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The

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SHAVINGS M A R C H / A P R I L • 2 0 0 6

New Support for

The Center for Wooden Boats A new access from South Lake Union’s park has been planned by the Depatment of Parks and Recreation and CWB. This project will include a gangway from the east edge of the park to our Boathouse. The bridge will be aligned with the new pedestrian bridge going in over Waterway 3, at the west side of the park, with a path across the park connecting that bridge with this gangway. CWB will have our east-west entry gateway, as well as our original north-south portico. 4Culture, through the King County Lodging Tax has agreed to provide $7,500 toward construction of the new bridge and installation of interpretive signs in the gateway area.

Our Collections are rather unique for an historical museum because we put them to work. Some historical museums regard this as blasphemy. We don’t want to change our means of education but we also don’t want to put our collection at risk of losing their essential value as material objects of historic significance. Therefore, wee have applied and received a grant of $5,520 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a Conservation Assessment Program. Johnathan Taggart, a professional conservation assessor will examine our Collections and provide a report this Spring. You can view a color summary of 2005 at CWB on our website cwb.org. Choose “View our 2005 Activity Report” January / February 2006

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We have received a $12,000 grant from the Collectors Foundation to support an internship program with the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding of Hadlock, Washington. A graduate of their accredited school will work for six months under the direction of CWB’s lead boatwright to help with maintenance and restoration tasks on our fleet. This will add a new dimension to our internship program which already hosts boatbuilding student interns from Seattle Central Community College, and our Shipwright in Residence, Geoff Braden, who passes on tips from over 30 years in the trade to the student interns. A Transportation Enhancement Grant is federal money which goes to each state to be used for projects that add dimensions of recreation, education, beautification, mitigation, natural and historic preservation to our transportation corridors. CWB received a grant of $250,000 that will enable us to research and define a plan for exhibits and interpretation of historic of water transportation in this region. CWB’s planning will include identifying and interpreting appropriate artifacts, photographs and vessels as well as planning for their preservation. This was an extremely competitive grant. Most of the applicants were cities and counties of Washington, and they received 76% of the almost 42 million dollars of our state allotments. 148 projects received funding from a pool of over 300 project applications.

Inside This Issue:

FOUNDER’S REPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NEWS FROM SOUTH LAKE UNION AND CAMA BEACH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MARITIME SKILLS PROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 THE COLLECTION: NEWS FROM THE BOATSHOP AND THE DORA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 COMING OF AGE IN LAKE UNION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 MARTHA SAILS TOWARD 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 HAIDA CANOE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CWB LIBRARY SURVEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 CWB FEED & CARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 BOATS FOR SALE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Shavings 1


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Volume XXVI Number 2 ISSN 0734-0680 1992 CWB The Center for Wooden Boats

Shavings is published bimonthly by The Center for Wooden Boats, 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 phone 206.382.2628 fax 206.382.2699

To learn more about CWB, please visit our Web site at www.cwb.org

Our Mission

To provide a community center where maritime history comes alive and our small craft heritage is preserved and passed along to future generations.

CWB Staff

Betsy Davis Executive Director Dick Wagner Founding Director Jake Beattie Waterfront Programs Director Patrick Gould Boat Sales Manager & Instructor Eldon Tam Volunteer Coordinator & Event Manager Jean Scarboro Bookkeeper Edel O’Connor Boatwright & Workshop Coordinator Heron Scott Lead Boatwright Greg Reed Livery Manager, Dockmaster & Youth Sailing Tom Baltzell Youth Field Trip Coordinator Saaduuts Artist in Residence Geoff Braden Shipwright in Residence

Board of Trustees Alex Bennett Caren Crandell David Dolson Brandt Faatz Gary Hammons David Kennedy Andrea Kinnaman

Stephen Kinnaman Robert Merikle Lori O’Tool Walt Plimpton Chuck Shigley Denise Snow Bill Van Vlack

Design and production of Shavings by CWB volunteer Heidi Hackler of Dolphin Design, www.dolphindesignstudio.com. Printed by Olympus Press, www.olypress.com.

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Seattle needs a comprehensive maritime heritage center at South Lake Union Park that gives educational and exciting experiences every day, year round, on land, in water and under roofs; a center that provides stimulating programs that will keep the public coming back. On a cold drippy day, with clouds clinging to the water of Puget Sound, the schooner Exact dropped anchor and discharged a disillusioned band of passengers on a lonely beach. These people were the founders of Seattle. They were disillusioned but still dedicated. One month later they had cut 50’ pilings, shipped them to San Francisco and made over a thousand dollars. At that moment the City of Seattle was born, and so began its everlasting bond with the great inland sea and boats. Boats are of the highest historical significance to Seattle. Pioneer Square, our most historic site, would not have occurred without the ships, brigs, barques and schooners which carried away Yesler Mill’s fresh cut timbers. Boats and ships have played key roles in shaping the sources of employment, layout and character of this city, and yet this city has no place celebrating our maritime legacy. Those that don’t know our maritime past are missing the juiciest fruit on the history tree. There is exploration, adventure, ingenuity, endurance, courage, pride, sublime design and top rate craftsmanship in our maritime heritage. We are a city that knew native carved cedar canoes, lumber schooners, the Alaska gold rush steam ships, building of the battleship Nebraska, Pocock shells, Slo-Mo Shun IV, the Mosquito fleet, yachts, trollers, gillnetters, halibut schooners, tug boats, fireboats, boat liveries, and fishing derbies. Seattle’s first politicians hired native canoes to paddle them to Olympia. It is time to bring the Sea back to Seattle at South Lake Union Park. . South Lake Union was always a place of watercraft from the native canoes that gathered there for trading and ceremonies since a

