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the capital MAGAZINE 2010 | issue one

A lifestyle magazine for Pretoria and Greater Tshwane we govern | we educate | we give | we create | we play | we grow | we remember


The Jupiter Drawing Room 39946

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“Along the length of the river, there is a new opportunity to unify man-made differences...” – page 14

WE GOVERN

38 54 80

Pretoria/Tshwane: A Rose By Any Other Name DIRCO: A World Class Building The First Mayors

WE REMEMBER

24 60

Yusuf Abramjee’s Laudium Solid as a Rock – Geological History

WE TRADE, GROW & GIVE

ontents

14 16 22 64 68

To Where the Apies Flows Prepare for Lift Off Centurion Sakekamer Golden Oldies Audi Hatfield Wows

“If meat be the food of love, eating at

Moo Moo will allow you to indulge in a protein-rich affair...” – page 28

WE PLAY

12 18 30 42 50 66 70

FIFA Comes to Pretoria Bowled Over by the Boeremark Tesla Super Sports Car Opikopi Guest House Backstage at The State Theatre Travel Tunisia Cullinan Day Trip


“The Tesla Roadster accelerates faster than nearly any other supercar, yet is twice as energy efficient as a Toyota Prius – making the Tesla the only car that delivers supercar performance guilt-free...” – page 30

WE TEACH & RESEARCH

34 44 48 58

Waldorf Education on a Farm Electricity in Hot Water Ignorance Isn’t Bliss Solar Car Challenge

WE SHARE

8 10 28 62 72 74

Letter from the Editor Capital Life: City Trends Moo Moo Restaurant Capturing Pretoria: Photo Essay Social Capital: City Vibe Human Capital: The City Speaks

“One of the primary economic sectors in Cullinan today is tourism, focusing on the rich natural and cultural history of the area and the mining industry...” – page 74


Blood is memory without language – Joyce Carol Oates

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For me, blood means hope. When it stops pumping, it means there’s nothing to live for. Blood is the fundamental expression of how precious life is. The flow of blood depicts how quickly it can be taken away. The first edition of the capital infuses the lifeblood of our rich society into the city in an unparalleled fashion. There has yet to be a sophisticated, successful, sustainable lifestyle magazine for the people of Pretoria and the Greater Tshwane Area. As this Pretoriainspired lifestyle magazine surges forth in cultivating a cohesive, creative and classy communication medium, we hold ourselves accountable to be the voice box for our capital city. the capital strives to create a pulsating excitement within the city. The heartbeat of the capital lies in the ideal that the magazine is truly representative of the city. the capital serves to bridge gaps, unfold stories, celebrate our heritage and build platforms for future dialogue between the various cultures and creeds of Pretoria and the Greater Tshwane Region. the capital is a bold statement: those who live within the boundaries of the municipality are united. The magazine builds up the people of the capital whereas the popular media seeks to tear it down with sensational musings of the name of city... past, present and future. While we understand the importance of a name, we also understand that what makes Pretoria and the Greater Tshwane Area so distinctively different is something that runs deeper than labels. Our city is the gateway to Africa, it is the city with the most black supporters for a local rugby team, it is the city with the most concentrated group of educated people in a single city on our continent, it is the city with the most diplomatic representation internationally (other than Washington DC), it is the Jacaranda city, it is the people’s city, it is your city and it is my city. In this launch edition, the capital reveals our city’s heritage and showcases some of the truly exclusive places, people and events to which those who live in the city are privy. From the photo essay about Pretoria’s historic buildings, to the contentious name change issue, the capital seeks to provide you with information fit for a capital city. Look out for our restaurant review, our experience at the Boeremark and our feature on the super Tesla car – made by an internationallyacclaimed home-grown Capital City entrepreneur. Joyce Carol Oates, the American author, states that “blood is memory without language.” the capital will strengthen the city’s memory through the bloodline of language, and we invite you to read, laugh and learn with us as we move forward, capitalising on our city’s CAPITAL brand.

editor’s letter

Publisher Chapel Lane Media Tel: +27 (0)82 452 8110 Managing Editor Charl du Plessis charl@chapellane.co.za Tel: +27 (0)82 452 8110 Group Editor Tanya Goodman tanya@chapellane.co.za Tel: +27 (0)82 671 2762 Editor Claire Pienaar claire@chapellane.co.za Tel: +27 (0)82 372 8054 Advertising Sales: Gizela van der Sandt gizela@chapellane.co.za Tel: +27 (0)82 578 3181 Alwyn Dormehl alwyn@chapellane.co.za Tel: +27 (0)84 580 8284 Zélna Perez-Sánchez zelna@chapellane.co.za Tel: +27 (0)82 374 7333 Design & Layout Liesel van der Schyf VDS Design Studio liesel@vdsdesign.co.za Tel: +27 (0)82 336 7537 Printed by Business Print, Pretoria the capital is published by Chapel Lane Media. Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Chapel Lane Media or its Editors. Information has been included in good faith by the publisher and is believed to be correct at the time of going to print. No responsibility can be accepted for errors and omissions. No material (articles or photographs) in this publication may be reproduced, in whole or in part, without specific written permission from the Editor. Copyright © 2010. All copyright for material appearing in this magazine belongs to Chapel Lane Media and/or the individual contributors. All rights reserved.

Much love and happiness, Claire Pienaar

cultureShock

In the Afrikaans culture, there is a tradition of the opsitkers. In the old days, when a young man came to call on your daughter the couple would visit by what was called “‘n opsitkers” – a special candle that was lit. During this time, the couple could talk to each other privately, without the bother of siblings or parents. The young man could stay as long as there was a flame. As soon as the flame went out, he had to leave. This ritual developed as a way of ensuring that the couple would remain chaste and pure. Though the practice is no longer in use today, it gives other cultures a glimpse of how devout Afrikaans society used to be. And some parents might consider it to be a tradition worth reigniting. Words: Claire Pienaar Images: © iStockphoto.com


Susan Slee cutlery

is

a

stainless steel ethnic

a story of an unusual friendship between two

the

South African boys coming of age in the early

loves!

1990s. It is the personal account of a crucial

The warmth and creative

period in the country’s history; about the birth

spirit of Africa is captured

of a new country and the loss of innocence. It’s

in these high-quality stainless

also a rambunctious, quixotic novella about a

set of

beautifully

Sunnyside Sal by Anton Krueger is

homeware that

capital

steel

absolutely

range

side of South African life rarely narrated before –

includes salad servers, ladles,

the Interregnum years, when a whole generation

tea and cream spoons, cake

left school amidst tumultuous changes – to

lifters, swizzle sticks, cocktail

discover that most of the things they had learnt

stirrers

products.

openers.

were wrong. Elegantly combining an upbeat

You can the see the passion

tone with quieter moments, this is a story about

for

people

belligerence, post-punk poetry and the search for

and animals projected through

freedom. Sunnyside Sal is available at Exclusive

each

Books Stores nationwide.

the

and

The

letter

continent,

piece.

Susan

its

resides

in

Lynnwood, Pretoria, which is also where her showroom is located. Tel: +27 (0)12 361 4104 iss u e

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life

capital

EZ Shuttle

is a sterling, Pretoria-based shuttle and

car-hire service that operates from 40 branches nationally for your travel convenience. EZ Shuttle is the largest provider of its kind in the area, and offers competitive prices. EZ shuttle has many quality controls in place, to help you stress less during your journey. They are the only airport shuttle with a full online booking facility, providing you with real-time reservations as well as SMS confirmation of your order. This is all done through the use of a state–of-the-art scheduling system which is continually improved upon, ensuring that your booking experience is seamless and hassle-free. Visit www.ezshuttle.co.za for more information.


Words: Claire Pienaar Images: © Maneki (Susan Slee), Isabellas (AneldaErken), Sunnyside Sal (Exclusive Books), EZ Shuttle (EZ Shuttle) and iPad (Courtesy of Apple)

Isabella’s Cake and Food Shop is an absolute treat for the senses. Based in Groenkloof, the décor is tasteful and inspired by romantic shades of pink, with chic black and white overtones. From sumptuous breakfasts to healthy lunches, with other delicious treats served daily from 7:00am, Isabella’s is an intimate, relaxed environment where the standard of

service is highly

refreshing. The temptation to devour a decadent cake or pretty pastry might overwhelm you! Tel: +27 (0)12 346 0769.

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Courtesy of Apple

Apple has launched its most innovative piece of technology yet in the

iPad. The large

Multi-Touch screen on an iPad lets you see web pages as they were meant to be seen – one page at a time. Your emails can be accessed with a flick and a tap, and your photos come in an album format. The high resolution screen allows you to watch anything from HD movies to podcasts and YouTube. Music is literally at your fingertips with the iPod application, and iTunes can readily be synchronised to the content you already have on your Mac or PC. View maps with high resolution satellite imagery and stay up-to-date with its nifty calendar. iPad comes with a screen reader, support for playback of closed-captioned content, and other innovative universal access features – right out of the box. There’s no additional software to buy or install. These features make iPad easier to use for people who have vision impairment, are deaf or hard of hearing, or have a physical or learning disability. Contact the iStore in Menlyn Park Shopping Centre on +27 (0)12 348 6555.

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FIFA World Cup 2010

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Pretoria Sees Pick of the Crop

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Words: CHARL DU PLESSIS (isiZulu translation by Nonku Khumalo) Images: © iStockphoto.com; FIFA LOC

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With the number of days now left before kick-off for the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup quickly dwindling, some of the most exciting

their home base in preparation for their own assaults on the trophy. The following teams are already confirmed: the United States, Ghana’s Black Stars, Italy’s Azurri, Australia’s Socceroos, Argentina and Germany.

Sekusele izinsukwana nje ukuthi indebe yomhlaba elindwe ngamehlo abomvu iqale lapha Emzansi, futhi amaqembu ayisithupha asekhethe idolobha elihle lase Pitoli njenge ndawo abazohlala kuyo futhi bazilolonge khona. Lamaqembu alandelayo asesho lokhu, iqembu lase Melika (United States of America), Ghana, Italy, Australia kanye ne Germany.

A

A

teams in the world have opted to make Pretoria’s beautiful surroundings

lthough Pretoria and Loftus Versfeld fans will have to travel for semi-finals and finals, if you know where and how to get those mysterious tickets, the biggest match we will host is a Round 16 game on 29 June. But, even though this rugby capital of the world has been overlooked for the biggest FIFA matches, it has something that few other major venue cities can offer: altitude, altitude and more altitude. Yes, because so many of the final deciding matches of the world’s premier events will be played in the thin Highveld air (and, we should add, the cold bite of the Highveld winter), Pretoria has been chosen by many a top team as the ideal place to base themselves in preparation for and during

balandeli bebhola abazobe bebukela imidlalo yama semi-final kanye nama semifinal e Loftus Versfeld kuzomele bahambe ibangana okubona lemidlalo uma bekwazile ukuthola ama thikithi alemidlalo. Yize lelidolobha elaziwelwa ibhola lombhoxo lingakhethwanga ukubamba imidlalo emikhulu yendebe yomhlaba, inye nje into lelidobha elinayo amanye amadolobha angenayo, ukuthi iPitoli isesicongweni. Kodwa ngisho imidlalo eminingi ingeke idlalelwe ePitoli, amaqembu amaningi akhethe lelidolobha ukuthi azivivinye kulo. Lelidolobha alinaso isiminyaminya emigwaqeni, umoya upholile kanye nezikhungu zokuzivivinya zikanokusho. Emva kwezimpikiswano phakathi kweqembu lase


we play

Melika kanye ne Italy mayelana nendawo yokuhlala, kubonakala ngathi iqembu lase Melika lizobe lihlala e Irene Country Lodge bese lizivivinyela e Southdowns College. Abafana base Australia bona bazobe behlala e Kloofzicht Lodge ese Zwartkops Mountains basebenzise iSt Stithians College ese Randburg ukuthi bazilolonge. Iqembu lase Ghana ke lona lizobe lihlala khona edolobheni hhayi eMpumalanga njengoba babeshilo, neqembu lase Argentina nizobe likhona edolobheni lase Pitoli. I-Germany ke yona izobe ise Centurion. Akwaziwake ukhuthi abadlali bazobe bevikeleke kanjani noma abalandeli bazokwazi ukubana abadlali abayintandokazi bezilolonga. Siyethemba kodwa ukuthi emva kwesigameko esehlakalele iqembu lase Togo ngenkathi ye African Cup of Nations, ukuthi inkundla yemidlalo kanye nezindawo lapho bezohlala khona zizobe zivikelekile ngendlela efanele. Iyithupha imidlalo ezodlalelwa e Loftus Versfeld, owokuqala uzobe uwu Group D ngomhlaka 13 June phakathi kwe Serbia kanye ne Ghana. Olandelayo uzobe uphakathi kwe Bafana Bafana kanye ne Uruguay ngo 8 ntambama ngomhlaka 16 June. Emva kwezinsuku izintathu abafana base Cameroon bazothathana ne e on

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the tournament. Other criteria that likely played a significant role in the final assessment of base camps is the lack of major traffic congestion, the calmer atmosphere, the world-class training facilities, and the five-star lodgings that this city can offer. After an initial scuffle about accommodation between the US and Italian teams, it appears that the US will be staying at the Irene Country Lodge, while making Pilditch their training arena. The Italians will also be in the Irene area, with Southdowns College as their practice grounds. The Australian Socceroos will be housed at the Kloofzicht Lodge in the Zwartkops Mountains, driving out to St Stithians College in Randburg for their daily stretch. Ghana’s Black Stars opted against their initial Mpumalanga reservations and will also be in the city. The ever-passionate Argentineans will join them in town, and the German team will be based out in Centurion. Time will tell how serious the security at each of their practice sites will be, or whether there may be the opportunity for local fans to see their heroes in practice. Given the drama with the Togo team during the African Cup of Nations, one should safely assume that the teams’ security at their hotels and lodges will make it almost impossible to drop by there in the hope of encountering some famous names and faces. Loftus Versfeld will be hosting six matches in total. The first match kicks-off at 4.00pm on 13 June, when Serbia and Ghana take to the field in their Group D openers. On 16 June, a public holiday in South Africa, our very own Bafana Bafana takes on Uruguay in a Group A match at 8.30pm that evening. Three days later, on 19 June, again an evening match at 8.30pm, Africa’s most enigmatic team, Cameroon, plays Denmark, which will be a fantastic showcase of the difference between African and European soccer styles. By 23 June, at 4.00pm, the USA meets up with the Algerian team, who hopefully by then have placed all the drama of their final qualifying matches against Egypt safely behind them. In the final Group match for Pretoria, Chile and Spain take to the field in their Group H match at 8.30pm on 25 June. This is the day when we finally get to see some of the world’s greatest stars on home turf. Home to South Africa’s most successful rugby franchise, the Blue Bulls, Loftus Versfeld can comfortably host 50,000 people. That is a far cry from its proud origin in 1903, and with its first concrete structure built in 1923 that could host only 2,000 people. Although the origins of this stadium is deeply rooted in the rugby culture, and might have had its founders spinning in their graves with the idea of a round ball and vuvuzelas, Loftus has actually embraced soccer warmly and both Mamelodi Sundowns and SuperSport United claim Loftus as their home ground. Loftus has made local soccer fans proud, when in 1999, Bafana Bafana achieved their first ever victory over a European side when beating Sweden 1-0. Let’s hope it will once again, prove to be a good stomping ground for our home team. 

