Page 1

THE CHAPARRAL Monday, May 22, 2017

Volume 65, Issue 5

Student Voice of College of the Desert Since 1962

WWW.THECHAPARRAL.NET

/TheChaparral.net

BY JESSE NUNEZ

@TheChaparralCOD

/the_chaparral

TheChaparralNews

COD honors its largest graduating class

uation number expanded from 778

to 1,137 with 779 students alone re-

STAFF WRITER

ceiving degrees. This year, those

numbers have grown to 1,220 with 1,038 obtaining degrees.

As College of the Desert

The completion rate has

continues to grow, so does its grad-

steadily increased since 2008.

uating class each year. This year

COD's research department reports

COD boasts the largest graduating

that since 2008 the rate went from

numbers in its 55 year history.

24.64 percent to 29.45 percent as of

More than 1,200 students are grad-

2012. Since 1993 COD went from

uating this month and 490 are

awarding associate of art degrees

choosing to participate in the grad-

to 248 students to more than dou-

uation ceremony on Friday, May

bled that number in 2015 with 520.

27. With a diverse graduating class, COD sees people from all

PHOTO COURTESY OF PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE AT COLLEGE OF THE DESERT

A past graduation ceremony illustrating the vast number of the graduating class. ication.

and 182 certificates."

With as many as 2,171

students enrolled so far in the Fall

dents, as recorded by COD's Re-

2017 semester, College of the

walks of life and from all over the

"There are 1,220 gradu-

In retrospect, each year

search Department. The graduat-

Desert shows no signs of a short-

world. Students come in prepara-

ates this year making it yet again

shows a trend of an increasing

ing numbers follow this as well.

age of students deciding to attend

tion to transfer to a four-year uni-

the largest graduating class ever."

number of students. During 2013-

Whether it is students receiving

and then graduate or transfer to a

versity, earn a certificate and some

said COD's Interim Director of

14, the school had a headcount of

non-credit awards, certificates or

four-year university. To learn how

older individuals came back to col-

Community Relations James Meier.

12,816, the next year it increased to

degrees, each year shows the suc-

to enroll at COD visit www.colle-

lege years later. What they all have

" We are awarding 1,038 degrees

13,428, then to 14,063 and as of last

cess rate increasing.

geofthedesert.edu.

From 2013-2016 the grad-

year, the count was 15,440 stu-

in common is hard work and ded-

PHOTOS BY ANDREW VERDUZCO

Students lobby to protect immigrants in the valley

BY ALEJANDRO MEZA AGUILAR

STAFF WRITER

been voted on by an assembly

There was reportedly a prior

keep the protections of sanc-

regular PTA meeting on school

member and a senator.

experience at Desert Mirage

tions to immigrant students

matters.” Stone had come to

and immigrant workers.

agree on voting on the bills

group

High School. Student Juliana

went for three days to learn

The

student

Taboada said, “The superin-

The group was desig-

after having a discussion with

College of the Desert

how to reach out to their repre-

tendent of the school called

nated to speak to Senator Jeff

and Desert Mirage High School

sentatives and speak to them

ICE for a PTA meeting to keep

Stone, serving the 28th District

The Free Our Dreams

students visited Sacramento on

about the bills in an organized

the parents silent of anything

Assemby about the bills. When

organization had also formed a

May 7 to lobby for the modern-

and composed fashion.

on the school. That's not right.”

he was approached on SB 68 he

protest towards the current ad-

The bills that the group fo-

was very supportive.

ministration and the effects

ization of the California Dream

The reason for sup-

students.

Act and the prevention of U.S.

porting these bills as stated in

cused on were Assembly Bill

was

that have been set on immi-

Immigration and Customs En-

the Free Our Dreams partici-

699, Assembly Bill 450 and Sen-

somewhat skeptical for the AB

grant students, LGBT people,

forcement (ICE) raids at work

pant orientation packet is to

ate Bill 68.

699, when he heard about the

the Muslim community, people

and schools.

ensure sanctuary for all, justice

AB 699 prevents ICE

situation

of color and women.

reinvestment and transforma-

from raiding schools and edu-

The students went as

Although

at

he

Desert

Mirage

High School he was concerned.

Taboada was one of

representatives from the Youth

tive justice and educational,

cational institutions, AB 450

Senator Stone wanted

the most vocal students in the

Organizing

economic and health justice.

prevents the raids on immi-

to know if the local district su-

group, “I feel that rallying and

grant workers while they work

perintendent called ICE to pre-

lobbying is necessary for peo-

Coachella Healthy

Council Valley

of

Building

Communities.

The

The Coachella Valley mainly on

and SB 68 is another modifica-

vent

goal was to focus on two pieces

the immigration reform laws to

tion into the California Dream

school. The students who at-

of new legislation that have not

ensure security for everyone.

Act. The bills are created to

tended said, “No, it was just a

Protestors in Sacramento

students focused

PHOTOS BY ALEJANDRO MEZA AGUILAR

campus life

Pages 2-4

Features

Pages 5-6

Arts & Ent.

Page 7

Sports

Page 8

criminal

activity

SPECIAL GRADUATION EDITION COD CELEBRATES 55 YEARS

in

ple to learn about the needs facing immigrant students.”