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time before history, a landing for coal from Newcastle, a landing for Seattle’s first public transportation, the steamer, City of Latona, 60 years of naval vessels and 29 Wooden Boat Festivals. The history of the park site is a microcosm of the history of Seattle and America. We are a maritime nation, city and neighborhood. The success of every park is not the quality of its landscaping, furniture or artwork. Its measure of success is the number of visitors and the quality of their experience. What will bring people to this park is access to Lake Union and a multitude of changing programs and activities, year-round for people of all ages and abilities. The wharfs, built for historic ships, can have revolving displays that will give visitors the experience of treading the decks, hauling the halyards to a chantey, climbing the rigging or going for a round-the-lake cruise. Events on shore can re-awaken cultural memories of boats and water with heritage skills demonstrations, sea music, maritime arts and crafts, films, talks, exhibits of artifacts and ongoing rendezvous’ of classic boats. . The more exciting, and adventurous their learning experiences, the more visitors will return, bring their neighbors and friends, and support the park through financial and in-kind contributions. This park can become one of Seattle’s biggest, most popular and most educational parks. South Lake Union Park is twelve acres, but wherever heritage tall ships or small ships carry their visitors on the 700 acres of water between the bridges, that is also the park. South Lake Union Park can be a destination for its neighborhood, the city, the region and the nation. Who could resist a park where you learn history by playing with the exhibits? This historic waterfront site and this historic lake have earned a right to be the place where our seafaring heritage comes alive.


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News from South Lake Union New Floats

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The last issue of Shavings featured a photo of two unsmiling old volunteers standing in front of the Boathouse, with a caption about donations of $3000 for site improvements. [From the editor…Those gifts are designated for floating dock improvements. Of their gift, $1500 cannot be spent until it is matched by other contributions.] Well, Thanks, but we, Walt Plimpton and Dave Erskine, wish to reemphasize the need for funds to match this from the membership at large. Our floating connections to the world are in need of rebuilding. We depend on these buoyant platforms of wood, concrete, metal and plastic to safely convey the feet, wheelchairs and paws of our many visitors, members and staff. Two primo examples of recently rebuilt floats exist now: The picnic float just north of the Boat-House and the Boatshop-to-Boathouse float. Check ‘em out! We have recycled material scavenged from older floats which reduces the demand for new lumber and fittings. The next phase will require new supplies and much more labor. Several other units are in the planning. Extreme Make-Over “CWB style”! Call to find the path for donating and volunteering. Work parties will be announced. Only basic skills are needed for most tasks (contact eldon@cwb.org.) While new floats are great, it’s the folk that make CWB grand. Walt and I want to praise Brian Greene for all the planning and very strong effort and energy he has given for the last several months. If you see him {stocky, white hair, tool belt and kneepads} making things on the deck- Stop! Walk over and shake his hand, better yet, ask him what you can do! March/April 2006

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Urban centers and gridlock have become virtually synonymous. In an urban area with lots of navigable water, gridlock is inexcusable. The water is the finest kind of freeway. It never has potholes, traffic lights or lane lines. One gets on it in a boat and goes across, around, in circles, or whatever. Small boats used as pedestrian ferries that can stop at every street end need no massive parking structures or expensive piers and ramps. History has given us many examples of the convenience and fun of modest sized pedestrian ferries. Lake Union was serviced from 1870-1880 by the 26’ steam launch City of Latona. It took passengers from the rail terminus at South Lake Union, the north end of Seattle, to the villages of Ross, Fremont, Sunnyside (now Wallingford), Latona, Jensen’s Beer Garden (now the NOAA base) and back to Seattle. History is repeating itself in the best way. The Electric Boat Company has planned to provide 21’ counter sterned electric powered pedestrian ferries on Lake Union. One terminus will be at CWB where the City of Latona landed. There will be flag stops all around the lake. Operations will begin in May on Opening Day. Tom Wolfe said “you can’t come back again.” Ken Kesey said “sometimes a great notion.” I’d say in the case of pedestrian ferries, Tom was wrong and Ken was dead on. The Electric Boat Company will provide the finest kind of transportation on Seattle’s first freeway, Lake Union.

Lake Union Water Taxi starts service

Begins May 6, Opening Day of Boating Season!

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Lake Union Water Taxi starts exclusive all electric water taxi service on Lake Union using quiet and clean Duffy 21 Foot Electric Series Cruisers. The boats hold up to 10 passengers plus a captain. Initially there will be 7 established stops around the lake, one of which will be at the Center for Wooden Boats. The taxi service will operate up to 10 hours a day offering regular service at established times and locations and specialized tours around Lake Union and the adjoining waterways. Shavings 3


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News from Cama Beach Replica Cama Beach Boats B Y

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Cama 60 is being built by Rich Kolin with a grant from the Hamalainen Foundation.

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Since Camano Island has an annual Art Walk event on Mother’s Day, CWB has invented an Island Mother’s Weekend by shifting our annual Sunday Mom’s Day Sail to Saturday. This year Mother’s Day sailing will be on May 13th and Mothers Day Art tours on May 14th. There is no fee for this event. CWB will bring a fleet of small craft to ferry the participants to the heritage sailing vessels and give inshore rides for those waiting for the next sail. We will have a 26’ Umiak, which is a replica of an Aleut paddling boat used for whaling and transportation between islands in the Aleutian chain. We will also have our 25’ longboat Discovery, which is a replica of the boat used by Captain Bligh when the Bounty mutineers cast him off. Also on hand will be a host of classic skiffs built by students in the CWB workshops instructed by Rich Kolin. Some of our power safety boats will also be on hand. The big boats awaiting the throngs of Moms and their best friends will include the gaff yawl Joshua, built and skippered by Bill Harpster, the La Conner Sea Scout schooner Rejoice, Patsy Good, Captain, Jim Taylor’s Sophia Christina, designed by Ted Brewer and built by David Jackson, and CWB’s sloop Mistral, a Ben Seaboarn design, built by Blanchard Boat Company. Volunteers are always welcome to handle the registration, supervise toy boatbuilding and run the small boats. All aboard for an unforgettable maritime experience.

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Through grants previously received by CWB from the Hamalainen Foundation, the various types of Cama Beach livery boats were measured and documented by Rich Kolin. Following that effort, the Hamainen foundation also agreed to fund replicas of the two tpes of Cama rowing skiffs and the most popular outboard motor skiff. These replica vessels will be added to CWB’s working fleet at Cama Beach. The three vessels to be replicated would be Cama Beach 5, a 12’ flatbottom rowing dkiff, Cama Beach 20, a 14’ flat-bottom rowing skiff and Cama Beac h60, a 15 1/2’ V vottom outboard boat. Cama 5 and Cama 20 have been replicated by Rich Kolin and number 60 is in the process of construction by Rich Kolin. We would like to have an outboard motor contemporary with Cama 60 when she was first used at Cama Beach in 1934. Any offers? If donated, the donor will get first honors at the launching of the new Cama 60.


