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Special Report: Education & Training.

Putting Up the Lights: Downtown Decorations expands again. Page 3.

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Vol. XXVI • No. 51/52

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 KEEP ON TRUCKIN’

BY JOURNAL STAFF

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he past year in Central New York business news featured a spate of expansion projects and mergers and acquisitions. The Business Journal also brought you news of business consolidations, moves, key new executive hires, and a whole lot more. Below is a month-by-month recap of the year that was in Central New York business news, as we reported it.

JANUARY

BY RICK SELTZER JOURNAL STAFF

RICK SELTZER/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

Dependable Disposal owner and President Steve Morgan with the company’s new automated split-body vehicle. See story, page 2.

See YEAR IN REVIEW, page 5

December brings no relief for New York manufacturers BY RICK SELTZER JOURNAL STAFF

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negative business climate persisted for New York’s manufacturers in December, according to the monthly Empire State Manufacturing Survey from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The general business conditions

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Edward Audi’s move to Stickley president part of ‘gradual handoff’

YEAR IN REVIEW

In January, we told you about the latest expansion for Eric Mower and Associates (EMA). The Syracuse–based firm combined with Cincinnati–based advertising agency Strata-G Communications. The move brought EMA more than 35 people and $35 million in capitalized billings. Financial terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. EMA also has offices in Atlanta, Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, and Charlotte, N.C. The company employs 215 people and generated estimated capi-

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December 21/28, 2012 • $2.00

CNYBJ.COM

2012: The year that was in Central New York business news

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index in the survey report, which was issued Dec. 17, slipped 2.9 points to -8.1, its fifth straight reading below zero. The negative score shows that more manufacturers experienced worsening conditions than improving conditions. Nearly a quarter of manufacturers, 23.2 percent, said conditions deteriorated, while just 15.1 percent said they

improved. Remaining survey respondents indicated business conditions were the same as last month. Questions over forging an agreement to solve the federal fiscal cliff, which was still unresolved as of press time, are affecting the manufacturing sector as much as any other part of

MANLIUS — The recently appointed president of L. & J.G. Stickley, Inc. says his new seat at the furniture company is part of a transition from one leadership generation to the next. Edward Audi became the Manlius–based wood and upholstered furniture manufacturer’s president in Audi a move announced to employees Dec. 1. He had been the company’s executive vice president and president of its Stickley

Wolken

See EMPIRE, page 4

See AUDI, page 4

TOP RANKS: UNITED WAY ALLOCATIONS / 6 • COMMERCIAL REAL-ESTATE FIRMS / 11  INDEX BUSINESS CALENDAR

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OPINION

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DOWNTOWN DECORATIONS

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PEOPLE ON THE MOVE

EDUCATION & TRAINING

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TOP RANKS

6, 11

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2 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

