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S H A V I N G S V O L U M E X, N U M B E R 4

Published for members of The Center for Wooden Boats

July-August

A GATHERING OF THE CLAN What can you say about the Twelfth A n n u a l W o o d e n Boat F e s t i v a l that hasn't b e e n said b e f o r e ? It's l i k e w r i t i n g a r e p o r t o n C h r i s t m a s . N o t h i n g is s u p p o s e d to change. You don't fool a r o u n d w i t h t r a d i t i o n . T h e w h o l e p o i n t is a g a t h e r i n g of t h e c l a n , of boats, people, s k i l l s , demonstrations, and m u s i c . S o m e w e ' v e s e e n b e f o r e , s o m e are new, some are tricked — out, some are thin on

e r e d race, the p i r o g u e No Bikini Atoll, built by James Counihan and Dave O l s o n , came in first by a hair over the double ender, Deborah Elaine, built by B o b W o r t h i n g t o n and C h r i s Coutoumanos. However, building point totals gave the pirogue S e c o n d P l a c e , the 12-foot skiff, Top Notch, built by B r i a n L e n z and K e l l y S a l i s b u r y took T h i r d , and the final w i n n e r of the prized Lake Union Challenge C u p , not to

the edges. It's the s t r o l l i n g a r o u n d , exchangi n g lies, jokes, good and bad news, t r y i n g out the f o o d , l i s t e n i n g t o the t u n e s , a n d j u s t being there because, if you l i k e m a r i t i m e history, c r a f t s m a n s h i p , or just a good old wooden boat, there's no better place to be on July F o u r t h w e e k e n d .

m e n t i o n e n g r a v e d m u g s , c h a m p a g n e and a bundle of cash, was Deborah Elaine. A n d 1 had to talk B o b Worthington into e n t e r i n g the contest. He p r o m i s e d he he w i l l submit a design early on for next year.

T h e Q u i c k and D a r i n g B o a t b u i l d i n g C o n test drew the fascinated c r o w d s as ever before. It's fun to watch people at w o r k . E v e n more fun to see three different types of boats b e i n g built at the same t i m e — w i t h a s c o r e b o a r d . T h i s year's new o r n a m e n t s w e r e refe r e e s — B o b and K r i s t i n F i s h e r attired i n black and w h i t e s t r i p e d s h i r t s , black pants, white caps, whistles, and stopwatches. T h e rules have changed ever so slightly to encourage seaworthy design. T h i s year, lo and b e h o l d , a l l six e n t r a n t s s t a y e d afloat! T h e y w e r e : a n 8-foot V i k i n g " l o n g b o a t , " 12foot p i r o g u e , 12-foot p r o a , 12-foot f l a t i r o n skiff, 8-foot G a r v e y , and 12-foot r o u n d bottom double ender. B u i l d i n g ended w i t h everyone pretty close on the s c o r e b o a r d : t i m e of b u i l d i n g , cost of materials, and tool weight. T h e judges had w o r k e d out, by secret formulas, the factors of o r i g i n a l i t y , a e s t h e t i c s , and showmanship. In the sail and human pow-

T h e B e s t O w n e r R e s t o r e d Boat was another of our low-key "contests." O u r goal is to recognize the person who invests more sweat than cash to b r i n g an old classic back to life. T h e sponsor, Daly's Wood Finishes, repeated their award policy unveiled last year and p r e s e n t e d t w o t r o p h i e s : one to the 1953 C h r i s C r a f t r u n a b o u t Velvet Lady of Ed Todd a n d P a t r i c k M u r p h y , a n d the o t h e r t o the 1935 s l o o p Clara of G e o r g e R o d z o n . N e x t y e a r t h e r e m a y b e c a t e g o r i e s for c a n o e s , power, sail, and s u b m a r i n e s , if they're wooden.

Other vignettes M i k e O ' B r i e n , WoodenBoat magazine e d i tor on his knees in the N a v y d r i l l h a l l s h o w i n g a new boat owner how to rig a s p r i t s a i l . . . T h e z i g z a g lane of craft b o o t h s that had the color and bustle of a Damascus bazaar. No matter how m a n y street fairs t h e r e are each s u m m e r , people always s e e m to have appetite enough for one m o r e . . .

Tongue-biting absorption of kids building toy boats and glow of pride w h e n they looked at their finished p r o d u c t s . . . James C o u n i h a n s t i l l p a i n t i n g the pirogue No Bikini Atoll at 10 p . m . Friday night... C r o w d s at "tool r o w " fondling the new, the o l d , the antique and the "what's it f o r ? " displays... T h e long r o w of c r u i s i n g boats along the north quay of the Naval R e s e r v e Base, w i t h a rainbow of types from the Rubenesque hull of the 28-foot, 56-year-old catboat Sharon L by Blanchard to the 65-foot Ted Geary-designed s t a y s a i l s c h o o n e r Red Jacket. W i t h her w i d e d e c k s and l o w b u l w a r k s and c a b i n , she sails as fast as she l o o k s . . . T h e t o w e r i n g masts and rigging festooned w i t h baggy-wrinkle of the 101-foot Crownin¬ shield schooner Adventuress... T h e incongruity of the regatta of perfectly scaled radio controlled boats among the Brob¬ dingnagian's boat show... T h e w i d e range of vessels constantly flitt i n g i n and out t o g i v e v i s i t o r s a r i d e : the Pure Sound Society's 1792 replica eight-oared launch Discovery, the 1897 B a l t i c ketch Sylvia, the 24-foot S n e k k e l a u n c h by B i o r n S u n d t , and Paul Ford's Y - F l y e r . . . continued on next page

CANOES, KAYAKS, AND PUNTS IN CWB'S SUMMER SEMINARS T h e big problem in planning workshops is g u e s s i n g what k i n d s w i l l s e l l i n Seattle. W e use all sorts of scientific s u r v e y s to compose the c u r r i c u l u m : s t u d e n t s f i l l out a w o r k s h o p continued on page 3


A GATHERING OF THE CLAN (continued from page

SEMINAR ON THE SALISH

1)

T h e quiet a u d i e n c e S t e v e P h i l i p p g a t h e r e d each day to t e l l tales of the S a l i s h people of Puget S o u n d . T h e visitors were equally fascinated by Steve's w o r d s , the demonstrations of crafts done w i t h his rock-hard hands, and the u n b e l i e v a b l e c a n t i l e v e r o f his silver eyebrows... T h e audio oasis of folk music on the fantail s t e r n of the 1922 cruiser Arro. People passing along Boat R o w would stop, l i s t e n , s m i l e , and

from three factors, the w h e e d l i n g of Dennis Broderson who located many of the items, the catalog done by C a t h e r i n e W i l s o n , and the smooth persuasion of the auctioneer, Doc Folkm a n . T h e sound s y s t e m was created by C h r i s Glanister. A l e x H a m i l t o n , the official voice of the festival, never ran out of quips, but he ran out of time. His substitute, M i k e Oswald, hand l e d the a n n o u n c e m e n t s just l i k e a n a i r l i n e pilot (which he is). Terry G o s s e and

T h e ship's log would read: 2 0 A p r i l — D o c k s i d e , C e n t e r for W o o d e n Boats, Lake U n i o n , Seattle; w i n d b l o w i n g 2 0 - 3 0 k n o t s ; extra lines to p i l i n g . 30 A p r i l — A t anchor, Port L u d l o w ; w i n d less sunset; perfect evening canoeing. 1 May — At anchor, n o r t h side H o o d H e a d ; p a r t i c i p a n t s & the P h i l i p p s out c a n o e i n g , b i r d i n g and clamming. At anchor, Port M a d i s o n ; another quiet evening. 2 May —

maybe tap, clap, and sing a l o n g . . .