Denmark ngomhlaka 19 June. Laphoke kuzobonaka umehluko phakathi kwebhola lase Africa kanye nelase Europe. I-Algeria iyobe isithathana ne Melika ngezi 23 zika June. Umdlalo wokugcina ozodlalelwa e pitoli uzobe uwumdlalo ka Group H phakathi kwe Chile ne Spain ngomhlaka 25 June ngo 8.30pm kusihlwa. Lenkundla I Loftus Verfeld eyikha leqembu lombhoxo ama- Blue Bulls, ithatha inani labantu elingu 50,000. Lelinani selenyukile njengoba kuqala ngo 1923 lenkundla ibithatha abantu abangu 2,000 kuphela. Yize lenkundla yaziwelwa isasasa lebhola lombhoxo, lenkundla isiyamukele nebhola nelizinyawo njengoba i-SuperSport United kanye ne Mamelodi Sundowns isibiza lenkundla njenge khaya labo. Abalandeli bebhola bayaziqhenya nge Loftus njengoba ngo 1999 i-Bafana Bafana yawina okokuqala lapho ihlula iqembu lase Sweden lapho i-Bafana iwina nge goli elilodwa eqandeni. Asithembe ukuthi i-Bafana Bafana izophinda idlale ibhola lika nokusho kulenkundla. 

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Words: Claire Pienaar Images: Š Sarel van Staden; iStockphoto.com

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To Where the

Apies River Flows

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we remember

The Apies River, in years gone by, had a reputation for

the rainy season, thereby creating havoc for residents around the river. Nowadays,

he Apies River is renowned for a particular incident in the late 19th Century. Before this incident, a folktale says that the Ndebele were the first people to recognise the suitability of the Apies River Valley as a place to call home. They settled on the outskirts of present day Pretoria, and were delighted by the then-gushing river that would serve as a water source. They named the river after one of Chief Musi’s sons, Tshwane (“little ape”), which was later translated into the Afrikaans “Apies.” Thanks to the oral tradition, the origin of the name of the body of water passing between Wonderboom Poort and the Bon Accord Dam is not lost. The river is a landmark recognised by all. Because of the history of its name, one is reminded of just how intertwined our collective past is. The popular story about the Apies River concerns the famous World War II leader, Sir Winston Churchill, though the incident took place before the bulldog became famous as a political leader. In 1896, when the Second Anglo-Boer War broke out, Pretoria mustered a formidable defence against the British forces. Schools in the area were closed during the War, and were used by the Boers as military offices. One such school was the State Model School that was utilised as a training school for teachers from what was then the Transvaal. This school was situated on the corner of Van der Walt and Skinner Streets and was used as a prisoner-of-war camp for British officers. It was here that Winston Churchill, a young man working as a journalist at the time, was captured and imprisoned. Within two months, Churchill had decided that he would break out from the prison. He successfully escaped on 12 December 1899 and swam across the then “mighty” Apies River. In Churchill’s writings about his escape, he relates how his friends, who had been caught during the breakout, spoke Latin to him (while he was already on the other side of the wall on his way to the Apies River) and told him to flee on his own. At the time of Churchill’s escape, some 25 million litres of water surged down the Apies River daily. Once he had crossed the river, he made his way to Muckleneuk Hill about a mile away where he awaited a goods train. Churchill made his way to

the river trickles pleasantly into the

Pienaar’s River, fish-less and useless, save for the urban-picturesque views one steals of it when driving past

it in Marabastad.

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The military parade as Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts, enters Pretoria in June 1900 to mark the end of the Second Anglo-Boer War.

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Witbank, and then to Delagoa Bay (Maputo) and back to Natal. The day after Churchill’s escape, his official release signed by General Joubert arrived at the State Model School. Both President Kruger and Joubert had said that the war correspondent was of no value to them, and they were instructed not to waste any time in trying to capture him. Since the end of the Anglo-Boer War, the Apies River has traversed through the different cultural enclaves in Pretoria, from the villages of Marabastad in the north where blacks became servants to the State; to a portion south of the Apies River where an Asian community, known as Tin Town, survived the dark days of Apartheid; to the many white neighbourhoods dotted along the banks. Along the length of the river, there is a new opportunity to unify man-made differences as it flows. Founded by the Ndebele people, named by the Afrikaners, and conquered by the British (albeit one lowly journalist), the Apies River epitomises South African history without the blood. 

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flooding its banks during

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Lift Off

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Prepare for


we grow

T

raffic delays regularly plague the one million commuters who journey between Pretoria and Johannesburg daily. While I am grateful for the upgrading of our national roads by the government, it does not help me to be efficient or punctual TODAY. And then I stumbled across John Le Warne’s latest investment, and within seconds I felt lighter, happier, calmer... my silent wishing and hoping has paid off. FLY ME is an ultra-modern way to travel in Gauteng. This initiative takes local commuting to the next level. The concept is to shuttle passengers by helicopter between Pretoria, Sandton and OR Tambo International airport in a fast and efficient way. On arrival at your destination, a fleet of vehicles wait to transport you to your final destination – be it an appointment or a shopping venue. “This is a complete travel solution,” says John. “Our business people and government dignitaries need fast, reliable local travel, without the hassle.” My initial thought was that this “high-flying” shuttle service would be reserved for the fortunate few who can afford it. However, John explained that the service is by no means unreasonable – it starts at R700 per person, for one-way travel. The target market is primarily the legal fraternity and the auditing industry, as these contractors and advisors typically spend up to three hours on the highways between Pretoria and Johannesburg, travelling to court or arbitrations or auditing clients. Government officials who are time-pressed for attending meetings and out-of-town commitments will obviously also make use of this mode of transport. With the price set at a mere R700 per passenger, even families going on holiday could chopper their way to the airport in a relaxed fashion, with time on their side. The sheer promise of time-saving has my attention. FLY ME guarantees that travel in Gauteng should never be more than a 15 minute trip. The trip between Pretoria and Sandton will take place in a six-seater Bell Longranger, a Bell 407 or a Eurocopter EC130 B4. The duration of the flight will be 12 minutes. If your destination is OR Tambo International Airport, you’ll be transported in an eight- or twelve-seater Eurocopter EC155 B1 and the duration is under 10 minutes. There are currently three helistops in Gauteng, namely in Pretoria at Menlyn Park Shopping Centre, in Sandton (just off Grayston Drive) and at OR Tambo International. The permanent helistop in Pretoria is situated at the Atterbury entrance to Menlyn Park Shopping Centre. The area can accommodate up to nine helicopters at a time, and the pick-up-and-drop-off pads have a turn-around time of 15 minutes. There are rest rooms, conference rooms, and a booking desk. There is also a luxurious waiting lounge at Menlyn’s helistop, complete with coffee bar and Internet access. If you need a break from business, or need to entertain clients, there is also the option to take a helicopter flight to Sun City, for R1,500 per passenger. No roadblocks, no speeding fines, and no time wasted in getting to “South Africa’s Kingdom of Pleasure” for those with the dough. John explains that he’ll be launching this leg of FLY ME by the start of the FIFA 2010 Soccer World Cup, and for good reason. Soccer wives, corporate entertainment initiatives and soccer fans will need to be taxied to and from the Rustenburg area for soccer events taking place at the Royal Bafokeng Stadium. Even when the upgrading of our national road system is complete, the sheer efficiency of the FLY ME model will still be unrivalled. I’ll be taking off in style for my next important meeting in Johannesburg – perhaps you should consider doing the same.  Contact: John Le Warne Tel: +27 (0)82 973 5963 Website: www.flyme.co.za Email: john@flyme.co.za

I cannot count the times I have been stuck

in traffic on the

N1 to or from Johannesburg,

and have sat daydreaming about a convenient

air-travel

alternative to the mayhem of

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Words: Claire Pienaar Images: © Fly Me

our current road system.

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Bowled Over by the

Boeremark


we play

B

y 5:40am, I am driving out of my neighbourhood with the car lights on, as even the sun doesn’t seem to know it’s morning yet. I soon arrive at the Pioneer Museum, just off Watermeyer Street, and pull into an already jam-packed parking lot. It doesn’t take me long to realise there is a distinct “early bird catches the worm” mentality among the Boeremark patrons. “Well done,” I think to myself; “You’ve made it!” As I walk into the market, smells of atchar and sights of fresh meat immediately awaken the hunger pangs of someone who has skipped breakfast. Onward I march, only to find that with each step of my journey, I am increasingly pleasantly surprised. There is an array of sweet treats, with everything from cupcakes to chocolate tarts and mini-doughnuts. A few steps further take me to the vegetable pit-stop. Huge pumpkins, bright red tomatoes, over-sized cucumbers and a vast array of other seasonal goodies are displayed, somewhat haphazardly, on the hessian cloth that shields the vegetables from contact with the dew-soaked soil. Fruits fit for paradise are also on sale, and it is difficult to stop myself from biting into anything that I pick up to inspect. A few metres on there is a bizarre little stall with every type of security gadget – from stun-guns to other industry specific devices. This stall seems strangely out of place at a market which embodies the freedom and relaxation of yesteryear. Moving swiftly along, I find myself at the dairy stall. Yogurt and milk products are in abundance, with a friendly sales lady offering samples. Soon enough, my nose directs me to the cinnamon-infused waft of fresh pancakes. Fresh pancakes are irresistible at 6:15am and there’s a long queue. Later, I notice that there are many pancake stores, all with eager customers. The critical mass for supply versus demand regarding pancakes clearly has no boundaries before 8:00am. And then, without warning, the air becomes alive with the smell of roasting coffee and fresh bread. With that, my healthy, low-carb eating plan is out the window as I indulge in tasting tender Italian breads, chocolate and cheese croissants, and more French loaves for good measure. The coffee is an obvious match. The fresh aroma, the friendly faces, and the warm caramel-coloured liquid warming my chest begin to make up for the lost sleep. Beaver Creek coffee is only one brand of choice at the Boeremark, and it is 100% South African grown and brewed. Another brand of delightful java available at the market

To most of us, the dawning

of a

Saturday morning is a precious period

that needs to be savoured from the downy

ap

dedicated to selling fresh produce and

wholesome products – has them rising before the crack of dawn. At

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local market

the

the Boeremark – a

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realms of the duvet. However, for some,

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5:15am

Words: Claire Pienaar Images: © Sydney Curtis; iStockphoto.com

one Saturday morning, I do the same.

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ed’s top 5: Beaver Creek Coffee – to rejuvenate you in the early hours of the morning. Tel: +27 (0)39 311 2347 Edith’s Gourmet Cupcakes – deliciously decadent treats. Tel: +27 (0)79 434 5550

Paul’s Beads and Wire Creations – for superb gifting ideas. Tel: +27 (0)79 780 3250

Ouma Bessie’s Fudge – it’ll change your life! Experience the real thing at the Boeremark. Rouchickens – iss u e

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organic, quality whole chickens. Tel: +27 (0)82 399 9088

ed’s tip:

Take cash only, there are no credit/debit facilities and old-fashioned bartering is frowned upon. The Boeremark is open every Saturday from sunrise, and is located at The Pioneer’s Museum, just off Watermeyer Street.

is the Bean2Cup variety. This stall has everything from medium roast to flavoured coffees, making sure there’s something to suit everyone’s desire. From this point on, the Boeremark experience becomes a frenzy of colour, excitement and taste-testing. My suspicion is that the caffeine shot from the coffee had something to do with it. More decadently designed cupcakes are on display, as is every kind of fresh flower one can image, with proteas, roses, gerberas, and many other assortments there for the picking. Another pleasant discovery is the organically farmed wholechickens from Rouchickens. Well-priced, good looking whole birds are difficult to come by, and these are in a class of their own. The owner enthusiastically explains that the birds are supplied to the top Bed & Breakfasts in Johannesburg, including the hotels at Montecasino. My feeling is that if it’s good enough for the fivestar Palazzo Hotel, it’s good enough for me. But the market does not only cater for those on the scout for fresh produce. Mosaic elements, white-washed photo frames, wire-and-bead creations and a host of clothing and other trinkets can be discovered at the Boeremark for a fraction of the price one would normally pay at a retail outlet. The atmosphere is also incomparable to that of our many shopping centres in the capital. One stall owner jokingly explains to me, while graciously promoting his gerberas, that the Boeremark is a place where the people of Pretoria can be viewed in their natural habitat: “Here, the people are not stressed because of traffic or lifestyle, they are here to enjoy the outdoors and the produce that’s available.” In his opinion, you find all kinds of people at the Boeremark, all with one thing in common: the bliss of shopping in a relaxing environment. The market has a loyal following of weekly shoppers, who are the first in line on a Saturday morning. From 7:30am onwards, the Boeremark welcomes the later risers – students, pensioners, and families of all backgrounds and income brackets. If you want to experience the typical A-grade fresh produce market that the people of Pretoria treasure, get there at sunrise, and stay for a hearty breakfast at the café. I completed my experience with a purchase of the most creamy camembert cheese I’ve ever had the pleasure of devouring from Le Petit France before heading back home to enjoy the croissants and said cheese over a mild cuppa. Was it a good start to the day? Most definitely. Will it change your life? It just might. 


design by: www.spiritlab.co.za


Centurion S a ke ka m e r • C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e

chamber, as it exists today, is to promote

Centurionomgewing te bevorder.

business interests within the Centurion area.