Dependable Disposal testing truck to help it pick up and grow Morgan says. Dependable Disposal paid for the vehicle using its own cash, along with financing from Lyons National Bank. Morgan wants to continue the vehicle’s VAN BUREN — A Central New York trash pilot program for another few weeks before hauler is in the midst of a pilot program he decides whether to add similar trucks in testing a new truck that’s less stressful on the future. its pilot. “We’ll probably look at it through January Dependable Disposal, headquartered at and then make that determination,” he says. 6948 Herman Road in Van Buren, started “We want to see how the holidays go.” sending an automated split-body vehicle on The truck serves routes with a total of about some of its residential routes in November. 2,000 residential customers. It is one of 22 The truck uses a mechanical arm to pick up vehicles at Dependable Disposal and Morgan recycling and trash receptacles and empty Rubbish Removal, a sister company Morgan them into separate compartments for disowns that focuses on the commercial market. posal or recycling. Both companies are headquartered in That means a driver can operate the truck 16,000 square feet of space at 6948 Herman alone without having to constantly climb in Road. Together they employ 32 people, and out of its cab, cutting the potential for inwhich is up six in the past year. jury. It could also allow Dependable Disposal The hiring came because of a municipal to add more routes without having to take contract with theBINDING town ofBLIND Camillus, Morgan on the expense of rapid hiring.APPAREL APPOINTMENT CARDS ARIBA SOLUTIONS AWARDS BACKPACKS BAGS BALLOONS BANNERS BANNERS/TABLE COVERS ANNOUNCEMENTS ANNUAL REPORTS BARCODING EMBOSSING BOOK says.BUSINESS Dependable also has a muThe companyBOOKLET currently operatesBOOKLETS some BOOKS BOXES (STOCK &CUSTOM) BRANDING BRIEFCASES BROCHURES BUMPER STICKERS BUSINESS CARDS COVERS/ BOOKMARKS ENVELOPES FORMSDisposal BUTTONS/ SIGNS/NAME TAGS rick seltzer/THE CENTRAL NEWCHECKS YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL CALENDARS CARBON crews, INTERLEAVED CARD/FORM COMBINATIONS CATALOG ENVELOPES CD’S AND CD HOLDERS CLOTHING (INDOOR/OUTDOOR/WORKWEAR) COASTERS nicipal contract with the town ofCOFFEE Geddes. routes with two-man each CARBONLESS of which MUGS/SLEEVES/WRAPS COMMERCIAL PRINTING CONTINUOUS FORMS Disposal COOLERS CORPORATE CORRUGATED CUSTOM PRINTED DISPLAYS CUT It SHEET DESK AND DOOR SIGNS DESKTOP Dependable owner andGIFTS President Steve COUPONS Morgan operates the company’s and DECALS its sister company serve residential is made up of a driver and a laborer dumpACCESSORIES DIE CUT CARDS DIE CUTTING DIGITAL PRINTING DIRECT MAIL DISPLAY UNITS DOCUMENT FOLDERS DOOR HANGERS DRINKWARE DUFFELS EASELS ECO-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS ECOMMERCE SOLUTIONS new automated split-body vehicle, which it is using to serve about 2,000 residential and commercial customers in Onondaga EDI ing bins. It also has routes served by lone ELECTRONIC REPORTING EMBOSSING EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION ENGRAVING (STOCK &CUSTOM) EXPANSION FOLDERS FILE FOLDERS FLAGS FLASHLIGHTS FLAT PRINTING FLIP & SEAL FOIL EMBOSSING as part ENVELOPES of a pilot program. County. Much of their business is in regions employees who both drive and jump out of customers FOLDING- CUSTOM FOLDOVER CARDS FOOD FULFILLMENT FULL COLOR PROCESS PRINTING GIFT CARDS/CERTIFICATES GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASSIONS GOLF BALLS/TEES/ACCESSORIES GRAPHIC DESIGN HATS HEALTH AND to the west of Syracuse, and they are also their trucks to dump bins. WELLNESS HOLIDAY GIFTS HOSPITAL FORMS HOTEL/MOTEL FORMS HOUSEWARES ID BADGES/RETRACTABLE BADGE HOLDERS INSIDE TINTED WINDOW ENVELOPES INSURANCE FORMS (HCFA, UB-92) INTEGRATED CARDS 35-gallon containers are too large, but the com- expanding in Cayuga County. each customer being served by the new No employees are in line to lose their INVITATIONS INVOICES JOURNAL BOOKS JUMBO ROLLS KEY RINGS KITTING LABELS LANYARDS/BADGES LARGE FORMAT PRINTING LASER FORMS LETTERHEAD LIGHTED DISPLAYS LITERATURE DISPLAYS LITHOGRAPHY Morgan anticipates keeping employment jobs because of the new truck, according to truck with two containers — one for recy- pany has actually picked up some new customLUGGAGE MAGNETIC CARDS MAGNETS/MAGNETIC SIGNS MAIL SOLUTIONS MAILINGS MARKETING SERVICES MEMO PADS METER TICKETS MICR ENCODING MOUSE PADS MYLAR NAPKINS/TOWELS NEWSLETTERS of the system, he continues. levels steady over the nextFRAMES year. HePLASTIC declines onePEGBOARD for trash. The containers come ers because Dependable automated pro- cling NUMBERING OFFICEDisposal. FURNITUREThe OUTERWEAR PADFOLIOS PEEL and & SEAL SYSTEMS PENS/PENCILS/RULERS PERFORMANCE CLOTHING PERSONALIZED ITEMS PHOTO HOLDERS/PHOTO CARDS “It’s allowed us to differentiate ourselves to share specific revenue totals, but anticiin 35-gallon, 65-gallon, and 95-gallon sizes, cess is intended to be better for both workers PLASTIC CARDS PLAYING CARDS POSTERS PRE-COLLATED PRESENTATION FOLDERS PRESENTATION PACKAGES PRINT ON DEMAND PURLS RECYCLED PRODUCTS REGISTER FORMS REPORT COVERS RETRACTABLE BANNER fromAWARDS our competitors,” Morgan says. “None patesBOTTLES growth STAMPS of aboutSTATEMENTS 5 percent. STATIONERY which are much larger than the standard and customers, says Steve Morgan, owner SALES DISPLAYS RIBBONS SAFETY & AUTO SALES AWARDS SHEETS SECURITY ENVELOPES SELL SHEETS SERVICE SHIRTS SIGNAGE SOUVENIR CUPS SPORTS our other competitorsTOWELS are offering two “We’re TRAYS alwaysUNIT adding front-load “blue bin”TAGS Onondaga County recyclingTHERMAL re- of LABELS and president of Dependable Disposal. STATIONERY PRODUCTS STOCK FORMS SUBSTRATES TABLE COVERS TAX FORMS TECHNOLOGY THERMOGRAPHY TRADING CARDS TRAVEL SETS/SNAP SETSaccounts UV COATING VARIABLE DATA VINYLconvenient DECALS WAREHOUSING WATCHES ceptacles, WATER BOTTLES WATERMARKED LETTERHEAD WEB SITE SOLUTIONS WEB TO PRINT WIDE WINDOW INSTRUMENTS ANNOUNCEcontainers. They’re offering the FORMAT trash con— ENVELOPES that’s our WRITING commercial side,” he says. Morgan says. And they’re lidded, “It’s more for the customer MENTS REPORTS APPAREL APPOINTMENT ARIBA SOLUTIONS BAGS BALLOONS BANNERS/TABLE tainer, butBANNERS not one for recycling.” COVERS BARCODING “EveryBINDING month BLIND we’ll EMBOSSING get three BOOK to fiveCOVERS/ ackeeping bottles andAWARDS papersBACKPACKS from blowing andANNUAL much safer from the collection stand-CARDS BOOKMARKS BRANDING BRIEFCASES BUMPER STICKERS BUSINESS CARDS BUSINESS FORMS BUTTONS/ SIGNS/NAME TAGS CALENDARS The automated split-body truck is a signifcounts.” q away(STOCK when&CUSTOM) the receptacles are on the curb. BROCHURES point,” BOOKLET he says. ENVELOPES BOOKLETS BOOKS BOXES CARBON INTERLEAVED CARBONLESS CARD/FORM COMBINATIONS CATALOG ENVELOPES CD’S AND CD HOLDERS CHECKS CLOTHING (INDOOR/OUTDOOR/WORKWEAR) COASTERS COFFEE MUGS/SLEEVES/WRAPS Customer feedback has been largely posi- icant investment. Purchasing it and its comConvenience for customers stems from COMMERCIAL PRINTING CONTINUOUS FORMS COOLERS CORPORATE GIFTS CORRUGATED COUPONS CUSTOM PRINTED DISPLAYS CUT SHEET DECALS DESK AND DOOR SIGNS DESKTOP ACCESSORIES DIE CUT CARDS DIE the fact that Dependable Disposal provides tive, according to Morgan. A few believe the patible containers cost a total of $350,000, Contact Seltzer at rseltzer@cnybj.com By Rick Seltzer Journal Staff

