning when I saw you park your VW beetle and you brightened my existence with your presence. Gracing the earth with your gentle steps, I had never witnessed a combination of style and wide rimmed hipster glasses so irresistible. I fought the urge to instinctively lunge behind shrubbery and watch you from a far, as is standard protocol with all my crushes, and followed you into the building. As we passed the Drawing Board en route to the elevator, my heart quivered at the thought of holding an awkwardly casual elevator conversation but it seemed our time together would be short lived – your choice to take the elevator to go up one flight of stairs only heightened my curiosity in your eccentricities. If you read this, I’m watching you. Monday Tuna Lover. Drawing Board this past Monday you were sitting there like you always do. Tuna. Whole wheat. Lettuce tomato pickles. Probably mayo and a splash of crystal if I had to guess. Wearing skinny jeans and a flashy button down and sports jacket that would make Giorgio Armani squirm. Just wanted to say hey and ask you if those smokey spectacles are custom. If discussing the potential behind Rhino’s ‘maelstrom’ command over some tuna fish sandwiches and lattes sounds like your thing, I’m game.

TSA 3rd Floor Bathroom Pad

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sketches by sanaa shaikh


MIES on the 1’s and 2’s Studio Tunes inspired by Mr. Farnsworth

To Build a Home- The Cinematic Orchestra ‘There is a house built out of stone Wooden floors, walls and window sills...’ If I had to pick just one this would be it. Awesome late night studio music. An extremely mellow and melodic piano accompanied by chilling vocals. Its no surprise this song opens “Ma Fleur”, the third album by this relatively unknown British group. Mies would have been proud. Architecture! - 3-2-1 Contact “To make sure that a building is built with precision, architects make a lot of decisions! Will it be an office, a store, a home? Be built out of steel? Have an arch or a dome?!” As if the 80’s weren’t an awkward enough period for pop culture. 3-2-1 Contact came along making educational videos for American youth. I don’t think this even qualifies as music but what do I know.

Here I Dreamt I was an Architect- The Decemeberists “And I am nothing of a builder But here I dreamt I was an architect And I built this balustrade To keep you home, to keep you safe From the outside world But the angles and the corners Even though my work is unparalleled They never seemed to meet” This is actually just another song about a guy getting dumped but The Decemeberists never disappoint and this is no exception. They will be playing at Jazzfest. If you’re into this genre and are looking for more, check out Tarkio, Neutral Milk Hotel or Okkervil River. Little Room - The White Stripes “And when you’re in the bigger room You might not know what to do You might have to think of How you got started in your little room” A Catchy, short song about a room not meeting the spatial requirements of songwriter Jack White. So Long Frank Lloyd Wright - Simon and Garfunkel “Architects may come and Architects may go and Never change your point of view. When I run dry I stop awhile and think of you” Commemorating one of the greats. Not something I’d listen to but maybe some of the older readers will enjoy. Maybe.

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editors

kevin michniok, eic hannah ambrose katherine delacey

staff

alexandra bojarski-stauffer contributors cameron conklin frank xiong sanaa shaikh tyler guidroz

alicia zimmerman austin frankel a.l. davis project team emilie taylor scott heath


theCharrette January 2011 Issue