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Sounds

Rippin’ It Up

Seniors Finish the Game

Sounds of the Season

See Pages 6-7

See Pages 10-11

See Pages 4-5 of the Season See Page 4

Vol 55 Issue 8

Culver City High School

June 2010

Human After All

Alex Kurihara will be this year’s valedictorian

by Philip Bennett Opinions editor

Penny Schulte/The Centaurian

A CULVER CITY CIRCUS: Freshman Eric Mitchell shows off his juggling talents at this year’s circus-themed Summerfest. The annual ASB-sponsored event allows clubs to fundraise and students to celebrate the end of second semester.

Truly Honored

A music aficionado, an Eagle Scout, an athlete, a brother, and a friend. Senior Alex Kurihara is many things. He also happens to be the valedictorian of the class of 2010. Aside from a heavy workload from his AP classes, lacrosse practice, violin lessons, boy scout meetings, and math tutoring, Kurihara makes time for his friends and family. An alumnus of El Marino, Kurihara has maintained strong relationships with the friends he made there as well as in Boy Scouts. “Alex is the man. He has always been there for me and is such a great friend,” senior Matt Gima said. “He’s someone I can be proud to call my friend.” Through lacrosse, Kurihara has learned a lot about himself and how to handle a variety of situations. “I truly believe that lacrosse helped me transition from middle school and into high school,” Kurihara said. “I think having friends with a lot of the guys in the grades above me made my freshman year a lot more enjoyable.” Kurihara’s lacrosse experience has taught him the value of teamwork, hard work, and dedication. These lessons, he believes, have helped him endure high school. “Playing lacrosse was an escape for me, to get away from the redundant textbooks to play on the field with my friends,” Kurihara said. “Alex is a great combination of being an incredible student, [who is] consistent in his work, dedicated, and has a positive attitude,” History teacher Andy Owens said. “He always had a positive influence on the class.”

Kurihara enjoys simply hanging out with his friends. He has a close-knit crew that he sees frequently and believes their company is vital to his mental health. “Without the friends I have now, I would probably go insane,” Kurihara said. “I guess you can call it a ‘bromance.’” A trait that Kurihara possesses is the ability to take his work seriously, but also make time for leisurely activities. His work-before-play ethic has done a lot for him and has certainly helped him in the long run. “I was always told to get my stuff done before I go out and play with my friends,” Kurihara said. “Since the beginning of high school Alex took his studies very seriously and we would rarely see him outside of lacrosse practice,” senior Will Robins said. “But clearly it panned out really well for him.” An accomplishment that has proven his character and demonstrates his moral fiber is his Eagle Scout distinction. This is the highest honor a Boy Scout can obtain in the program. Kurihara’s Eagle Scout project was a food drive for the local Westside Food Bank. This project required time, effort, and heart. Kurihara’s true character was demonstrated wholeheartedly through this project. “I helped Alex with his project and just seeing his dedication, I was impressed,” fellow Boy Scout Gima said. “He has the potential to do whatever he wants to,” Owens said. “He has the personal qualities to be successful to do whatever he sets his mind to.”

> See VALEDICTORIAN Page 2

Rachel Snyder chosen as Teacher of the Year by Marisa Okano Editor-In-Chief History teacher Rachel Snyder has been elected by ASB Student Council as CCHS’s 2009-2010 Teacher of the Year. After learning the news, Snyder felt nothing less than utter shock. "I had no idea," she said. "It's a great honor." A CCHS faculty member for the past sixteen years, Snyder has become famous for heading one of the toughest courses on campus, AP European History. “If you survived AP Euro, you can have bragging rights for the rest of your life with a teacher as rigorous as Ms. Snyder,” junior and ASB voter Katherine Maxwell said. Maxwell credits her solid score of “5” on her 2009 AP exam to Snyder’s well-known “Fix-It” test correction sessions and iconic “starcircle-highlight” color coding strategies. All weekly tests and sleepless nights aside, Snyder has also been reported to have a genuine concern for her students’

- for lack of a better word - overall sanity. According to senior and ASB President Noya Kansky, Snyder fought for the student right to leave campus immediately after completing an AP exam. “She made the point that we’ve worked extremely hard to take a three-hour test and that we deserved the day off,” Kansky said. To most students at CCHS, it may seem as if Snyder herself rarely has time to relax. Sophomore and ASB voter Layal Bishara finds the amount of time that Snyder sacrifices for her students almost superhuman. “She’s really hard working. The amount of work she does for us is crazy,” Bishara said. Assistant Principal Ian Drummond, Snyder’s longtime colleague, insists that her attitude is far from “all work, no play.” The two first met at CCHS during the beginning of the ’94-’95 school year. Although

Penny Schulte/The Centaurian

FIGHTING TEARS: Rachel Snyder receives the honor at the June staff meeting. he has observed Snyder several times in “teaching mode,” he has also noticed her passion for travel. A self-proclaimed “avid traveler having set foot into 39 countries all over the world,” Snyder often shares colorful stories of her voyages with friends and colleagues like Drummond. “She goes to places I wouldn’t even consider.” Drummond finds one of Snyder’s recent expeditions especially impressive. “She even

traveled to the Baltic nations to trace her family heritage,” he said. Due to a week-long trip to Fort Collins, CO to score AP exams for the College Board, Snyder will be unable to deliver a traditional commencement speech at the June 18 graduation ceremony. "I've loved teaching here for the past sixteen years, and I'm looking forward to many more," she said.

Page design by Emily Hogan


2

News

The Centaurian

June 2010

The Party Don’t Stop ‘Til 5 a.m.

An inside look at the annual All Night Grad Party by Melody Sabet reporter On Friday, June 18, CCHS staff and parent volunteers will host the 57th annual All Night Grad Party at the Veteran’s Park auditorium for all to come together and live up the last hours of senior year. CCHS has been nationally recognized for this event for over 55 years. Approximately 30-50% of seniors attend the party each year. The ongoing tradition is planned by the All Night Grad Night Party Committee which meets once every month and once a week starting in May to help create a memorable event for graduating seniors. The party is designed to provide students with an enjoyable atmosphere and a safe and carefree graduation night. “We hope to offer the students an evening of excitement, fun, recreation, and one last day to spend time with friends,” All Night Grad Party Chair Elliot Heffler said. The committee works tirelessly to plan the party but relies solely on donations and volunteering from Culver City residents, businesses, and CCHS alumni. In fact, all of

the casino equipment for the party will be donated by CCHS alumni Scott and Larry Zeidman who own L.A. Slot Machine Co. in Redondo Beach. At the party, students will find themselves surrounded by a variety of activities which include airbrush tattoos, tarot readings, and crazy balloon artists. Casino games such as Black Jack and Texas Hold ‘Em will also be available to students. “It was so fun. You’re able to gamble without being underage and losing money,” Michele Enoch, a ‘07 CCHS alumnus who attended the event said. Other unique activities offered to the party-goers include an extensive variety of activities ranging from video games like rock band and DDR to mechanical bull riding. On top of that, students can participate in numerous free activities to win tickets for various prizes like iPods, flat screen TVs, digital cameras, and bicycles. Other prizes include gift cards from iTunes, Best Buy, Target, and popular eateries such as Chipotle, Starbucks,

and Famima. Food and beverages from Tito’s Tacos, hot wings, pizza, iced mochas and much more will be provided. Chocolate fountains and smoothie bars will be available to students all night long to refuel them and keep their party on. The party will also include a live DJ spinning tracks and keeping the toes tappin’ from sunset to sunrise. It is expected that 300 seniors will attend this year’s grad party.The pre-sale tickets are $30 or $40 at the door with no other costs. The party will be held at Veteran’s Memorial Center at 4117 Overland Ave. and admission is from 9:00 pm to 11:30 pm, but the party keeps going until 5:00 am the next morning. Students will not be “locked in” and are free to leave at anytime, but they will not be readmitted into the party. “I can’t wait to get as many gift cards as I can and get kicked off the mechanical bull,” senior Charlene Amarasekara, who plans on attending this year’s party said.

PHOTO COURTESY PATRICIA SAITO-LEWE

DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY: Students from the Class of 2009 enjoy the festivities at Veterans’ Park Auditorium.