CUTTING DIGITAL PRINTING DIRECT MAIL DISPLAY UNITS DOCUMENT FOLDERS DOOR HANGERS DRINKWARE DUFFELS EASELS ECO-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS ECOMMERCE SOLUTIONS EDI ELECTRONIC REPORTING EMBOSSING EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION ENGRAVING ENVELOPES (STOCK &CUSTOM) EXPANSION FOLDERS FILE FOLDERS FLAGS FLASHLIGHTS FLAT PRINTING FLIP & SEAL FOIL EMBOSSING FOLDING- CUSTOM FOLDOVER CARDS FOOD FULFILLMENT FULL COLOR PROCESS PRINTING GIFT CARDS/CERTIFICATES GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASSIONS GOLF BALLS/TEES/ACCESSORIES GRAPHIC DESIGN HATS HEALTH AND WELLNESS HOLIDAY GIFTS HOSPITAL FORMS HOTEL/MOTEL FORMS HOUSEWARES ID BADGES/RETRACTABLE BADGE HOLDERS INSIDE TINTED WINDOW ENVELOPES INSURANCE FORMS (HCFA, UB-92) INTEGRATED CARDS INVITATIONS INVOICES JOURNAL BOOKS JUMBO ROLLS KEY RINGS KITTING LABELS LANYARDS/BADGES LARGE FORMAT PRINTING LASER FORMS LETTERHEAD LIGHTED DISPLAYS LITERATURE DISPLAYS LITHOGRAPHY LUGGAGE MAGNETIC CARDS MAGNETS/MAGNETIC SIGNS MAIL SOLUTIONS MAILINGS MARKETING SERVICES MEMO PADS METER TICKETS MICR ENCODING MOUSE PADS MYLAR NAPKINS/TOWELS NEWSLETTERS NUMBERING OFFICE FURNITURE OUTERWEAR PADFOLIOS PEEL & SEAL PEGBOARD SYSTEMS PENS/PENCILS/RULERS PERFORMANCE CLOTHING PERSONALIZED ITEMS PHOTO HOLDERS/PHOTO FRAMES PLASTIC CARDS PLASTIC CARDS PLAYING CARDS POSTERS PRE-COLLATED PRESENTATION FOLDERS PRESENTATION PACKAGES PRINT ON DEMAND PURLS RECYCLED PRODUCTS REGISTER FORMS REPORT COVERS RETRACTABLE BANNER DISPLAYS RIBBONS SAFETY & AUTO SALES AWARDS SALES SHEETS SECURITY ENVELOPES SELL SHEETS SERVICE AWARDS SHIRTS SIGNAGE SOUVENIR CUPS SPORTS BOTTLES STAMPS STATEMENTS STATIONERY STATIONERY PRODUCTS STOCK FORMS SUBSTRATES TABLE COVERS TAGS TAX FORMS TECHNOLOGY THERMAL LABELS THERMOGRAPHY TOWELS TRADING CARDS TRAVEL TRAYS UNIT SETS/SNAP SETS UV COATING VARIABLE DATA VINYL DECALS WAREHOUSING WATCHES WATER BOTTLES WATERMARKED LETTERHEAD WEB SITE SOLUTIONS WEB TO PRINT WIDE FORMAT WINDOW ENVELOPES WRITING INSTRUMENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS ANNUAL REPORTS APPAREL APPOINTMENT CARDS ARIBA SOLUTIONS AWARDS BACKPACKS BAGS BALLOONS BANNERS BANNERS/TABLE COVERS BARCODING BINDING BLIND EMBOSSING BOOK COVERS/ BOOKMARKS BOOKLET ENVELOPES BOOKLETS BOOKS BOXES (STOCK &CUSTOM) BRANDING BRIEFCASES BROCHURES BUMPER STICKERS BUSINESS CARDS BUSINESS FORMS BUTTONS/ SIGNS/NAME TAGS CALENDARS CARBON INTERLEAVED CARBONLESS CARD/FORM COMBINATIONS CATALOG ENVELOPES CD’S AND CD HOLDERS CHECKS CLOTHING (INDOOR/OUTDOOR/WORKWEAR) COASTERS COFFEE MUGS/SLEEVES/WRAPS COMMERCIAL