Pg. 2 • Campus Life

Monday, May 22, 2017

The ChaparraL

CAMPUS LIFE

Why students love to study abroad

BY DAVID BABAO

living somewhere different from

STUDENT CONTRIBUTOR

their home or birth nation. Some students love making new friends and travel just to enjoy life."

There are many college

“Students also want to

students who want to study

travel the world and it can

abroad. College campuses usu-

change a person for the better.

ally post flyers to inform students

Students can learn that many

of travel and study opportunities

people are different, learn new

around the world. These trips can

languages

help students change the way

friends," said Communication

they see the world through new

professor, alex Jazan.

and

make

new

cultural experiences, meeting

Studying abroad can be

new people and experiencing

the best opportunity for students

new landscapes.

to better understand diversity

So the question is, What

throughout the word and appre-

is the real reason students want to

ciate different cultural experi-

study abroad? Several COD pro-

ences.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PEXELS

fessors commented on what stu-

Studying abroad can

dents enjoy most about their

also be a good activity to add to a

4 months. he said he loved it and

them become more responsible.

language. It can be a life chang-

travel experiences.

resume if a person wants to work

would do it again. "I recommend

Students are away from home,

ing experience that many stu-

in hospitality, at a travel agency,

studying abroad," said rivera.

away from friends and on their

dents don't pass up."

english professor, Cor-

byn Voyu believes, “Students

or with the airlines.

Many educators at COD

own with more responsibility.

For more information

study abroad to learn new cul-

COD student and active

believe that students go on these

Students are forced to learn a

about study abroad programs v

tures and experience living in a

Minds Club president, Jorge

trips because it is a new eye

new culture, with new customs

isit www.college.usatoday.com.

foreign nation. They also enjoy

rivera Jr. studied in argentina for

opening experience. It helps

and maybe try to speak a new

BY KELLEY HUSKEY

and often no supervision can

food, transportation, housing,

year. That is a total of $3,385,

have dire consequences. With

utilities

entertainment.

which could be enough for the

cut from their list to balance

an increased level of responsi-

Impose strict limits on discre-

average cost of one year of

their budget further. What ex-

bility, first time college stu-

tionary income items – the

community college.” hanson

penses can they live without?

dents

funds you have left over after

recommends setting aside $10

paying your bills.

to $20 a week for splurges.

STUDENT EDITORIAL

Surviving college on a budget

are

susceptible

to

overspending. To keep finances in order, creating and balancing a

The transition to fi-

nancial

independence

avoid

using

Tracking and managing expenses while in college

credit

Other ways to main-

is simple with budgeting tool

cards or limit yourself to one

tain a budget are to cook rather

apps such as Level Money,

budget can prevent students

or

cards.

than eat out. Use student dis-

Left

from developing poor financial

Maintain a low balance and

counts and take advantage of

(“you need a budget”).

habits according to experts.

pay them off at the end of each

campus resources. Before com-

month.

One way for college PHOTO BY ALEX MEZA-AGUILAR

and

determine what items they can

two

low-interest

to

Spend

and YNaB

Microsoft excel pro-

mitting to activities, find out

vides budgeting templates, in-

students to create good money

according to renee

about fees. Students can also

cluding one specifically for

habits is to maintain a log of

hanson, a private wealth advi-

shop at thrift stores and avoid

college students. Financial ex-

income and expenditures. Set a

sor, students should consider

paying full price for textbooks

perts say budgeting has never

dollar amount for how much

the math. "For example, $5 a

by looking for other online op-

been easier and can be done

tions or rentals.

with the convenience of a

for

you are able to spend on vari-

day at Starbucks is $1,825 per

young adults with little or no

ous items including groceries,

year. Dinner out at a restaurant

Once students have

experience managing money

laundry, clothing, toiletries,

at $30 a week is $1,560 per

everything organized, they can

BY VIRGINIA SANTILLANES

mental health community.

smart phone.

Don't be silent, join the Active Minds Club

STUDENT CONTRIBUTOR

Through

campus-

wide events and national programs, active Minds aims to remove the stigma that sur-

The

COD

active

rounds mental health issues

Minds Club members were

and strives to create a com-

very active during the Spring

fortable environment for an

2017 semester at College of

open

the Desert. The club is ending

mental health issues on cam-

the semester on a high note

puses

and its members plan to con-

america.

conversation throughout

about North

tinue working in the Fall 2017

Jorge M. rivera Jr.,

semester pursuing their pur-

president of COD's active

pose of helping students find

Minds Club shared how he

the

for

got involved, "I heard from a

active Minds is an

ing an announcement made

organization working to uti-

in my psychology class for

lize

to

members to join," said rivera.

conversation

rivera decided to join

resources

needed

mental health issues.

the

student

change

the

classmate about the club dur-

voice

PHOTO COURTESY OF ACTIVE MINDS CLUB, 2017

The Active Minds Club and the Coachella Valley Sexual Assault Services members.

about mental health on col-

based on his own personal

ious things to spread the

making a change. I'm trying

is to recruit more members, "I

lege campuses. according to

experience.

word such as social media

to make a change even if it is

look forward to a new semes-

"I took interest when

and events. My active Minds

just for one. I'm doing it for

ter

college students between the

my close friend had commit-

officers are the best and I

him," Jorge explained.

you're coming in the fall be

ages of 18 and 24 have diag-

ted suicide and spoke with

thank them."

research, nearly 30 percent of

The

active

Minds

for

new

members.