VALEDICTORIAN continued from Page 1 Kurihara will be attending Brown University in the fall and will major in computer science or “wizardry” as he likes to call it. He has an extensive variety of plans for the future which revolve around helping humanity advance. Kurihara wants to assists in the construction of a super computer that contains computation skills beyond the human race. His hopes are to work with computers, own a “sweet car,”

and have a modest income. In his free time he wishes to start a whale-watching club and go fishing with his friends. “I want to be successful, by my own standards. Which means doing what I love and being around the people I love,” Kurihara said. Kurihara is a friend, and a human after all.

Continued Miracle

A look at AA, the longest running club on campus

by Juliana Vasquez news editor Is your summer schedule already chock-full of activities? Give us a couple of weeks, and we’ll give you a score to brag about. Our summer camps allow you to take our full-length courses in a condensed format. Plus, with small classes and extra coaching from talented instructors, you’ll get just what you need in order to ace the SAT/ACT.

Westwood Santa Monica West LA Venice The Grove Downey Bellflower

Downtown Hollywood Beverly Hills Pacific Palisades Palos Verdes Torrance Koreatown

Gardena Redondo Beach Manhattan Beach Carson El Segundo Culver City

The speaker takes his seat, the room quiets down and the atmosphere turns solemn. By addressing the dark moments in his life, which revolve around substance abuse, the speaker grasps the attention of every student in Room 17. As the bell rings, members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) leave with mixed emotions. Now advised by RSP teacher Sherry Agron, AA is one of the most well-known clubs on campus. Characterized by its daring purpose, pre-prom assemblies and powerful speakers, AA is about to complete its 23rd year on campus. Even as a club aimed at sobriety and recovery, AA faced many challenges when it first began at CCHS. “The school board was very hesitant,” retired English teacher and AA’s original advisor Howard Zager said. “And I understood why, since no one was talking about students drinking or smoking.” The club which began under the name Miracles was the first AA program offered in a California high school. According to Zager, Miracles was an appropriate name considering that students were actually seeking help for their addictions or family dependence with drugs and alcohol. Like the nationally recognized AA, cofounded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Akron in the 1930’s, Miracles began small with the hope to prosper. While the club grew and received acknowledgement, it also began to affect students outside of the classroom. “I drank a lot [my sophomore year] and joined because my friends were members,” CCHS alumni John Doe* said. “[However] after going to a few meetings I found myself going because I needed to and I did until I graduated.” According to Zager, many students like Doe* have come back and shared the impact AA has had in their lives, even after high school. Apart from meetings, AA has greatly contributed to the message of precaution incorporated in the pre-prom and grad night season. In the past, the club has organized assemblies which have dis-

couraged substance and alcohol abuse. According to Zager, like the meetings, the assemblies have occurred two days if not one day before the dance in order to be more effective. Today as the club has shifted advisors and meeting place, it has not lost its sole purpose of reiterating the importance of the 12 step program which is free and the most successful program of recovery. It continues to extend its welcome to any student who is the least bit curious; however, AA especially invites those who need it. According to Agron, as AA starts out small once more she stresses that the program is about content not enrollment. “The door is always open on Friday and the meetings will be held even if there is one student,” Agron said. *John Doe is an alias in consideration of AA’s policy of keeping members anonymous

Length of Sobriety for AA Members

31%

33%

Less than 1 year

10+ years

24%

1-5 years

12%

5-10 years

Data courtesy of AA.org

Page design by Emily Hogan


Trends

The Centaurian

June 2010

3

Thrift stores are a great way to shop on a budget. Economic times are tough and thrift shops offer great prices on a variety of items. From clothing, accessories to random trinkets, thrift stores have it all! Summer vacation is fast aproaching and the Centaurian staff set out to find different looks for the summer on a budget from three different local thrift shops.

You can shop smart too by Philip Bennett

OPINIONS EDITOR Model: Isabella Gallegos

Long patterend denim skirt, worn as a dress ($3.99), woven belt ($3.99),straw hat ($3.99) purchased at Thank You Mart TOTAL: $11.97

Cotton button down shirt ($3.99), Frayed cut off shorts ($3.99), Sunglasses ($3.99) purchased at Thank You Mart TOTAL: $11.97

Thin, clingy cotton mini dress ($7.99) purchased at Goodwill

Endless aisles, big price tags, and homogeneous clothing are things that repel men from the shopping experience. So guys who are on a tight budget can be at ease knowing that their wallet will not be emptied out when shopping at a thrift store. Take for example the Thank You Mart where no item is over $3.99 and there are new items in the store almost every week to keep things fresh. Though most of the stuff is for women, there are items there for guys, too.They have a wide selection of plaid shirts, ties, and stunna shades. There are articles of clothing for all occasions, even for those last-minute situations. Thank You Mart has racks of classy vintage shirts for dates, t-shirts for working out, and casual everyday stuff like vintage-styled shirts with funny logos or slogans. Shopping may seem like a “girly activity,� but it does not have to be. The Thank You Mart has some cool stuff that appeals to guys who want to look badass. Not only does this store have regular day-today clothes but they carry strange and exotic costumes and accessories such as wigs, mustaches, and shoes that fit into a dart board. A trip to any thrift store can make any guy happy. Man up and shop.

Goodwill 8905 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA, 90034 Phone: 310-845-9327 Directions: Metro line # 33 or 333

Model: Michelle Mallahi

Sparkly summer dress ($9.99) purchased at Timeless Treasures

Classy long button down shirt, worn as a dress ($9.99) paired with faux leather belt ($3.99) purchased at Timeless Treasures TOTAL: $12.98

Thank You Mart 1138 Westwood Blvd Westwood, CA 90024 Phone: (310) 861-7547 Directions: Culver City green line #6 Timeless Treasures 9441 Culver Boulevard Culver City, CA 90232-2616 Phone: (310) 559-8338 Directions: Culver City green line #1

Model: Emily Hogan

Page design by Jessica Marin


4

A&E

The Centaurian

Taylor Momsen of The Pretty Reckless

Page design by Summer Concepcion

Green Day kicks off their summer world tour May 29 in the Netherlands, and wraps up October 29 in Costa Rica. This tour comes in lieu of the band’s introduction to Broadway. The band last toured in 2006 following the hit album “American Idiot” which grossed $408 million (Spin Magazine) and skyrocketed Green Day’s popularity off the charts. The band will also be performing with AFI who has a lasting reputation of being another one of the most prominent “goth-rock” groups of all time. The punk revival rock group of the 90’s has become one of the leading rock groups to date. Having made their way to a different kind of stage (Broadway), the group has recruited a number of professional theatre actors to perform a number of their famous hits, such as “American Idiot” and “When September Ends.” They are touring for a number of dates and they have added two Southern California dates on August 31st in Irvine and a second date on September 2nd, in Chula Vista. -Zach Lange

This summer, avant-garde dance pop songstress Lady Gaga is inviting her fans to the Monster Ball – a 31-date concert tour to promote her 2009 album The Fame Monster. Ever since her 2008 debut, it seems as if this classically trained, once-underground musician has catapulted into veritable superstardom overnight. Gaga-holics can quench their thirst for their favorite hitmaker by attending performances at L.A.’s Staples Center on August 11-12. Described by Gaga herself as “the first-ever pop electro opera,” it’s highly unlikely that concertgoers will find themselves disappointed. -Marisa Okano

Expected to span 12 hours in duration this year (from noon to midnight) on August 7th, the HARD Summer Music Festival will take place at the Los Angeles Historic State Park delivering numerous electronic/house acts to its attendees. Performers include well-known acts in electronic music such as Soulwax, Crystal Castles, and Major Lazer as well as lesser-known acts such as Schlachthofbronx and Afghan Raiders. Attendees are guaranteed a taste of their favorite artists as well as becoming familiar with new ones. Known as one of Los Angeles’ most anticipated annual music events, each year many music enthusiasts attend for the fact that HARD feels like one massive party. Indeed, HARD’s success can be attributed to the fact that with each event, most attendees leave feeling like they took part in the party of a lifetime. -Summer Concepcion

HARD Summer

Win two tickets to see Rihanna and Ke$ha live at the Staples Center! Raffle tickets on sale for $1 until Friday, June 11 in Room 41

Is boredom turning your summer into a bummer? Fun is just one concert away.