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PRINTING CONTINUOUS FORMS COOLERS CORPORATE GIFTS CORRUGATED COUPONS CUSTOM PRINTED DISPLAYS CUT SHEET DECALS DESK AND DOOR SIGNS DESKTOP ACCESSORIES DIE CUT CARDS DIE CUTTING DIGITAL PRINTING DIRECT MAIL DISPLAY UNITS DOCUMENT FOLDERS DOOR HANGERS DRINKWARE DUFFELS EASELS ECO-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS ECOMMERCE SOLUTIONS EDI ELECTRONIC REPORTING EMBOSSING EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION ENGRAVING ENVELOPES (STOCK &CUSTOM) EXPANSION FOLDERS FILE FOLDERS FLAGS FLASHLIGHTS FLAT PRINTING FLIP & SEAL FOIL EMBOSSING FOLDING- CUSTOM FOLDOVER CARDS FOOD FULFILLMENT FULL COLOR PROCESS PRINTING GIFT CARDS/CERTIFICATES GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASSIONS GOLF BALLS/TEES/ACCESSORIES GRAPHIC DESIGN HATS HEALTH AND WELLNESS HOLIDAY GIFTS HOSPITAL FORMS HOTEL/MOTEL FORMS HOUSEWARES ID BADGES/RETRACTABLE BADGE HOLDERS INSIDE TINTED WINDOW ENVELOPES INSURANCE FORMS (HCFA, UB-92) INTEGRATED CARDS INVITATIONS INVOICES JOURNAL BOOKS JUMBO ROLLS KEY RINGS KITTING LABELS LANYARDS/BADGES LARGE FORMAT PRINTING LASER FORMS LETTERHEAD LIGHTED DISPLAYS LITERATURE DISPLAYS LITHOGRAPHY LUGGAGE MAGNETIC CARDS