If

ready! We will be talking

nosable forms of mental ill-

other friends about it. They

rivera wants to reach

Club has had various speak-

about our club and getting

ness. active Minds develops

all agreed that he had some-

those in the general audience

ers come from Coachella Val-

ready for club rush which is

and supports chapters of stu-

thing going on, but nobody

to help bring an end to the

ley Sexual assault Services.

when we present ourselves with all the other clubs trying

dent-run

health

knew what to do to help him.

stigma of mental health is-

The

awareness, education and ad-

mental

This is why this club is so im-

sues. In past years the club

many events over the semes-

vocacy groups on campuses.

portant," said rivera.

club

participated

in

to recruit."

had one event per semester.

ter during eating Disorder

"It is not good to re-

organization

rivera describes his

This spring the active Minds

Week, Be heroic Don't Be

main silent," rivera said. he

works to increase students’

relationships with the club

Club had four events break-

Silent, Mental health Week

emphasizes to be active and

awareness of mental health

members as close friends and

ing a new record.

and Take Back the Night,

check up on family members

issues, provide information

family. "They are the back-

"It resonated with me

where a group of 20 people

or peers if they begin to act

and resources regarding men-

bone because without them

deeply and personally with

gathered at the palm Desert

strange or different.

tal health and mental illness.

I'm nothing. I may be presi-

my friend that committed

Civic park and then marched

For

They also encourage students

dent, but I go off of what they

suicide. So that when I reach

across the street to COD to

The

more

informa-

tion, check out their Facebook

to seek help as soon as possi-

say and their input is valu-

out for those in suicide pre-

bring awareness and protect

page, active Minds at College

ble and serve as a liaison be-

able to me. They are so eager

vention that is when I really

women against rape.

of the Desert.

tween

to be active in body to do var-

feel that I'm inspiring or

students

and

the

One of rivera's goals


MONDAY, MAY 22, 2017

Campus Life • Pg. 3

THE CHAPARRAL

CAMPUS LIFE

COD holds its first Grad Fest

BY ALEJANDRO MEZA AGUILAR

Naria Kitahara, a COD student

said, “I went there not looking my

STAFF WRITER

best. If had I known they were

going to take pictures then I

College of the Desert

would have tried a little harder

Cravens Student Center on April

tion announcements, so there is

held its first annual Grad Fest in

that morning.” The photos taken

the multi-purpose room of the

were for the intention of gradua-

19. Students who attended had the

little to worry about graduation

chance to easily prepare for the

photos.

transfer and graduation process. A

few 4 year institutions had booths

set up at the event for students to

their cap and gown, their pictures,

browse for transfer options and

and some time with prospective

the COD Alumni Association was

institutions such as California

there to sign students up as

alumni.

State

circle conveniently so that stu-

chance to win prizes. Free t-shirts

were given to those who attended

and refreshments were served to

keep students motivated and

ready for their graduation needs.

COD invited students to

of

San

tional University. The schools attended

dents could check in and go

around the room to stamp a bingo

University

Bernandino, Brandman and Na-

Booths were set up in a

like ticket they were given for a

The lines were bustling

with students attempting to get

to

recruit

graduate

students before graduation and

PHOTO BY ALEJANDRO MEZA AGUILAR

Graduating students lining up to get their cap and gown

join the alumni association to con-

tinue

the

experience

of

dents who signed up with the

the beginning of the transfer

the

alumni association had the chance

process. Students lined up to have

longer students of the school. Stu-

pher at the event to commemorate

what they thought of the event.

Coachella Valley and be involved

in the campus even if they are no

to win an iPad mini.

There was a photogra-

their pictures taken in their cap

and gowns. Students were asked

one last opportunity on campus

after the transfer fair at the HILB.

This is the first time Col-

lege of the Desert has created an

event to prepare students as a

whole before they head towards

another step in their life.

Transfer ceremony recognizes student achievement those scholarships,” Meade said.

BY ANGELA SANCHEZ

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

He will be attending University of California, San Diego in the fall.

Elliana Villa managed to

work with tutors in order to excel.

mony that there are many paths in

life and encouraged students to

find the right path for them-

selves..

Opening remarks were

On May 11 a colorful cer-

Math was one of her biggest chal-

given by President Joel L. Kinna-

transfer students as they continue

thought her friends turned their

Dean of Institutional Effective-

emony at the McCallum Theatre recognized College of the Desert

on to 4-year universities. The cer-

emony began at 3 p.m. in the Mc-

Callum Theatre in Palm Desert.

Over five hundred stu-

dents completed the coursework

required to transfer into a bachelor’s degree program at Cal State

Universities, Universities of Cali-

fornia and various other universities across the country.

lenges. "It happens, it happens to

everyone.” Villa said. When she

back on her she found that the

best moral support was her fam-

ily. Villa is the first in her immedi-

ate family to receive a college degree. Villa will be attending Cal

State University, San Bernardino.

Jess Lucia through diffi-

cult times in his life received help

from his priest. Lucia said, “It’s

those little things in life when we

students

learn to challenge ourselves. We

were the student speakers. Their

moments in life." Lucia will be at-

Transfer

Nicholas Meade, Elliana Villa, Jess Lucia and Sabrina Youngerman

speeches consisted of stories

ceed.