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Upcoming Events CWB Annual Meeting April 11, 2006

6:30 PM Reception 7:00 PM Meeting At The Center for Wooden Boats

Third Friday Speaker Cruising the French Canals Friday March 17, 2006 7pm CWB Boathouse

“I discovered what Heaven looks like” were the words of Philip Thiel when he described his nine passages through various French canals. Phil is a retired Architect (he taught at the University of Washinton) and Naval Architect. He will display his lovely sketches with written narrative of his barge cruises. Phil will offer both the esthetic virtues and practical tips of French canal cruising.

Discovery Modelers Calendar of Events Pssst: Wanna Build a Ship Model?!

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The Discovery Modelers Education Center provides classes, workshops and seminars in the skills and techniques of building ship models of all kinds. Instruction is provided for those of all ages and abilities. Classes also are held on associated subjects, such as photographing ship models, hints and tips for building, pre-build research and more. All classes are held at Discovery Modelers Education Center, Room 239, Armory Building at South Lake Union Park (860 Terry Ave. N., Seattle 98109). Reservations are suggested for all classes. For more info or to register, call Colleen Wagner, 206 282-0985, or e-mail discoverymodelers@yahoo.com

Here’s what’s coming up:

March 11 or April 15 (Saturdays) 10-11 am Peter Puget Tells All: Lt. Peter Puget (portrayed by Andrew Loviska) will talk about his experiences on the 1790s voyage of Capt. George Vancouver’s ship of exploration, HMS Discovery, to explore and chart the waters of the Pacific Northwest (and coastal waters from California to Alaska). The backdrop for his talk will be the 14’ scale replica of Discovery, on display on the main floor of the Armory building. March 25 or April 22 (Saturdays) 9 am – noon Ship Models for Kids of All Ages: Chose your model from a great selection of kits. Then build and paint your boat (kids under 7 should be accompanied by an adult to assist them) and take it home. Fee, including model kit and all supplies, is $15. Limited to 10. April 8 (Saturday) 9 am-4 pm Not-Just-Maritime-Treasures Sale: Our fourth annual sale of maritime items and everyday good stuff takes place on the second level of the Armory Building. From books to bibelots (come to the sale to find out what those are) we’ll have it all, not to mention a ship model building demonstration. Refreshments available too, plus plenty of parking. Vendor tables are still available: $20, no commission. Also will sell on consignment for you. Call Colleen, 206-282-0985. April 15 and 29 and May 13 and 20 (Saturdays) 12:30-4:30 pm Build the LaGoleta: This sweet schooner, a John Alden design from the 1920s, comes in kit form. Lead instructor Harvey Nobe and modeler Mike Graf will guide new and intermediate modelers through the build. Fee of $125 (10% discount for Discovery Modelers members) includes kit and all necessary materials. Limited to 6. March/April 2006

Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii)

I have been given the privilege of writing a bimonthly column about wood species used in wooden boatbuilding. I will do my best to give good factual information, spiced with a bit of myth, and the occasional bit of history from the true masters of the venerable trade of building vessels out of wood to sail the seas, rivers and lakes of our world. A good place to start is by paying homage to our local species and like so many of our boatbuilding forefathers I couldn’t help but choose Douglas Fir. Doug Fir has more uses than you can shake a stick at. It has been shipped all over the world to be used in nearly anything and everything built of wood. The Pacific Northwest is home to this tree and it grows in one of the most beautiful, colossal temperate rainforests in the world. The largest D Fir tree in recent times measured 15.8’ (4.8m) in diameter and was 200’ 6” (61.7m) tall. It was an estimated 720 years old when it succumbed to a storm in 1962. With regard to boatbuilding, Fir is the King, used for everything from deadwood to spars. Because of its size the old growth yields planking stock as long as saws can cut, 40’, 50’ even 60’ long, clear, and straight grained. It is a joy to work, dimensionally stable, reasonably light in weight and strong. It glues well, paints well, and dries with little defect. And as Bob Prothero of the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding used to say, “If you build boats in the NW why would you use anything else?” As with all woods, it comes from trees that take a minimum of 200 years (more like 500) to mature, to be any use to a traditional boat builder. We need to approach its use with respect and caution to protect the remaining old growth forests of the NW. We need to limit its use to objects that really need this type of material and harvest it in a sustainable fashion. Until next issue Best Regards, Charlie Moore Shavings 5


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Maritime Skills Programs How to Feed Your Crew ...and shipboard life

Instructor: JoAnn O’Connor Dates: March 30 & April 6 Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM (at CWB) Cost: $300 members / $350 non-members & TBA – Overnight transit trip on the Historic Schooner ZODIAC

Women’s Woodworking:

An Introduction To The Basics

Tool Making Workshop

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: April 22 & 23 Time:9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $175 members / $210 non-members

Oar Making Workshop

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: April 8 & 9 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $290 members / $350 non-memb

Varnishing Workshop: An Introduction to Brightwork Repair and Maintenance. Instructor: Dave Thacker Session1: May 20 & 21 Session 2: September 16 & 17 Time:9:00 AM to 2:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $120 members / $150 non-members.

Aleut Ikyak (Baidarka) Workshop Instructor: Corey Freedman (www.skinboats.com) Session 1: May 6 - 14 Session 2: June 10 - 18 Session 3: July 15 - 23 Session 4: Sep 23 - Oct 1 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday thru Sunday, 9 day workshop) Cost: $1100 members / $1300 non-mem

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Cedar Bark Potlatch Pouch:

Traditional Twining with Native Fibres.

Family Boat Building

Lofting and Building the Heidi Skiff: Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: June 10-18 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday thru Sunday, 9-day workshop) Cost: $800 members / $950 non-members.