Lady Gaga

A typical day at the Vans Warped Tour is an around the clock party where you get the opportunity to see as many as 50 bands all over the rock spectrum perform. This summer, there will be three chances (that are somewhat close by) to get a taste of the Warped Tour scene. On June 25, Warped Tour will be make its first stop at the Home Depot Center in Carson. A couple of days later on June 27, Warped Tour will be at the Ventura Country Fairground at Seaside Park. Then for a month and a half, Warped Tour will be spotted all around the country but then will make one last hit to California at the Pomona Fairplex on August 11. Some of this summer’s big name performances include The All-American Rejects, Alesana, Bring Me The Horizon, Hey Monday, Mayday Parade, and Nevershoutnever. Also, there will be comeback performances from bands such as Discharge, GBH, and Reel Big Fish. Warped Tour serves as an amazing opportunity to have a day full of summer orientated fun and entertainment. -Charlotte Tingler

Sounds of the Season

Green Day

Warped Tour

R ih anna

This summer, Grammy winner and R&B diva Rihanna will kick off her “The Last Girl on Earth” tour in North America, making two stops in California. Fans will be able to experience Rihanna live at the ARCO Arena in Sacramento on July 9 or at the Staples Center on July 21. The Billboard and music award show regular, who has won numerous awards thus far has promised that her upcoming tour will be “way better than the previous tours” with opening acts performed by Ke$ha. The summer tour will begin July 2 in Seattle and make 25 stops over the US until August 25. The “Last Girl On Earth” Tour will support her fourth studio album, Rated R, which has been certified platinum in the US will be directed by Jamie King, who has also collaborated with Madonna, Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. -Firooz Kabir

June 2010

Alice Glass of Crystal Castles

Photos courtesy of Flickr


A&E

The Centaurian

June 2010

5

Natural History Museum

Summer Entertainment: T h e C h e a p E d i t i o n Have fun without going broke Museums 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3466 Hours 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. daily At $6.50 for a student with ID, the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is a worthwhile day trip suitable for anybody. The halls of the NHM offer dozens of exhibits ranging from ancient dinosaur bones to oil well pumps of the 20th century. Exploring every exhibit within this diverse museum can take more than six hours, and makes for both an educational and entertaining day. If you get bored of the NHM or visit everything, you can easily take a stroll through the beautifully maintained rose garden, or visit the California Science Center located next door. -Duncan Ballantine

DUNCAN BALLANTINE / The Centaurian

As the largest art museum in the Western U.S. and a key part of Los Angeles culture, LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) possesses thousands of objects within its art collection. Entering the permanent galleries and non-ticketed exhibitions is free for children 17 and under -- sorry, 18 year olds, your admission costs $8 with student ID. These galleries provide visitors with paintings, sculptures, and other forms of art for viewing pleasure. LACMA does not only provide fantastic art galleries; film and music events occur regularly at LACMA. Information on past, present, and future galleries/events can be found at www.lacma.org. -Duncan Ballantine

Flea Markets

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Melrose Trading Post

LACMA

5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6000 Hours - Mon, Tu, Thur, Fri 12 noon-8 p.m., Saturday-Sunday 11 a.m.-8 p.m. CLOSED Wednesday

A type of bazaar in which secondhand goods can be sold or bartered, flea markets tend to maintain an environment similar to that of the Melrose Trading Post. Regardless of the economy, they offer reduced prices, providing a sound alternative for those wishing for an enjoyable and successful shopping experience without the expenses found in a typical mall. Depending on the vendor, the prices of items can be haggled, so for those on a specific budget the price flexibility can be ideal. With a young crowd bustling about under a maze of tents, the Melrose Trading Post – a flea market located in the parking lot at Fairfax High School, 7850 Melrose Avenue – seems to be a destination shopping location for Los Angeles’ west side. Boasting a range of goods from old 60’s records to trendy clothes and accessories, offbeat artwork, antique furniture, and an array of random knick knacks and decor, the Post attracts a crowd brimming with energy as they search for their next prize find. For an entry fee of two dollars, every Sunday, shoppers can enter the market to browse and buy an assortment of cheap items all in one convenient location. -Jasira Woods JASIRA WOODS / The Centaurian

Art Galleries

Culver City Art District

One of the highest concentrations of fine art galleries in Southern California is right here in Culver City, and with over forty galleries around the same area, it’s sure to keep any summer day filled with entertainment. Most of the galleries are located in the Culver City Art District around Washington Boulevard between Helms Avenue and Fairfax Avenue, and La Cienega Boulevard, between Venice Boulevard and Blackwelder Street. Go on your very own mini Culver City Art Walk and explore galleries like ROYAL/T art cafe, Corey Helford gallery (pictured at left), and much more. Most galleries are open from around 1-5 pm, but hours vary from gallery to gallery. The art in these galleries range in style and media, containing a mix of contemporary art, Japanese Kawaii, modern design, folk-art,sculptures, etc. -Neha Ahmed

Hammer Museum

PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR

10899 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310)443-7000 Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat 11am - 7pm, Thu 11am - 9pm, Sun 11am - 5pm Cost: $7 Adults, Free for students with I.D. and on Thursdays for all visitors Operated by UCLA’s School of the Arts and Architecture, the Hammer Museum has grown in reputation as a space for various works of contemporary art and for putting a twist to what an art space can be used for. For a small visiting fee, one can explore the fine art gallery and also attend its Thursday public concerts for free at the Hammer courtyard. July kicks off the “Also I Like to Rock” concert series featuring a number of emerging indie acts such as Kitten and Chasing Kings. The “JazzPOP” series begins in August and brings together talented and soulful Jazz musicians of various backgrounds such as Industrial Jazz Group. Hammer provides an outlet for one to enjoy both visual and audio artwork in one place. -Summer Concepcion

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Page design by Summer Concepcion


Features FIRE DRILLS

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Austin Fan

Fresno State

Arnaldo Aquino

Chanda Marrick

Miguel Diaz

Sergio Valadez

Yeon Jin Sung

Noya Kansky

Matthew Better

Alex Stautzenbach

San Francisco State University

Geana Ayala

Heather Hudson

Eric Alvarez

Matt Hershman

Cal State Fullerton

Avionne Thomas

Kelly Jew

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Delaney Knorr

Jacob Lewe

Humboldt State University

Stanton Welsh

Rodel Gonzalez

Andrew Baird

Jonathan Harper

Michael Lee

Cal State Long Beach

Zeerak Hashimi

Mariam Faruqui

Eli Reich

Amira Bennett Shawn Kassa

Cal State Northridge Santa Barbara

Jonathan Abboud

Katherine Hennessy

Francis Torres

Michael Castillo

Edward Dono

Michael Fraser

Marymount College

Sarah Hattem

Brown University

Gabrielle Bon Durant

Santa Monica College

West LA College

Christina Astorga

Muhammad Ali

King’s College

Michael Castro

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John Conchola

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Andrew Montes

Jose Morales

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Marvin Mizell

Sonia Motten

El Camino College

Caroline Plaza

Mark Rafla

Virginia Reyes

Lisa Rodriguez

Four-Year Universities

American University

Alexander Ige

Missouri State University

Alex Kurihara

Noah Ashley

Mount St. Mary’s College

Boise State University

Northeastern

Elizabeth Jeronimo-Mejia

Joyce Flores

Columbia University

Northwestern

USC

Daejon Moore

Marquel Carter

East Tennessee State

Derek Farrar

Lucy Linderman

Glenn Alexander

NYU

Alexander Geeves-Booth

Timothy Kang

Emerson College

Marisa Okano

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Jesse Pilchen

Howard University

Divakar Singamsetty

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Jessica Wang

Kyle Murphy

Joey Guthman

Erika Tucker

Gabrielle Isabel Garcia

Goucher College

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Julie Choi

Ben Klemes

Joshua Plottel

Slaveya Minkova

Seattle University

Sasha Brown

Samantha Lambour

Jonathan Zisner

Ethan Bennett

Luke Medina

Conor Murphy

Philip Beer

Anthony Sacharny

Matthew Tsuda

Justin Yi

Anas Farooq

Monica Mejia

Grambling State University

Spelman University

Max Oriel

Julia Panchenko

Hampton University

University of Arizona

Jessica Pombo

Zachary Rubin

Juniata College

University of Portland

Jonathan Schwartz

Tony Stevenson

Knox College

University of Redlands

Irene Wilson

Adriana Lanzarotta

Mariah Lowe

Jody Stiger II

Skukura Woods

Philip Bennett

Zane Lowry

Jillian Jones

Oscar Santana

Kandace Santillana

Aaron Williams

Irvine Valley College

Herman Davis III

Kody Devoux

Olivia Alvarez

University of Washington

Giovanni Elias

Los Angeles Recording School

Dominique Pitts

Ashley Viscarra

Jamie Walpole

Seth Bronstein

YOUR FIRST CLUB

BUY YOUR SENIOR

Andrew Gomez

Le Cordon Bleu

Kimberly Moser

JOIN

Long Beach Community College

Art Institute of Los Angeles

JEFFERSON BLVD. AVOID THE SEAGULLS

VENICE BLVD.