Meade

quoted

Tom

Brands, “You don't get what you

Sabrina Youngerman is

attending University of Califor-

she failed her first class she said,

“It felt like a punch in the gut.”

She took it and used it to her ad-

vantage to try harder and excel.

After succeeding through all her

deserve, you get what you earn."

pre-college school years and grad-

from a 1.6 GPA to a 3.9 GPA.

said, “Without the Edge program

After having no one to blame but

himself, Meade managed to go

Meade has been an active leader

at COD. He was elected as the ex-

ecutive officer of communications

and served as student ambassador

to the president's office. “I earned

Daut emceed the event and introduced COD student speakers.

uating from high school, she came

to COD. It was difficult at first she

I wouldn’t have made it this far.”

COD Transfer Counselor

Scott Cooper said, “Everyone is

running their own race, nobody

else’s.” He mentioned at the cere-

Aldo Perez and Kaitlyn Boyles

Counselor Maria Herrera read the

student acknowledgements and

Director of Counseling Amanda

Phillips provided the closing re-

marks.

Transfer Advocate Hon-

Associate

nia, Los Angeles in the fall. When

ended with a motivation to suc-

Planning Annabelle Nery, Ph.D.

Transfer Coordinator Veronica

tending Cal State University, San

with reading and being discour-

aged by friends. All their stories

ness, Educational Services and

orees nominated by students.

pened to us will lead us to these

Bernardino.

mester, being on hiatus from

cate of Transfer Achievement was

realize that all the things that hap-

about landing six F’s in one se-

school, having a difficult time

mon, Ed.D., Presenting the Certifi-

Maria Avalos, Instructor, Early

Child Education. Heather Benes, professor,

English.

Adell Bynum, Coordinator, ACES.

Oceana Collins, Instructor, His-

tory. Carl Farmer, Director, MESA.

Geoff Hagopian, Professor, Math-

Kevin Haddad and Alex Enriquez

ematics. Sancdra Hauf, Counselor Veterans. Tula Marin, Director of

TRIO DSPS. Jorge Perez, Instruc-

tor, Mathematics. Vanessa Potter,

Adjunct Faculty, Assistant Tuto-

rial Coordinator. Donni Prince,

Veterans

Specialist.

Michael

Smith, Associate Professor, Philosophy. Corbyn Voyu, Adjunct Fac-

ulty, English. Escarlet Wirth,

Adjunct Counselor, HSI.

Over 300 people at-

tended the ceremony.

Rosaleen Escareno

PHOTOS BY ANGELA SANCHEZ


Pg. 4 •

CAMPUS LIFE

What’s happening over summer? BY MEGHAN SORENSON

STAFF WRITER

PHOTOS BY MEGHAN SORENSON A few of the attractions coming to the desert this summer

.

Ideas for celebrating graduation

Job and internship opportunities for students BY PAUL C.H. VELASCO

STAFF WRITER

PHOTO COURTESY OF PEXELS

BY BRIANNA FERRELL STAFF WRITER

New Accounting class scheduled for Fall

PHOTO COURTESY OF PEXELS

BY CAROLINE DEGRAEVE STAFF WRITER


FEATURES

Business student soars academically

BY CHAYAN GARCIA

he achieved his goal, “My ad-

success that I obtained during

you want to transfer in two

counseling and tutoring, a study

15-18 units a semester and 7

room. They really made it so I

vice to future students has to be,

STUDENT CONTRIBUTOR Local College of the

Desert student Alex Enriquez

solidifies

his

academic

tance

University

achievements at COD by ac-

cepting his hard earned admitto

of

California, Irvine.

Enriquez majored in

business administration at COD

and plans to continue his stud-

ies in business economics

Enriquez came to COD

if there's a will, there's a way. If

years, even though people will

say it's unlikely, you can. Take

units in the summer. Take on-

Enriquez shared how

The Basic Peace Offi-

cer Training and Basic Fire

Academy Awards Ceremony all

together

24

cadets at the McCallum The-

atre. There were 12 recognized

from each program. The cadets

were able to earn their certifi-

cates after working hard at

meeting the training require-

ments prescribed by the ComPeace

Officer

Standards and Training and

Office of State Fire Marshal. Public

Closing the semester

Enriquez reflects back on his

space and other items that

time at COD and particular in-

helped me succeed in the class-

dividuals who have inspired

and helped him along the way,

would not have any excuses to

“I am thankful for many people

easy task, juggling his academ-

Professor John Gerardi, Profes-

going to take that type of effort.”

Celebrating

his

aca-

demic achievements, Enriquez

ally helped with his success at

COD, “ACES (Academic Counis a group that particularly

Enriquez admits that

the amazing professors. In par-

being a successful student is no

ticular, I would like to recognize

ics and life in general was

sor

tough, “In order to successfully

both my educational and finan-

ing my education at COD.”

Enriquez understands

faced was balancing work and He sacrificed what he

felt necessary in order to save

his own funds to fully support

ceed the event. The ceremony

Lauritizengf.

nity members and local public

James Wadlundxd, Peace Offi-

and

who especially helped me dur-

cial goals. The biggest struggle I

school.”