Instructor: Greg Gilbert Date: June 24 & July 1.(Saturdays) Time:10:00 AM to 2:00 PM (June 24) 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM (July 1) Cost: $80 members/ $95 non-members

Instructors: Laura Wong Whitebear & Carol Emarthle-Douglas Session 1: May 18 (Thursday) Time: 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM Cost: $65 members/ $80 non-members

Instructor: Hannah Browne Date: May 10,17,24 & 31 Time: 6 PM to 9 PM, Wednesdays Cost: $200 members / $240 nonmembers

A week of Boatbuilding for the Beginner.

Boat Photography at CWB’s Wooden Boat Festival

Half Model Workshop

Instructor: CWB Staff and Volunteers Session 1: May 20, 21, 27 & 28. (Weekends at CWB) Session 2: July 1 to July 4 (Saturday-Tuesday at CWB’s Annual Wooden Boat Festival) Time:10:00 AM to 6:00PM Cost: $1,300 members / $1,450 nonmembers

Knots 1:

(Nameboards, Banners & Nautical Details)

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: April 15 & 16 Time: 9:00 AM to 5 PM, Saturday & Sunday Cost: $240 members / $300 nonmembers

Basic Knots Date: April 1 (Saturday) Time: 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM Cost: $30 members / $40 non-members

Nameboard Carving

Instructor: Rich Kolin Date: August 6, 7, 8 Time: 9:30 AM to 5 PM, Saturday - Monday Cost: $250 members / $300 nonmembers

Knots 2:

Simple Rigging Without a Lot Of Tools Instructor: Dennis Armstrong Date: April 15th (Saturday) Time: 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM Cost: $30 members / $40 non-membe

Knots 3: Ocean Plat Mat

Date: May 6 (Saturday) Time: 10:30 AM to 1:30 PM Cost: $40 members / $50 non-members

This is a listing of programs scheduled in the next few months. We are constantly adding new programs. Please check our website at www.cwb.org for the latest listings and information, or call us at 206.382.2628 to request a printed copy. NOTE: For courses costing more than $500 we ask you to deposit one half of your total costs and pay the remainder by day of course start at the latest. For all other programs, pre-payment in full reserves your place. Programs may be cancelled or postponed due to low enrollment.


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Maritime Skills Programs Lapstrake Lofting

Instructor: Eric Hvalsoe date: May 20 & 21. Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $175 members / $210 non-member

Bronze Casting Workshop

Instructor: Sam Johnson Session 1: April 22 & 23 Session 2: July 29 & 30 Time:9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday & Sunday) Cost: $230 members / $260 nonmembers

Caulking For Beginners

Instructor: Tim Reagan Session 1: May 20 Time: 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM (Saturday) Cost: $50 members / $60 nonmembers

SailNOW!

SailNOW! Dates: Session 1: January 21 – Feb 25 Session 2: February 25 – April 1 Session 3: May 6 – June 10 Session 4: June 10 – July 15

SailNOW! Intensive

Dates: April 22 – May 7 Cost: $300 members / $330 non-members,

SailNOW! for Women Dates: April 1 – May 6

Cost: $300 members / $330 non-members

Get Your Captain’s License

With CWB And US Maritime Academy Instructor: Captain Jeff Sanders Session 1: March 21 to May 11 Time: 6:00 PM to 9:30 PM (Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays) Cost: $1200 per person

School Year Sailing

Instructor: CWB Staff. Dates: May 6th – June 10th September 23- October 28 Time :10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. (Saturdays) Cost: $150 Ages: 10-14

SailNOW! for families

Dates: May 6 to June 10. Cost: 280 per adult / $135 child (under 14)

Docking Under Sail

Instructor: CWB Staff Session 1: April 2 Session 2: May 7 Session 3: June 11 Time: 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (Sundays) Cost: $30 members and non-members / $15 SailNOW! Graduates

Canoe Building

Instructor: Eric Harman Date: May 6-12 (Sat thru Friday) Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Cost: $700 members / $800 non-members

Canoe Canvasing & Caning Workshop

Instructor: Eric Harman Date: May 27 & 28 (Saturday and Sunday) Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Cost: $190 members / $230 non-members.

Rigging for Women Workshop

Instructor: Margie McDonald Date: April 29 Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM (Saturday) Cost: $100 members / $140 non-members

Sail Making Workshop

Instructor: Sean Rankins, (Northwest Sails) Date: May 1 to 6. (Monday thru Saturday) Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Cost: $750 members / $900 non-members

March/April 2006

RaceNOW!

Instructors: Oliver Davis & Kemp Jones Date: April 8,15 & 22 Time: 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM, (Saturdays) Cost: $225 members, $260 non-members

Introduction to Sharpies

Instructor: John Watkins Date: April 29 (Saturday) Time: 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM Cost:$65 members / $80 non-members,

Girls Sailing Camp

Instructor: Courtney Bartlett Cost: $150 Dates: April 10 - 14 Time: 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

Pacific Challenge Team

Instructor: CWB Staff Training Camp: April 13-15 (Spring Break) April 22, 29, May 6, 13 & 20 (Saturdays) Time: 8:00 AM to12:00 PM Cost: $140 Ages: 14+

Power Plant Start Up Class aboard Arthur Foss

Instructor: Adrian Lipp Session 1: April 15 Session 2: September 16 Cost: $60 members / $80 non-members Time: 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM (Saturday)

Diesel Engine Theory

Instructor: Adrian Lipp (also on Arthur Foss) Cost: $500 CWB/NWSP members / $550 non members Ages: 14 and up Dates: June 3,10,17,24 & July 1 (Saturdays) Time: 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM

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This just in: Despite the lack of dry weather the CWB boat shop will continue to function. We will paint and we will varnish; the rain be damned. This winter has been a tough one for the shop and its production schedule, but we’re pushing on into the spring with high hopes for clear skies. The volunteers and interns have done a tremendous job of perservering throughout the wetness and a number of boats have gotten done, including the finish work of a North Shore Dinghy built by a class here at CWB five years ago. I’m very pleased to announce a new addition to the shop staff, Adam Karpenske. Adam is an Evergreen State College student, and is now our new El Toro Fleet Maintenance Director. The title pretty much says it all; Adam will be responsible for the rehabilitation and restoration of all things El Toro. As the maintenance director he’s also responsible for organizing and managing volunteers on various tasks associated with the fleet. Already he and his crew have made fifteen new rudders and tillers for the fleet and are hard at work on new mast steps and partners. There’s a ton of finish work to be done on these boats, and this provides an excellent opportunity for new volunteers to learn about the refinishing process. Expect to see the fleet vastly improved this summer. Also, work continues on the Puffin; the last of the rot has been found, and CWB shipwright Geoff Braden and a variety of volunteers and interns will be hard at work this spring getting her back together. The majority of the work that remains is in the stern of the boat where water has leaked down from the deck and created rot in the keel batten and the bottom of the stern post. To fix this a new piece of Purple Heart will be half lapped into the batten and a new white oak stern post will be made and installed. This is a tricky job