NEWSPAPER

VOCATIONAL

Jeana Linstrot-Graves

Firooz Kabir

OVERLAND AVE.

READ THE SCHOOL

SWEATER

Michelle Kwak

Garrett Rockey

FIDM

McKinley Jordan IV

LINCOLN AVE.

LL

CAP AND GOWN

VISITING College list compiled by Jasira Woods

SCHOOL

WAY

DISNEYLAND

THROUGH THE

GRAD NIGHT

LUNCH NO MORE P.E.

VOTE FOR ASB OFFICERS

HALLS

A

ATTEND

A

FIGHT YOUR

S

BUY

LE

IN Y

A

L

Michael Baroudi

BUY YOUR

RD O

Santa Cruz

TU

HO

Loyola Marymount University

San Diego

SA

JUST

SC

OUT-OF-STATE

Lauren Fox

UR

ELENDA ST.

TESTING

Duncan Ballantine

Jennifer Song

Danielle Galper

CENTauRS

S.T.A.R.

PROM

universities, while 55% of the Class of 2010 will be attending two-year colleges. The following list represents the seniors whose surveys we received with permission to publish them.

Chapman University

Cal State East Bay

Los Angeles

WITH

Nicole Wettach

CCHS seniors have lived through various experiences that have ultimately defined their high school years. Now, it’s time for them to move on and graduate. 43% of the Class of 2010 will be attending four-year

Juliana Vasquez

Sonoma State University

San Diego State

Riverside

FINISHED

Robert Safoyan

Cal State Channel Islands

ATTEND FIRST HOME GAME

Azusa Pacific University

Ryan Pugh

FOR

IC E

SUMMERFEST

CULVER BLVD.

ATTEND

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Irvine

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY

GET READY

O

SS

Berkeley

GRADUATION The Game for High School Seniors

PRIVATE

SATURDAY SCHOOL

G

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

FARRAGUT DR.

PA

PUBLIC

SENIOR PRANK

IN

IN-STATE

CENTINELA AVE.

DETENTION

U

BRADDOCK DR.

GO DIRECTLY TO

PARTICIPATE IN THE

RN

SEPULVEDA BLVD.

SPIRIT WEEK

DANCE

YO

PA

S

DRIVER’S LICENSE

FOR

HOMECOMING

C O

N

LU

H

C

FIRST

COUNTLESS

7

DRESS UP

SE RV

SS

PRACTICE

HO

O

FF

-C

GET YOUR

GO TO YOUR

EC T

A

TAKEN AWAY

HURON AVE.

GET YOUR PHONE

June 2010

WASHINGTON BLVD.

The Centaurian

M PU S

6

G

Page design by Jasmine Alrayes and Firooz Kabir


Features FIRE DRILLS

‘10 GET YOUR FIRST

DONATE BLOOD

Austin Fan

Fresno State

Arnaldo Aquino

Chanda Marrick

Miguel Diaz

Sergio Valadez

Yeon Jin Sung

Noya Kansky

Matthew Better

Alex Stautzenbach

San Francisco State University

Geana Ayala

Heather Hudson

Eric Alvarez

Matt Hershman

Cal State Fullerton

Avionne Thomas

Kelly Jew

Rebecca Schwartz

Delaney Knorr

Jacob Lewe

Humboldt State University

Stanton Welsh

Rodel Gonzalez

Andrew Baird

Jonathan Harper

Michael Lee

Cal State Long Beach

Zeerak Hashimi

Mariam Faruqui

Eli Reich

Amira Bennett Shawn Kassa

Cal State Northridge Santa Barbara

Jonathan Abboud

Katherine Hennessy

Francis Torres

Michael Castillo

Edward Dono

Michael Fraser

Marymount College

Sarah Hattem

Brown University

Gabrielle Bon Durant

Santa Monica College

West LA College

Christina Astorga

Muhammad Ali

King’s College

Michael Castro

Olivia Arreola

John Conchola

Hector Casillas

Ozzay Carranza

Linden Dawson

Lauren Dumas

Diane Jeon

Giovanni Heredid

Jeremy Jones

Vlad Ionescu

Juliann MacNicoll

Nicolas Linarte

Joseph Marquez

Francisco Lopez

Felix Martinez

Mina Mekhan

Lenard Mendez

Andrew Montes

Jose Morales

Melissa Morales

Marvin Mizell

Sonia Motten

El Camino College

Caroline Plaza

Mark Rafla

Virginia Reyes

Lisa Rodriguez

Four-Year Universities

American University

Alexander Ige

Missouri State University

Alex Kurihara

Noah Ashley

Mount St. Mary’s College

Boise State University

Northeastern

Elizabeth Jeronimo-Mejia

Joyce Flores

Columbia University

Northwestern

USC

Daejon Moore

Marquel Carter

East Tennessee State

Derek Farrar

Lucy Linderman

Glenn Alexander

NYU

Alexander Geeves-Booth

Timothy Kang

Emerson College

Marisa Okano

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Jesse Pilchen

Howard University

Divakar Singamsetty

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Jessica Wang

Kyle Murphy

Joey Guthman

Erika Tucker

Gabrielle Isabel Garcia

Goucher College

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Julie Choi

Ben Klemes

Joshua Plottel

Slaveya Minkova

Seattle University

Sasha Brown

Samantha Lambour

Jonathan Zisner

Ethan Bennett

Luke Medina

Conor Murphy

Philip Beer

Anthony Sacharny

Matthew Tsuda

Justin Yi

Anas Farooq

Monica Mejia

Grambling State University

Spelman University

Max Oriel

Julia Panchenko

Hampton University

University of Arizona

Jessica Pombo

Zachary Rubin

Juniata College

University of Portland

Jonathan Schwartz

Tony Stevenson

Knox College

University of Redlands

Irene Wilson

Adriana Lanzarotta

Mariah Lowe

Jody Stiger II

Skukura Woods

Philip Bennett

Zane Lowry

Jillian Jones

Oscar Santana

Kandace Santillana

Aaron Williams

Irvine Valley College

Herman Davis III

Kody Devoux

Olivia Alvarez

University of Washington

Giovanni Elias

Los Angeles Recording School

Dominique Pitts

Ashley Viscarra

Jamie Walpole

Seth Bronstein

YOUR FIRST CLUB

BUY YOUR SENIOR

Andrew Gomez

Le Cordon Bleu

Kimberly Moser

JOIN

Long Beach Community College

Art Institute of Los Angeles

JEFFERSON BLVD. AVOID THE SEAGULLS

VENICE BLVD.

NEWSPAPER

VOCATIONAL

Jeana Linstrot-Graves

Firooz Kabir

OVERLAND AVE.

READ THE SCHOOL

SWEATER

Michelle Kwak

Garrett Rockey

FIDM

McKinley Jordan IV

LINCOLN AVE.

LL

CAP AND GOWN

VISITING College list compiled by Jasira Woods

SCHOOL

WAY

DISNEYLAND

THROUGH THE

GRAD NIGHT

LUNCH NO MORE P.E.