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The Centurion Chamber of Commerce was founded in 1963 with 37 members, and was affiliated to the Afrikaans Chamber of Commerce. At this stage, it was known as the Verwoerdburg Afrikaans Business Chamber. The mission of this business

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ie AHI het die Centurion Sakekamer verskeie kere aangewys as die “Beste Sakekamer – Klein en Algeheel.” Die toekennings het die Sakekamer te beurt geval as gevolg van sy beleid om sy lede behulpsaam te wees in die ontginning van beskikbare besigheidsgeleenthede. Die verteenwoordiging van lede op veral die plaaslike regeringsvlak verseker ook dat lede se belange in hierdie aspek aandag geniet. Die Centurion Sakekamer vereer op ‘n jaarlikse basis sakemense in Centurion. Een van die vereistes is dat hulle ‘n bydrae moet lewer tot die opheffing van andere. Die huidige “Centurion van die Jaar” toekenning het die legendariese sakevrou en ikoon, Dr Annique Theron, toegeval vir haar uitsonderlike prestasies, sowel plaaslik as internasionaal. Dr Theron, beter bekend as “Die Moeder van Rooibos,” se bydrae tot die sakewêreld is onmeetbaar. Nie net was

Van links na regs: Gerda Potgieter (Bestuurslid van die Centurion Sakekamer), Sy Edele Mnr Ali Goutali (vorige Ambassadeur van Tunisia), Dr Annique Theron (“Die Centurion van die Jaar” en Ms Faza Goutali. From left to right: Gerda Potgieter (Management of the Centurion Chamber of Commerce), His Honourable Mr Ali Goutali (previous Ambassador of Tunisia), Dr Annique Theron (“Centurion of the Year”) and Ms Faza Goutali.

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he Afrikaans Chamber of Commerce has awarded the Centurion Chamber of Commerce the “Best Business Chamber – Small and General” on many occasions. Such awards have been forthcoming because of the dedication of the business chamber towards fulfilling its members’ developmental goals within the realm of business. The representation of the members, especially on the local government level, ensures that their interests receive attention. The Centurion Chamber of Commerce annually honours business people in the area. One of the pre-requisites is that they need to contribute to the upliftment of others. The current “Centurion of the Year” award was presented to the legendary business woman and icon, Dr Annique Theron. She

Words: Wilhelmina Bekker (Translation by Claire Pienaar) Images: © Sarel van Staden; Marc Everitt

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Die Centurion Sakekamer is in 1963 met 37 lede gestig as ‘n affiliaal van die Afrikaanse Handelsinstituut (AHI). Tydens die beginjare het dit as die Verwoerdburg Afrikaanse Sakekamer bekend gestaan. Die Sakekamer stel hom ten doel om die


we trade

Die doelstellings van die sakekamer word redelik omvattend omskryf en sluit, onder andere, in om – • ‘n Katalisator te wees om sakelui in die Centurionomgewing saam te bind; • Die sakelewe in Centurion te bevorder deur bedryfsleiding en -voorligting te verskaf; • Lesings te reël en besprekings te voer oor enige kommersiële onderwerp; • Ondersoek in te stel na enige saak wat die sakelewe raak en enige inligting wat vir die sakelui van waarde mag wees te versamel, te verwerk en te versprei; • Enige ekonomiese beleid te bevorder wat die handel in besonder, of die ekonomiese lewe in die algemeen, raak en wat tot voordeel van die sakewêreld strek; • Sy lede behulpsaam te wees in sake wat die oprigting en uitbreiding van sake-ondernemings raak; en om hulle met hulp en voorligting te bedien; en • Om saam te werk met ander liggame en verenigings wat dieselfde doelstellings nastreef.

The vision of the Centurion Chamber of Commerce is described in detail, and includes the following: • To be a catalyst for the grouping of business leadership within the Centurion area; • To promote business through occupational development and educational initiatives; • To provide platforms for discussions of any commercial nature; • To develop research into business development and to provide and disseminate relevant information about business leadership; • To support any economic policy that will promote trade or the general economy and will benefit the greater business environment; • To aid members in businesses that will, in turn, aid in the growth of other enterprises; as well as to support members with educational material; • To work together with other bodies and associations in order to achieve common interests and goals.

Navrae oor die Centurion Sakekamer, asook oor lidmaatskapgeleenthede, kan gerig word aan: sake@ centurionsakekamer.co.za. Besoek ook die webtuiste: www.centurionsakekamer.co.za 

Enquiries about the Centurion Chamber of Commerce, as well as membership opportunities can be directed to sake@centurionsakekamer.co.za or visit www.centurionsakekamer.co.za. 

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has made immeasurable contributions to both the world of commerce and beauty, and is best known locally and internationally as the “The Mother of Rooibos.” Not only has she founded the highly successful family business under the brand “Annique Rooibos Health and Beauty Products,” she has also allowed many other women the opportunity to become involved with the enterprise. In this way, she has set an example to those women who seek to be entrepreneurs; as well as being instrumental in guiding thousands of women on how to create additional income streams and be financially independent and, in turn, spurring others to do the same. Over the years, Dr Annique Theron has ploughed back her profits into local and previously-disadvantaged communities. Other business people that were honoured at the dinner were Alzanna Noome, who received the Centurion Business Chamber’s “Entrepreneurial Business Woman” award; and Louis Fivaz, who received the “Professional Business Person” award. Both of these business people were cited for not only displaying a determined work ethic in order to create successful businesses, but for also giving back to communities by assisting others to become successful in their initiatives. In these uncertain economic times, the role of local business chambers is invaluable. Chambers of Commerce can be hugely successful, but only if they are supported by their local communities. Success flows from the numbers of people who join their respective chambers of commerce, and continue to be actively involved in them.

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sy die stigter van die suksesvolle familiebesigheid, die Annique Rooibos Gesondheid- en Velsorgprodukte nie, sy het sedert die ontstaan van haar besigheid haar daarop toegespits om ook ander vrouens die geleentheid te gee om by haar besigheid betrokke te raak. Op hierdie wyse het sy oor die jare letterlik duisende vrouens nie net deur haar eie voorbeeld gelei om besigheidsvrouens in eie reg te word nie – sy was instrumenteel daarin dat hulle die geleentheid kon gebruik om geldelik onafhanklik te word en om andere aan te moedig om dit ook te doen. En, oor die jare het sy ook winste teruggeploeg in die plaaslike gemeenskappe om minderbevoorregtes en kinders behulpsaam te wees en om vrouens in die algemeen te bemagtig. Ander sakemense wat vereer is, is Alzanna Noome, wat die sakekamer se “Entrepreneurs Sakevrou” toekenning ontvang het en Louis Fivaz, wat die “Professionele Sakepersoon” toekenning te beurt geval het. Beide hierdie sakepersone het nie net deur harde werk hulle besighede suksesvol opgebou nie, maar het ook teruggeploeg in die gemeenskap deur hulpverlening en ondersteuning te bied wat andere die kans gebied het om suksesvol te wees. In onsekere tye is die rol wat plaaslike sakekamers speel van onskatbare waarde. Sakekamers kan egter hulle werk suksesvol doen slegs as hulle ondersteun word deur hulle plaaslike gemeenskappe. Sukses is in getalle en daarom is dit noodsaaklik dat besighede by hulle plaaslike sakekamers moet aansluit en aktief betrokke raak.

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bramjee is a central figure in the life of Laudium and he has distinguished himself across a number of spheres, including education; print, TV and radio journalism; publishing and community affairs. Among other endeavours, he is well-known for launching the national CrimeLine initiative. Abramjee currently serves as the Head of News and Current Affairs for Primedia Broadcasting as well as the Head of Corporate Affairs/Communication.

The capital (Tc): When did your family first arrive in Laudium and what where the conditions under which they settled here? Yusuf Abramjee (YA): I was born and grew up in Lady Selborne, north-west of Pretoria as this is where my father had a business. I did my schooling in Laudium, some 15km away. When the Group Areas Act came into effect, Indians, Coloureds, Blacks and Chinese who lived in Lady Selborne

the capital chose Yusuf

Abramjee as our

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insight into the history and culture of Laudium, one of the most vibrant communities in our Tshwane municipality.

were forced out. Indians were relocated to Laudium, Coloureds to Eersterust and Blacks to Ga-Rankuwa, Mamelodi and Atteridgeville. My father challenged the eviction order and after years of legal wrangling, our family was forced out and we moved to Laudium in the late 1980s. Laudium was a well-established area and the initial change was quite challenging. In LadySelborne, the vibe was different and it took some time to get used to Laudium. tc: Who were your heroes in Laudium and why? YA: Laudium has produced a string of prominent personalities. The late former Chief Justice, Ismail Mohamed,

Words: Tanya Goodman & Yusuf Abramjee Images: © Tayob Architects; Primedia

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lived in Laudium. Former Chairperson of the SA Human Rights Commission and now an acting judge, Jody Kollapen, also lives in the area. Laudium also produced former National Deputy Police Commissioner, Mala Singh; a string of political activists; and sporting personalities, including former Bafana Bafana star Zane Moosa. The list can go on and on… TC: How has the area changed over the years? YA: Laudium has developed since the first families moved into the area in the late 1950s. Today, it is home to about 60,000 people. Neighbouring Claudius and Erasmia have also seen significant growth. Businesses, religious places and sporting facilities have also developed. Laudium is now a vibrant community with a great sense of community spirit. TC: What is the biggest change you have seen post 1994? YA: There have been many challenges. Politically we are free. But, service delivery to the residents of Tshwane has deteriorated over recent years. Residents constantly complain about poor service and this needs urgent attention. I have over recent months engaged the municipal leadership with a view to getting a better deal for the residents of the Capital City.

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TC: What changes still need to be made? YA: Improved service delivery. The conditions of our parks and recreational areas are bad. Maintenance of municipal facilities is not up to standard. Also, we need a capital injection that will enable additional community facilities to be developed, such as youth centres, community halls, improved roads and infrastructure, etc. Together with some community leaders, I have successfully managed to convince the provincial government to upgrade a section of the notorious R55 road on the outskirts of Laudium. Phase

two – the section between Laudium and Sunderland Ridge – now needs to be done. TC: How would you describe the community today? YA: It is very vibrant but there could be more unity. Sometimes, we talk too much and we need to put words into action. The community should unite on many fronts including in the fight against crime. Drugs are a major problem in the area and we need to focus on ridding the community of this menace. TC: What is one of your favourite buildings? YA: The Darus Salaam Centre on 19th Avenue is an architectural masterpiece. It was designed by local award-winning architect, Aziz Tayob. The complex includes a mosque and its dome has become a landmark in the area. Inside, the art effects are beautiful and when one enters, you can feel the tranquillity. Visitors to Laudium must make a point of visiting this complex. TC: Where would you tell a visitor to go in Laudium? YA: Visit the business district, mosques and temples. Laudium also has a sub-economic residential area called “White Blocks.” On the surface, Laudium will appear to be a wealthy and upmarket community but one needs to see it all… The good and the bad. TC: What are your hopes for the area in the near future? YA: Improvement, improvement and improvement. Laudium needs improved service delivery, improved community facilities and improved unity. We need to clean-up the area of lawlessness, especially drug dealing. 


Magnificent

MooMoo Moo Moo: The sound

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oo Moo fills the meat lover’s gap, in more ways than one. This new establishment is located in the Brooklyn Square Centre, and is the only real carnivorous option for those who enjoy dining in the modern, stylish complex. Moreover, Moo Moo offers affordable meat in a classy, upmarket environment. From the attractive team, to the carefully selected décor and finishings, and the overtly tongue-incheek humour that encompasses management’s lighthearted approach to the dining industry; Moo Moo exudes an air of exclusivity without being presumptuous. So why should you consider a dining experience at Moo Moo? Well, because you can afford to, over and over again. The meat is sold as a single meal, and all sides and sauces are sold separately. The price of a 200g cut of meat starts at R45, with the 500g rump steak costing a mere R95. The sides include your standard fries and onion rings, as well as more exotic options such as a balsamic and green bean side salad or crushed baby potatoes. The creamy peri-peri sauce will leave you wanting more, and the cheese sauce is mature in taste. Chicken, lamb and pork are also on the menu, as well as oxtail. If meat be the food of love, eating at Moo Moo will allow you to indulge in a protein-rich affair! The lighter dishes on the menu include salads, starters, trinchado, wraps and meat-in-a-bun options. Moo Moo is open for brunch from 9:00am, so it’s always a good time to stop by and enjoy a snack and read through the newspaper-inspired menu. The desserts are definitely worth ditching the diet for; with a fabulous Chocolate Volcano that is sold out by mid-week because of popularity (book yours when you’re seated!) and the Nutty Caramel Decadence is truly a magical experience. You won’t find anything creamier or more indulgent, as the name suggests. Moo Moo, while keeping the purse strings in balance, has a connoisseur’s variety of wine. From Hermanuspietersfontein Kleinboet, to Haute Cabriere Chardonnay Pinot Noir, to Moët and Chandon Brut Imperial, you’ll find refreshment to suit your palate. The wines are all served by the bottle and by the glass. There is no additional mark-up on wines ordered by the glass, and Moo Moo uses a scientific inert gas method to preserve their wines that are dispensed by the glass to ensure that “just opened” taste. Moo Moo has a fully serviced bar, a generous smoking area and individual restrooms that are spacious and well-lit. A fully electronic food-ordering system is in place, to ensure that your meal arrives at your table as you ordered it. Wine vases adorn the tables, and the cutlery is clean, sharp and presented before you realise you need it. It’s the attention to detail, the family-friendly atmosphere and the hearty menu that will keep me going back for more. Moo Moo offers what other meat-providing establishments have forgotten – an enjoyable, quality eating experience. Yum Yum for Moo Moo. Go Go soon! 

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south african genius abroad


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Young Silicon

Valley entrepreneur, Elon Musk, left South Africa at the age of 17 to build himself a technology empire as one of the

founders of PayPal. His most visible project at the moment is the Tesla

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fter Musk graduated from Pretoria Boys High, he decided to leave home against his parents’ wishes. He did not want to take part in the South African compulsory military service. “I didn’t have an issue with serving in the military per se,” says Musk, “but serving in the South African army suppressing black people just didn’t seem like a really good way to spend time.” After co-founding the Internet start-ups Zip2 and PayPal when he was in his 20s, Musk launched the Space Exploration Technologies

Words: Peter Collins Images: © Tesla

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– Mathieu St-Pierre, Editor of www.auto123.com.