Volunteers make the Boat Show happen T h e whole shebang couldn't happen w i t h out the aid of a lot of good f r i e n d s and o u r grateful t h a n k s to the Naval R e s e r v e Base for t h e i r facilities and the watch they p r o v i d e d . T h e M a r i n e r ' s M a r k e t Place, our popular new street fair, was the product of C o r r i n e A n d e r son who also edited the boat show edition of SHAVINGS and organized the photo exhibit. The Quick and D a r i n g sponsors were F l o u n d e r Bay Boat L u m b e r , T h e W o o d worker's Store, Ivar's, Lake U n i o n B u r g e r K i n g , M o d u l a r V i d e o S y s t e m s and Waterlines Magazine. A r m c h a i r Sailor provided the naut i c a l v i d e o tapes for our Bijou T h e a t e r . T h e ice c r e a m d e l i g h t s w e sold o n C a l o r i e B o u l e v a r d were provided at a more-than-generous discount b y Fratelli's. M a r t y L o k e n designed our poster, M e l o d y B u r r i s organized the potluck supper, and Pat C r o w organized the moorage in her silky smooth manner, more or less in plot plan order. M i k e P h i m i s t e r recruited the folk musicians. T h e auction success r e s u l t e d

John Hartsock managed the sailing and rowing races w i t h equanimity. John G r u e n e w a l d organized toy boatbuilding, which has got to w i n an award for most adorable activity. He had able assistance from P e r r y O v e r t o n , S h e r r y D a r r o w , Joe K a h l e , M a r c u s L e s t e r , M a r t h a R o g e r s , M i k e M a r s h , Joe B r a w l e y . P a u l L u k s c h , V i r g i n i a Farley, Todd Blakely, David M c M i l l a n , E a r l Fenstermacher and W i l l M i l l e r . C a p e C o d C o m f y s p r o v i d e d the m o u n t a i n o f pine and c e d a r s c r a p s that a horde of e a g e r b u i l d e r s t r a n s f o r m e d i n t o boats. D a r l e n e A l l e n s m o o t h l y c o o r d i n a t e d the food b o o t h s and husband N e i l was o u r e l e c t r i c i a n . C h r i s Pittman, David Erskine, Courtenay Smith and P a u l S t r e t c h w e r e e v e r y w h e r e , h e l p i n g e v e r y o n e , and H o r a c e I n g r a m held c o u r t i n the Boatshop. T h e cast of spear c a r r i e r s who provided all the other necessary ingredients to make our extravaganza happen: L e e E h r h e a r t , Dave Rigby, T o m P a r k e r , B e t s y C a s e , B o b K e l l y , John and Jadene M y e r s , M a n j u s h a P e a c o c k , Pam H i d a k a , J i m Waite, Vern Velez, E r n i e continued on page 7 2

Dockside, Kiana L o d g e , Agate Pass; raining heavily as we prepare to visit the Suquamish M u s e u m . D o c k s i d e , C e n t e r for Wooden Boats, Lake Union; reluctant good-byes. T h e s e are the bare facts for the participants in a seminar co-sponsored by Seattle's Center for Wooden Boats and Resource Institute. But the l a s t i n g i m p r e s s i o n of the w e e k e n d is of h a v i n g had the p r i v i l e g e to get to k n o w two gems in the perfect setting—Steve and D o r o thy P h i l i p p on b o a r d the rugged 65-foot continued on page 7


Boater's Bookshelf:

A CLASSIC BACK IN PRINT T h e V i c t o r i a n E r a in E n g l a n d was a t i m e of enthusiasts. T h e period produced explorers, social r e f o r m e r s , m i s s i o n a r i e s , and s p o r t s m e n in carload lots. D e d i c a t e d to a philoso p h y o f c o l d b a t h s , h a r d w o r k , h a r d play, P r o t e s t a n t theology, g o o d d e e d s , and m o r a l rectitude called " m u s c u l a r C h r i s t i a n i t y , " this throng filled every waking moment w i t h feverish activity. Few were busier than John M a c G r e g o r . In 1853, he listed his p r i m a r y interests as " T h e Protestant A l l i a n c e , T h e Protestant Defence League, The Ragged School Union, The Shoeblack Society (which he founded to prov i d e w o r k for London's street u r c h i n s ) , T h e Shoeblack S h o p , T h e B a n d o f H o p e R e v i e w , The True Briton, The Town M i s s i o n , The O p e n A i r M i s s i o n , T h e Slavery Q u e s t i o n , T h e P r e v e n t i v e and R e f o r m a t o r y School Society, T h e L a w y e r ' s P r a y e r Society, and the M a n s e l d S o c i e t y . " S i n c e h e d i d n ' t have p r i v a t e means, he w o r k e d f u l l - t i m e as a lawyer. In 1865, M a c G r e g o r t u r n e d his interest to the p o s s i b i l i t i e s of s m a l l boat travel and i n vented the R o b Roy canoe. A f t e r a s u m m e r of c r u i s i n g , his enthusiasm produced a book, A Thousand Miles in the Rob Roy Canoe on Twenty Lakes and Rivers in Europe. Napoleon III was so i m p r e s s e d by the book that he arr a n g e d a S m a l l B o a t E x h i b i t i o n i n the s u m m e r of 1867 and invited M a c G r e g o r to attend. M a c G r e g o r was happy to oblige. It w o u l d give h i m a c h a n c e to d i s t r i b u t e P r o t e s t a n t tracts t o the " P a p i s t F r e n c h " and provide m a t e r i a l for another book to raise money for his charities. I n s t e a d of his b e l o v e d canoe, M a c G r e g o r c o m m i s s i o n e d a 20-foot yawl and solo sailed it f r o m L o n d o n to P a r i s , r e t u r n i n g to the Isle of Wight. H i s book, The Voyage Alone in the Yawl "Rob Roy," is one of the classics of boating literature. M a c G r e g o r ' s accounts of good weather, bad w e a t h e r , navigational h a z a r d s , and e n counters w i t h other ships (most of t h e m m i s h a n d l e d b y l u b b e r l y f o r e i g n e r s ) are p r e t t y much the same as you could read in anyone's b o o k . T h e sea and s a i l o r s haven't c h a n g e d m u c h . D e t a i l s o f h a r b o r e n t r a n c e s , the o p eration of chain boats, the life of bargees, and the antique habits of the F r e n c h are f e r t i l e e l d s for t h e m a r i n e h i s t o r i a n . B u t the r e a l treat for lay readers is the insight M a c G r e g o r gives us into a m o r e i n n o c e n t , m o r e h o p e f u l time. Britons were unabashedly ethnocentric. E v e r y t h i n g seen in F r a n c e is d i s c u s s e d in the light of how the same thing is done "at home." In T r e p o r t , he m e e t s the Onyx " a n E n g l i s h built yacht, but owned b y M . C h a r l e s , one o f the f e w F r e n c h m e n t o b e f o u n d w h o r e a l l y seems to l i k e yachting; plenty of t h e m affect it." In another place he comments acidly that he "came upon a very unusual sight, a F r e n c h yacht s a i l i n g . " M a c G r e g o r flew a F r e n c h e n sign in accordance w i t h m a r i t i m e good man-