VOTE FOR ASB OFFICERS

HALLS

A

ATTEND

A

FIGHT YOUR

S

BUY

LE

IN Y

A

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Michael Baroudi

BUY YOUR

RD O

Santa Cruz

TU

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Loyola Marymount University

San Diego

SA

JUST

SC

OUT-OF-STATE

Lauren Fox

UR

ELENDA ST.

TESTING

Duncan Ballantine

Jennifer Song

Danielle Galper

CENTauRS

S.T.A.R.

PROM

universities, while 55% of the Class of 2010 will be attending two-year colleges. The following list represents the seniors whose surveys we received with permission to publish them.

Chapman University

Cal State East Bay

Los Angeles

WITH

Nicole Wettach

CCHS seniors have lived through various experiences that have ultimately defined their high school years. Now, it’s time for them to move on and graduate. 43% of the Class of 2010 will be attending four-year

Juliana Vasquez

Sonoma State University

San Diego State

Riverside

FINISHED

Robert Safoyan

Cal State Channel Islands

ATTEND FIRST HOME GAME

Azusa Pacific University

Ryan Pugh

FOR

IC E

SUMMERFEST

CULVER BLVD.

ATTEND

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Irvine

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY

GET READY

O

SS

Berkeley

GRADUATION The Game for High School Seniors

PRIVATE

SATURDAY SCHOOL

G

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

FARRAGUT DR.

PA

PUBLIC

SENIOR PRANK

IN

IN-STATE

CENTINELA AVE.

DETENTION

U

BRADDOCK DR.

GO DIRECTLY TO

PARTICIPATE IN THE

RN

SEPULVEDA BLVD.

SPIRIT WEEK

DANCE

YO

PA

S

DRIVER’S LICENSE

FOR

HOMECOMING

C O

N

LU

H

C

FIRST

COUNTLESS

7

DRESS UP

SE RV

SS

PRACTICE

HO

O

FF

-C

GET YOUR

GO TO YOUR

EC T

A

TAKEN AWAY

HURON AVE.

GET YOUR PHONE

June 2010

WASHINGTON BLVD.

The Centaurian

M PU S

6

G

Page design by Jasmine Alrayes and Firooz Kabir


8

Opinions

The Centaurian

June 2010

It Doesn’t Matter How You Get There... Just Get There The choice to attend a four-year or two-year college can have the same results, but students shouldn’t treat quality community colleges like SMC as their go-to safety net

STAFF EDITORIAL There are many misconceptions about attending a community college like Santa Monica College, a popular choice for a number of graduating Centaurs each year. Despite this fact, many students believe that community colleges are inferior and are only for the slackers. Students toss negative names around like “Culver Continuation” and “13th and 14th grade” referring to many community colleges - oftentimes SMC specifically - in a condescending manner. The less-than-perfect reputations of nearby community colleges could be attributed to the large number of slackers who earn Ds and Fs through high school only to continue their behavior at quality institutions like SMC. SMC should not be defined as the ideal option for students in search of a safety net, as there are dedicated and industrious students that attend as well. Therefore, SMC and other local community colleges should not be treated as an extension of high school, but rather an opportunity to succeed. In the long run, the choice to attend either a four-year or two-year college can have the same results, although the means of arriving at this success are much different. Unlike four-year universities, high school diplomas are not required to attend most community colleges. Although any student regardless of their high school record may attend a community college, students who might not have exerted their best effort in high school will not be granted leniency during their years of community college. The reality is that if students choosing to attend SMC would like to benefit from a community college education, students will have to work hard, especially since high school and college levels are much different. The workload at community colleges can be significantly more than work in high school. Several hours are spent reading, doing research, and writing papers.

One other misconception is that one can easily transfer from a community college to a prestigious university. How often have you heard, “I’m just going to go to SMC and transfer to Berkeley”? Students must face the reality of the transfer process: it’s not as easy as simply submitting an application. Depending on the college,

most colleges only accept a small percentage of their transfer students. This makes the application process even more competitive. According to a report by the Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE), six in 10 students who enter the California community college system as freshmen with high school diplomas aiming to transfer to four-year universities drop out or lower their academic sights after just one semester. The same report followed students ages 17-20 entering community colleges in California and over the six-year period these students were followed, only 32.5 percent ultimately transferred to four-year schools, both public and private. Clearly the overall transfer process is not easy. Many students get discouraged and take their time at a community college or drop out entirely. Those who are going off to community college in the fall should take this opportunity seriously. Although the choice to attend to a community college such as SMC may be “frowned upon” by some students, a school’s prestige does not guarantee success in the long run. Community college should be taken as seriously as any fouryear college if these preconceived notions are to be dispelled.

FROWNED UPON: Due to common misconceptions about the quality of local community colleges like SMC, many students often find themselves subject to degradation. ILLUSTRATION BY ERIKA TUCKER

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Culver City High School 4401 Elenda Street Culver City, CA 90230 Room 41 Telephone: (310) 842-4200 E-Mail: cchscentaurian@ yahoo.com

Thank You to the Alumni Association

The Centaurian newspaper is made possible by donation from the Culver City High School Alumni Association. For more information go to www.cchsa.org Email: CCHSAlumni@aol.com

Printed by the Gardena Valley News Page design by Zachary Lange

Editor-in-Chief Marisa Okano Managing Editor Firooz Kabir News Editors Julia Panchenko & Juliana Vasquez A&E Editor Summer Concepcion Trends Editor Charlotte Tingler Opinions Editor Philip H. Bennett Photo Editor Duncan Ballantine Sports Editor Timothy Kang Online Editor Neha Ahmed Features Editor Jasmine Alrayes & Jasira Woods Advisor Penny Schulte

This Just In

Get involved. Comment. Contribute. Tell us what you think. Get updated with exclusives, breaking news, and more. Log on today: www.cchscentaurian.com


9

Opinions

The Centaurian

June 2010

Not Lovin’ It

Why can’t I ride my bike through the McDonald’s Drive Thru? by Redmond Stephan Reporter The drive-thru at McDonald’s: we’ve all been there. Two cars back some demon-spawn is screeching like a rabid chimpanzee about their Happy Meal, one car up an overweight office-worker bumbles their way through the entire menu before settling on a Quarter-Pounder meal super-sized. As I said before, we have all been there. Few of us, however, have been there on a bike. Fewer still have followed through on the terrible service. To start from the beginning of the story, it was the first of May, 2010. On this auspicious Saturday, my friend, known as Jesse Tellez, and I rode our bikes to McDonald’s. We arrived to find, in a fact as dismaying as it was ironic, that we had forgotten our bike locks. To a brain nourished with delicious McDonald’s grease, this would warrant one of us standing outside while the other ordered. There were two problems with this, the first being we lacked the nourishment of Mickey-D’s and the second being Jesse’s bike has a significant street value and should not be left unattended. As such we took the logical route, we commenced riding through the drive through. However to commence the festivities, the voicebox, which has the kind words of “May I take your order, please?” did not activate and no voice inquired as to what sustenance we required. To solve this dilemma Jesse and I ran our hands in front of the car sensor making vroom sounds in an attempt to garner the attention of McDonald’s employees. It was after five minutes of this complete lack of service that an employee finally addressed us. All we saw of her was a brief movement as she bustled out of the door into the parking lot and told us, in a dialect of English, to leave because she would/had

called the police/federal government. As we left the establishment, Jesse attempted to resolve the situation by offering to take the bike inside so he could order. His action resulted in the employee staring us down until we left the property. It was the third of May when we called McDonald’s customer service. We conveyed our story to the kind woman on the phone, informing her of the terrible injustice and lack of service we received. She was very considerate, often reminding us of how important the call was. Despite a constant juggling of the phone so “Thort’n” - this was what Jesse insisted on calling himself - and I could speak, she remained calm and patient and even offered to send us a certificate for one free large sandwich meal. She informed “Thort’n” and I that the certificate would arrive in four to five business days and that she would call the manager and juxtapose her story with ours. On the fourth, “Thort’n” received a call from the manager at McDonald’s. She wished to see Jesse and me as soon as possible. Unfortunately, this was on the fifth after school. This in and of itself was not an issue, what was however was our friend Dan Buso. To be even more specific, it was Dan’s fake beard. We arrived at McDonald’s to see the manager, and learned that the manager we were looking for was not in, so we would have to speak to a different one. This different manager appeared to be the woman who had demanded us to leave on Saturday. After a very long conversation, during which she showed zero expression, she repeatedly informed us that bikes are not allowed through McDonald’s drivethru’s. We politely told her that we did not know that companies still discriminated against bike riders. “I did,” chimed Dan from behind.