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“Don’t kid yourselves ladies and gents, the Roadster and especially the S, are not, I repeat, are not toys. This car is in fact a dedicated sports/high-performance car that happens to lay a massive carbon footprint that is equivalent to a big fat ZERO.” Corporation (SpaceX) in 2002, with the ultimate goal of colonising Mars. The company recently won a $1.6-billion contract with NASA to resupply the Space Station. In 2004 Elon provided Tesla with its initial funding, and upped the stakes in the electricity car game. It remains the only automaker selling highway-capable electric cars. The Tesla Roadster accelerates faster than nearly any other supercar, yet is twice as energy efficient as a Toyota Prius – making the Tesla the only car that delivers supercar performance guilt-free. Note that the Tesla has no tailpipe, because it has no emissions. Powered by a 375 Volt electric motor, it is the acceleration and speed of the Tesla that have supporters in awe. The sales people love playing the joke of asking test-drive passengers to quickly turn on the radio, and then accelerating just as they reach for the dial. With the thrust of the car, the passenger simply cannot reach the radio! More than a

1,000 customers in 21 countries have been impressed enough to fork out the $125 – $150,000 required to make the Tesla their own. This roadster can be found in the garages of George Clooney, Matt Damon, Leonardo DiCaprio, and David Letterman, to name but a few. Tesla is taking the world by storm. And we can bask a bit in its glory, as its founder is a Pretoria home-grown hero and the product of one of our finest schools. Named Inc Magazine’s “Entrepreneur of the Year” in 2007, Musk is now in his late 30s, and the father of five children. He is the Chairman, CEO, and product architect of Tesla Motors (as well as CEO and CTO of SpaceX). But, his restless spirit has already turned to his next futuristic venture – SolarCity. Perhaps Musk’s best bet yet; this company is working on the massive installation of solar panels in a plan to reduce the cost of solar power significantly. Sure to make a couple of old teachers at Boys High smile proudly once again. 


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Waldorf Education

on a Farm Thuto Ya Waldorf Polaseng

Just Outside Our Capital • Ka Ntle Ga Toropokgolo Ya Tshwane


we teach

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hat a difference it could make to your children if they were able to go to school in the countryside, with wide open spaces, trees and blue sky all around. No traffic noise, no pollution, no stress – just a peaceful environment where children love to learn. Luckily, there is such a place and it is a lot closer than you might think. The Max Stibbe Waldorf School moved to its current location at Mooiplaats, just east of Pretoria, in 1977. This beautiful country school is a member of the international Waldorf community, which has over 1,000 schools worldwide and has been in existence since 1919, when Rudolf Steiner started a school at the Waldorf Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart, Germany. Waldorf education emphasises the role of the imagination, which develops creative as well as analytical thinking. Young people are provided the basis on which to develop into free-thinking, moral and independent individuals. The curriculum was

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aa phapano e be e tla ba e fe ge bana ba be ba ka kgona go ya sekolong lefaseng leo le bulegilego, go nago le dihlare le leratadima le le tala go dikologa! Mo go se nago sephethephethe sa lešata, tšhilafalo le kgatelelo – tikologo ya khutšo moo bana ba ratago go ithuta. Ka mahlatse go na le lefelo le le bjalo e bile le kgauswi kudu moo o ka se naganego. Max Stibbe Waldorf School e hudugetše lefelong la Mooiplaats Bohlabela bja Tshwane ka 1977. Sekolo se se sebotse se ke leloko la International Waldorf community, eo e nago le dikolo tša go feta sekete lefaseng ka bophara – se bile gona go tloga ka 1919, ge Rudolf Steiner a thoma sekolo go la Waldorf Astoria Cigarrette factory kua Stuttgart Germany. Thuto ya Waldorf e gatelela karolo ye kgolo ya boikgopolelo, yeo e godišago go nagana ga mmogo le go gopola moo go tseneletšego. Bana ba fiwa motheo ka tsela yeo ba swanetšego go godiša mokgwa wa go nagana ka go lokologa, mekgwa e mebotse

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developed to address the three major developmental stages of childhood (as well as a number of substages), each with its own learning requirements. The major stages can be summarised as follows: • Early childhood learning is largely experiential, imitative and sensory-based. Learning takes place through various practical activities. • During primary school years, learning is regarded as artistic and imaginative. Here the approach emphasises the development of the child’s emotional life and artistic expression across a wide variety of performing and visual arts, which can be applied to enhance and entrench all subject matter. • During adolescence, in order to meet the developing capacity for abstract thought and conceptual judgment, the emphasis moves to the development of intellectual understanding and ethical ideals. Waldorf education is exclusive in its consistency, thoroughness and the creativity with which it implements the curriculum, based on the children’s

le go ikema ka noši. Kharikulamo e theilwe go tliša mekgwa e bohlokwa e meraro go ya ka magato a go godiša ngwana (gammogo le mekgwa e mmalwa ya dikarolwana). Ye nngwe le ye nngwe e na le dinyakwa tša yona. Mekgwa ya gona e meraro e akaretšwa ka tsela ye: • Go ithuta ga ngwana go ithekgile ka go dira, go ekiša le go dupelela. Go ithuta go tšea karolo ka ditsela tše fapanego tša go phethagatšwa. • Mephatong ya tlase go ithutwa go tseba ka ga bokgabo le go akanya. Ka tsela yeo go dirišwa mokgwa wa go gatelela go gola ga bophelo bja khuduego ya ngwana le go itšweletša ka tsela ya bokgabo ka go diragatša le go bona tšeo di ka šomišwago go godiša le go tšweletša thutwana ka moka. • Nakong ya tsela ya go ya bogolong, gore go fihlelwe bogolo bja kgolo ya dikgopolo tšeo di sa bonwego le kgopolo ya go ahlola, kgatelelo e leba go godiša kwešišo yeo e tseneletšego ya mekgwa le maitshwaro a mabotse. Thuto ya Waldorf ke moswananoši ka go se

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fapoge, go tsenelela le go ikgopolela ka fao re kgona go hlohlomiša kharikhulamo ye e theilwego go thuto ya bana, khuduego le tšwetšopele ya mmele. Tše ka moka di kwagala di lokile, eupša tabataba ke gore tsela ye e a šoma. Dialoga tše Waldorf ba iteka kudu ge ba fihla unibesithi ka lebaka la gore ba

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academic, emotional and physical development. This may all sound a bit idealistic, but the bottom line is that the system works. Waldorf graduates thrive when they reach university because they have the ability to think out-of-the-box and work on their own. College professors have praised Waldorf graduates for their social awareness, initiative, communication and truthfulness. Some excerpts from a recent survey done in the United States: • 94% of Waldorf graduates go to a university. • 89% of Waldorf graduates are satisfied with their career choices. • 42% of Waldorf graduates choose science as a major at university. • 50% more Waldorf graduates study maths and science than the national average. Prominent Waldorf graduates include: • Kenneth Chenault (Current CEO of American Express worldwide). • Jens Stoltenberg (Prime Minister of Norway). • Ferdinand A Porsche (Founder and original designer of Porsche). Facts and figures can speak volumes, but the truth is that this system is tried and tested. Pretoria is fortunate enough to have a wellestablished independent Waldorf school with boarding facilities, a bus service and a group of enthusiastic and dedicated staff members who really care about all their learners. It’s more than education, it’s a lifestyle. For more information, call +27 (0)12 802 1175 or visit www.maxstibbe.co.za. 

na le bokgoni bja go nagana ka ntle ga lepokisi le gona ba itšhomela ka bo bona. Kholetšhe ya diprofesa e tumišitše dialoga tša Waldorf ka ga go lemoga tša leago, tlhamego, poledišano le go ba le nnete. Tše dingwe tša ditsopolwa go tšwa go dinyakišišo tšeo di dirilwego go la United States: • 94% ya dialoga tša Waldorf ba ya unibesithi. • 89% ya dialoga ba kgotsofetše ka mešomo yeo ba e kgethilego. • 42% ya dialoga ba kgetha thutamahlale bjale ka thuto e kgolo unibesithi. • Baithuti ba go feta 50% ba Waldorf ba ithutile Dipalo le Thutamahlale go feta kelo ya naga ka bophara. Baithuti ba bohlokwa ba Waldorf go akaretšwa: • Kenneth Chenault (Current CEO of American Express worldwide). • Jens Stoltenberg (Prime Minister of Norway). • Ferdinand A Porsche (Founder and original designer of Porsche). Dika le mabaka di ka ipolela, efela lebaka go šetše la gore mokgwa o o lekilwe wa ba wa šomišwa. Toropo ya Tshwane e mahlatse kudu go ba le sekolo sa Waldorf seo se nago le ditlabakelo ka moka go akaretšwa le marobalo a barutwana, pese yeo e ba sepetšago le bašomi ba bokgoni le mafolofolo bao ba elago šedi barutwana ka moka. Ke go feta thuto, ke tsela ya bophelo. Go tseba ka botlalo, leletša +27 (0)12 802 1175 goba etela www.maxstibbe.co.za 


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AbyRose any other name The Pretoria/Tshwane Name Controversy Statue of Chief Musi at the Union Buildings


we govern

Tshwane –

has been under the spotlight. the capital decided to look into the

history of the two names in an effort to find some clarity in the confusion. culture. The Ndebele are thought to have settled in the general Pretoria region in the early 1600s. In Explore Gauteng by Peet van Dyk, the origin of the name is explained as follows: “A new metropolis was recently established in the Pretoria area known as Tshwane. It was named after Tshwane, one of the son’s of the Ndebele chieftains, Musi (the name means ‘vervet monkey’)”. Another publication entitled The Transvaal Indigenous Place Names: Past and Present explains the meaning and origin of the name Tshwane as follows: “The little ape (monkey), the original name of the Apies River and Pretoria, named after the eldest son of the Chief Msi (Musi): the river also had the name ‘Enzwabuklunga’ given by the occupying Matebele, meaning ‘painful to the touch,’ having reference to the sharp stones that hurt the feet of those crossing the river.” The Apies River typically traverses the city of Pretoria, thereby reinforcing the fact that the Tshwane society included the Pretoria area upon the arrival of the first whites in the area. The Name Change Debate Pretoria is one of the areas under the jurisdiction of the current Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality. In the 1994 national election the former City of Pretoria formed the Greater Pretoria Metropolitan Transitional Council. In 2000, this resulted in an umbrella Municipality including a number of other local authorities with the name: City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality. The South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC), which is linked to the Directorate of Heritage in the Department of Arts and Culture, approved changing the name of Pretoria to Tshwane on 26 May 2005. However, it had not been approved by the then-Minister of Arts and Culture, Pallo Jordan, and he requested further research on the matter. Later in 2005, Dr André Horn, Senior Lecturer in Geography, Geo-Informatics and Meteorology at the University of Pretoria and a member of the SAGNC’s research team, said Tshwane was the first local authority to do such thorough research before making a decision about changing a name. Dr Horn believed that the opinions

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Origin of the Name Tshwane The background of Tshwane is rich in pre-colonial

– from Pretoria to

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Origin of the Name Pretoria What we know today as Pretoria was founded by white settlers who came to this the region under the leadership of Commandant General Marthinus Wessel Pretorius, the Anglo-Boer War Boer Commander who was later to become the first President of the South African Republic. It was Pretorius’ dream to establish a new town to serve as a central point that would become a capital of what was then known as the South African Republic (composed of a region that spanned the current provinces of Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and North West). On 16 November 1855, the Volksraad accepted his offer of two farms for a new settlement along the Apies River, from then on referred to as Pretoria. He named Pretoria after his father, Commandant General Andries Pretorius, who had been a national hero of the Voortrekkers. Pretoria was declared the official capital of the independent Voortrekker Republic of the Transvaal in 1860. Not long after its establishment it became known as the “City of Roses” because its climate encouraged the growth of rambler roses, which covered gardens and hedges all around the city. In 1888, JD Cilliers, a resident and avid gardener, imported Jacaranda trees from Rio de Janeiro to plant in his Myrtle Grove garden. These trees flourished, and as a result, the city is now aptly known as the “Jacaranda City,” with about 50,000 Jacarandas lining its streets. Pretoria’s growth and development towards becoming a city was slow at first, but on 14 October 1931, the Innesdale Municipal Area was incorporated into Pretoria and it gained official city status on the same day. Later on, the Hercules Municipal Area (which included more than 70 square miles) was also incorporated, making Pretoria one of the largest municipal areas in South Africa. Today it is the executive capital of the country, and the de facto national capital.

Recently, the name change issue

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retoria was never the original capital of South Africa. The first capital point of administration and leadership was The Cape of Good Hope. Once the Afrikaans community embarked on the Great Trek north, there was a need for administrative and political head-quarters for the Afrikaners. In the days prior to 1855, Potchefstroom was labelled as the Capital City, as this was where most commercial dealings took place. Pretoria, as we know it today, gained the rights from Potchefstroom and has enjoyed the status of “Capital City” for over 150 years. However, Pretoria is currently synonymous with the national campaign to change previously “white” inspired names of towns and streets to names that are more reflective of South Africa’s collective history.

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of a number of people and different versions of the city’s history were properly notated in the process. Another study was done by of Prof Pieter Labuschagne from the University of South Africa and Dirk Hermann, Director of the Research Institute of the trade union Solidarity. In the short historical overview there is mention of the existence (approximately 200 – 300 years ago) of “a single tribe under the leadership of Musi or Mnisi of the main group (of the Ndebele) [that] moved away and settled in the vicinity of the current Pretoria. The presence of the Ndebeles in the Pretoria area is not denied but there isn’t any anthropological proof to support the claim that the Ndebele settled south of the Magalies Mountains, ie, in the old Pretoria area.” Since the name change was approved by the SAGNC in 2005, one of the major issues of contention arose when the Tshwane Municipality launched an advertising campaign promoting the “City of Tshwane” as “Africa’s leading Capital City.” This led to controversy as many people criticised the Municipality for acting prematurely, before the name change had been accepted by the Department of Arts and Culture. Following a complaint lodged by AfriForum with the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), it was ruled that such advertisements are deliberately misleading and should be withdrawn from all media. The Municipality refused to discontinue their “City of Tshwane” publicity and the ASA subsequently requested that the Municipality pay for advertisements announcing that they had misled the public. The Municipality then refused to abide by the ASA’s request, and it was banned consequently from placing any advertisements

in the South African media that refer to Tshwane as the capital. However, the Municipality continued to place Tshwane advertisements, using municipalowned advertising boards and bus stops throughout the municipal area. In a more recent development, the current Arts and Culture Minister, Lulu Xingwana, on 29 January 2010, registered the Tshwane Municipal Council as a geographical feature. She retracted it the same week, saying that “more work can be done by officials on this matter.” Politicians’ Perspectives about the Pretoria Name Jacob Zuma: South African President Zuma is on the record as explaining in Parliament that changing the name of Pretoria is a national issue that needs sober thinking from leadership. He agrees that further talks are necessary with all parties, where a solution that will be acceptable for all can be discussed. Pieter Mulder: The former Freedom Front Plus (FF+) Leader has emphatically stated that the FF+ had been fighting for years along with Solidarity, AfriForum and the Federation of Afrikaans Cultural Associations, to retain the name of Pretoria. Mulder has proposed that Pretoria be retained as name for the city and the metropolitan area be known as the Tshwane Metro Municipality. Or, as is the case in Washington DC (District of Columbia), the option of Pretoria DT (District Tshwane) remains as a compromise. Gwede Mantashe: The ANC Secretary-General has openly voiced that for him, the ideal solution to the Pretoria name change issue is to retain Pretoria for the name of the city and to call the greater municipal area Tshwane. Lebogang Nawa: Former Tshwane Metro Councillor, who was part of the team tasked with looking into the name change issue, explained during an interview with Independent Newspapers that he was “gravely disappointed” that Minister Xingwana had retracted the notice. “It seems our government is worrying too much about a minority vote. [It] is worried about the Afrikaner vote which it is not sure whether it will get, instead of worrying about the [black] vote they already have.” The Pretoria name change issue is now going back to the drawing board. While the name of South Africa’s Capital City remains, for the time being, Pretoria, the greater Pretoria region is known as Tshwane, and is governed by the municipality under that name. Various public and private entities are still at loggerheads about the proposed name change, but the Jacaranda tree-lined city will still be South Africa’s capital – regardless of its name. the capital wants to hear your views on the Pretoria name change issue. Please send an email with your opinion written in a non-offensive, responsible way to claire@chapellane.co.za.  Statues by South African sculptor Coert Steynberg of both General Andries Pretorius and Marthinus Wessel Pretorius (father and son) were erected in the City Hall gardens on 4 October 1913 by the Prime Minister, General Louis Botha.