ners w h e n he first came to P a r i s . W h e n a newspaper mentioned "the smart French yacht Rob Roy," M a c G r e g o r hauled down the t r i c o l o r and nailed the C a m b r i d g e B o a t C l u b flag to the mast. Victorian England was so absolutely sure of its f u t u r e . B r i t o n s had d i s c o v e r e d how to make the w o r l d w o r k , and they were eager to share that knowledge w i t h anyone w h o would listen and a good few who wouldn't. W h e n M a c G r e g o r d i s c o v e r e d solo s a i l i n g , it was only natural for h i m as a V i c t o r i a n to proselytize unceasingly. In his industrial society, m a chines and i n v e n t i v e n e s s w e r e the a n s w e r s to e v e r y t h i n g , so he spends pages d e s c r i b i n g his c o o k s t o v e , his stowage p h i l o s o p h y , and how he rigged his compass. He goes on about the suitability and excellent taste of the new tinned foods. In those days, most yachting was done by t i t l e d o w n e r s i n big ships w i t h p r o f e s s i o n a l c r e w s . B r i t o n s had a h e a l t h y r e g a r d for the s e a , and thought that a m a t e u r s w o u l d be a danger to themselves and o t h e r s . N o , it's not d a n g e r o u s , M a c G r e g o r preached, it teaches self-reliance. For safety, he c a r r i e d a d i n g h y s t o w e d b e l o w . (A d i n g h y for a 2 0 - f o o t e r ? H o w exactly he was g o i n g to l a u n c h it in extremis, he doesn't divulge.) He explains the cork waistcoat given to h i m by the L i f e s a v i n g S o c i e t y (but p r e f e r s a s i m p l e l i f e b e l t ) . I t never seems to occur to h i m to use the exped i e n t of today's s o l o s a i l o r s , a h a r n e s s and lifeline w o r n at all t i m e s . L o r d N e l s o n didn't use one, after a l l . Most onlookers seemed to be worried about solitude and loneliness. M a c G r e g o r denied he was ever lonely, and held that "mere s i t t i n g in a yacht, w h i l e o t h e r s have a l l the w o r k in a b r e e z e , and a l l the r e s p o n s i b i l i t y ,

is no pleasure to m e ; nay, I confess frankly, it i s a b o r e ' . " H e l i k e d the c o n s t a n t a c t i v i t y , s i n c e h e t h o u g h t l e i s u r e a k i n t o the s i n o f sloth. A s a m o r a l V i c t o r i a n , M a c G r e g o r had a n a b i d i n g belief that the d e m a n d s of the sea taught v i r t u e . It. gave near-divine purpose of m i s s i o n to what w o u l d o t h e r w i s e be mere enj o y m e n t . He had a f i r m o p i n i o n that people are b e t t e r on the w a t e r t h a n off it. W h e n he visits the Worcester, a schoolship used to train o f f i c e r s , he s p e a k s of "100 f r e s h - c h e e k e d m a n l y b o y s , f u t u r e captains of the Taepings and Ariels and as neat examples of the gentlem a n sailor-lad as any E n g l i s h m a n w o u l d be p r o u d to s e e . " W h e n he c a l l s on the Chichester, a training ship for London's homeless b o y s , h e o b s e r v e s that " P a l e a n d s q u a l i d , t h i n , heartless, and homeless they were; but n o w , r u d d y i n t h e r i v e r b r e e z e , neat a n d clean, alert w i t h energy, happy in their w o o d en h o m e , w i t h a k i n d c a p t a i n and s m a r t off i c e r s to teach t h e n , " he feels s u r e that they and their c o u n t r y w i l l prosper. W h e n w e f i n i s h e d V o y a g e A l o n e , w e felt like we had spent our t i m e in good company. M a n y of M a c G r e g o r ' s thoughts and attitudes w o u l d b e f u r i o u s i n d e e d today, but h e e x presses t h e m w i t h such v i g o r and innocence that they s e e m p o s i t i v e l y r e f r e s h i n g . A n y way, for a g l i m p s e of the e a r l y y e a r s of C o r i n t h i a n yachting, Voyage is a g e m . M a c G r e g o r ' s delightful little book (a good two-night read) is one of several long out-ofprint m a r i n e classics b e i n g reissued in paper b y Grafton B o o k s . N o more h u n t i n g through used book stores. O t h e r authors include M a s efield, C o n r a d , Smeeton, C h i l d e r s , and B o m bard. Whee! —Chas. Dowd

CANOES, KAYAKS, AND PUNTS IN CWB'S SUMMER SEMINARS (continued from page 1) evaluation questionnaire which includes " W h a t other workshops w o u l d you l i k e ? " We review our file for other workshop requests. We ask almost everyone w h o walks d o w n the r a m p what c l a s s e s t h e y w o u l d t a k e . W e d o e v e r y t h i n g short of e x a m i n i n g chicken entrails, and s t i l l , some scheduled workshops are cancelled for lack of registrants. So it came as a b i g jolt w h e n P a u l Ford's annual s p r i n g t i m e c a s t i n g class asked if we c o u l d give a s t r i p - p l a n k e d kayak w o r k s h o p , p r o v i d i n g P a u l would teach it. H o w a sand and i n v e s t m e n t c a s t i n g c l a s s got i n v o l v e d w i t h kayaks beats m e , e x c e p t P a u l has d e s i g n e d and b u i l d a few, and his teaching m a n n e r is always a hit. We could book Paul in P e o r i a and the crowds w o u l d love h i m . A n y w a y , Paul said O K , if one of the casting class, Ivor T h o m a s , w o u l d b e c o - t e a c h , and we said O K , and the rest of the casting class said O K , and voila! A kayak class was b o r n . S i x s t u d e n t s b u i l t t w o 16-foot k a y a k s ( a

3

Paul Ford and Ivor T h o m a s model) on premade m o l d s , i n six t h r e e - h o u r s e s s i o n s — 1 8 class h o u r s ! N o s l a c k e r s i n that group. T h e boats t u r n e d out b e a u t i f u l l y a n d we had a happy launching party. We normally spend our administrative hours w i t h feet on desk, a cigar in one hand and b r a n d y in the o t h e r , p l a n n i n g strategies to have traditional w o o d e n boats as a plank in o u r p a r t y ' s p l a t f o r m . W h i l e i n the m i d s t o f this s c h e m i n g we were suddenly i n t e r r u p t e d by a d e l e g a t i o n f r o m the c l a s s t h r u s t i n g a p e t i t i o n i n o u r face, d e m a n d i n g that C W B keep t h e s e boats available for the public to see and use. I don't know how George III felt w h e n the A m e r i c a n c o l o n i s t s p e t i t i o n e d for self r u l e , but I l o v e d the fierce p r i d e of a c c o m p l i s h m e n t that w e l d e d t h i s c l a s s together and immediately agreed to their d e m a n d . T h e s e boats are now a p a r t of the fleet. continued on page 7