“Well, except for Dan here,” I stated turning round to look at him. It was at this moment that Dan touched Jesse and me on the shoulder and said to the manager, “I oblige if my friends have offended your fine... building.” Yet, somewhere between the words “fine” and “building” Dan’s beard began to peel off. The visage of Dan attempting diplomacy as his beard fell off sent me into a fit of laughter. It was at this moment that the manager told us that should we ever return and waste her time laughing again then she would call “police,” not “the police” but “police,” - that’s how we knew she meant business. And so, a group of teenagers learned that fascism is alive and well in America; and it thrives in McDonald’s establishments like the one on 4835 South Sepulveda. It thoroughly sickens us, to the very core of our being.

What happened to female self-respect? The media’s perception of young women is changing and not for the better by Emily Hogan Reporter What happened to the good old days when little girls were innocent; when they would play dress up and see their mothers as their role models? Now that technology can be accessed by anyone and everyone it seems that innocence has flown straight out the window. The media’s influence over children is tarnishing our society and ruining the minds of our future. With such attention focused on the “trainwreck” celebrities such as Lindsay Lohan and “Snookie” it is no wonder that young girls’ minds are filled with tabloid trash and false interpretations on life. All of these social failings are due to society’s dependence on the media as well as technology. We can’t help but notice supermarkets stock piled

with gossip magazines. Televisions cloud our mind with scandals along with scandalous women that tarnish our younger generations’ perception of life and the ability to hold the moral values that our nation once held. One prime example of media’s sad excuse for a television program is the show “Toddlers & Tiaras.” This show follows the cult behavior of mothers modeling their children as grown women. Makeup covers their faces and skimpy clothes reveal the young girls’ skin. It is an obsession that has damaged our youth and hindered our ability to remain innocent. All thanks to dollar signs, money has control over media and it seems as though the people controlling the funds have no regard for

keeping youthful innocence intact nor the power of media messages. Society’s infatuation with recent scandals involving Sandra Bullock and Tiger Woods prove a mass obsession with gossip that eventually desensitizes our youth. Many individuals believe that what most celebrities do off the screen is the correct thing to do. Last month, a viral online video featured a group of seven-year olds in bright leotards and dancing to Beyonce’s hit single “Single Ladies.” Their provocative dance stunned the masses. The media’s portrayal of this “sexy” dance led these young girls to believe that it was okay for them to dance this way. This shocking dance made many people question what was wrong with our

society to make parents think that it is okay for their young children to dance so provocatively.There is a larger picture inside American media that tends to rule over the concept of right and wrong. The media controls daily happenings all over the world. When all young women in skimpy outfits are glamorized, it poses the question: will our country keep leading the way in shallow beliefs and following the ways of others through the constant attention on the media? Toby Canham/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/MCT

ROLE MODEL? Trainwreck celebs like Lindsay Lohan (above, at her recent probation hearing) are constantly under the spotlight.

Page design by Zachary Lange


10

The Centaurian

Lapping the Competition

Sports

Charging Forward

After gliding through CIF, junior Michael Dozal swam his way to the state competitions for the first time by Emily Hogan Staff Writer For any student-athlete, the thought of just qualifying for the California Interscholastic Federation, or CIF, would be a dream come true. However, for junior swimmer Micahel Dozal, qualifying for CIF was just another step towards his ultimate goal. Nevertheless, making it to CIF, is still an accomplishment he is proud of. After ten long years of tireless work, Dozal passed the division sectional portions of the CIF and became an official Division 3 CIF swimmer. To achieve this feat, Dozal not only practiced all of the different strokes for almost 18 hours a week, but he also spent a large portion of time weight training. Through his relentless work, Dozal was able to enhance the quality and strength of his strokes, shorten his time, and elevated his muscle endurance. “I had to sacrifice a lot of my social life for swim,” Dozal said. Junior Jim Slotnick also asserted that his teammate and long time friend had done more work than expected of him. “His work ethic is unbelievable. [He has] sacrificed many aspects of his social life just to practice and reach his goal in the sport,” he said. In the end Dozal’s hard work paid off. Since he has made it to CIF and reached the Master’s Meet, he has received tons of mail from colleges, all inviting him to take interest in their school. But that now seems like such a small sacrifice for sucha rewarding experience. “He has embraced swimming like no other athlete I know,” Slotnick said. “His outright dedication to the sport can be seen at every event he competes in.” Through his hard work and dedication, Dozal has achieved his one of his goals: qualifying for CIF. Looking on to TIMOTHY KANG/The Centaurian the future, he believes that he can improve A ‘MASTER’-FUL PERFORMANCE: Junior Michael Dozal did well enough in CIF to be able to and reach his ultimate goal: to place higher compete in the state Master’s Meet. in the Master’s Meet in order to garner scholarships from colleges like the USC. Only time will tell if he can fulfill his expectations for himself, but one thing is certain: his teammates will continue to support him.

Five student-athletes from CCHS’s track-and-field team qualified for the CIF finals this year by Zach Lange Staff writer CCHS’s track-and-field team began their CIF southern sectional track-meet on May 22 with a total of five competitors looking to become qualifiers for the state competition (also called the “Master’s Meet”). Four of the twelve athletes, seniors Ryan Pugh and BJ Smith and sophomores Alex Jackson and Anthony Luckett qualified for the event by receiving a time of three minutes and 24 seconds in the 4x400 relay, catapulting them above the rest of the runners. However, the four did not have a short enough time to qualify for the state competition. “I worked hard all year, I attended every practice but sometimes things just don’t work out. But I was just happy to compete in the CIF meet,” Pugh said. Senior Olympia Jewett was successPHOTO COURTESY OF OLYMPIA JEWETT ful during the CIF LEADER OF THE PACK: Senior Olympia Jewett qualified competitions, qualifyfor the state competitions after passing the rest of her competiing for the triple jump, tors in the 300 hurdles. 100 hurdles, and 300 hurdles. In the end, Jewett qualified for the triple jump for the state competition preliminaries this past Saturday in Fresno, California, being the only person on the team who qualified for the competition. “I didn’t do my best, placing 16th in the state. But it is still a good achievement because I made it to the state championships,” Olympia said. Although she has been on the team for all four years of high school this is her first year making it to the state competition. “I have been training since October of this year,” she said. “It takes a lot of work to get to where you need to be.” As seen through the results of this season, the training the coaches gave the student-athletes during the season proved to be successful. Jahmal Wright, CCHS’s head track and football coach, has trained Olympia and the rest of the track team extensively, placing an extra emphasis on conditioning and leg strength. Coach Wright has been delighted to see his talented squad make it to the CIF competition. “I’m truly proud of my competitors and how well they worked for this season,” Wright said. The track-and-field team has always been able to produce fantastic achievements through its student-athletes. Two years ago, Anniya Louis impressed Culver High by making it to the Master’s Meet and placing first in the nation. This year Olympia Jewett also excited many people by qualifying into the competition. If the pattern continues, who knows which underclassmen will step up and proudly represent CCHS in the upcoming years. “We have some incredible athletes at this school,” former trackand-field coach Dave Sanchez, who was present during Louis’s historic achievement, said. “It is through their hard work and dedication that they become champions.”

A Look Back

Collective season records from the 2009-2010 school year

Fall Sports

Winter Sports

June 2010

Visit D rivers Ed.c during om and en ter di the on sco line p ayme unt* code C nt pro AHS cess.