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Opikopi Guest House An A-List Venue

The Deputy High Commissioner of the Republic of Singapore Mr Manik Binwani and Mrs Venda Binwane (left) were among the guests who have tried (and complimented) the lamb shank, the speciality of Opikopi.

Ask travellers what they look for when

accommodation and they will probably tell you “a home away from home.” This is exactly what the award-winning Opikopi Guest choosing

House in Erasmuskloof offers. Peace of

Words & Images: Wilhelmina Bekker

mind, in a tranquil place.

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ur Capital City is home to more than 190 foreign representatives, including ambassadors and high commissioners. This elite group is often tasked with ensuring that their visiting delegations are well taken care of and accommodation and services are of a high standard. the capital team recently decided to put the Opikopi Guest House to the test by inviting a group of foreign representatives for a traditional South African food-and-wine dinner and an overnight stay. At the back of our mind was whether they would be willing

to recommend Opikopi to their visiting delegations. Owners Pieter and Helen de Beer started Opikopi shortly after moving to Pretoria, in search of a new challenge. When the house next to them became available, they poured their passion into this project. Quite the perfectionists, and with plenty of personal touches, they scooped up their first major award in their very first year. Helen went hunting for special pieces of furniture to fit their design theme and give each of the rooms its very own feel. “Privacy” and “elegance” were the catch phrases and this philosophy emerges in the eclectic mix of new and old. Staying abreast of


modern demands, though, each of the eight luxury suites also feature DSTV, Wi-Fi, air conditioning and underfloor heating, and digital safes. All the suites have an own private entrance into the lovely garden where guests can sit and relax. For the longer stay, there are two self-catering units with fullyequipped kitchens. Helen is an excellent chef who brings her same sense of daring through the kitchen door, whether it is a candle-lit dinner for two, or catering for up to 40 guests using the conference facilities at Opikopi. Centrally located, Opikopi Guest House allows foreign visitors and conference attendees alike a chance to explore the best of Pretoria’s attractions.

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Contact Opikopi Guest House: Cell: +27 (0) 83 302 1899 Email: helendebeer@mweb.co.za Website: opikopiguesthouse.co.za

the capital would like to thank the following people for making the visit a success: Fritz Smith of the Visitors International Protection Association (VIPA); Jonathan Ross of Sea World; Veronika Naude from Makro (Silverlakes); Julian Tuca from the Kleingenot winery; The SA Chef’s Association (The President’s Office); Chani Mare and Mariette Smith of Dough. If you manage a similar type of venue and would like us to put it to the test, email charl@chapellane.co.za 

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The guest house is in close proximity to the city centre, the N1 freeway, the Menlyn Shopping Centre and Brooklyn Mall; and there are several world-class golf courses nearby, as is superb evening entertainment. The winner of a Tshwane Tourism Award for “Best Guest House 2008,” Opikopi is well worth exploring. Says Helen: “We had a vision to create a special place that caters for customers who want upmarket accommodation at affordable prices. Our guests tell us that we have succeeded in realising this dream.” The dignitaries who accompanied the capital on this outing agreed, and the De Beers might have to start polishing up on their foreign languages!

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Ben Naude, Jeannie Millington from ICUE Media and Gerda Potgieter from the City of Tshwane Metro were among the guests at Opikopi.

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Electricity in

Hot Water A Liquid Perspective Why is Eskom so concerned

about their 6%, while the home-owner is unconcerned about his 36%? The brief answer is that the former knows a lot of things which the latter (still) does not know.

Words: Theunis Verster Images: Š iStockphoto.com

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he purpose of this article is to provide some “Broad Based Consumer Electricity Empowerment” (BBCEE), since the industrial sector quite certainly has the facts and ability to make good economic decisions for themselves, but home-owners generally not.

The Domestic Sector The first issue is: Why is there so much emphasis on domestic users of electricity? Let’s look at the figures (rounded for simplicity): 20,000 Gigawatt hours (Gwh) 17% of total production = 3,400 Gwh 30 – 50% (36% average) = 1,200 Gwh 6%

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Solar Water Heaters For Eskom, the widespread introduction of SWHs could mean the permanent

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It seems strange that such a small proportion of electricity generation capacity is singled out for so much official attention – the remotely controllable geyser switches, and the solar water heater (SWH) roll-out plan of one million units in five years. In mitigation, it must be stated that most of the groundwork has been laid for implementing a compulsory Power Saving Programme (PSP) at Eskom’s 300 biggest consumers, but domestic households (because there are so many) cannot be monitored in the same way. So why bother with a minor sector at all, especially one that is not only a remarkably complex sector to manage, but also because it has the potential to contribute a mere 6% to the total country’s savings? From Eskom’s point of view, the fear is that South Africa will run out of reserve margins by 2013. Therefore, their answer is simple: during daily peak demand times, the domestic sector’s consumption shoots up to almost 30% of the total energy used. If hot water can be temporarily removed from the equation, it will effectively relax the demand not by 6%, but by more than 10% during these periods. This is most important in view of the reserve margin, which is too small and shrinking, while the new power stations are still being built. Unfortunately, the situation is that South Africa does not have a differential tariff structure with low cost electricity by night, which would provide an economic incentive to defer some operations to night-time, like swimming pool cleaners, bore-hole pumps, hot water geysers, under-floor heating, and other activities. It is also unfortunate that many consumers, who would be willing to voluntarily participate in this way, are not aware that South Africa is really much more subject to a day-time electricity shortage than a general shortage. The message consumers hear is simply “save electricity.” The economic incentives (rising tariffs/sliding scale tariffs) also merely encourage electricity-saving rather than diverting electricity usage to other times. The fact that energy saved by day, particularly during the early peak time (6:00am to 9:00am) and the late peak time (5:00pm to 9:00pm), is much more valuable than that saved at other times, has not been communicated effectively to the general public. A potential consumer awareness programme could educate people to save energy during peak periods, thereby helping to avert applications for the dreaded 35% tariff increases. The other side of the coin is also somewhat puzzling: If you, as a homeowner, pay an electricity account of R1,000/month, of which R360 is due to hot water usage, there is something to be done. From utilising SWHs, to “tuning” your geyser, these simple changes could benefit you financially as well as save much needed energy.

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Eskom’s energy production/month: Domestic sector consumption/month: How much is used for hot water: Hot water as a % of total generation:

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disappearance of a large chunk of demand during peak times and during off-peak times, which would enable Eskom to save in capital investment, or improve the time scale of such an investment. This justifies the rebate offered to purchasers of SWSs (which was recently dramatically increased). The time scale for large-scale uptake of SWHs, however, seems to be frustratingly long, and the urgency of the situation requires a rapid effect in less than two years. For a domestic household, a SWH will mean the immediate decrease of most of its hot water cost. In some areas like the Karoo, more than 95% of this cost will be saved. However, most urban areas are situated where cloudy periods will necessitate occasional use of the auxiliary electrical element. Important issues for a potential buyer, therefore, are the purchase price (even after deduction of the rebate), and the breakeven time scale.

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It would be wise for Eskom to initiate a free-ofcharge systematic programme to make the appropriate energy-saving adjustments to large numbers of inservice geysers in domestic households. Doing so could save up to 600 Gwh/month. A programme like this could be implemented during the next two years, during which time the effect of SWHs will not yet be noticeable, as SWHs will likely only become dominant three years from now. However, at this moment, there is no such strategy in place. These two country-wide implementation programmes should be pursued simultaneously to garner the best results, the impact of which can be visualised with the aid of the curves below (see Graph 1). How the two effects will add up or supplant each other after year three, can only be estimated at this point, but the most important benefit of tuning for Eskom is that it can enhance energy savings rapidly, and at a fraction of the cost of SWH rebates.

Graph 1: Energy Saving in Practice

Energy Saving on Hot Water

Combining two strategies for rapid take-off 1200 Solar water heaters

1000

Energy Savings (GWh/mo)

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Alternative Geyser Energy-Saving Methods The question could well be asked: Why even think about other options beyond solar water heating, if this seems such an ideal solution? The answer lies in the following facts: • The rate of uptake of SWHs will not be high enough to ward off an electricity short-fall in the short-term (less than two years). • Transformation to SWHs in existing buildings will never be 100%, and large numbers of conventional geysers will remain in operation for a long time. • Procedures and strategies for minimising the

energy requirements of electrical hot water geysers have been documented1 and show that a large amount of energy-saving potential can be realised at short notice, and at low expense. It is based on (the calculable) effect of adjusting the hot water temperature and flow rate, and deciding when not to switch the heater element on. Some categories of consumers can effect significant savings simply by tuning their geysers; a savings that it is potentially more cost-effective than switching to SWHs1.

800 600 “Tuning” hot water systems

400 200 0 2010

2011

2012

2013

Time scale: Years

2014

2015


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For householders as a group, there is no general advice which applies equally well to everyone; therefore, each individual should look at his/her own situation and evaluate the different possibilities for energy saving; and choose the most cost-effective way to produce hot water for the household. Table 1 below presents three real life examples, assuming a loan of R15,000 at 12% for a Solar Water Heater:

household consumption on average, but exceeding 50% in individual cases). If each of us do our bit, together we can help ward off power cuts, and do our part to aid in reducing global warming. 

Table 1: Household Analysis of “Tuning” and Solar Water Heaters (SWH) Size of Household

Family of 6

Family of 4

1 Person

Main use of hot water

Bath and shower at various times

Bath and shower at various times

One shower in early morning

Electricity consumption for hot water (KWh/month)

665

440

203

Electricity consumption after “tuning” hot water system

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The strongest economic motive to install a SWH is for a big family, with many people showering and bathing daily. Even after tuning the hot water system, they still need to pay R315/month, at the current rate of R0.84/KWh, just for hot water usage, and this is sufficient to pay off a SWH in 5.4 years (4 years if a rate rise of 25% is approved). The householder with the least incentive is a single inhabitant of a bachelor flat, who is often absent, and whose hot water cost may be less than 100 KWh/ month (R84) after tuning. His payback time would be 15 years if interest costs are excluded; thus, for this situation, it is not an economic proposition. Any householder who decides to analyse their hot water energy footprint (or to let it be analysed), could just as well obtain an electricity audit of the rest of the household at the same time, and may be surprised at the energy savings attainable from some of the other appliances, as used in each particular case. On average, this increases the household savings to one third above that which would be due to water alone. Any householder who rents a dwelling on a temporary basis may not be motivated to finance a SWH, but will benefit significantly by tuning the household. In conclusion, householders have a large, direct economic incentive to reduce their electricity consumption/costs due to hot water (36% of total

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Payback period for conversion to SWH (yrs)

A Definition of “Tuning” “Tuning” a hot water geyser means adjusting water temperature, water flow rate, and timing of heater “on” in order to use the minimum amount of electrical energy to provide just the required quantity of hot water when needed, and prevent wasted energy. It is not the same combination for different situations.

Notes: 1 TC Verster, “The Electric Hot Water Geyser: Figures and Characteristics Needed to Numerically Evaluate Different Domestic Energy Saving Strategies.” WATTNow, (February 2010), Crown Publications.

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Isn’t Bliss

Words: Charl du Plessis Image: © iStockphoto.com

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the capital interviewed Dr Theunis Verster, an engineer retired from a productive career at the CSIR, who now advises Pretoria households on the reduction of their electricity consumption. In this interview, he shared valuable insights and an anecdote of how things can really get out of control. He explains: It is not good to assume helplessness towards an electricity account which “does not feel right” when the bill arrives and your usage is higher than expected. The cause may lie outside your house (faulty meter reading or faulty account rendering) or inside (defective appliances, wasteful settings or human habits). An electricityuse audit of the household by a competent person can unscramble the various factors and put the spotlight on the primary cause. With this knowledge, effective action can be taken to bring the situation under control. Usually the energy hog turns out to be understandable, even if not suspected beforehand – a fridge with a refrigerant leak, a heater with a faulty thermostat, a high-power security light on all night, or high hot water usage. On occasion, though, a bizarre situation can be exposed and rectified. Illustrative of this is a Lynnwood resident who received remarkably large electricity bills from the first month after moving into her rented town-house. An electricity audit revealed that all her appliances as well as the municipal meter operated normally, but that her monthly usage figure was 300% of what it should be! This is the sort of consequence you could expect if you opened the hot water tap in the bath and left it running 24 hours a day. I deduced that the hot water pipe built into the wall and under the floor had ruptured somewhere and that hot water was constantly seeping into the soil under the house. There was no damp area visible anywhere to indicate a leak, and only by monitoring the hot water geyser’s electrical current could it be proved that hot water was constantly being produced and supplied to a bottomless pit. My advice to this Lynnwood resident was that the simplest solution would be to get her plumber to divert much of the hot water supply line along a different route, and to simply disconnect the old line rather than trying to locate the exact point of the leak. She called me back a few days later to explain that her plumber disagreed and wanted to excavate the cold water supply line in the driveway for a R14,000 charge! If she had not had the information on what the core of this problem was, this unscrupulous plumber would have only added insult to injury.  Editor’s Note: Need one say more about why it makes sense to get a qualified person out to your home as soon as possible? On the day we interviewed Dr Verster, the National Electricity Regulator approved Eskom’s 25% annual increases for the next three years. Get pro-active now, and call Dr Verster on +27 (0)73 334 8753 today and ask him to come and audit your household and advise you how to cut down on your electricity bill.