GRAYS HARBOR PROJECT ON SCHEDULE FOR NOVEMBER LAUNCH T h e G r a y s H a r b o r Tall Ships Project is l o o k i n g towards a N o v e m b e r 12 launching for the Lady Washington, first part of their ambitious c o n t r i b u t i o n to the state's C e n t e n n i a l celebration. Right now a professional planking g a n g f r o m P o r t T o w n s e n d has the e x t e r i o r p l a n k i n g "nearly two-thirds d o n e , " says project relations head Ralph E m p e y . "Some days

they m a k e e v e r y t h i n g s m e l l d e l i c i o u s l y o f Stockholm tar. Inside the h u l l , shipwright R i c h M i l e s and his crew are a q u a r t e r of the way done i n s t a l l ing the t w o - i n c h c e i l i n g . Ships l i k e the Lady Washington have a lot less interior work than m o d e r n ships. " A l l we have is a generator for the r u n n i n g lights and the stove and a s m a l l diesel for m a n e u v e r i n g . T h e only other cabin is the C a p t a i n s cabin aft. O t h e r w i s e the 'tween d e c k s are just open h o l d s , " says M i l e s . " T h e crew and passengers w i l l s w i n g hammocks in these open holds. People told us that the Coast G u a r d wouldn't l i k e h a m m o c k s , " he said. " H o w e v e r , it turns out that the Coast G u a r d doesn't consider hammocks as p a r t of t h e s h i p . It g i v e s t h e m one l e s s t h i n g they n e e d t o i n s p e c t . " W h e n a s h i p wright finishes the hull of a m o d e r n yacht, he

can figure that his w o r k is about a t h i r d done, M i l e s continued. " W h e n the Lady goes d o w n the w a y s , she'll b e w e l l o n the w a y t o b e i n g 60% c o m p l e t e . " If you want to check on the Lady's p r o g r e s s y o u r s e l f , the s h i p y a r d is in full operation f r o m Tuesday through Saturday. A d m i s s i o n to the V i s i t o r ' s G a l l e r y is $1 for adult non-members every day except the free Tuesday O p e n House. Volunteer help is there to fill you in on details and can find one of the builders to a n s w e r really technical questions. Office manager Jeanette H e s b r o o k says that v o l u n t e e r h o u r s c a m e c l o s e t o 150 d u r i n g July, i n c l u d i n g the W e d n e s d a y w o r k o f the Ancient M a r i n e r s who are r e m o d e l i n g a nurse r y b u i l d i n g on the site into a N a v a l S t o r e s and S h i p ' s C h a n d l e r y , a n o t h e r p a r t o f t h e planned H i s t o r i c Seaport. — S t o r y and photo by Chas D o w d

CHILI CONTEST TAKES BRR OUT OF OCTOBER

it's a s t r a k e a l l ' r o u n d , s o m e d a y s it's a bit l e s s . " T h e p l a n k e r s are w o r k i n g w i t h t w o and-a-half inch thick stock fastened w i t h s e v e n inch g a l v a n i z e d s h i p s p i k e s . A t the wale, the bilge, and the garboard the plank is a f u l l three inches. T h e planking job has been s p e e d e d up w i t h the donation of a b e a u t i f u l shipsaw from the C u m m i n s family of Tacoma s h i p b u i l d i n g fame. I n p e r f e c t c o n d i t i o n and bravely gleaming w i t h a new coat of red paint, t h i s venerable antique c a n rotate t h r o u g h a f u l l 90 degrees to cut bevels on the fly. T h e P r o j e c t got a n o t h e r b i g b o o s t w h e n the U . S . N a v y Seabees offered to build a shipway and move the Lady into it. "We're excited for t w o reasons," said D i r e c t o r B r a n d o n F o r d . " F i r s t , this saves us fully $60,000, w h i c h was t h e l o w e s t bid to m o v e the Lady to a l o c a l shipyard, even including substantial volunt e e r help. S e c o n d , even though m u c h of the s h i p w a y w i l l b e t e m p o r a r y , i m p o r t a n t and l a s t i n g p a r t s w i l l be left as the b e g i n n i n g of our traditional shipyard. A l r e a d y we can beat the p r i c e of a n y y a r d on the coast for s o l i d wood spars: eight-sided, sixteen-sided, or f u l l y round. Handmade. A n d we use top-quality, fully seasoned stock." T h e ship's f u l l c o m p l e m e n t o f s p a r s and m a s t s , t e s t i f y i n g t o the a c c u r a c y o f F o r d ' s c l a i m s , s t r e t c h across the shop floor next to the h u l l . T h e s e aren't the straight o r s i m p l y t a p e r e d m o d e r n s t i c k s but b u l g e h e r e a n d there along their length w i t h shoulders, g i r t h s , and flat s p o t s to take the h a r d w a r e that s u p p o r t s the y a r d s . B o s s R i g g e r Steve J o h n s o n a n d his c r e w a r e m a k i n g t o p s a n d h o u n d s for the masts and bee b l o c k s for the s t a n d i n g r i g g i n g . T h e y ' v e already s t r o p p e d up garlands of wooden-shelled blocks and h u n g t h e m u n d e r the shop b a l c o n y w h e r e

That t i m e is c o m i n g a g a i n — w h e n all w o o d e n boat sailors and rowers begin planning for the Fall chili contest at their favorite Wooden Boat Center. It's Fall Regatta t i m e — S u n d a y , O c t o b e r 2, noon til dark. T h i s means r o w i n g r a c e s , s a i l i n g r a c e s , t i m e t o t r y out o t h e r boats, talk, eat and d r i n k . T h i s regatta w i l l have gig races, of course. T h e s e are 21-foot, f o u r - o a r s - a n d - c o x s w a i n boats. We w i l l also have special R o u n d Robin gig races w i t h c r e w s s w i t c h i n g boats s o w e can really test crew skills. For this contest we w i l l use the T o w n T a v e r n C l a s s g i g (Erica, Glide and Dan, built by the N o r t h w e s t School of Wooden Boatbuilding from a design w o r k e d out on the b a c k of an e n v e l o p e at g u e s s

what P o r t Townsend bistro. A n o t h e r new feature is planned—the F i r s t A n n u a l Giant Zucchini Boat Contest. H e r e at last is the chance to use those zucchinis that look l i k e they came from the garden of a mad geneticist. U s e your outrageous imagination to m a k e y o u r o u t r a g e o u s z u c c h i n i s i n t o a boat. A b s o l u t e l y a n y t h i n g g o e s . P r i z e s w i l l be awarded for categories that w e ' l l make up w h e n w e see the e n t r i e s . T h e r e w i l l b e a prize for the best c h i l i , too. Please b r i n g a boat and something for the 2 p . m . potluck luncheon. B r i n g your zucc h i n i s , too. T h e regatta is a l l about good boats, good f u n , and good friends.