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The steamboat Puffin is undergoing restoration in anticipation of her 100th birthday. This photo shows the complicated bracing and a new white oak deck beam which hold the Puffin together as CWB shipwright Geoff Braden surveys the rest of the work needed.

which requires lots of stabilization and bracing to support the boat as these structural timbers come out. This Spring also expect to see a new Blanchard Junior Knockabout grace our docks as Larry Roth and I complete the last of the work on the BJK in the Northwest Seaport parking lot. The last thing on the list is building a new main mast and boom, which will begin sometime in March.

Upcoming projects: • Haul out of the Gillnetter Admirable for painting • Haul out the New Haven sharpie BetsyD for painting and to fix a leak • Haul out the Woods Hole Spritsail Dewey • Restoration of the Hereshoff 12 ½ Shrimpo in the pavilion • Launching and rigging of the black Beetle Cat

March/April Shavings Contributors: Jake Beattie • Dave Erskine • Melissa Koch • Charlie Moore • Edel O’connor Jack Saylor • Heron Scott • Schooner Martha Foundation • Jennifer Towne Arne Thompson • Colleen Wagner • Dick Wagner


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Fantail launch has an historical ring. There are old sepia toned photos Dora will be used as part of our Cast Off fleet and also be used to of fantail launches in the late 1800’s to 1930’s carrying women in long provide instruction in electric boat operations. She will have red cedar white dresses and straw hats with fruit salad on top and men in blazer planking on steam bent white oak frames. The keel, stem and deadwood jackets and bowler hats. Fantail launch rides were an essential element will be Alaska white cedar. The wood was donated by Flounder Bay Boat of middle class recreation back then, before the era of mass produced Lumber. There will be an Elco electric motor. The Elco Company is bikes and cars. CWB invokes that time when people escaped the urban history itself. It began in 1903 and its first contract was to build electric bustle by riding in classic powered fantail launches for boats similar to our 1906 the Chicago Worlds Fair. Steam launch Puffin. But Once more construction Puffin doesn’t have a fantail. will be done by another Seattle It’s pointy at both ends. historic icon, the Boatbuilding CWB had a gap that needed School. This operation first to be filled. Before we really called Edison Technical Vocathought about being fantaitional School of Boatbuilding, less in Seattle, much less how began in 1936 as part of Seto solve the problem, Mike attle Public School System. Its Foley came along. first instructor was a talented Foley wanted CWB to Scotsman, Jim Chambers have a boat in memory of his with a brogue you could cut grandfather, Dewey Duggan. with a knife. Bill Garden, Dewey was a rugged long internationally known nashoreman and Mike wanted val architect, was in the first a boat that exemplified DewEdison Tech class. There have ey’s character. We agreed on been only 4 head instructors a Wood’s Hole Spritsail boat, since the school began. After which was built through Chambers was Earl WakeFoley family funding by the field, Roy Kobyashi and now Students at the Wood Construction Center of Seattle Central Community Wood Construction Center College turn CWB’s new electric fantail launch upright. Dave Mullens who has been of Seattle Central Commuteaching Boatwright arts and nity College (aka The Boatbuilding School). Dewey has been a vital part skills there for 30 years. Since Chambers, all head instructors began as of our working fleet for over six years. Mike Foley dropped by a year or students of the school. Seventy years of quality instruction by 4 gifted so after Dewey’s launching interested in sponsoring another boat that and supportive faculty! The first students were 18 year old men just out would reflect the character of Mike’s grandmother Dora Duggan. I said of high school. The current students average about 40 and are of both “fantail launch”, Mike said “show me a design”. We chose the elegant genders, looking for a new profession that provides more satisfaction design by Pat Spurlock of a 24’ fantail. than before. We think Dora Duggan would like that.

March/April 2006

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Coming Of Age In Lake Union The History of CWB’s SailNOW! Program B Y

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It was a little over 16 years ago - December 1989 to be exact – that a child was born at the Center for Wooden Boats (CWB). After some months of gestation SailNOW! came to life in the form of four students and a sailing instructor aboard a Blanchard Junior Knockabout in the tempestuous and cold waters of Lake Union on a brisk Saturday morning. The idea had been brewing in the minds of some of the regular sailors at CWB because they did not like to see the boats sitting idle during the colder months. After all, they must “earn their keep.” The entrepeneurial sailors spent a few weeks working on a curriculum and teaching guidelines that would prepare the students – and some instructors – to sail the varied collection of sailboats on exhibit at the Center. After two drafts were rejected by Dick Wagner, CWB’s Founding Director, and while waiting for him to approve the third one, the instructors could not make the interested students wait any more, so the classes began. Every discipline needs a catch phrase. SailNOW!’s became “Learn to Sail – in Five Easy Lessons.” The four students –three ladies and a gentleman – quickly graduated and became regular volunteers who sailed all our livery boats. All of them spread the word among friends and acquaintances. The male student had his wife and two children take the course; one of the ladies bought a 32ft sailboat; another lady became the president of SWASA (Seattle Women’s Sailing Association) and the third lady went on a four year round-the-world cruise with her husband. In March of 1990, a newspaper reporter was looking around for “things to do on the weekend” to be published on the local Sunday paper. The reporter was invited to join a teaching session which she photographed extensively. The photos and a story about SailNOW! appeared in the following Sunday’s paper starting a tsunami of students which forced us to recruit more sailing instructors and some of us doubled our volunteer hours. From then on the program grew geometrically. The first sixteen years, of course, have produced memorable students and moments. Some standout. The librarian from Skagway, Alaska whose words “This is the first day of my circumnavigation,” were spoken as she started the shore school. In 2002 we received a postcard from the Virgin Islands as she had just completed 2/3 of the trip. She still lives there. There was also the young couple from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan who believed the best way to use up their frequent flyer miles was to 10 Shavings