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MAGNETS/MAGNETIC SIGNS MAIL SOLUTIONS MAILINGS MARKETING SERVICES MEMO PADS METER TICKETS MICR ENCODING MOUSE PADS MYLAR NAPKINS/TOWELS NEWSLETTERS NUMBERING OFFICE FURNITURE OUTERWEAR PADFOLIOS PEEL & SEAL PEGBOARD SYSTEMS PENS/PENCILS/RULERS PERFORMANCE CLOTHING PERSONALIZED ITEMS PHOTO HOLDERS/PHOTO FRAMES PLASTIC CARDS PLASTIC CARDS PLAYING CARDS POSTERS PRE-COLLATED PRESENTATION FOLDERS PRESENTATION PACKAGES PRINT ON DEMAND PURLS RECYCLED PRODUCTS REGISTER FORMS REPORT COVERS RETRACTABLE BANNER DISPLAYS RIBBONS SAFETY & AUTO SALES AWARDS SALES SHEETS SECURITY ENVELOPES SELL SHEETS SERVICE AWARDS SHIRTS SIGNAGE SOUVENIR CUPS SPORTS BOTTLES STAMPS STATEMENTS STATIONERY STATIONERY PRODUCTS STOCK FORMS SUBSTRATES TABLE COVERS TAGS TAX FORMS TECHNOLOGY THERMAL LABELS THERMOGRAPHY TOWELS TRADING CARDS TRAVEL TRAYS UNIT SETS/SNAP SETS UV COATING VARIABLE DATA VINYL DECALS WAREHOUSING WATCHES WATER BOTTLES WATERMARKED LETTERHEAD WEB SITE SOLUTIONS WEB TO PRINT WIDE FORMAT WINDOW ENVELOPES WRITING INSTRUMENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS ANNUAL REPORTS APPAREL APPOINTMENT CARDS ARIBA SOLUTIONS AWARDS BACKPACKS BAGS BALLOONS BANNERS BANNERS/TABLE COVERS BARCODING BINDING BLIND EMBOSSING BOOK COVERS/ BOOKMARKS BOOKLET ENVELOPES BOOKLETS BOOKS BOXES (STOCK &CUSTOM) BRANDING BRIEFCASES BROCHURES BUMPER STICKERS BUSINESS CARDS BUSINESS FORMS BUTTONS/ SIGNS/NAME TAGS CALENDARS CARBON INTERLEAVED CARBONLESS CARD/FORM COMBINATIONS CATALOG ENVELOPES CD’S AND CD HOLDERS CHECKS CLOTHING (INDOOR/OUTDOOR/WORKWEAR) COASTERS COFFEE MUGS/SLEEVES/WRAPS COMMERCIAL PRINTING CONTINUOUS FORMS COOLERS CORPORATE GIFTS CORRUGATED COUPONS CUSTOM PRINTED DISPLAYS CUT SHEET DECALS DESK AND DOOR SIGNS DESKTOP ACCESSORIES DIE CUT CARDS DIE CUTTING DIGITAL PRINTING DIRECT MAIL