Spring Sports

Girls Tennis: 6-14

Boys Soccer: 4-15-3

Boys Tennis: 6-14

Girls Volleyball: 7-3

Girls Soccer: 15-10-1

Boys Volleyball: 15-11

Football: 9-2

Boys Basketball: 9-18

Softball: 16-9

Girls Basketball: 17-13

Baseball: 19-10 Golf: 0-21 Boys Lacrosse: 4-12

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Sports

The Centaurian

Catch a Wave

Bulking Up

Many of the student-athletes at CCHS incorporate different techniques in order to increase their fitness

Cool off this summer in the surf

by Firooz Kabir Managing editor

by Duncan Ballantine photos editor So why ride massive, towering waves that can crush a long piece of wood? “It’s the feeling that you get, it’s all about the feeling. It’s a feeling of freedom and a feeling of exhilaration,” physics teacher and avid surfer John Bakunin said. “It’s just a beautiful feeling. I just love being in the water.” Surfing is a completely unique sport in that it provides the participant with a three-dimensional surface that changes with time. A good surfer learns to understand the waves, to interpret them on the fly, and to adapt to them as they come along. Most importantly, a surfer just wants to have fun. “It’s just nice no matter what time of year it is, just to swim around and be closer to nature,” senior and surfer Andrew Baird said. “It really clears your mind when you’re just out in the water and hanging out.” Baird has been working at a local surf shop, Rider Shack, for 2 years, and began surfing at the beginning of his freshman year. Mostly a self-taught surfer, he got into the sport when

11

June 2010

he discovered an old Becker surfboard from the ‘80s in his attic and took it out one day. He PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN BAKUNIN was immediA BEAUTIFUL FEELING: Physics teacher Mr. Bakunin has surfed ately hooked. in exotic places such as Indonesia, Australia, and, in this picture, Maui. “I really wanted to learn, so I kept going thousands of dollars in or- and they offer some pretty out, no matter how frus- der to pay for the wet suit, decent rides,” Baird said. trated I got,” Baird said. board, and other supplies. A Culver City is a great place “It’s the hardest thing in decent board costs at least to be a surfer, with Venthe world to start doing,” $400, if not more. “Don’t ice Beach just a few miles math teacher Kyle King try to start surfing on a bud- away and other beaches eisaid.”You have to be habit- get, expect to have to shell ther north or south from it. ual in going every day and out some cash,” Baird said. “Here, you can surf almost braving the elements and Summer is ideal for new- every day,” Bakunin said. the cold water. But once comers to the sport because “This was a particularly you get it, you get it, and of the fresh swells hitting good winter season. I’ve none of those things could the coast of California from been in California now for possibly get in the way of the south. “Usually in the 15 years, and I’ve never wanting to go surfing ev- summer the waves are a seen anything even close. It ery single day of your life.” little bit flatter, a little bit was so good this year.” UltiKing had tried surfing smaller,” Baird said. New mately, surfer preference is before, but became active riders are also encouraged what matters when picking within the past three years. to start with a larger, lon- a surfing spot. Beginners For him, learning was not ger board (around nine to may choose local beacheasy; he spent an entire ten feet) in length, allow- es, but might also want to summer in Florida and did ing them more stability consider avoiding crowds not catch a single wave. But when riding waves. Local and finding a quiet beach King had the drive, deter- beaches at the Venice Pier friendly to the beginner. mination, and desire, and he and Venice Breakwater ultimately got the hang of it. provide waves that are not Starting surfing does not extremely radical. “The come cheap; it’s an ex- spots are mediocre, but pensive sport that can cost they’re fun, they’re close,

Tread Safely

by Timothy Kang sports editor

One of the more popular jobs taken by teenagers during summer is lifeguarding swimmers can get a cramp during a swim meet and he or she may need a lifeguard to save his or her life because once you get a cramp, you’re basically done,” junior Rene Sanchez, who is applying for two lifeguard jobs in the upc oming FOCUSED: Although the job seems to be summer, said. relaxing, lifeguarding requires tremendous Clark focus and responsiblity Dikeman, At any local swimming a lifeguard of over thirty pool, danger surrounds ev- years and teacher of the ery swimmer. People of any lifeguarding ROP program, age can drown for an abun- asserts that many teenagdant amount of reasons, ers initially wish to become whether it be from reckless lifeguards because “it is a behavior, a simple cramp, or good way to get a tan, meet maybe a combination of the people, have fun and just two. “A lot of people think hang out.” But he and other that drowning only hap- experienced lifeguards, pens to kids and other non- know that the lifeguard job swimmers, but experienced is an ocupation that must

balance life and death. Lifeguarding, a job fulfilled by many teenagers during the summer, is quite different from how it is depicted on television (Baywatch) and other movies. “[Being a lifeguard] really isn’t as smooth as it looks,” Sanchez asserted. “If you think about it, someone is dying so you’re going to need to spring up towards them. And when you do CPR, there is only a 30% survival rate because, in that state, the victim is already drowning.” Although there are some ways to increase the survival rate for a victim if the lifeguard uses an AED (Automated External Defibrillator), the survival rate only increases by 5%, implying that there are more deaths than rescues when an emergency does occur. The extremities of being a lifeguard is very daunting, but, as Dikeman states, life-guarding consists of “ten hours of boredom and 2 minutes of actual care.” It is the lifeguard’s job to focus on over 100 kids in a pool and, because someone drowning can die after a few minutes, he or she

must act accordingly when an emergency does happen. “Knowing stuff is important, but I think the most important thing to do is to stay calm and recall what to do properly,” Sanchez said. Another key to becoming a reliable lifeguard is to be responsible, stay focused, and appreciate the life and death terms which come with the job. “I try to convey to my class this because the fact is that having to focus on 400 kids in a pool is very overwhelming,” Dikeman said. Although emergencies which may require lifeguard assistance are unwanted, they are, nevertheless, a reality that all may face once in their lives. “People have to take the job seriously. A lifeguard is a first responder and you are responsible for people’s lives,” Dikeman said. “If you are not ready to take that responsiblity then don’t do it.”

School may be nearing an end, but for many studentathletes their training is far from over. Maintaining an active workout routine and staying in shape during the summer may appear to be burdensome and rather unnecessary, yet those undertaking this challenge find themselves better prepared for an intense fall season. CCHS coaches recommend that their athletes continue training and exercising during the twomonth break. In fact, many of these coaches have devised summer programs that include conditioning for the most serious athletes who desire to play varsity. These suggestions, however, differ from one sport coach to another. “Summer is very important to develop the mental discipline necessary to play at a highest level of which each athlete is capable,” Athletic Director Jerry Chabola said. “During the summer there are a variety of different distractions and the athlete who can focus with all of those distractions and continue to improve will be mentally tougher. Football head coach Jahmal Wright’s six-week mandatory summer workout program (labeled as “hell week”) consists of lifting weights, building cardiovascular strength, and working on improving game skills. Although he admits the three hour, fourdays a week training days are intense, he assures that the benefits are considerable and overall increase the football team’s mental vigor. “If [the players] stay on track, they get in excellent shape,” Wright said. “It teaches [athletes] a mental and physical toughness to to be able to fight through some tough workouts and also builds camaraderie.” Though many may argue that engaging in such strenuous activities during the summer negates the entire notion of a “break,” coaches and many student-athletes have discovered the benefits of staying active, especially during a time period when many tend to abandon any thought of physical exercise. “The time to get in shape is during the summer because there’s no time to get in shape when school starts,” Wright said. Senior and varsity track runner Eli Reich has included a personal workout plan in his summer schedule for

the past four years, during which he has completed numerous speed workouts up and down neighboring hill areas, basic running, biking, as well as various self-motivated drills. “I’m addicted to exercise,” Reich admits. “But I learn a lot from my [training] and experiences.” Reich believes that remaining active during the summer has allowed him to progressively improve as a track runner throughout his four years at CCHS. Adjustments must be made in order to prevent health risks and accidents. Athletes who work out independently without their coaches are constantly reminded to avoid overtraining in the summer heat and remember that the high temperatures may reduce the amount and duration of their exercise. “Kids should be more cautious during the summer when bad habits can form which may cause injury,” athletics trainer Marcos White said. White also emphasizes the importance of properly hydrating. “While the average human should drink eight glasses of water per day, athletes need to be drinking 10 per day.” Though it may require a substantive amount of dedication and energy, training arduously during the summer may ultimately be in a student-athlete’s best interest in order to continue working out and staying in shape. “At some level during their lives they will not be able to achieve their potential without a strong work ethic,” Chabola said.