SEMINAR ON THE SALISH (continued from page

2)

s c h o o n e r Crusader. D u r i n g a t h r e e - d a y s e m i n a r on the daily-life s k i l l s of the N o r t h w e s t canoe p e o p l e , these t w o gracious and gentle h u m a n beings shared sea s t o r i e s and tales of their friends, the Salish of the Tulalip r e s e r v a t i o n w h e r e Steve had made his home for the last 60 y e a r s . T h e couple taught the s e m i n a r p a r t i c i p a n t s how t o m a k e the tule mats a n d n e t t l e f i s h i n g l i n e ; p a d d l e d w i t h t h e m i n c a n o e s i n quiet c o v e s ; t o o k t h e m c l a m m i n g w h e n i n s p i r a t i o n (or w a s i t steamer-fever?) s t r u c k t h e m ; e x p l a i n e d the construction and uses of longhouses, canoes and fishing gear, a l l present through Steve's meticulous craftsmanship in model or replica form; and led them on mandolin and guitar in late-night sing-alongs. Steve, w i t h his c a r e f u l l y t r i m m e d b e a r d , combed eyebrows and heavy wool pea jacket, looks e v e r y bit the weathered and w i s e seam a n . His 80 years of experience spill forth in one tale after another, one nugget of precious knowledge after another, one engaging d e m onstration or re-enactment after another. H i s

4

intense desire to share his experience and to provide w h a t h e c a l l s " t h e m i s s i n g l i n k " i n our knowledge of the daily lives of the Salish is m a n i f e s t in a contagious e n t h u s i a s m that leaves y o u a l w a y s w a n t i n g m o r e . D o r o t h y , w h o j o i n e d S t e v e o n the r e s e r v a t i o n w h e n they m a r r i e d , is e q u a l l y l i v e l y and nearly as w e l l v e r s e d . W i t h h e a r i n g that is better than Steve's, she quietly organizes and lovingly edits his presentations. T h i s s e m i n a r was the p e r f e c t b l e n d i n g o f e x p e r t i s e and e n v i r o n m e n t , the f o r m e r embodied in people who have a great deal to s h a r e and the l a t t e r s e r v i n g a s c l a s s r o o m , subject, and home. To this, C e n t e r m e m b e r s W i l l & Sharon Beach, B i l l Hambright, C r a i g M i l l e r , B e t t y P r i c e & B i l l Zauche added their appreciative and e n t h u s i a s t i c p a r t i c i p a t i o n . A l l o f u s left w i t h s o much more t h a n we'd come. T h e C e n t e r for W o o d e n Boats plans to o r g a n i z e m o r e s e m i n a r s l i k e this one. If you're interested, please let us k n o w at (206) 382-2628. — C a r e n Crandell


Cruiser's Logbook:

ROWING AND WADING, WE CROSS THE SKAGIT FLATS G i n n y and I t u r n e d off I-5 into Conway, en route to LaConner. High frame houses awaited the next flood and the S o n s of N o r way flew t h e i r native flag. D a v e L e f e b v r e ' s p l y w o o d boat w a s p e r c h e d atop his c a r i n front of the g r o c e r y store. We parked alongside and went in to buy lunch. C h a s and D e b D o w d were waiting by the big L u t h e r a n C h u r c h w i t h t h e i r l o n g , y e l l o w p u l l i n g boat w h e n we joined h i m . Paul and L y l a Ford drove up w i t h their strip-planked kayak followed by J i m and B a r b a r a S a n d , t r a i l e r i n g t h e i r c o l d molded boat.

larly on the bars between channels. A flock of white birds fed at the edge of the light green reeds. To the east, woods and farms l i n e d low h i l l s . To the s o u t h , graduated r i d g e s r o l l e d into infinity under a blue sky. The rest of the group went ashore on C r a f t Island while G i n n y and I c o n t i n u e d up a n a r r o w inlet. A c u r r e n t i n d i c a t e d it w a s a r i v e r o u t l e t . We rowed on for a while, searching for a channel. At a branch, we gave it up and r e t u r n e d to the o t h e r s , gathered on the l o w e r of the two knolls. To the south and west was the broad, low outline of Camano Island. Boats could be

a n d , together, we w o r k e d against the last of the ebb toward L a C o n n e r . B a c k a t the r a m p , w e h e l p e d each o t h e r load our boats and gear, then went our separate w a y s . We had r o w e d eight m i l e s . T h a t night, I kept s e e i n g a line of m a r s h and w o n d e r i n g if Ika r e a l l y is an i s l a n d and if t h e r e a c t u a l l y is a c h a n n e l a r o u n d i t . P e r h a p s , on a n o t h e r fine day, but w i t h a f u l l flood t i d e , w e ' l l go back and find out.

seen in Saratoga Passage separating C a m a n o from Whidbey Island. Out of sight, around Hoypus Point to the northwest, lay Deception Pass w i t h its infamous currents.

Petaluma in Print:

— S t o r y by John H a r t o c k , photo by Chas D o w d

G i n n y and I headed out f i r s t , c o n t i n u i n g west and north over the r i c h delta farmland. N e a r i n g L a C o n n e r , refurbished farm houses a d v e r t i s i n g B e d and Breakfast seemed everywhere, proliferating like toadstools. The town, nestled on the banks of S w i n o m i s h C h a n n e l , was f u l l of tourists. T h e Indian settlement across the w a y looked u n c h a n g e d . We drove s o u t h to the r a m p on the edge of t o w n — l a u n c h e d o u r f o u r t e e n foot C o s i n e W h e r r y , and waited under the high Rainbow B r i d g e for the others. O u r group i n c l u d e d t w o a t t o r n e y s , a n e d i tor, t w o e n g i n e e r s , and a r e t i r e d professor. F o u r of us had d e s i g n e d — a n d three built — o u r b o a t s . T h e t r i p had b e e n C h a s ' i d e a , t i m e d for a fortuitous set of t i d e s . A f t e r the last boat was launched and ready, we headed south on the ebb. We passed under the bridge and by the e x p e n s i v e homes of S h e l t e r Bay. Some stopped to view the Hough B r o s , shipy a r d , then we slipped out between the rocky cliffs called " T h e Hole in the W a l l . "

Shortcut to the Skagit F r o m here, the channel turns sharply west and r u n s for t w o m i l e s past Goat Island into Skagit Bay. A long stone breakwater separates the channel from the N o r t h Fork of the Skagit R i v e r . C h a s had d i s c o v e r e d a n a r r o w opening in the breakwater, a fishway that cut out the long row past Goat and let us directly onto the Skagit F l a t s . W e headed t o w a r d w h e r e he p o i n t e d , e n t e r e d a t w i s t i n g cut a few y a r d s w i d e , and c r o s s e d o v e r w i t h less trouble than e x p e c t e d . We then made for the w e s t s i d e o f I k a I s l a n d b e y o n d the s h a l l o w river's w i d e m o u t h .

T i m e and tide wait for no m a n A f t e r a r e s t , we a l l t r i e d to w o r k up the inlet, but by now it was too s h a l l o w . We r e t u r n e d t o the Bay and headed n o r t h w e s t . We were all doing the Skagit Flats t w o - s t e p : row some, then tow some. Paul w a d e d in the w a r m , s h a l l o w water by the edge of the marsh — p u l l i n g Lyla in their kayak. G i n n y and I kept as close as possible, t h i n k i n g they m i g h t b e i n t r o u b l e , but l e a r n e d l a t e r t h e y were enjoying the adventure. T h e other boats headed f a r t h e r out. D a v e led the w a y i n his single w i t h its low silhouette. T h e D o w d s followed in t h e i r double and the Sands in t h e i r higher boat. B a c k at I k a I s l a n d , t h e F o r d s d e c i d e d to r e t u r n t h r o u g h the cut w h i l e the rest of us headed out around Goat Island. By now there was a l i g h t w i n d out of the n o r t h w e s t . It slowed the w h e r r y and I laid a course for the lee of the i s l a n d . G i n n y a n d I f i n i s h e d o u r lunch in the still water of the island's shelter.