Marhuenda-Donate,

Professor Laura Graff as people

transfer, I needed to achieve

helped me achieve the level of

included the many cadet fam-

FEATURES EDITOR

on

priority registration, one-to-one

of

how important engaged pro-

PHOTO BY ANGELA SANCHEZ.

Alex Enriquez at 2017 COD

Transfer Ceremony

fessors are in inspiring stu-

dents to achieve their dreams

and educational prosperities.

Public Safety Academy recognizes cadets

BY JESUS MAGAÑA

mission

university

to be successful at COD, it is

of work, but if you really want

seling and Educational Services)

lege programs.

academic

here, but I am most thankful for

dent involved with many col-

years. He was a dedicated stu-

his

choice, by himself.

not transfer in time.”

shared who or what groups re-

year university in just two

my time here. They provided

line classes and study for at

least five hours a day. It is a lot

determined to transfer to a four-

recognized

Pg. 5 • Features

THE CHAPARRAL

MONDAY, MAY 22, 2017

Safety Acad-

emy Director Neil D. Lingle

greeted those present as he em-

BY JUAN RODRIGUEZ

FEATURES CONTRIBUTOR As we say goodbye to

many graduating College of

the Desert students, we also

say goodbye to a few beloved

ily members, friends, commu-

safety leaders. Among the few

cadets, some were also recog-

nized in other areas they ex-

Outstanding

Awards:

Firefighter

Cadet

Cadet

cer Cadet Yuan E. Hernandez.

COD's Safety Acad-

emy has been training first re-

celled in. Palm Springs Fire

sponders

Nalder started his fire service

ers and emergency technicians

Chief Kevin Nalder was the

event's

keynote

speaker.

career in 1985 in Utah and

eventually made his way to

in

the

Coachella

Valley since 2001. The acad-

emy's peace officers, firefight-

reach far and wide, from Ban-

ning to Blythe and from Yucca

Palm Springs in September

Valley to El Centro. For more

ment

tact the COD Public Safety

2015.

Academic Awards:

Achieve-

Firefighter

Cadet Dylan Schneider, Peace Officer Cadet Albert Melara. Marksmanship

Award:

information

about

public

safety programs, please conAcademy.

Peace Officer Cadet Patrick W.

Members of the PSA Academy in formation

PHOTO COURTESY OF COD

Professor Tapleshay says goodbye

professors. One in particular

has been a favorite for many here at COD. Students, faculty

and staff will say goodbye to

English Professor Jack Taple-

shay. He has worked at COD

for 34 years and plans on retir-

ing after this spring semester. Tapleshay

started

1A, English 1B and English 2

inspiration students give you,

The thought of retiring

have to try because that's prob-

since he is a composition in-

teaching at COD in 1983 and

structor at heart.

to his heart. Tapleshay has

doing what I'm doing but I still

has since made many memories that he'll be keeping close

taught many classes, although

his favorites have been English

I don't know how I'm going to

replace that but I'm going to

is hard for Tapleshay, "I love

ably the best part of what I

satisfactory way but I can

thing he is going to miss the

feel that I'm doing my job in a sense that I'm getting to that

point in my life where I don't

know if I can do it forever. I

do."

Of course, the main

most here is the students. Tapleshay's plans for retirement

at the moment are unknown

have a funny feeling there's a

and seems almost scary to him.

said Tapleshay.

plans at this point. Tapleshay

voice inside me saying maybe

you should not do it anymore,"

Tapleshay started his

journey at COD teaching his

first English 1A and will be

ending it teaching his last

American Literature II class.

When asked how he is going to

feel after leaving the campus

for good, "I've never done be-

ginnings well, I don't think

I've ever done endings well. There's a certain melancholy

that goes along with this. I

think you don't realize doing

this is how much energy and

English professor Jack Tapleshay

He has a few ideas on what he

wants to do but really has no wants all his students to know

before he leaves that they have to face challenges, "Never give

up. Whatever is going on in

your life, it's a challenge and I

think everyone should know

how to face challenges. Some-

times you're going to come up

on the right end of it and other

times you won't. Giving up is

never an option." COD will miss Jack Tapleshay, but will never forget his legacy.

PHOTO BY ANDREW VERDUZCO


Pg. 6 • Features

THE CHAPARRAL

FEATURES

MONDAY, MAY 22, 2017

Career & Workforce Solutions Center gets new Director

PRESS RELEASE

skills necessary to help them in

their career development while

College of the Desert is

also helping diverse Coachella Val-

rector of the Career & Workforce

More than 21,000 current

pleased to announce its recent hire

of Robert St. Juliana as its new Di-

Solutions Center. Within this role,

and past students have active cen-

and internship and externship pro-

educated workforce.

Coachella Valley, as well as devel-

opening for the community in

oping relationships and introduc-

ing the center to the people and

nearly 5,600 new people have used

perience in career services with his

ers.