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e’d dress up in our best dresses, have our hair curled, use some of our mom’s palest pink lipstick and for the 50km trek to the State Theatre, we’d chatter on about which ballerina we wanted to be when we were all grown up. There is definitely something magical about South Africa’s State Theatre – the smell of excitement permeates the air, and the nervous energy from the performers backstage filters through to the audience, heightening the senses. There are many who claim that the performing arts in South Africa were born and nurtured at The State Theatre. Indeed, from its very beginning, almost 30 years ago, the centrally situated State Theatre has been a driving force in the cultural life of our capital and our country. Today, it continues to play a leading role and is host to a wide variety

of entertainment that represents not only the best international offerings but also the diversity of our local talent. When the theatre complex first opened in 1981, it was a non-profit, government funded company that soon became known for staging lavish performances that attracted international stars to its programme. The inaugural performance in May 1981 was Applause, originally a Broadway musical and Tony Award winner in the United States. This was followed one month later with the Afrikaans production of Germanicus, and The State Theatre has not come to rest since. The largest show that has been performed on stage in The State Theatre’s history is the opera, Aida, a vastly ambitious production that included 400 cast members. In the last decade, audiences in Pretoria have been treated to blockbuster shows like Cats, Sarafina!, The Phantom of the Opera, and The Sound of Music.


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Everyone has

memories of The South African

State Theatre. My own memories start at the age of three, when my best friend and I were whisked off to watch many a ballet

matinee over a weekend when our daddies were busy with rugby.

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eatre The State Theatre is an enormous complex that is incomparable to any other theatre house in South Africa. It hosts six fully equipped theatres in varying sizes, which can accommodate any theatrical production, from a world-class musical for an audience 1300 strong in the Opera Theatre, to a solo performance in the Intimate Theatre. Ismail Carr, the Marketing Director of SAST explains that “there’s nothing else like it in the country.” Between the six venues, any type of production – from children’s theatre, to dramas and musicals, to jazz sessions and comedy nights, seminars and workshops – can and have been presented. Given the diverse programme of events and the high quality of the productions, The State Theatre can match whatever Johannesburg has to offer – and it’s all under one roof. It is not only the stages and venues that are impressive. The State Theatre has excellent safety

and security measures in place, unfortunately often a concern from theatre patrons. The existing upmarket watering-hole, Cappello’s, is a favourite place for many theatre-goers to enjoy a nightcap after a show or an early dinner before a performance. To enhance the entertainment experience at the complex, the Theatre is currently in negotiations with various other restaurants to aggressively pursue the idea of an upmarket entertainment centre for the people of Pretoria. Clearly part of the new South Africa, the Theatre has embarked on a number of initiatives to make theatre more accessible to the average person on the street. One such effort is the use of a “road-show” concept in local communities, townships and schools, to publicise upcoming shows. The Theatre is also involved with community groups that work closely with an in-house Development Department in order to tackle the issues of redress and reformation within arts and performance in South Africa. The State Theatre is clearly an integral part of the heart of Pretoria – physically and aesthetically. The Theatre’s ongoing commitment to bringing outstanding, quality productions with a vibrant South African edge to the local stage, allows The State Theatre to entertain like no other theatre can. 

Words: Claire Pienaar Images: Courtesy of Kim Zimmerman

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The Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra will be making a come-back at The State Theatre in 2010, after an extended hiatus. Do not miss these performances, as the JPO is one of the most treasured orchestras in South Africa.

If you’re looking for a family-friendly outing, Tselane and the Giant – a traditional African pantomime – is definitely a worthwhile experience. It runs until 28 March, and is an adaptation of the African tale about a young girl who lives with her mother in a village near the forest, and who fears an evil giant. This story is a multilingual and culturally diverse production, representing real life situations in our country and its communities. It is fun, exciting, and full of action and music. Tickets are available from: Magongolo + 27 (0)82 763 1587 or Anna +27 (0)84 739 0901.

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Sing is an unforgettably fresh Afrikaans drama. Written by Wikus du Toit, and combined with the performing talent of Tobie Cronje, Lizz Meiring and Terence Brudgett, this show promises unrivalled entertainment. Set in the 1600s, the French Court is in a shambles as Madame Kol A Ratuur (Meiring) is set to sing in an opera, despite her obvious lack of talent. The actors work seamlessly together to create a great show. Sing is on at The State Theatre until 28 March.

2010 state theatre the

Opera Africa presents Puccini’s La Bohème, an opera in Italian with English subtitles, with the Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra. This bittersweet love story of young love and heartbreak will be on stage during March 2010.

Line Up

Nothing But The Truth is John Kani’s popular stage production which explores the destruction of a man’s aspirations at the very moment when democracy is about to be realised. The play is a South African English Additional Language setwork. It showcases the relationship between those who remained in South Africa to lead the struggle against apartheid and those who returned victoriously after living in exile. Catch it on stage during April and May 2010. Africa Umoja (“The Spirit of Togetherness”) is South Africa’s pride and joy. Travelling on the beat of drums, Africa Umoja is a musical theatre production that transports the audience back into the history of South African music and dance. The story moves through the shebeens and the cultural melting pot of Sophiatown. Africa Umoja will delight audiences regardless of their cultural background. For more information, visit www.umojatheshow.com. Shaka – The Musical will explode onto the stage in June. This worldfamous and heroic South African story, created and produced by South Africans, is in celebration of the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup taking place during this time. It is a spectacle for the whole family and features an originally created musical score and the cream of South Africa’s performance and production design talent. The biggest surprise that will hit The State Theatre’s stage in 2010 is the hit musical Buddy Holly. The story of the “pioneer of rock and roll” will make The State Theatre the venue of choice for 2010. For more details on what’s showing, call +27 (0)12 392 4000 or visit www.statetheatre.co.za. 

Words: Claire Pienaar Images: Kim Zimmerman

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he South African State Theatre is going out on a “full culture attack” in 2010, by bringing the people of Pretoria more culture, better performances and bigger shows. The Rendezvous Theatre will be hosting Jazz and African Music Nights in collaboration with OppiKoppi Productions, as well as comedy shows and hip-hop nights throughout 2010, with the aim to bring the beat back to the city centre.


Words: Claire Pienaar Images: © DIRCO

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A World Class Building with a

Foundation in

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he newly named Department of International Relations and CoOperation (DIRCO), previously known as the Department of Foreign Affairs, has never housed all its officials and employees in one building. Up until late 2009, at least eight buildings throughout the Pretoria Central Business District were the playing field for all Foreign Service officials. Under the guidance of the previous Minister, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, a vision emerged of uniting the staff in one building that symbolises ubuntu (the humanistic philosophy that focuses on peoples’ relations with each other). The main goal was to design a suitable and sustainable single-site

working environment for the department’s head office staff complement. On 11 December 2009, the present Minister of International Relations and Co-Operation (DIRCO), Ms Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, together with the DirectorGeneral Ayanda Ntsaluba and South African President Jacob Zuma, officially opened the new building. Sited on 15 hectares of land on Soutpansberg Road on the northern side of the Daspoort Ridge in Pretoria, it was named by President Jacob Zuma as the “OR Tambo” campus. While many people feel that the name, already given to our International Airport in Johannesburg, is heading for recognition overload, it is nonetheless fitting for DIRCO to be housed in a place named after OR Tambo, as he was the pioneering “diplomat of


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Africa the people” during the days of the struggle against Apartheid. He portrayed patriotism, loyalty, integrity and dedication in all his dealings in the international arena; and DIRCO has continued to embody these values since 1994. The construction of the 175,000 square metre campus was undertaken under the government’s Public Private Partnership (PPP) initiative. The private entities involved Trencon Construction, Motheo Tshwane Property Development, Old Mutual Properties, National African Women’s Alliance, Motseng Property Services, Rand Merchant Bank, Khomelela Investments and Integrasol Finance. The funders of the project included the Government of the Republic of South Africa through the National

Treasury, the Development Bank of Southern Africa and Rand Merchant Bank. The Government advisory team was headed by SPP Projects with Vela VKE consulting engineers as the technical advisor and Deneys Reitz as legal advisor. OR Tambo campus comprises of two parking basements; seven 4-storey low-rise office towers integrated through a main thoroughfare; a state-ofthe-art conference centre to host international events; and the Diplomatic Academy which is responsible for training diplomats. A new boutique-style guesthouse is also being built on a remote corner of the main campus site, while the existing DIRCO guesthouse in Pretoria is being refurbished as part of the project. According to Mark Pencharz, Director in charge of

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design on the project at TC Design Architects in joint venture with ACG Architects, the DIRCO building is “second in stature only to the State President’s office in terms of political status.” The project design called for longevity and durability of structure. The original idea was to emulate the stature of the Union Buildings, which is constructed of natural stone. However, due to budget constraints the consortium had to be creative about using cost-effective mediums, such as glass and concrete. The emphasis was predominantly on the concrete blockwork that was chosen over the more traditional face brick or glass façades, as it was felt that it epitomises the same medium used to build the RDP houses and the Union Buildings’ stone façade. In addition, the choice of these materials can be seen as symbolising a synergy between DIRCO, the people and our country’s history. As a result, these materials have given the building a contemporary look of natural longevity. The building fulfils functional requirements while being aesthetically pleasing and culturally in sync with the environment. This is illustrated, for example, by the concrete flowerboxes that mimic the African basket weave pattern. The flowerboxes act as both shading and landscaping devices, thereby retaining a traditional African ambience. OR Tambo campus is also energy efficient, with the incorporation of light shelves that reflect light into shadowed areas within the buildings. This has contributed to the required 20% energy reduction. Kevin Hussey, Project Manager for JV, explained that in order to address the skills shortage while reinvesting in the local community, the DIRCO’s PPP set up onsite training for unskilled workers to receive instruction on bricklaying, concrete work, plastering, shuttering, and steel-fixing. Together with the upskilling of the local community, the PPP was also involved in the protection of the surrounding environment. The property on which the DIRCO campus is sited is encapsulated within a ridge zone which has stringent environmental protection measures attached to it. Under the ambit of the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, not only were there a number of fauna and flora species that were deemed ecologically sensitive, but there are also a number of protected archaeological artefacts on site. By creating a world-class building that takes into account the ecological, environmental, and functional spheres in which it must operate as well as the goals of community upliftment to which our society is obligated, the OR Tambo campus will likely become an iconic African representation of democracy. 


(Solar) The

SHOW Will Go On

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Imagine a car

powered by the sun. Imagine taking part in an 11-day endurance race in a solar-powered car across some of the most dramatic landscapes of South Africa. The Innovation Hub supports this kind of imagining, and the headquarters for the 2010 Solar Challenge are based in our capital. in our capital.


we research

the challenge? The 2010 Solar Challenge is open for applications, so if you’re keen to get together a team in an eco-friendly motor machine, this might be your chance to shine.  Contact: Winstone Jordaan Tel: +27 (0)83 284 7747 Website: www.solarchallenge.org.za Email: winstone@solarchallenge.org.za

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from Annesley College and Deep Green Research also participate with their hybrid and electric cars. With such international exposure, it’s no wonder that there are huge sponsors for the Global Green Challenge in Australia, with the Municipalities of Adelaide and Darwin on board, as well as Internode, Cars Guide and Citizen watches. South Africa, on the other hand, is struggling to match 2008’s personal hand-out of R400,000 from one of the Advanced Energy Foundation’s directors. But participants and funding are not the event’s only challenges. The worldrenowned solar-powered-car team from Germany has voiced their fears about travelling to South Africa because of continuous reports about the lack of safety and ever-increasing crime. “This team draws major international media interest, and if Germany does not come, I have to ask myself if other teams will follow suit,” Winstone explained. So what is needed for the Solar Challenge to be a success in 2010? Winstone smiles wryly, as though he’s been asked this question before. “We need corporate backing. There are many companies out there who’d like to embark on sustainable energy solutions or development, we just have to find out who they are.” To ensure that this event takes off in style, a figure of R8 million has been proposed, as this will cover the flights of each international team as well as accommodation for all teams once they arrive in South Africa. But with all these imminent hiccoughs in the pipeline, will the Solar Challenge become a reality in September? As long as hope remains, South Africa will have a Solar Challenge, and South Africans will have the opportunity to witness these amazing vehicles on our roads. Do you think you’re up for

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Words: Sydney Curtis Images: © Winstone Jordaan

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he South African Solar Challenge is an epic journey where solar-powered cars traverse the length and breadth of South Africa in energy efficient ways. The gruelling 11-day expedition will put the durability of the solarpowered vehicles to the test. The race has been designed to encourage and provide education in innovation and business principles. The Challenge promotes collaboration between scholars, students, private individuals and various industry and government partners to work together on a safe, technology-rich event. Even though the Solar Challenge drew the capital’s attention, it appears that the rest of South Africa is not as enthusiastic. At present, there are only four South African teams that plan to take part in the event, namely the University of the Witwatersrand, the German School in Johannesburg, Eco-Zone (a renewable energy systems company in Johannesburg) and the Olsner Group (they have previously built a 13 Megawatt wind farm in Darling, in the Western Cape). There is a possibility of a Pretoria-based group of volunteers taking a spot on the challenge, as well as other private schools in the Gauteng region. There have been queries from the University of Cape Town and the University of KwaZulu-Natal, but they have yet to confirm their involvement in this year’s challenge. The problem with the numbers of teams actively taking part in the Solar Challenge is that the Challenge does not yet have a high profile as there has been no room for active marketing and advertising. The Advanced Energy Foundation runs the race in South Africa, and is a registered Section 21 company. The spokesman for the foundation, Winstone Jordaan, explained that there is simply not enough governmental support for this initiative. “While it is important to be proud of South Africa’s sporting achievements and opportunities,” he says, “the government must realise that there is a real need for this sort of brain sport. It develops our skills and entrepreneurial base, and with a little effort South Africa could look like a real leader in the industry.” In Brazil, a country that has comparable developmental standards to South Africa, there are three resident teams for their own version of the Solar Challenge. However, prior to the Advanced Energy Foundation’s initiative, South Africa did not have one resident solar car team. This is the second time that the race has been scrambled in South Africa. In 2008, the Advanced Energy Foundation decided to implement the Solar Challenge after visiting the Global Green Challenge in Australia. The Global Green Challenge includes 38 solar cars and teams from 17 countries, including participants from Australia, Canada, Netherlands, China, United Kingdom, US, Turkey and India to name a few, as well as participants from major manufacturers including GM Holden, Volvo, Hyundai, Suzuki, Skoda, Ford, KIA, BMW, and HSV. Teams

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rock solid as a Tshwane’s Geological History

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outh Africa is one of the world’s most geologically rich countries, as this little piece of planet Earth has gone through it all; from the first stable piece of land, to the oldest and most beautiful landscape known to man. Geological sites to marvel at in and around Pretoria include the Malmani Dolomites in the Groenkloof Nature Reserve, the Daspoort Tunnel quartzite, the Magaliesberg quartzite at Wonderboompoort and the shales and ironstones at Fort Klapperkop. The history of the area begins some 3,200 million years ago when the Johannesburg Granite Dome intruded. Around this granite dome there is approximately a 2km thick belt of rock known as the Malmani Dolomites, which is underlain by the thin Black Reef Formation sandstones, and that creates the flat terrain on which Irene, Lyttleton and Thaba Tshwane are located.