Page design by Timothy Kang


Sports

The Centaurian

Catch a Wave

Bulking Up

Many of the student-athletes at CCHS incorporate different techniques in order to increase their fitness

Cool off this summer in the surf

by Firooz Kabir Managing editor

by Duncan Ballantine photos editor So why ride massive, towering waves that can crush a long piece of wood? “It’s the feeling that you get, it’s all about the feeling. It’s a feeling of freedom and a feeling of exhilaration,” physics teacher and avid surfer John Bakunin said. “It’s just a beautiful feeling. I just love being in the water.” Surfing is a completely unique sport in that it provides the participant with a three-dimensional surface that changes with time. A good surfer learns to understand the waves, to interpret them on the fly, and to adapt to them as they come along. Most importantly, a surfer just wants to have fun. “It’s just nice no matter what time of year it is, just to swim around and be closer to nature,” senior and surfer Andrew Baird said. “It really clears your mind when you’re just out in the water and hanging out.” Baird has been working at a local surf shop, Rider Shack, for 2 years, and began surfing at the beginning of his freshman year. Mostly a self-taught surfer, he got into the sport when

11

June 2010

he discovered an old Becker surfboard from the ‘80s in his attic and took it out one day. He PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN BAKUNIN was immediA BEAUTIFUL FEELING: Physics teacher Mr. Bakunin has surfed ately hooked. in exotic places such as Indonesia, Australia, and, in this picture, Maui. “I really wanted to learn, so I kept going thousands of dollars in or- and they offer some pretty out, no matter how frus- der to pay for the wet suit, decent rides,” Baird said. trated I got,” Baird said. board, and other supplies. A Culver City is a great place “It’s the hardest thing in decent board costs at least to be a surfer, with Venthe world to start doing,” $400, if not more. “Don’t ice Beach just a few miles math teacher Kyle King try to start surfing on a bud- away and other beaches eisaid.”You have to be habit- get, expect to have to shell ther north or south from it. ual in going every day and out some cash,” Baird said. “Here, you can surf almost braving the elements and Summer is ideal for new- every day,” Bakunin said. the cold water. But once comers to the sport because “This was a particularly you get it, you get it, and of the fresh swells hitting good winter season. I’ve none of those things could the coast of California from been in California now for possibly get in the way of the south. “Usually in the 15 years, and I’ve never wanting to go surfing ev- summer the waves are a seen anything even close. It ery single day of your life.” little bit flatter, a little bit was so good this year.” UltiKing had tried surfing smaller,” Baird said. New mately, surfer preference is before, but became active riders are also encouraged what matters when picking within the past three years. to start with a larger, lon- a surfing spot. Beginners For him, learning was not ger board (around nine to may choose local beacheasy; he spent an entire ten feet) in length, allow- es, but might also want to summer in Florida and did ing them more stability consider avoiding crowds not catch a single wave. But when riding waves. Local and finding a quiet beach King had the drive, deter- beaches at the Venice Pier friendly to the beginner. mination, and desire, and he and Venice Breakwater ultimately got the hang of it. provide waves that are not Starting surfing does not extremely radical. “The come cheap; it’s an ex- spots are mediocre, but pensive sport that can cost they’re fun, they’re close,

Tread Safely

by Timothy Kang sports editor

One of the more popular jobs taken by teenagers during summer is lifeguarding swimmers can get a cramp during a swim meet and he or she may need a lifeguard to save his or her life because once you get a cramp, you’re basically done,” junior Rene Sanchez, who is applying for two lifeguard jobs in the upc oming FOCUSED: Although the job seems to be summer, said. relaxing, lifeguarding requires tremendous Clark focus and responsiblity Dikeman, At any local swimming a lifeguard of over thirty pool, danger surrounds ev- years and teacher of the ery swimmer. People of any lifeguarding ROP program, age can drown for an abun- asserts that many teenagdant amount of reasons, ers initially wish to become whether it be from reckless lifeguards because “it is a behavior, a simple cramp, or good way to get a tan, meet maybe a combination of the people, have fun and just two. “A lot of people think hang out.” But he and other that drowning only hap- experienced lifeguards, pens to kids and other non- know that the lifeguard job swimmers, but experienced is an ocupation that must

balance life and death. Lifeguarding, a job fulfilled by many teenagers during the summer, is quite different from how it is depicted on television (Baywatch) and other movies. “[Being a lifeguard] really isn’t as smooth as it looks,” Sanchez asserted. “If you think about it, someone is dying so you’re going to need to spring up towards them. And when you do CPR, there is only a 30% survival rate because, in that state, the victim is already drowning.” Although there are some ways to increase the survival rate for a victim if the lifeguard uses an AED (Automated External Defibrillator), the survival rate only increases by 5%, implying that there are more deaths than rescues when an emergency does occur. The extremities of being a lifeguard is very daunting, but, as Dikeman states, life-guarding consists of “ten hours of boredom and 2 minutes of actual care.” It is the lifeguard’s job to focus on over 100 kids in a pool and, because someone drowning can die after a few minutes, he or she

must act accordingly when an emergency does happen. “Knowing stuff is important, but I think the most important thing to do is to stay calm and recall what to do properly,” Sanchez said. Another key to becoming a reliable lifeguard is to be responsible, stay focused, and appreciate the life and death terms which come with the job. “I try to convey to my class this because the fact is that having to focus on 400 kids in a pool is very overwhelming,” Dikeman said. Although emergencies which may require lifeguard assistance are unwanted, they are, nevertheless, a reality that all may face once in their lives. “People have to take the job seriously. A lifeguard is a first responder and you are responsible for people’s lives,” Dikeman said. “If you are not ready to take that responsiblity then don’t do it.”

School may be nearing an end, but for many studentathletes their training is far from over. Maintaining an active workout routine and staying in shape during the summer may appear to be burdensome and rather unnecessary, yet those undertaking this challenge find themselves better prepared for an intense fall season. CCHS coaches recommend that their athletes continue training and exercising during the twomonth break. In fact, many of these coaches have devised summer programs that include conditioning for the most serious athletes who desire to play varsity. These suggestions, however, differ from one sport coach to another. “Summer is very important to develop the mental discipline necessary to play at a highest level of which each athlete is capable,” Athletic Director Jerry Chabola said. “During the summer there are a variety of different distractions and the athlete who can focus with all of those distractions and continue to improve will be mentally tougher. Football head coach Jahmal Wright’s six-week mandatory summer workout program (labeled as “hell week”) consists of lifting weights, building cardiovascular strength, and working on improving game skills. Although he admits the three hour, fourdays a week training days are intense, he assures that the benefits are considerable and overall increase the football team’s mental vigor. “If [the players] stay on track, they get in excellent shape,” Wright said. “It teaches [athletes] a mental and physical toughness to to be able to fight through some tough workouts and also builds camaraderie.” Though many may argue that engaging in such strenuous activities during the summer negates the entire notion of a “break,” coaches and many student-athletes have discovered the benefits of staying active, especially during a time period when many tend to abandon any thought of physical exercise. “The time to get in shape is during the summer because there’s no time to get in shape when school starts,” Wright said. Senior and varsity track runner Eli Reich has included a personal workout plan in his summer schedule for

the past four years, during which he has completed numerous speed workouts up and down neighboring hill areas, basic running, biking, as well as various self-motivated drills. “I’m addicted to exercise,” Reich admits. “But I learn a lot from my [training] and experiences.” Reich believes that remaining active during the summer has allowed him to progressively improve as a track runner throughout his four years at CCHS. Adjustments must be made in order to prevent health risks and accidents. Athletes who work out independently without their coaches are constantly reminded to avoid overtraining in the summer heat and remember that the high temperatures may reduce the amount and duration of their exercise. “Kids should be more cautious during the summer when bad habits can form which may cause injury,” athletics trainer Marcos White said. White also emphasizes the importance of properly hydrating. “While the average human should drink eight glasses of water per day, athletes need to be drinking 10 per day.” Though it may require a substantive amount of dedication and energy, training arduously during the summer may ultimately be in a student-athlete’s best interest in order to continue working out and staying in shape. “At some level during their lives they will not be able to achieve their potential without a strong work ethic,” Chabola said.

Page design by Timothy Kang


page design by Marisa Okano


June 2010 The Centaurian