MBA with a concentration in entre-

April. More than 850 new jobs

Robert joins the college

This semester, The Chapar-

ral had three returnees and 12 new

staff members. Although I was hesi-

tant to take on the responsibility of

being Editor-in-Chief, I could not be

contact with nearly 1,250 employ-

and center with eight years of ex-

arral's content and thank you to Lau-

rilie Jackson for taking on the challenge

of managing multiple classes and

being our faculty advisor. Some issues

were more challenging than others;

Grout and Salvador Rivera for sacrific-

people being visually attracted to our

ing their Thursday and Friday nights

every production week, they both

helped me tremendously. I would also

like to acknowledge the staff writers

who are the foundation for The Chap-

Robert combines his ex-

education, holding a bachelor’s

degree in economics as well as an

preneurship and small business.

Robert St. Juliana

stands are scheduled to be painted the beginning of the fall semester.

After being part of the The

Chaparral for over a year, I will be

moving on from COD and attending

a 4-year university in the fall. I will be

aged to push through for our readers.

continuing my journalism journey.

newsstands. On May 23, 2017 that vi-

per has been a work in progress, but I

during an on-campus art exhibition

Best of luck to all,

Last year, I envisioned more

sion will come true when COD art stu-

dents will paint a few of the old stands

event. The rest of the red Chaparral

I hope The Chaparral news-

paper continues to grow. The newspa-

thank the readers and close observers

who have given us feedback.

Chelsea Hernandez The Spring 2017 Chaparral staff

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Chelsea Hernandez

PRODUCTION MANAGER Anissa Grout COPY EDITOR Anissa Grout

PHOTO COURTESY OF COD

Letter from the Editor

however, the newspaper staff man-

I would like to thank Anissa

graduation.

Graduation rules and reminders

more pleased with how far the newspaper has come.

grams, giving students and gradu-

ates access to a robust network of

have been posted over the past

Workforce Solutions Center pro-

vides students with the tools and

student job-preparedness training,

employment opportunity upon

year as well. The center has made

The college’s Career &

he led community outreach efforts,

the center, which held a grand

businesses that want to partner

with COD.

tor of Career Services for a private

college in Indianapolis, Ind. There,

ter accounts. Over the past year,

the economic vitality of the

recently, Robert worked as a Direc-

ley industries retain a skilled and

Robert will help the center to-

wards its mission of supporting

perience in higher education. Most

SECTION EDITORS Front Page - Jesus Nunez Local/Campus - Alex Meza-Aguilar Features - Jesus Magana James Toscano Current Affairs - Paul C.H. Velasco Caroline DeGraeve Trending - Meghan Sorenson Brianna Ferrel Arts & Ent - Angela Sanchez Andrew Verduzco Opinion - Myron Penwell Sports - Robert Graves Paola Salcedo Roman Delara ADVERTISING MANAGER Salvador Rivera FACULTY ADVISOR Laurilie Jackson

Mondays & Wednesdays 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Office: South Annex, Room 4

PHONE: (760) 776-7244 FAX: (760) 862-1338

WEBSITE: www.thechaparral.net EMAIL: chaparral@collegeofthedesert.edu

The Chaparral will be published five times this semester. All editorials are strictly the opinions of the editorial board, and do not necessarily reflect any opinions held by The Chaparral staff or College of Desert. Editorials are subject to review by the editorial board.

Letters to the editor are printed in the order they are received with space and deadline considerations, and may be assigned to future publications.

Students are invited to submit any original and appropriate creative materials to the editorial board of The Chaparral. Materials may be sent to the following address: Editor, The Chaparral, College of the Desert, 43-500 Monterey Ave, Palm Desert, Ca, 92260.

All letters must include a phone number for verification. The Chaparral reserves the right to edit for libel and/or length as needed.

PHOTO BY ANDREW VERDUZCO


Arts & Entertainment • Pg. 7

THE CHAPARRAL

MONDAY, MAY 22, 2017

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

COD's student art scholarship exhibition

BY ANDREW V. & ANGELA S.

David Gonzalez Silva, Johnie Harrell, Jasmine Osorio, Allen

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WRITERS College of the Desert's

Triplett and Forest Vasquez.Jas-

from Triplett.

here to help." first

David Gonzalez Silva is a Studio

started out painting. He was in-

Art major. He plans on transfer-

Allen

Triplett

mine Osorio is a COD student

fluenced by Jackson Pollock. His

ring to UC Davis this fall and

majoring in Studio Art. It's her

passion evolved into experimen-

major in Entomology, the study

last semester at COD. Osorio's

tal painting influenced by his

of insects. His future work will

Marks Art Center (MAC) hosted

peers. "I believe art is my truth,

be influenced by insects, “Our

an award exhibition on May 11

my story and my human experi-

view on them, what people think

for nine students who received

ence," said Triplett. He has

of them and how they're so mis-

scholarships. The scholarships

worked on several art pieces and

understood,” said Silva. His

awarded were provided by The

received feedback from his pro-

process of work is trial and error.