If we fast forward to about 100 million years after that incident, a large body of water came into existence over the Kaapvaal Craton, and was known as the “Transvaal Sea.” This sea deposited the sediments found in the Pretoria region. There is a series of three resistant quartzite ridges that span from Hartbeespoort, west of the city, into the Northern Province, and down to the southeast of Tshwane. The Timeball Hill Formation is the oldest ridge, followed by the Daspoort Formation. The northernmost ridge is the youngest and the best known feature, and is called the Magaliesberg. This beautiful range looks over the Hartebeespoort Dam and the angle of the dip is clearly evident. The valleys between the ridges are filled by nonresistant shales and lavas, and there are numerous sills and faults that intersect the formations. Collectively, all these sediments and lavas are known as the “Pretoria Group” of the Transvaal Supergroup.


Our Capital City is the ideal

place to see the history of our

planet come to life, from the lush valleys to the rocky ridges that provide a spectacular

view of the Greater Tshwane Region. These attributes are credited to the underlying crustal architecture which is controlled by the geology.

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A couple of hundred million years later, around 2,050 million years ago, the famous Bushveld Complex intruded to the north of where present day Pretoria is found (Onderstepoort and Wonderboom area). The Bushveld Complex is the most extensive, and by far the thickest, intrusion of its kind in the world. This intrusive body was formed from liquid magma that was intruded into the rocks of the Earth’s crust at some depth, allowing the magma to cool slowly and become layered. This magnificent structure is home to the world’s largest platinum, chrome and vanadium deposits. Up to 60% of the world’s chrome lies within the Upper Critical Zone, and almost half the world’s platinum group elements can be found in the famous Merensky Reef and the UG2 layers. To the north of the Jacaranda city, we have the youngest geographical sequence, the Karoo Supergroup’s Ecca Group. About 250 million years ago, all the present southern continents of the world

were joined together, and were collectively called Gondwana Land. A vast inland water body dominated the area in the Ecca stage, extending across much of South Africa and surrounding areas. However, the Tshwane area was a delta region along this water body’s shoreline. During this time, simple terrestrial plants were making their grand appearance on Earth. Rivers that had drained into the sea deposited their load and formed coal within fluvio-deltaic sedimentary cycles, from swamps associated with rivers and deltas and in some barrier islands along the shores. In this area of Tshwane, a small coal field is found, but has not yet been actively mined. With coal, platinum, chrome and vanadium deposits peeling out of our very core, it’s no wonder why Pretoria and the Greater Tshwane Region create a magnetic attraction for academics and business entrepreneurs alike. We might not have gold, but we’re definitely worth more than our weight in it. 

Words: Camille Myburgh Images: © Sarel van Staden; iStockphoto.com

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The Municipal Manager’s office at Church square on a Sunday evening

the capital introduces our

reader photo section with a collection of historic buildings by established photographer, Sarel van Staden.


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Paul Kruger’s house in Church street

Approaching storm from the Union Buildings

Each month, one of our aspiring photographer-cum-readers of the capital will be showcased in the magazine. The theme for this edition is “History captured.” Please send your high-resolution images of Pretoria and the Greater Tshwane Area to thecapital@vdsdesigns.co.za. Please ensure that images submitted to the capital must be high-resolution. the capital reserves the right to publish these images in our magazine at any stage and the photographer will be credited accordingly.

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golden OLDIES Maxis Cares • Maxis Gee Om


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Tommy Roux (owner of Maxis) with Elzette and Rosie from the Wonderpark Shopping Centre with members of the Golden Oldies.

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ie bestuur van die nuwe Maxis in die Wonderpark Winkelsentrum het onlangs hulle deure en harte oopgemaak vir nagenoeg tweehonderd senior burgers van die omgewing, almal lede van die Wonderpark Winkelsentrum se Goue Oues Klub. Vir die gaste was dit ‘n eerste besoek aan die gewilde eetplek in die noorde en hulle was baie beindruk met die mooi en moderne uitleg van die restaurant. Die gaste is getrakteer op ‘n gesonde ontbyt, en die teenwoordigheid van verskeie gaskunstenaars soos Ryan Watt, Steven Sterling en Jill (Jansie van Egoli). Die gelukkige prystrekkings het ook groot byval onder die gaste gevind. Maxis se eienaar, Tommy Roux, het reeds met die opening van die eetplek laasjaar dit duidelik laat blyk dat hy ‘n spesiale plekkie in sy hart het vir die behoeftiges in die gemeenskap, veral die senior burgers. Hierdie geleentheid met die Goue Oues was maar een van die ruimhartige donasies van Tommy aan die mense in sy onmiddellike omgewing. Die Goue Oues word maandeliks deur die Wonderpark Winkelsentrum se bestuur uitgenooi en getrakteer. Dit is ‘n manier om erkenning te gee aan die ouer geslag wat oor die jare ‘n waardevolle bydrae tot die ontwikkeling van die gebied gedoen het. the capital moedig sy lesers aan om, soos Tommy, hulle harte en beursies oop te maak vir die senior burgers en behoeftiges in ons gemeenskap. Ons ondersteun in beginsel organisasies wat teruggee aan die gemeenskap en hoor graag van u. 

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he management of the new Maxis in Wonderpark Shopping Centre recently opened its doors, and hearts, for nearly 200 senior citizens from the area; all of whom are members of the Wonderpark Shopping Centre’s Golden Oldies club. For these guests, it was their first visit to a popular franchise restaurant in the northern suburbs of Pretoria, and they were impressed with the modern design of the restaurant. The guests were spoiled with a breakfast, as well as spending the morning with a few entertainers such as Ryan Watt, Steven Sterling and Jill (Jansie from Egoli). The lucky draws were also a positive talking point among the guests. Maxi’s owner, Tommy Roux, has already made it public knowledge, after the official opening of the store in 2009, that he has a special place in his heart for the needs of the community, specifically the needs of the senior citizens. This opportunity with the Golden Oldies was just one of the charitable causes that Tommy has supported within his immediate community. The Golden Oldies are invited by the management of the Wonderpark Shopping Centre on a monthly basis to be inspired and spoiled. It is one of the ways in which to honour the older community that has impacted the development of the area over the years. the capital encourages our readers, like Tommy, to be compassionate and generous and would like to hear about ways in which your company is meeting these goals. 

Woorde: Pieter de Klerk (English translation by Sydney Curtis) Fotos: © Wilhelmina Bekker

Tommy Roux (eienaar van Maxis) saam met Elzette en Rosie van die Wonderpark Winkelsentrum by lede van die Goue Oues.

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travel

Tunisia a kaleidoscope of experiences


we visit

Tunisia is nestled at the heart of the Mediterranean basin right at

the crossroads of the African, Arabian and European spheres of influence. Tourism has been boosted by the many film-makers who have used the stunning landscape and architecture in ntil recently, South Africans had not considered Tunisia a viable tourist destination as there is no direct flight out of South Africa to Tunisia. But, with connecting flights available from Doha, Egypt, France, the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom, there is no reason why South Africans cannot enjoy the splendour that this country represents. I have travelled to Tunisia a number of times, and each time I fall in love with it all over again. From the French-colonial architecture to the Arab-infused spices the capital, Tunis, reflects the country’s diversity. The perfume maker’s market (which has been a part of society from the 13th Century) is a must-see when one explores the World Heritage Site, the old Medina. The National Museum of Carthage is located on the outskirts of Tunis, and puts the modern world in perspective by highlighting the archaeological treasures of the Roman, Christian and Islamic eras. Tunisia has the finest collection of mosaics in the world and the majority of these can be seen at the Bardo Museum. Due to the culturally abundant tapestry of Tunisia’s past, the Tunisian people show a genuine interest and definite respect for others as evidenced in their moderation, tolerance and hospitality. The

beaches and rich history also attract literally millions of tourists each year. overwhelming majority speak Arabic and French; however, with modern education, English is increasingly spoken, especially by younger people. The country is a world in itself, as it offers remarkable contrasts. The northern coast has idyllic coastal towns and ancient ruins; in the Sahel region – or central Tunisia - you find fertile, olive tree landscapes; and the Cape Bon Peninsula combines sleepy villages with the largest cosmopolitan holiday resort in the country. Djerba, sometimes called the Polynesia of the Mediterranean, and the Medenine area in the southeast, are known for their wonderful scenery and seductive beaches; the northern coast offers idyllic coastal towns and ancient ruins; Jerid and the dramatic southern region of Tunisia are home to salt lakes and cave dwellings that date back to the 4th Century BC, and the many oasis towns in the Sahara region welcome visitors with impeccable hospitality. The dynamic culture and tourism potential of this “Pearl of Africa” is well worth exploring. 

Words: Wilhelmina Bekker Images: © iStockphoto.com; Wilhelmina Bekker

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making of films such as Star Wars (1977) and The English Patient (1996). The beautiful

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Africa’s First Terminal Concept Dealership Opens in Hatfield

Words: Meena Motiram and Claire Pienaar Images: © Audi SA

Audi wows!


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Audi’s new Terminal

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in Hatfield is the

first of its kind on the African continent, the result of a R50-million

n traditional Audi fashion, the “vorsprung” concept was followed to create a Terminal that is both unique in showroom design and primed for ultimate customer satisfaction. The Terminal is a multi-storey building that transcends the challenges of the highdensity situation in Hatfield and takes the art of intelligent construction to its pinnacle. Incorporating a green ethic, the Audi Terminal boasts solar efficient glass, solar geysers and an innovative aluminium composite façade. The special façade allows for air gaps between the interior wall and outer skin, thus creating a thermal break, which acts as a heating mechanism. The aluminium exterior also eliminates ongoing maintenance to the building. The PreOwned car section is on the top floor of the building, complete with a lift for easy access. The escalator is also engineered to be energy conscious, and actually stops operating when not in use. The construction was completed in a record nine months, and was finished on 1 December 2009. To launch the facility, a glamorous opening event was recently held, where Group Managing Director David Powels and members of top management as well as international guests from Audi AG, the Hatfield Group,

investment by

the independently owned Hatfield Group. customers and VIPs attended. One of the highlights was Fashion Designer and Audi Ambassador, Stefania Morland, showcasing her Winter/Fall Collection recently shown at Audi Joburg Fashion Week. The rest of the evening was a mix of music, fashion and, of course, beautiful cars. “Even in such a challenging economic climate it became clear to the shareholders of Audi Centre Hatfield that the dealership had to expand its facilities in order to cater for the continuous growth in its customer base and the Audi brand,” said Brad Kaftel, Franchise Director and Major Shareholder of the Hatfield Group. “The Audi Terminal facility will further enhance the customer service standards for which Audi Centre Hatfield has become known.” To add to the experience of visiting the showroom, a coffee bar and shop are poised on the mezzanine level, and for those with a penchant for the history of racing, a must-see is the curved wall in the New Car area which is made from the racing tracks of the 1930s. With this new Terminal, Audi clients – old and new – are in for a treat. 

Stefania Morland showcased her Winter/Fall Collection. Brad Kaftel is the owner of the Hatfield Terminal.


Words: Wilhelmina Bekker Images: © Wilhelmina Bekker; iStockphoto.com

cullinan R

the real gem of gauteng

ecently, the capital joined a group of dignitaries on a visit to Cullinan. It is a historic little town situated a mere 50km north-east to the city centre. On a crisp and clear morning in February, members of the diplomatic community embarked on a trip to Cullinan. The day started early, with a hot air balloon ride over the area complete with a breakfast afterwards. An informative tour of the town followed, and then it was time for the group to don their hardhats and torches for an extensive underground tour of the working mine with well-informed tour guides. The day ended with delicious snacks being served at the Oak House – a recently renovated 1904 guest house and function venue. One of the primary economic sectors in Cullinan today is tourism, focusing on the rich natural and cultural history of the area and the mining industry. The “Refilwe Township Tour” offers a chance to learn about the people indigenous to this region, an opportunity to consult with a traditional doctor, and a taste-testing of the local homemade brew. There are also a host of quaint coffee shops and restaurants that serve wholesome food. Speciality

stores and interesting exhibitions make this quiet town come alive. Cullinan’s best known asset is the diamonds that have been mined from the area. The town not only boasts the most extensive single diamond mine in the world, it is also the source of the largest diamond yet discovered: the internationally-famous Cullinan Diamond discovered by surface mine manager, Frederick Wells on 25 January 1905. The uncut stone had a mass of 3,106 carats which was split into the 530 carat “Star of Africa” and the 317 carat “Lesser Star of Africa.” A total of seven other substantial stones and 96 smaller ones were cut from the original stone. Some of the bigger stones ended up in the crowns of the King of England and Queen Alexandra. Today the mine’s treatment plant process more than 20,000 tons of Kimberlite daily. Over the 100 years of its existence the enormous hole (40 hectares in surface area and 400 metres deep) has yielded more than an incredible 131 million carats (or 26 tons) of diamonds. The town of Cullinan is a pure gem. The cultural, historical and tourist attractions ensure that a single trip to Cullinan is not enough to truly experience all that this town has on offer.


we visit

From top to bottom: Taking flight in a hot air balloon over Cullinan; A beautiful sunrise in Cullinan for the Ambassador of Romania, Mr Gabrielle Safta, his family and friends; Enjoying lunch at one of the many quaint side-walk cafés.

Did You Know That Cullinan: • Made history again on 23 February 1991 when – for the first time – a train/road race was held between Pretoria and the village; with more than 500 athletes competing with the steam train? • Boasts, apart from the many attractions and eateries in Oak Avenue; historic buildings and museums; a tourism route, also consisting of The Hub, where visitors are able to see the radiant beauty of diamonds; an upmarket golf course; an Italian prisoner-of-war cemetery of more than 63,000 prisoners of war held at Zonderwater prison (just outside the town); and the Premier Game Park – situated close to the edge of the mine? • Experienced snow in September 1936 and also in August 1969? • Was shaken into rigid shock by the sudden rumble of a colossal rock fall, which turned out to be over a million tons of apparently a huge chunk of rim rock that had split away from the edge of the mine and, taking a slice of tarred road with it, tumbled like an avalanche into the open pit below? • Managed to keep secret the finding of the exquisite and priceless Centenary stone, which was identified on 17 July 1986 by the electronic X-ray recovery system on the then Premier Mine, until the announcement of its discovery was made at De Beers’ centenary banquet in Kimberly on March 1988? • Has produced some of the world’s largest diamonds: • Cullinan (rough 3,106 ct) • Great Star of Africa (cut 530 ct) • Lesser Star of Africa (cut 317.40 ct) • Golden Jubilee (rough 755.50 ct) • Centenary (rough 599.10 ct) • Niarchos (rough 426.50 ct) • Premier Rose (rough 353.90 ct) • Taylor-Burton (rough 240.80 ct)

the capital would like to thank the following people and organisations for their hospitality, sponsorship and other contributions and for ensuring that the dignitaries’ visit to Cullinan was an unforgettable experience: Senette and Keron Phitides of Oak House Guesthouse & Function Venue; Gordon Webb, Manager of Cullinan Diamonds and his team; Flip Steyn of Life Ballooning; Refilwe Township Tourism and Cullinan Tourism and History. 