Ika is an eagle sanctuary and we could not go ashore. We had a s m a l l p r e - l u n c h in o u r boats off a m a r s h , t h e n c o n t i n u e d southeast u n d e r h i g h c l i f f s . E a g l e s c i r c l e d above the tree tops. G i n n y saw one teaching a y o u n g to fly, dropping it, then s w o o p i n g low to catch it o n his w i n g w h e n i t f a l t e r e d . A n occasional seal surfaced, s m i l e d at u s , then disappeared into the sun-flecked water.

The amber bark of madronas peeked t h r o u g h e v e r g r e e n s above the r o c k y b a n k . Dave had passed on ahead. T h e D o w d s were w o r k i n g in from offshore and the Sands were coming up from astern. We started rowing again. We rounded the point and encountered a s t r o n g c u r r e n t . I t r i e d to play the e d d i e s along the steep n o r t h side of the island and very nearly r a m m e d a r o c k .

We c o n t i n u e d o n — l o o k i n g for a break in the m a r s h through w h i c h we could round Ika and r e t u r n to L a C o n n e r . No opening could be s e e n as we neared the r o c k y k n o l l s of C r a f t Island. T h e water shoaled to reveal a b o t t o m of fine sand and we bumped our oar tips r e g u -

We continued east past long booms of freshly cut d e l i c i o u s - s m e l l i n g logs. T h e w h e r r y slid easily over and through wakes of larger boats p a s s i n g in the b u s y c h a n n e l . Dave and the Fords were waiting on a beach by the Hole in the W a l l . T h e D o w d s a n d S a n d s j o i n e d u s

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SIMON EXPLAINS HOW TO BUILD A LAPSTRAKE PULLING BOAT F i n a l l y . . . c o m p l e t e plans for the 20-foot r o w i n g s h e l l Petaluma a r e n o w a v a i l a b l e . S i m o n Watts has been slaving away at his outmoded computer in S a n Francisco putting tog e t h e r the f i r s t of a s e r i e s of b o a t b u i l d i n g m a n u a l s . E a c h one w i l l focus on one of the boats built i n his eight-day w o r k s h o p s . T h e Petaluma (three of w h i c h have been built at the C e n t e r for W o o d e n Boats) is a fast, elegant recreational single, built lapstrake out of 1/2-inch spruce planking in traditional fashion. To m a k e t h i n g s easier for the home b u i l d er, the plans package includes full-size body s e c t i o n s — n o n e e d to get s n a r l e d up in the l o f t i n g —a p a t t e r n for s t e m , s t e r n post, knees, and t r a n s o m , also full-size. T h e 225page manual describes the construction, step by step, and is based on the (sometimes traumatic) e x p e r i e n c e of g u i d i n g n i n e classes through f r o m a pile of l u m b e r to the c o m pleted boat. Watts also i n c l u d e s a c o m p l e t e m a t e r i a l s l i s t , s o u r c e s of supply, and i n s t r u c t i o n s on such techniques as s c a r f i n g , r i v e t i n g and clench nailing. For those unable or u n w i l l i n g to s p e n d the t i m e s h o p p i n g a r o u n d , he's arranged for a complete package of lumber f r o m F l o u n d e r Bay Boat lumber Company, r i g g i n g h a r d w a r e ( s p e c i a l l y m o d i f i e d for P e t a l u m a ) f r o m P o c o c k Racing Shells in E v e r e t t , and all the maddening miscellaneous items—fastenings, paint, b e d d i n g c o m p o u n d , glue, e t c . — from a source in the Bay A r e a , T h e Boater's Friend. continued on page 7


GOING DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS W h e n S t r o k e O a r and I w e r e p l a n n i n g to splice our lives together, my mother took her aside for a woman-to-woman talk. "You must u n d e r s t a n d that my son has a well-concealed but i n c u r a b l e b i r t h d e f e c t , " M o m s t o l d m y future helpmeet. "He's a boat nut." Since the issue was clear f r o m the v e r y outset, I have never had to pursue the elaborate stratagems of some friends, l i k e poor Sanderling. N a d i n e realized that she was the target of one o f S a n d e r l i n g ' s " c a m p a i g n s " w h e n h e bought the toothbrushes; one g r e e n , one r e d . Up to that t i m e , he'd always h u n g his toothb r u s h on the right side of the holder. H o w ever, his new toothbrush was red. That meant he had to keep it on the left side of the holder. "Just l i k e r u n n i n g lights on a boat, Honey," he'd e x p l a i n . " R e d for P o r t , g r e e n for Starb o a r d . T h a t way w e won't get t h e m m i x e d u p . " N a d i n e w a n t e d to point out that they'd never got t h e m m i x e d up w h e n he kept his b r u s h on the right side, but 5 o'clock in the m o r n i n g wasn't a good t i m e to squander energy on peripheral issues. She realized that S a n d e r l i n g w a n t e d to d i s c u s s b u y i n g a boat but that he w a s not g o i n g to be t h e one to b r i n g u p the s u b j e c t . H e ' d done the same t h i n g w h e n he wanted a sportscar. A f t e r the toothbrush visitation, a week passed before Sanderling opened a second front. N a d i n e came home to find h i m l i s t e n i n g to a s t a t e l y o r c h e s t r a l r e c o r d . It w a s H a n d e l ' s Water Music. O v e r the next few w e e k s , La Mer, The Flying Dutchman, The Trout Quintet, a n d South Pacific w e r e a d d e d t o S a n d e r l i n g ' s n a u t i c a l hit p a r a d e . N a d i n e pretended not to notice.

r e g a r d e d her t o t a l l y o b l i v i o u s l a n d l o c k e d sailor for a f u l l minute. " O h H e l l , " she said, " b u y the damn boat."

Born to Boat E v e n though the kids were gone, W i n s l o w couldn't convince Francine to consider l i v i n g aboard a boat. Instead she wanted the house r e d e c o r a t e d . She w a n t e d W i n s l o w to add a family room in preparation for grandchildren. She w a n t e d a n e w k i t c h e n . S h e ' d w a i t e d a long time. At first, W i n s l o w was disappointed, but he r e a l i z e d the j u s t i c e of Francine's d e m a n d s . A f t e r careful consideration, he announced that he would add the family r o o m if he could decorate it w i t h a complete nautical m o t i f . B a r r i n g Francine from the basement, he set to w o r k . T h r e e w e e k s later, he p r o u d l y showed her his r e s u l t s : a family r o o m i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e f r o m a tugboat's w h e e l h o u s e . T h e w a l l b e h i n d the bar had a huge ship's wheel s u r m o u n t e d by a set of picture frames like pilothouse w i n d o w s showing a panoramic view of the harbor. The stereo had been concealed in the cabinet for a ship-to-shore radio and the TV and V C R were housed in the shell of a WW II r a d a r unit W i n s l o w f o u n d at a G A O auction. L i t t l e brass p o r t h o l e s o n the walls each held a marine scenic, nicely backl i t . A l l the light f i x t u r e s w e r e bare b u l b s inside m e t a l c a g e s . T h e floor was t i l e d w i t h the same linoleum found in Washington State ferries. N e x t W i n s l o w tackled the k i t c h e n . H e replaced the o l d stove w i t h a huge s t a i n l e s s steel model w i t h fiddly rails to keep the pots f r o m s l i d i n g i n a n y t h i n g less than force ten on the Richter Scale. T h e small icebox turned into a big double-door m o d e l , also in gleaming