Dumont Foundation, as well as

fessors. He has worked hard to

Printmaking allows him to pro-

Nancy H. Bacon, Ruth Stark and

become the artist that he is today

duce multiple prints, he likes to

Joyce Norton.

and continues to grow.

zoom in and capture these in-

Students

eligible

for

Triplett has also learned

sects. Learning different tech-

scholarships majored in Art, Ar-

to apply different types of paint

niques and using different media

chitecture, and Digital Design and Production (Graphic De-

Jasmin Osorio

helps him shape his art pieces. When he was in middle

sign). The exhibition is open to

talents started as an accidental

school he watched the Animal

the public until May 25 and con-

hobby. The desert heat compelled

Planet show, "The Most Ex-

Kyra Coleman

sists of art pieces submitted by

her to stay inside when she was

treme." He remembers the insects

dio Art major she will continue

students who were awarded the

younger. When she reached high

were always on top and that’s

her studies in Art at Arizona

scholarships.

school she discovered she could

what gave him the spark to pur-

State University. She plans on ob-

sue this idea that appears on his

Other displays at the ex-

create art, sell it and use the op-

hibition consist of artwork by

portunity to make it into a career.

then her master's. "My work is

students from the Palm Springs

taining her bachelor's degree and

Osorio's work is influenced by

mainly about exploring my love

Unified School District in collab-

impressionism. One of her pieces

for color and making art in a

oration

displayed at MAC called Dawn,

Gallery, in an exhibition entitled

is heavily inspired by Jane

Allen Triplett

"Spot On: A Tribute to Yayoi

Austen's Pride & Prejudice. "I re-

styles. YouTube videos helped

types of art such as charcoal, wa-

with

the

S.C.R.A.P.

Kusama."

'child-like' manner." Classes have helped Coleman learn different

ally like how strong the character

him learn new types of art. At the

tercolor and ink. She's also

Some of the students’

Elizabeth is and her relationship

moment, Triplett's biggest focus

learned how to sculpt different

artwork is also for sale, thus pro-

with Darcy, it's not strong, but

on his work is balance. He has

materials that are difficult to

viding an excellent opportunity

they work on it." said Osorio.

sold up to 15 of his paintings at

to support students while acquiring affordable, original art.

Osorio's advice to other students majoring in Art, "Do not

David Gonzalez

the Indio International Tamale Festival.

form such as wire and cardboard. She started exploring art at a

work today. "My work is a reflec-

young age and was inspired by

The scholarship recipi-

be afraid to talk to your teachers

“Investing in the right

tion of my passion for art and an

her mother. "I picked up this cre-

ents this year: Astrid Acero, Kyra

for advice because they know

material is crucial,” is a recom-

obsession with insects," said

ativity from her," Coleman said.

Coleman,

what they are doing and they are

mendation to other art students

Silva.

Melissa

Anthony Enriquez-

Daniels, Gonzalez,

The Marks Art Center gallery at College of the Desert

Her advice to students, "Go for it Kyra Coleman is a Stu-

and don't be afraid."

ALL PHOTOS BY ANGELA SANCHEZ

Nature photographer connects life and death

BY JESSE NUNEZ STAFF WRITER

30 years. She said she found an appreciation for life from taking care of patients. “Art is a foil for words that come with it,” she said.

Artist and photographer

Windsand began painting

Joanne Windsand showcased an array

landscapes but that soon sparked an

of photographs capturing the beauty

interest in photography. She was not

in nature, to a number of people at the

trained as a photographer but grasped

Palm Desert Library on March 15.

the concepts on her own. “Pho-

Windsand introduced her-

tographs are a connection to life, as

self as a writer and a photographer be-

well as an expression of one’s person-

cause of her combinations of

ality and experiences throughout life,”

photographs with self-written poems.

she explained.

She explained that there is an “ebb

Windsand said she is very

and flow” that her work possesses be-

patient when it comes to photography,

cause she tries to connect each artistic

taking hours before she decides to

piece with one poem so one compli-

press the shutter on her Nikon D750.

ments the other.

She will hike to any spot that may pos-

In her latest work, Bone DNA, she used weathered bones and

sess some hidden beauty. Windsand's latest photo

feathers in her photographs to reveal

book is titled “Songs of Life” in

the connection between life and death.

which she displays her poems

She also showed that wild bones had

alongside her photos. For more in-

no funeral. By doing this, she finds

formation about her book or how

beauty in everything where most peo-

to order it contact Joannewind-

ple would not look for it. “Death and

sand@icloud.com,

life are intertwined,” she explained.

newindsand.com or the Palm

Windsand was a nurse for

Desert Library.

www.joan-


Pg. 8• Sports

Monday, May 22 , 2017

The Chaparral

SPORTS

Women’s basketball player to attend La Sierra University

BY ROBERT GRAVES

SPORTS EDITOR

I transferred to Cod because I love

when asked of her favorite mem-

the sport and I've really enjoyed it,"

ory at Cod. "Those were great

said edwards.

years. Great people, great memo-

edwards has been play-

ries, a lot of fun bus rides and

ing basketball since she was a

karaoke," she said. "This year was

Say hello to Sara ed-

young girl. "I started in yucca Val-

great too, the girls were great.

wards, a member of the College of

ley and it was more of a hobby. I

They're all individually great peo-

the desert women's basketball

played other sports but basketball

ple and I love them all like sisters."

team. The psychology major is get-

was always my favorite growing

ting ready for graduation and is

up," said edwards.

edwards has also enjoyed her time in the classroom, "School

going to be moving on to la Sierra

edwards stated that she

has been interesting. I've met a lot

University this fall to continue her

doesn't find much inspiration from

of people and I've loved it. I'm glad

psychology degree along with her

professional players on the court,

I took the junior college route. I feel

but mostly from her father, who is

like it eases you into the college

edwards is local and

a paraplegic after the accident he

level atmosphere." said edwards.