Rugby@Loftus is

Elvis Forever is a

always a favourite to support.

commemorative show for the

The Bulls take on the Sharks on

original King of Rock. Catch it at

Jacaranda National Arts Festival, from 26 April to

1 May. See www.thebulls.co.za

the Barnyard Theatre in Menlyn

2 May 2010 at the Zambezi Mall.

for more details.

until 28 March, tickets are R125.

For more information, visit

social capital

www.jacarandakunstefees.co.za.

A guide to Pretoria’s happenings, from movies to shows, to sports to events. the capital seeks to provide our readership with an up-to-date social pages section in every edition. If you are interested in marketing a note-worthy event, please email claire@chapellane.co.za.

events to diarise: Mile High with Cathy Specific will be on stage at the Unisa Little Theatre from 4 to 27 April, with ticket prices at R125 per person. You’ll receive a behind-the-scenes look at the glamorous, or not-so-glamorous, life of the flight attendant. A cabaret musical comedy that will keep you entertained. For bookings, contact Computicket at www.computicket.com. Chris Chameleon will be performing at the Centurion Theatre from 20 to 23 April 2010. He has a style of his own and a reputation for mesmerising audiences with his four-octave voice range and irresistible stage personality. His versatile and exceptional talent has won him rave reviews and a total of 16 impressive awards over the past three years, including a SAMA and a Medal of Honour from the South African Academy of Science and Arts. Tickets are available from Computicket. Groot Gat Fees is taking place until 22 June in Cullinan. Enjoy music, stage, gospel, country and rock shows, as well as arts, antiques, cheese, wine and whiskey tastings. There will be food stalls, a beer garden, and children’s entertainment. A Walk for Food challenge, as well as cycling and 4X4 programmes are also on the agenda. The price per ticket is between R100 and R150. Call +27 (0)83 448 5178 or visit www.grootgatfees.co.za for more information.


dates to diarise:

March 2010 • 20 Mar: International Earth Day • 21 Mar: Human Rights Day (Public Holiday) • 21 Mar: World Poetry Day • 21 Mar: World Down Syndrome Day • 21 Mar: International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination • 22 Mar: World Water Day • 23 Mar: World Meteorological Day • 24 Mar: World TB (Tuberculosis) Day

Cinema Nouveau Opera Season continues with screenings of Simon Boccanegra from 12 Ma rch and Hamlet from 16 April. The last opera for the season ends with Armida, from 28 May. For more information, go to www.sterkinekor.co.za.

Super Troupers will be on show at the Barnyard Theatre in Menlyn from 30 March to 23 May, and tickets are between R80 and R125 per person. This show promises a swinging collection of ABBA, the Bee Gees and other classic hits from the seventies.

April 2010 • 2 Apr: Good Friday • 5 Apr: Family Day • 4 Apr: International Day for Mine Awareness and Assistance in Mine Action • 17 Apr: World Haemophilia Day • 23 Apr: World Book and Copyright Day • 25 Apr: Africa Malaria Day • 26 Apr: World Intellectual Property Day • 27 Apr: Freedom Day (Public Holiday) • 28 Apr: World Day for Safety and Health at Work May 2010 • 1 May: Workers Day (Public Holiday) • 3 May: World Press Freedom Day • 6 May: World Asthma Day • 8 May: World Red Cross Day • 12 May: International Nurse’s Day • 15 May: International Day of Families • 17 May: World Telecommunication and Information Society Day • 18 May: International Museum Day • 20 May: International Candlelight Memorial Day • 22 May: International Day for Biological Diversity • 25 May: Africa Day • 26 May to 2 June: Child Protection Week • 31 May: World No Tobacco Day


human capital: By the people, of the people, for the people

Name: Adriaan Taljaard Age: 43 Occupation: Senior Manager: Corporate Communication Medihelp Medical Scheme Where do you live in Pretoria? Centurion Do you like the idea of Pretoria having its own magazine? Yes, I think the opportunity for advertising is endless, and there is a wealth of great stories Pretoria has to offer. What would you like to see in the magazine? Community projects, success stories, sport, people of interest and obviously, coverage on the Blue Bulls. The balance between English and Afrikaans stories is also very important. It would be great to see a positive magazine, with no soppy stories.

Name: Ané Stevenson Age: 28 Occupation: Account Co-Ordinator Where do you live in Pretoria? Faerie Glen Do you like the idea of Pretoria having its own magazine? In my opinion, Pretoria earned the right to have its own magazine a long time ago – so yes, I love the idea! Pretoria is not just the “city” I live in, it’s more a “lifestyle” I choose to live in. Pretoria people are so much more advanced intellectually as well as socially; we can work hard and play hard. Most of the time, people in Pretoria use social skills to gain business. Pretoria provides us with all we need to succeed in everything we set our minds to. We are a breed unto our own, and we don’t need bru to prove it. What would you like to see in the magazine? I don’t think we, as residents, are even aware of half of what Pretoria has to offer. It would be great to have a page or two in each issue on what to do and where to go, including places of historical interest and memorable value, places like all the different museums and even a visit to Mrs Ples. Off course, I am a sucker for socialisation and relaxation so an article about the latest spa, lodge or even the top restaurants would definitely have my attention.


we ask

the capital interviewed some of the city’s inhabitants to find out how they feel about a magazine exclusively for the greater Tshwane area, and what they would like to see in the magazine.

Name: Nthabiseng Ramatshela Age: 30 Occupation: Media Liaison Officer, Department of International Relations and Cooperation Where do you live in Pretoria? Pretoria West Do you like the idea of Pretoria having its own magazine? I like the idea…a lot! There are a lot of things taking place in Pretoria that we are not aware of, so having our own magazine will capture and tell a story of Pretoria, its beauty, challenges and successes. What would you like to see in the magazine? I would like to see what business prospects we have, what we are doing as a city for the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer event and beyond, as well as information about good places for food and entertainment.

Name: Yolanda Jordaan Age: forever young Occupation: Lecturer Where do you live in Pretoria? Hatfield Do you like the idea of Pretoria having its own magazine? Yes, why not? What would you like to see in the magazine? How about a “What to Do in Pretoria” section, complete with dates and times of flea markets, shows and events?

Name: Hetty Kudjoe Age: 25 Occupation: Assistant Editor

Where do you live in Pretoria? Equestria Do you like the idea of Pretoria having its own magazine? I absolutely love the idea of Pretoria having its own mag! In fact, I think that a magazine of this calibre is long overdue! the capital is a welcome addition to an evergrowing list of reasons why Pretoria is the place to be! What would you like to see in the magazine? Profiles of up and coming individuals and businesses; coverage/commentary of events, awards and special occasions taking place in Pretoria; indepth coverage of news-worthy topics taking place in Pretoria or affecting Pretoria; restaurant reviews as well as reviews of interesting museums or places unique to Pretoria. 

In this section, we seek the opinions of our resident capital readers concerning Pretoria and Greater Tshwane. If readers have a question they would like us to pose, please drop an email to claire@chapellane.co.za with subject line: Human Capital


French Chateaux

Mooikloof, Pretoria

This 1,400 square-metre home is perfectly built. The exceptional quality, design and finishes become apparent the minute you enter the majestic wroughtiron gates. The entrance hall, with its impressive staircase and chandelier, invites you into a home with soaring ceilings, chiselled moldings, exquisite floors – no expense was spared. The expansive entertainment rooms tumble out onto a north-facing outdoor area with breathtaking views and swimming pool. Upstairs there are four spacious bedrooms, all with en suite bathrooms. The TV room, lounge, bar, dining room, wine cellar and study are located downstairs. A Jacuzzi, gym and play room are also featured. The kitchen is a mix of old and new with its paint technique, dark wooden cupboards and modern technology, including the best kitchen equipment available. Extras include a walk-in fridge, separate laundry, pantry, underfloor heating, air conditioning, gas fire places, and alarm system. Besides three garages, there is a double-storey granny flat with own garage. A beautiful garden with water features and an expansive boma area can host 150 guests. Words do not do justice to this home. Asking price is R13.9 million. Web ref: 338543

Contact: Yolanda: +27 72 797 2019 Liesl: +27 82 377 8857 Visit: www.realnet.co.za


category

Modern Mansion – Mooikloof, Pretoria Located in Mooikloof Equestrian Estate, this 1,500 square-metre, modern mansion exudes class and sophistication, yet offers a comfortable environment in which family and friends can mingle. Room by room this home tells its own story of superb craftsmanship and design by award-winning Architect, Hein Viviers. Each of the five bedrooms has its own balcony, and three have en suite bathrooms. A formal lounge, wine cellar, bar, dining room, TV room, study, playroom, two kitchens, pantry, scullery, walk-in fridge, and separate laundry are just some of the features. All living areas have doors leading out into a picturesque garden and braai facilities are available inside and out. Visitors are greeted by a stunning water feature and koi pond. Five garages plus two carports and a fully-equipped flat or studio round out the details. Only once in a lifetime does a unique home blessed with spectacular views and remarkable sunsets become available. Asking price is R15 million. Web ref: 320923. Visit www.privateproperty.co.za/vt/J11597.htm for a virtual tour.

Stately Thatch – Mooikloof, Pretoria Situated against a hill in Mooikloof Equestrian Estate, this 1,500 square-metre thatch home is designed for easy living and effortless entertaining on a grand scale. Enjoy sipping sundowners on the pool deck encompassing magnificent views or hosting guests in a large space that can function as a conference centre or leisure area. The home boasts five bedrooms, a large study, lounge, dining and TV rooms. Outdoor highlights include a Jaccuzzi, immaculate garden and a dam. Seven garages and generator add to your sense of security. The large stand provides privacy and creates a feeling of space and tranquillity – a piece of paradise in the middle of suburbia. Asking price is R15.75 million. Web ref: 323149.

Unsurpassed Views – Mooikloof, Pretoria This extraordinary Tuscan Villa (1,400 square metres) welcomes you with a double volume entrance and sweeping staircase. The home features five bedrooms with en suite bathrooms, a gourmet kitchen, enclosed braai area and gym. Flowing entertainment areas include a cinema, steam room and wine cellar. With superb finishes, underfloor heating, aircons and gas fire places, this magnificent residence conveys an air of luxurious comfort. Outdoors, a stunning garden with a borehole and irrigation system with automatic fertiliser dosing system, swimming pool, and Jacuzzi offer numerous options for relaxation. Asking price is R16 million. Web ref: 321521

French Beauty – Mooikloof, Pretoria This home offers everything your heart desires. The master bedroom with en suite bathroom has doors opening up onto a balcony overlooking a breathtaking garden with pool and pond. Kids have a separate wing with playroom/study and two spacious bedrooms with large bathroom to share. The guest wing offers two bedrooms, also sharing a bathroom. The beautiful kitchen, formal lounge and dining areas, TV room with entertainment centre, wine cellar, braai area and large patio all make this an entertainer's dream. A huge, self contained flat with own braai area is part of the offer. Asking price is R16 million. Web ref: 324807

Contact: Yolanda: +27 72 797 2019 Liesl: +27 82 377 8857 Visit: www.realnet.co.za


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we govern

of the Capital

Transitional Mayor of Pretoria, until the first democratic election was held. The first elected black Mayor was Father Makwatsha. The current Mayor of Pretoria is Dr Gwen Ramokgopa, the first black woman to lead the Capital City. 

EF Bourke was Pretoria’s first elected Mayor under the local government system implemented after the South African War in 1903.

Words: Wilhelmina Bekker Image: © City of Tshwane Municipality

T

he establishment of a local government for Pretoria has had a long tradition of conflict and difficulty. It comes as no surprise then, that the Capital’s mayors were faced by equally challenging circumstances. The history of local government in Pretoria dates back to 1857. Initially, a municipality was not established, and the lack of funds forced the municipal bodies at the time to put a request to the Government to reassume control of Pretoria. It was not until 1881 that the first municipal elections were held in Pretoria. Johan Carel Preller was elected as the Chairman of the Council. However, before he could assume office, the First Anglo-Boer War broke out in 1880. After the war ended in 1881, Pretoria reverted to the republican system; and landdrosts (the title of various officials with local jurisdiction) took charge of the civic administration. For the next eight years, Pretoria was locally governed by a host of “temporary” committees and councils. During this time, Tielman Niewoud de Villiers and PJ Potgieter attempted to play their parts in these newly established governing bodies, albeit with difficulty. On 5 June 1900, the first officially appointed Mayor of Pretoria, PJ Potgieter, took office. He was unable to serve his full term of office because he was commanded to carry out the instructions of the Government. The Second Anglo-Boer War, also known as the South African War, had broken out on 11 October 1899 and Pretoria was compelled to surrender to Lord Roberts on 5 June 1900. Richard Kelsey Loveday, a former member of the earlier First Volksraad (governing body), immediately acted as Mayor after the occupation of Pretoria. He played an important part in moving the South African prisoners of war (who had surrendered to the British voluntarily) to Irene Estate in late December 1900. In 1903 the first municipal elections under the local government system took place and Edward Francis (EF) Bourke was elected Mayor under this system. According to historic documents, Bourke was born in Pietermaritzburg in 1852. He arrived in the then-Transvaal Province in 1877, and became active in the business community. Bourke is probably best known for his role as Chairperson of the Pretoria Chamber of Commerce (previously known as the Chamber of Commerce and Agriculture). His name has been commemorated in a street in Sunnyside that was previously called Buiten Street. It is from that point onwards, that the Capital enjoyed electing their mayors directly. A testament to the exercising of a community’s rights (albeit white rights under segregated South Africa in the 1930s), Pretoria’s first woman Mayor, Mrs Mabel Malherbe, was elected in 1931, one year after white female suffrage was granted. In 1994, Peter Holmes Maluleka was appointed as

Mayors

The First


Profile for Chapel Lane Media

The Capital Magazine  

A lifestyle magazine for Pretoria and Greater Tshwane

The Capital Magazine  

A lifestyle magazine for Pretoria and Greater Tshwane

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