She also forebore to comment when the detergent in the laundry room changed f r o m C h e e r to T i d e and then to Surf. W h e n S a n d e r l i n g ' s favorite tipple shifted f r o m b o u r b o n and b r a n c h w a t e r t o P u s s e r ' s B r i t i s h N a v y r u m , she said n o t h i n g . I n fact, h e r s i l e n c e took on such an o v e r w h e l m i n g quality that at a dinner p a r t y w h e n she g l i m p s e d S a n d e r l i n g unobtrusively tapping his biscuit on the table e d g e t o r i d i t o f 17th c e n t u r y w e e v i l s , h e abandoned that ploy immediately.

stainless. T h e breakfast bar got its o w n fiddly rail and t a l l s w the f l o o r . T h e paint s c h e m e w e n t t o W a r d r o o m G r e e n . It wasn't exactly what Francine e n v i s i o n e d f r o m House and Garden, but W i n s l o w ' s e n t h u s i a s m was c a t c h i n g . She j o i n e d the s e a r c h for s e a g o i n g a r c a n a and a week later W i n s l o w was proud to tell skeptics h o l d i n g d o w n the bar at T h e Sailor's G r a v e that i t was F r a n c i n e h e r s e l f w h o f o u n d the tugboat s k y l i g h t for t h e i r k i t c h e n . She was already c a l l i n g it the Galley. W i n s l o w sold the b e d r o o m suite to a thrift shop s u b s t i t u t i n g a w a l l of b u i l t - i n d r a w e r s and a waterbed. He put louvered doors on the closets. T h o u g h she quailed w h e n he put surplus N a v y blankets on the b e d , even Francine had to admit the h a n g i n g captain's lamp looked better than the acid-etched c e i l i n g fixture w i t h the palm trees. She didn't object to the c h i m i n g clock, even w h e n she found out it only told t i m e in bells. A n d since the smell of fresh paint kept t h e m awake, W i n s l o w bought a small white noise generator that made quite a convincing imitation of w i n d and waves. T h e whole project m i g h t have ended up as a Sunday supplement feature on husbands and w i v e s w h o w o r k t o g e t h e r , but u n k n o w n t o F r a n c i n e , she was u n w i t t i n g l y b e c o m i n g party to a subtle plot. It c u l m i n a t e d in an a l m o s t classic s h a n g haiing. Traditionalist W i n s l o w was denied the true a u t h e n t i c i t y of a few d r o p s of laudanum in Francine's r u m since she was a teetotaler, so he had to settle for a heavy dose of V a l i u m in her v e g g i e s . She r e g a i n e d consciousness a b o a r d t h e Golden Vanity a n d it was t h r e e days before she could t e l l f r o m the decor that she wasn't still in her o w n house. "It was the b a t h r o o m that gave it a w a y , " she told the a r r e s t i n g officer. " W h e n I discove r e d that I had to p u m p the toilet, I said to myself, 'Toto, I don't think we're in K a n s a s . ' "

Solange's Sad Story S o l a n g e k n e w that she w a s b o r n to be a s a i l o r , but a f t e r f o u r b i g , a t h l e t i c b o y s , Solange's M a m a finally got the little g i r l she w a n t e d . Solange had a toy kitchen and a d o l l house before she c o u l d e v e n focus her eyes. She was d r e s s e d i n pinafores w i t h s t a r c h e d continued on next page

T h e end came one quiet a f t e r n o o n w h e n Nadine's aerobics i n s t r u c t o r p u l l e d a s m i l e m u s c l e and had to c a n c e l class. O p e n i n g the front d o o r , she h e a r d a r h y t h m i c c r e a k i n g from upstairs. Quietly she ascended the staircase. T h e sound was c o m i n g out of the spare bedroom. P e e r i n g around the doorjamb, she saw S a n d e r l i n g . H i s hands w e r e h o l d i n g the spokes of an invisible wheel. His eyes were f i x e d o n a d i s t a n t h o r i z o n , far b e y o n d t h e w a l l s o f t h e s p a r e b e d r o o m . H i s feet w e r e w i d e apart as he rocked from one to another. E a c h t i m e he rocked to port, the loose bit of floor, the loose bit she'd b e e n t r y i n g to get h i m to renail for t w o years, creaked. N a d i n e

6


C A L E N D A R OF EVENTS October 2 CWB Fall Regatta Noon-Dusk, CWB Site

A gathering of boats to see and t r y out, open h o u s e for C W B b o a t s , pot luck l u n c h at 2 p . m . , and races. Read about it in this issue.

October 2 Wawona Crew Reunion 2 p.m. A l l Wawona c o d f i s h i n g c r e w , f a m i l y a n d f r i e n d s of t h e c r e w are i n v i t e d to a t t e n d a m u g - u p about Wawona. B r i n g fish s t o r i e s , photos & scrap b o o k s . C a l l 447-9800 for i n formation.

October 21,1988 CWB Monthly Meeting 8 p.m., C W B Boatshop Joan and W i l l Jaffe/Miller w i l l give a slide talk on c a m p i n g - c r u i s i n g in their K l e p p e r kayak in the w a r m , s u n n y A e g e a n and Adriatic Seas.

CANOES, KAYAKS, AND PUNTS IN CWB'S SUMMER SEMINARS (continued from page 3) T h e class: H a r r y D o n o v a n , P e r r y O v e r t o n , Flora Mace, Gene McCormack, Kathy Bahnick, and Tracy K i r k p a t r i c k . Paul Ford and Ivor T h o m a s , Instructors.

From kayaks to canoes T h e M a i n e Guide C a n o e workshop was far from a spontaneous happening. John R u n d b e r g who appears to be a m i l d mannered school teacher is actually a canoe fanatic and was the i m p r e s a r i o who concocted this w o r k shop s i x m o n t h s b e f o r e it h a p p e n e d . J o h n invited J e r r y Stelmok, the g u r u of canvas cove r e d c a n o e s , to come f r o m his home in M o o s e J u n c t i o n , M a i n e (or w h a t e v e r ) and show us the true l i g h t . J e r r y showed us more—he's a master of the fine art of teaching. As W a r r e n W i l s o n put it, " N o t too much, not too l i t t l e . " I t h i n k W a r r e n also l e a r n e d M a i n e laconic f r o m Jerry. In twelve quick days the class built a mold so m a s s i v e we c a l l it the " E i g h t h Wonder of the W o r l d , " t w o 17-foot guide c a n o e s , and a lasting bond w i t h each o t h e r . We're k e e p i n g one of the c a n o e s . C o m e and see i t — a b o u t the finest piece of c r a f t s m a n s h i p y o u ' l l ever f i n d . B e t t e r yet, t r y it out —it's part of our fleet. T h e c l a s s : H a r v e y E i s e n , J i m M o f f i t (he came f r o m S i t k a , Alaska), B i l l Paine, Warren W i l s o n , R i c h a r d Wollam, and John R u n d b e r g . Another summer workshop brainstorm was b o a t b u i l d i n g as a f a m i l y project. We f i g ured this would have to be an entry-level type of boat, involving S k i l l s 101 and not too many s t i c k s , s o i t c o u l d b e built before t e m p e r s f r a z z l e d . T h e key element in a w o r k s h o p is the teacher. Patience and s e n s e of humor is an absolute n e c e s s i t y in t e a c h i n g boatbuildi n g . W h e n you're w o r k i n g w i t h parents and continued in third column

M A R I N E SKILLS WORKSHOPS

September 26, 28, October 3, 5,10,12 Introduction to Model Making 7 p.m. - 9 p.m., CWB Boatshop Instructor: Jim Gass Fee - $60 CWB members, $75 non-members

A n i n t r o d u c t i o n t o the a r t o f m o d e l m a k i n g , to guide one past the h u r d l e s and q u i c k s a n d that often stop a builder from ever completing the project.