basketball career.

grew up in the high desert town of

endured. "he just keeps going.

like many other Cod

yucca Valley. She and her family

nothing stops him and he's defi-

students, she will be graduating in

moved down to the desert after

nitely my biggest inspiration for

a couple of weeks, and is extremely

her father was in an accident. She

doing everything I do on and off

excited about graduation and mov-

attended palm desert high School

the court. Whether it's school or

ing on to the next challenge. "oh

her sophomore year through her

basketball it's driven through him,"

man I'm so excited! Graduation for

senior year and then found herself

edwards explained.

me is definitely a rite of passage.

pursuing a higher education at

She began her basketball

Kind of like I'm closing this chapter

PHOTO BY ROBERT GRAVES

Women's Basketball player Sara Edwards. pate," she brightly explained.

get her psychology degree in foren-

edwards will be attend-

sics. "I want to be a forensics psy-

career here at Cod right after her

and moving on to the next one. I'm

ing la Sierra University in river-

chologist. I'm just taking it one day

"I played basketball all

senior year at palm desert. She

very excited to walk and partici-

side this fall where she will

at a time. Tomorrow's not promised

three of those years in high school.

looked back fondly at those times

continue her basketball career and

so I'm enjoying every minuet of it."

BY ROMAN DELARA

playing for the TaMUT eagles.

Cod.

COD’s own signs with Texas A&M University

SPORTS EDITOR

ing

his

business

major.

TaMUT offers an abundance of

going to be on a squad that fin-

specific business majors and mi-

ished the year at a record of 32-

nors.

24 overall and 17-9 in their Sophomore

on

next season, owen is

owen spent most of his

right-

conference, which is 2nd in the

life through high school in Wash-

handed pitcher (rhp) riley

rraC. The eagles also qualified

ington state and then began his

owen signed his letter of intent

for the rraC tournament.

collegiate baseball career in

to play for Texas a&M University Texarkana (TaMUT).

owen said he chose

Southern California at Cod.

TaMUT because he wanted to

Standing at 6'7" and

Texas is unfamiliar ter-

further his education and athletic

ritory to owen, but he is excited

from

abilities, "I want to experience

about the opportunity to live

Tumwater, Wa. owen looks to

another level of playing at a

somewhere new. "It's gonna be a

take his talents to the South into

higher level of competition."

weighing

200

pounds

big culture shock. a different

the red river athletic Confer-

Whether as priority or a

change from Southern California

ence (rraC), where he will be

contingency plan, owen is work-

and Washington where I grew up, but I think I'm gonna enjoy it." Competing at a higher level means fixing what's broken to better one's self. owen hopes to improve his game, "Staying fluid, not tensing up and getting into a rush. Just staying relaxed on the mound." owen with a rather large pitching repertoire, consists of a 4-seam fastball, 2-seam fast-

PHOTO BY ROBERT GRAVES

Baseball pitcher Riley Owen

ball, change up, slider and curveball. owen says his favorite pitch

would have to say, just getting

will try to prove himself to the

to throw is between his change

offers of walk-on at divisional

eagles.

up and fastball. his most diffi-

colleges and not getting the

owen at Cod pitched a

cult pitch to throw, he says, is be-

money because I wasn't either

career 52 innings, along with 24

tween his slider and curveball. Just like most athletes, owen has gone through adver-

Riley Owen in action

PHOTO COURTESY OF COD ATHLETICS

big enough [weight] or didn't

appearances and three games

have enough mph's [velocity] on

started. lastly, at the age of 10

my pitch to get there."

sity in his brief baseball career.

owen will be heading

owen threw a no-hitter in seven

"The adversity I've faced hasn't

back home to Washington state

innings, carrying his team to a 1-

been injuries. I've been pretty re-

this summer before starting a

0 shutout victory.

luctant, I haven't been hurt but I

new chapter at TaMUT where he

Soccer captain continues his journey

BY PAOLA SALCEDO PRADO

cepted and plans on transfer-

SPORTS EDITOR

ring to Cal State long Beach. he was also accepted at Cal State Fullerton, Cal State los

as Cod seniors pre-

angeles and Cal poly pomona.

pare for graduation, 20-year-

Miranda

has

good

old Juan Miranda wrapped up

memories at Cod, “My favorite

his last soccer season as a road-

memory about a game that I

runner with the title captain of

played here was against rio

the team during the 2016 sea-

hondo College. The game was

son and was nominated for the

very hard, they had a very

all pacific Coast athletic Con-

good team and they scored 3

ference.

goals on us during the first Miranda will be receiv-

half. When it was over, the

ing his associate's degree in

players were laughing in our

business administration and

face and saying that we were

management. Miranda ended his last semester with a grade point average of 3.48, was on

Juan Miranda looking for a teammate to complete a pass.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GIO CASTILLO

bad players. Then during the second half we scored 3 goals on them, the game ended 3-3

and they were out of the play-

the dean's list for the past two years and participated in an on-

ect where he generated $48,000

campus entrepreneurship proj-

revenue and donated $9,000 in

scholarships to the college. Miranda, is also a student

worker at the Cod Foundation. Miranda has been ac-

offs!”

The Chaparral, Vol 65, Issue 5  

Student Voice of College of the Desert Since 1962

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