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spend a week in Seattle learning to sail – they did and years later they moved to Lopez Island. It would take untold time to recall the many significant higlights of this program during its life. SailNOW! is especially proud of the many graduates who have become sailing instructors, not only at CWB but in many sailing facilities of the region. In late 1994 representatives of US Sailing Association visited the Center for Wooden Boats while in other business in Seattle. They had heard of SailNOW! and they wanted to see it in action. Their conclusion was that our “less book – more hands on” approach was not only innovative but faster and more human friendly. They were also highly impressed when they saw the students learning in different types of sailboats. In 1995 SailNOW! was awarded the Outstanding Sailing Program distinction by the US Sailing Association. The Grapevine, Texas and Flathead Lake, Montana sailing programs, who had spent some time in Seattle observing SailNOW!, received honorable mentions. SailNOW! continues its productive and consistent work at CWB bringing in new sailors, members, volunteers and contributing to its annual operation budget. We have prepared a brief 16 year audit of SailNOW! for the purpose of arriving at a bottom line: • Students who have learned to sail at The Center for Wooden Boats in the SailNOW! Program (2800+) [about 175 per year] • Graduates who have gone on to become sailing instructors (35+) • Hours of instruction by volunteer instructors (16,400) [over 8 years non-stop work] • Miles sailed in Lake Union (115,000) [almost 5 circumnavigations of the earth...] • Standing in Sailing education #1 !


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The Schooner Martha, built in San Francisco in 1907, is one of the oldest working sailing vessels in the State of Washington. Today, she is owned and operated by a Seattle-based nonprofit foundation whose mission is to restore and maintain the schooner so she can continue to offer youth and adult sail training programs for future generations. In 2007, she will celebrate her 100th birthday. Upon establishment of the foundation in 1997, Martha was hauled out for a comprehensive marine survey, from which a ten-phase restoration program was developed. Since that time, eight phases have been completed under the direction of Robert d’Arcy. Significant projects completed to date: transom restored to original design, bulwark and cap rail replaced, frames and topside planking replaced, saloon and passenger cabins refurbished, a complete recaulk, new engine and drive shaft installed, new sails fitted, and new teak decking laid. The restoration program has been successful due to tremendous support from volunteers and the community. Volunteers donated over 15,000 hours in labor and local businesses donated over $40,000 worth of materials. Additional funds were provided by private donations from individuals and foundations. The next phase of the restoration is scheduled to start in late 2006,

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when d’Arcy hopes to finish the reframing and replace the bottom planking and the rudder. Future projects will involve replacing the ballast keel and the foremast. As always, donations of time, materials and cash from the community will be needed to fully complete Martha’s restoration. During the summer, Martha offers sail training programs in and around the San Juan Islands and British Columbia, with trips departing out of Port Townsend. For the past eight years, trainees have enjoyed a hands-on learning experience, whether it be hoisting and trimming sails, setting anchor in a safe harbor or plotting the day’s navigational course. The hallmark of Martha’s training program is a low ratio of students to instructors, with a maximum of six students to two crewmembers. In 2004 and 2005, twenty students were awarded scholarships funded by a generous gift from E.C. Wartelle of Seattle. The Satterberg Foundation of Port Townsend also funded special trips for the Sea Scouts and the Puget Sound Explorers. The highlight of 2005 was an August trip that combined youth and adults. With ages spanning 15 to 70, all participants found the generation-bridging experience quite refreshing. For the summer of 2006, Mary Beth (“MB”) Armstrong is pleased to be serving as

Martha’s program focuses on: • Sail Training • Team Work • Craftsmanship • Fun! Martha’s captain while Robert d’Arcy and his wife Holly are on leave in the South Pacific. Youth programs for ages 12-17 are scheduled for one, two or three weeks, including a special joint trip with Camp Four Winds - Westward Ho departing from Orcas Island. Adult program offerings include a ten-day San Juan and Gulf Islands trip in September. Need-based youth scholarships will be awarded again this summer to up to ten students. Please contact MB concerning scholarship criteria. Plans are being made to celebrate Martha’s centennial in the summer of 2007. Special sailing trips and exhibitions will occur in the Seattle and Port Townsend areas. In the meantime, visit her in Port Townsend at the Boat Haven Marina or at the Northwest Maritime Center public dock, online at www.schoonermartha.org or by telephone at 206.310.8573.

Schooner Martha Sailing Schedule 2006.

All participants become a part of our working crew: learn to sail, navigate, stand watches, swab the decks and cook aboard a historic vessel. Cost: Adult rate = $150/day & Youth rate = $125/day. Youth scholarships available upon request. Program

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Ages

Program Start/End

Program Area

Family Sail

June 5 – June 10

12 and up

Port Townsend, WA

San Juan Islands

Open Enrollment Youth Sail

June 21- July 5

12 - 17

Port Townsend, WA

San Juan & Gulf Islands

Youth/Adult Art classes & sail training

July 9- July 18

12 and up

Port Townsend, WA

San Juan & Gulf Islands

Youth Sail in tandem with Carlyn

July 25- August 18

12 - 17

Deer Harbor, WA

San Juans to Princess Louisa Inlet

Youth/Adult support boat for The Raid

August 28 – September 7

12 and up

Port Townsend, WA

San Juan & Gulf Islands

Adult Sail

September 13 - 22

18 and up

Port Townsend, WA

San Juan and Gulf Islands

Schedule subject to modification. Call or visit the Martha website (www.schoonermartha.org) for more information and registration. March/April 2006

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H a i d a C a n o e Carving Cultural Connections 2006 B