October 4, 6,11,13,18, 20 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. October 8, 15 9 a.m. to noon CWB Boatshop Strip-Built Kayak Workshop Instructors: Paul Ford and Ivor Thomas Fee - $190 C W B members; $210 non-members

Students w i l l build t w o 16-foot cedar s t r i p p e d kayaks — one fore and aft planked, the other diagonal. No w o o d w o r k i n g experience is necessary. M a x i m u m of six students.

October 22-29 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lapstrake Workshop — Building the Petaluma Instructor: Simon Watts Fee - $500 C W B members; $550 non-members U n d e r the leadership of S i m o n Watts, another n a t i o n a l l y k n o w n a u t h o r and b o a t b u i l d e r , a small class w i l l build a 19-1/2' lapstrake r o w i n g shell while learning basic boatbuilding s k i l l s . S i m o n W a t t s has 3 0 y e a r s ' e x p e r i e n c e i n w o o d w o r k i n g and t e a c h i n g , and has taught many successful workshops at the C e n t e r for Wooden Boats. Woodworking experience necessary.

A GATHERING OF THE CLAN (continued from

page 2)

F o x , G e o f f J a m e s , A l i Fujino, A r c h i e C o n n , C h a r l i e and Toni M a s t r o , L o r i C l u k e y , L e e Cunningham, Bob Long, Andrea Luttinen, P e t e r B a i l l a r g e o n , Steve N o g a l , Ray C o n n e l l , B i l l Paine, Dick Faust, V i c t o r E s k e n a z i , Robin H e m b r e e , G e n e H u n t e r , Babette F a r i s , Pat H a r t l e , B a r b a r a and Jennifer Donette, R o g e r H u n t e r , John S t e w a r t , B o b Tapp, M a r k C u n ningham, Stuart Corsa, Matt M e r o , Rip Knot, Jim Feltrup, Gene M c C o r m i c k , Paul Ford, I v o r T h o m a s , B r o o k E l g i e , F r a n k Champagne, B i l l Van Vlack, John Shapiro, Jorge O s w a l d , A n d y O s w a l d , M i c k Warde, C h a r r i e B r e h e n y and L e i g h E r i e . For any I m i s s e d , you k n o w that we k n o w y o u gave it your best shot, and because of y o u , it was the best show ever. — Dick Wagner

CLASSIFIED SECTION FOR S A L E

T h e o r i g i n a l Windy Fifteen, p r o f e s s i o n a l l y built for the A m e r i c a n P l y w o o d A s s o c i a t i o n and used mainly as a s h o w r o o m d e m o n s t r a tor. 15-feet, m a r i n e p l y w o o d o n m a h o g a n y f r a m e s , m a h o g a n y t r i m , s p r u c e m a s t and boom, steel centerboard. M a i n , jib, lines, f e n d e r s , C l i n t o n o u t b o a r d , and e x t r a t a n k . Trailer. T h i s is a v i n t a g e boat but has b e e n r a r e l y s a i l e d . H a s b e e n g a r a g e d w h e n not i n use and is in a l m o s t o r i g i n a l c o n d i t i o n . $1,200. Contact J i m E v a n s , 206-842-6316

FOR S A L E 3 4 - f o o t W i l l i a m G a r d e n s l o o p , b u i l t 1960. Port O r f o r d cedar on oak, w i t h bronze s c r e w s . S p a r s , sails and r i g all excellent. Volvo diesel M D 2 B . M u c h extra gear, ground t a c k l e . S l e e p s f o u r . J o h n B e r g m a n , 3121 Birchwood Avenue, B e l l i n g h a m , WA 98225. 206-733-6865.

FOR S A L E

M E C C A 19' M a c k i n a w k e t c h . D e s i g n e d b y N e l s o n Z i m m e r . B u i l t i n 1984 b y Scott K i m mitt. Great camping cruiser. $5,000.00. 866-3739.

FOR S A L E B e a u t i f u l 17' R a n g e l e y r o w i n g boat. S t r i p built b y R K L . W e i g h s about 120 l b s . , w i t h oars. A s k i n g $3,500. 734-1205 (Bellingham)

FOR S A L E 16 F t . W i n d m i l l sailboat. E x c e l l e n t condition. N e w paint and v a r n i s h . Includes t r a i l e r and tarp. F u l l y equipped and ready to sail. $790. 821-6141. continued from column 1 k i d s s i m u l t a n e o u s l y we're t a l k i n g about a teacher w h o c o m b i n e s the best q u a l i t i e s of Job and Danny K a y e . T h e instructor who best fit these qualifications was W i n d W h i t e h i l l . B e s i d e s that, h e has the knack of speedy p l y w o o d construction and a b e a r d d e n s e e n o u g h to store his p e n cils. W i n d led three groups building an 8-foot pram designed by John G a r d n e r . Each w o r k shop took t h r e e e v e n i n g s and a l l day Saturday. T u r n e d out some fine vessels and gave a lot o f b i g a n d s m a l l f o l k s t h e i r f i r s t s t e p towards their home-built dreamboats. T h e c l a s s e s : Jack S h e r m a n and C a r l Foster, P a u l N i c h o l s o n and H e l e n C a r l s o n , B i l l and R a n d y B o e t t c h e r , M i k e and D o u g Hadley, Robert O s m o n d , T i m Delaney, A l a n R o b e r t s o n , Steve B u l l o c k , G a r y Parker, R o n and Delaney S u l l i v a n , D e n n i s H o l m e s , B e c k y Bumgarner, and M i c h a e l K i r r y .

PETALUMA IN PRINT

continued from page 5

T h e manual has six color photos (glued in i n d i v i d u a l l y ) , photo c o p i e s of o t h e r s , a l o n g w i t h sketches t o i l l u s t r a t e a w k w a r d d e t a i l s . T w o 2-1/2 f o o t by 3-1/2 f o o t s h e e t s of p l a n s drawings complete the package. T h e first e d i tion of 25 w i l l be numbered and signed. P r i c e is $ 7 5 . 0 0 p o s t p a i d , of w h i c h $5.00 goes t o C W B . O r d e r direct from S i m o n Watts at 720 B a y S t r e e t , San F r a n c i s c o , CA 94109.


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Shavings Volume 10 Number 4 (July-August 1988)