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In March 1999 a 6-ton, 600 year old red cedar log was delivered to CWB as a gift from the Haida Corporation of Hydaburg, Alaska. Saaduuts, a native of Hydaburg involved the whole community in creating a Haida canoe from this log through Carving Cultural Connections. Saaduuts was the conductor of hundreds of youth and adult volunteers who, chip by chip, created the 36’ Spirit of Peace. In January 2006 the Haida Corporation sent another ancient red cedar log which will again be carved as a community project directed by Saaduuts. With the arrival of the 26 foot long cedar log from Hydaburg, Alaska, deemed to be christened the “Steven Philipp” work has gotten underway. This Haida canoe will be home ported at The Center for Wooden Boats. There are several groups of youth working with Saaduuts on the carving of the Steven Philipp. Alternative School #1 (a Seattle public school) is participating as they have before, with students working weekly on the new canoe. Joining the program this year are Red Eagle Soaring and Brightwater School. Brightwater School’s 4th grade class walk down the hill to the CWB weekly and are learning how to handle carving tools safely, to work as a team and the process of transforming a tree into a canoe. Red Eagle Soaring students, who come down as an after-school program, have braved the dark and cold of winter, with a cup of hot cocoa and big smiles, while hauling out the halogen lamps and taking turns adzing and chopping on the canoe log, under the stars.

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While the winter of record rain has most of us putting on another layer and tightening our grip on our coffees, there are things happening at the CWB. Saaduuts, a Haida canoe carver and artist in residence at the CWB, has started his next canoe. Watching Saaduuts work on the canoe is a sight to behold. Without drawings or a written plan to follow, chips fly as his adze blade realizes the vision of the canoe that exists only in his head. What’s even more impressive is that the ones most able to see that vision are the kids who come to help. As you approach the carving shed you can hear when there is a group of students. First you hear the percussive peal of metal on metal as a student hammers in a wedge to remove wood from the hull. Then you hear laughter. Under the watchful eye of Saaduuts every student gets a chance to pitch in with adze, hatchet or wedge to tranform a 600 year old cedar log into a 9 person canoe. Five days a week school groups are coming for their weekly visit to the carving shed in South Lake Union Park to lend a hand, learn to use basic hand tools, and be part of the creation of something amazing. Their ages range from 6 to 14 and they represent the broadest swath of our city’s residents. There are groups coming from all over Seattle, from Ravenna to the Central District. There are groups of young Native Americans reconnecting to a culture

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denied to native peoples for most of the 20th century through Bureau of Indian Affairs reeducation programs. Mostly, every student in every group is connecting to the canoe. It’s a hard thing to fathom until you see the determined concentration in a ten year old’s eye as she removes her piece of wood. Her piece. Most students have such a strong connection to the work they have done they take the wood they removed home. Some have even had Saaduuts sign them. Which he does with delight that seems to come more from feeling honored by the young requests than feeling flattered by them. From a conceptual point of view, carving a dugout seems a simple thing. Cut down a tree, then take away enough wood until it looks like a canoe. With Saaduuts at the CWB, there is a far deeper process occurring. Through the carving project, students are connecting to canoes, new cultures, new skills, and new confidence what their small hands can accomplish. Not bad for a Tuesday.


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Survey About Cwb Library WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE IN CWB’S LIBRARY ? The Center for Wooden Boats is just as much a reading kind of place as a hands-on place, home to a wide, deep library full of marine how-to and history, boat designs, periodicals and artwork. CWB’s collection can entertain, educate, amaze. Now, largely thanks to generous donations from our membership, our shelves are full. You can be proud of this collection: the only one of its size and kind in this area. We want it to grow and improve as an accurate reflection of CWB members’ interests and priorities. Please take a few minutes to tell our Library Committee your preferences by completing and returning the survey form in this issue of Shavings. If you prefer, the survey is also available at the CWB website (www.cwb.org/librarysurvey); or copies are available at the CWB front desk in the Boathouse. Rate the importance of each topic to you. Least interested=1 and Most interested = 10.

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Navigation (basic, celestial, inshore) Basic Sailing Sail Cruising General Seamanship Heavy weather sailing Sailing History Sailboat Racing Sailing Safety Ships (Books about Design, Exploration, Steam, Museums) Small Craft (Books of Design, Canoes, Rowing, Power) Craftsmanship (Boat Building, Maintenance, Tools) Environmental (Wildlife, Oceanography) Engineering (Electrical; Engine Maintenance) Children’s Books Regional Historical (Maritime Histories by Area)

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CWB could continue to expand its fast-growing subject areas like books on small craft design/build/maintenance, craftsmanship, boat plans, marine magazines, etc., by eliminating or limiting the nautical fiction and/or non-fiction volumes, sending these items to area public libraries. Would you support: A) Eliminating the Fiction section entirely B) Limiting Fiction to selected “classics” C) Eliminating the Non-Fiction/Voyaging section entirely D) Limiting Non-Fiction/Voyaging to selected “classics”

Y Y Y Y

N N N N

Comments:_____________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________

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(Library Survey Continued from Page 13 ...) The library has a large and fast-growing section of books on sailboat racing, tactics and competitive rigging and sail-cutting; such books largely concern themselves with modern design, non-wooden vessels. Would you support: Reducing to a set of volumes chosen by a CWB panel of racing enthusiasts

Y

N

B)

Eliminating this section entirely

Y

N

C)

Retaining the section at its present size

Y

N

Comments:_____________________________________________________________________________________

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It has been proposed we create a new subsection under Small Craft/Books of Design, to be called Boat Design Theory and Practice. It would focus on how boats are designed, how to design a boat, rather than the actual end-product design itself. Would you support establishing this new subsection

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Comments:_____________________________________________________________________________________

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Over the years, a small but steady stream of books, some quite valuable, have left the library and have never been returned. Would you support: A) Becoming an in-house, reference library only – no books to be checked out; a copier available for taking home needed information B)

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If you circled N, would A) be acceptable if limited check-out

was available at the front desk, by special request to CWB staff C)

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Continue existing self-checkout procedures, but secure valuable

books behind glass-doored shelves, accessed by staff upon request

Comments:_____________________________________________________________________________________

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We could gain shelf space by changing our current policy of stocking two copies of popular topic books. Would you support: A)

Owning just one copy of each book

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Owning two or more copies, if we could store extras off-site

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Continue carrying two copies on our shelves

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Thank You Very Much For Your Input! Library Planning Committee at The Center for Wooden Boats. Please mail your completed survey to: The Center for Wooden Boats, 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 14 Shavings

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The Ed Monk Memorial Award Fund has been established to provide educational opportunities for professionals working in traditional maritime trades. The mission of the award is to further maritime professionals’ knowledge of traditional marine trades in other cultures. Study and research may include current and historical methods of boat construction and designs based on the functions to be served by the boats. CWB is seeking applications from qualified persons or nominations for qualified persons. Applications or nominations are due on or before June 1, 2006. The applicant should explain how the project will enrich the existing knowledge of the applicant and how the funds would be used. The budget for the grant may include transportation, housing, and other appropriate expenses. Also required is the background of the applicant in traditional marine trades and a list of references. Decisions by the application committee will be made by or before July 15. Funds granted must be used within one year of the award. A written report of the activities and benefit derived from the experience must be submitted to CWB. Grants awarded will total $3,000. The Award was named to honor Ed Monk, a prominent and respected boat designer and builder in the Northwest, and author of one of the first how-to books on small craft construction. The Fund was established by John M.Goodfellow, who has participated in the hands-on history activities at The Center for Wooden Boats. He is an advocate of preserving traditional maritime skills and wishes to encourage this through studies of those traditional skills being carried on beyond the applicants’ local regions and local knowledge. WoodenBoat magazine has become a funding partner to the Ed Monk Fund. Applicants can be of any locality, wishing to study indigenous materials and techniques of other areas. For more information, contact Dick Wagner at 206.382.2628. March/April 2006

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CWB isn’t the only living museum of maritime heritage on Lake Union. A few historic boatyards have remained on the lake since the Locks were completed in 1916, but there is only one yard still handling only wood: The Jensen Motorboat Company on the north shore of Portage Bay. It began in 1922 by Antonius Jensen, a concert violinist as well as master-boatwright. Antonius also formed and directed the Seattle Yacht Club band. His son Anchor carried on the shop until he died in 2000. Anchor designed and built the Gold Cup winner Slo-Mo-Shun IV. DeWitt Jensen, Anchor’s son, is now running this busy, historically significant boat shop. Jensen Motorboat has become the traditional boat owners favorite yard because of their skilled staff and three generations of quality service. Jensen noticed that CWB has trouble maintaining our growing fleet of operating vessels due to lack of space. They have generously offered to provide haul outs and consultation at their yard during their slow periods of work in August and September, and again in December through February. In February our logo sailing salmon boat, Admirable, will be at Jensen’s getting her hull inspected and refinished. Now we can spread out our maintenance tasks at both CWB and Jensen’s, allowing a quicker turnover maintaining our working fleet. And best of all, within a beloved environment of maritime history.

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Thanks to the crew of the Harold W. Streeter for poroviding the needed removal of many anchors at CWB as one of their training exercises.

The Harold W. Streeter was built in 1962 to conduct water quality sampling on the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. Designed by Seattle naval architect Edwin Monk, the 45’ Streeter is made from Douglas fir and oak. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center acquired the Streeter in 1973 to study the impacts of pollutants on local fishery resources, protected species, and marine habitat.

Woodworking Students Build Drawers for Boatshop Thanks to a generous donation of plywood from Compton’s Lumber, and the support of the Wood Construction Center at Seattle Central Community College, we have a sturdy and beautiful set of 30 new drawers for tools and hardware underneath our main workbench in the Boatshop. Photo by Sue Givens.

Ed Monk Scholarship Fund Announced B Y D ICK W AGNE

Julia Cordero, a student at the Wood Construction Center at Seattle Central Community College, with assistance from instructor Dave Borgatti.

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Buy a Boat from The Center for Wooden Boats !

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Mark your calendars for CWB’s 30th Lake Union

Wooden Boat Festival!

William Garden double ended sloop Victoria 30’ X 8’8”: Strip planked red cedar hull in great condition. She’s an able little cruiser that could take you to the San Juans, Alaska, or around the world if you wanted. Her cozy cabin makes her a great potential live-a-board. $19,995

1948 Fairliner Sedan Cruiser 26’ X 8’: A rare and desirable Puget Sound powerboat. She needs to be rebuilt but would be one of the most unique boats in the area. $750

1958 28’ Owens Express cruiser 26’ X 8 1/2’: Small Block V8 with signs of rebuild. Starts and runs well. Nice big cockpit and interior. Cosmetics in Good to Ok condition. It’s been in covered moorage and is pretty wel preserved, but could use a haul out for paint and varnish. $5750

Geary 18 Sailboat: Nicknamed the “Flattie” these 18’ sloops were designed as the training boat for the Seattle Yacht Club. This one is in good preserved condition after being stored in a garage for the last 50 or so years. It doesn’t have sails, but does have lots of original rigging bits. We’re looking for someone who will commit to restoring it, and the price will be reasonable. See the last issue of Shavings for more info on the Flattie.

Contact Patrick Gould at The Center for Wooden Boats for information about boats for sale, or for donating your boat to CWB, 206.382.2628.

1010 Valley Street Seattle, WA 98109-4468 206.382.2628 • www.cwb.org • cwb@cwb.org

The Center for Wooden Boats has started plans for our 30th Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival and Classic Speedboat Show and we would like you to participate! Once again, we will be partnering with The Antique and Classic Boat Society to produce our banner event. We plan to have the same great programs at this year’s Festival including Toy Boat Building, the Quick and Daring Boat Building Competition and Race, the Ed Clark Regatta, free public rides, our wonderful music stage, and many new events which are in the works! Last year’s event had an attendance of over 10,000 visitors. The 2006 Festival will be open to the public July 1-July 4th. Location: The Center for Wooden Boats and the neighboring South Lake Union Park Admission: Suggested $5 donation If you would like to reserve your spot in this year’s festival, please go to the festival page on our website at www.cwb.org/BoatFest2006 and print the correct application. Fill it out and mail it back (with payment, if required) to Festival Coordinator, 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 and your all set! If you have any questions, please contact Eldon Tam at 206.382.2628. Look for updates on our website and the next edition of Shavings! Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Seattle, WA Permit No. 1583


Shavings Volume 26 Number 2 (March-April 2006)