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DISPLAY UNITS DOCUMENT FOLDERS DOOR HANGERS DRINKWARE DUFFELS EASELS ECO-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS ECOMMERCE SOLUTIONS EDI ELECTRONIC REPORTING EMBOSSING EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION ENGRAVING ENVELOPES (STOCK &CUSTOM) EXPANSION FOLDERS FILE FOLDERS FLAGS FLASHLIGHTS FLAT PRINTING FLIP & SEAL FOIL EMBOSSING FOLDING- CUSTOM FOLDOVER CARDS FOOD FULFILLMENT FULL COLOR PROCESS PRINTING GIFT CARDS/CERTIFICATES GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASSIONS GOLF BALLS/TEES/ACCESSORIES GRAPHIC DESIGN HATS HEALTH AND WELLNESS HOLIDAY GIFTS HOSPITAL FORMS HOTEL/MOTEL FORMS HOUSEWARES ID BADGES/RETRACTABLE BADGE HOLDERS INSIDE TINTED WINDOW ENVELOPES INSURANCE FORMS (HCFA, UB-92) INTEGRATED CARDS INVITATIONS INVOICES JOURNAL BOOKS JUMBO ROLLS KEY RINGS KITTING LABELS LANYARDS/BADGES LARGE FORMAT PRINTING LASER FORMS LETTERHEAD LIGHTED DISPLAYS LITERATURE DISPLAYS LITHOGRAPHY LUGGAGE MAGNETIC CARDS MAGNETS/MAGNETIC SIGNS MAIL SOLUTIONS MAILINGS

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MARKETING SERVICES MEMO PADS METER TICKETS MICR ENCODING MOUSE PADS MYLAR NAPKINS/TOWELS NEWSLETTERS NUMBERING OFFICE FURNITURE OUTERWEAR PADFOLIOS PEEL & SEAL PEGBOARD SYSTEMS KariePERSONALIZED Ballway ITEMS PHOTO HOLDERS/PHOTO FRAMES PLASTIC CARDS PLASTIC CARDS PLAYING CARDS POSTERS PRE-COLLATED PRESENTATION FOLDERS PRESENTAPENS/PENCILS/RULERS PERFORMANCE CLOTHING TION PACKAGES PRINT ON DEMAND PURLS Lori RECYCLED PRODUCTS REGISTER FORMS REPORT COVERS RETRACTABLE BANNER DISPLAYS RIBBONS SAFETY & AUTO SALES AWARDS SALES SHEETS SECURITY ENVELOPES SELL Langlois cooleybrand.com SHEETS SERVICE AWARDS SHIRTS SIGNAGE SOUVENIR CUPS SPORTS BOTTLES STAMPS STATEMENTS STATIONERY STATIONERY PRODUCTS STOCK FORMS SUBSTRATES TABLE COVERS TAGS TAX FORMS TECHNOLOGY 315-432-1029 THERMAL LABELS THERMOGRAPHY TOWELS TRADING CARDS TRAVEL TRAYS UNIT SETS/SNAP SETS UV COATING VARIABLE DATA VINYL DECALS WAREHOUSING WATCHES WATER BOTTLES WATERMARKED LETTERHEAD WEB SITE SOLUTIONS WEB TO PRINT WIDE FORMAT WINDOW ENVELOPES WRITING INSTRUMENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS ANNUAL REPORTS APPAREL APPOINTMENT CARDS ARIBA SOLUTIONS AWARDS BACKPACKS BAGS BALLOONS BANNERS BANNERS/TABLE COVERS BARCODING BINDING BLIND BOOK COVERS/ BOOKMARKS BOOKLET ENVELOPES| BOOKLETS BOOKS BOXES (STOCK &CUSTOM) BRANDING BRIEFCASES | ROCHESTER | SYRACUSE ALBANY | EMBOSSING HUDSON VALLEY UTICA BROCHURES BUMPER STICKERS BUSINESS CARDS BUSINESS FORMS BUTTONS/ SIGNS/NAME TAGS CALENDARS CARBON INTERLEAVED CARBONLESS CARD/FORM COMBINATIONS CATALOG ENVELOPES CD’S AND CD HOLDERS CHECKS CLOTHING (INDOOR/OUTDOOR/WORKWEAR) COASTERS COFFEE MUGS/SLEEVES/WRAPS COMMERCIAL PRINTING CONTINUOUS FORMS COOLERS CORPORATE GIFTS CORRUGATED COUPONS CUSTOM PRINTED DISPLAYS CUT SHEET DECALS DESK AND DOOR SIGNS DESKTOP ACCESSORIES DIE CUT CARDS DIE CUTTING DIGITAL PRINTING DIRECT MAIL DISPLAY UNITS DOCUMENT FOLDERS DOOR HANGERS DRINKWARE DUFFELS EASELS ECO-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS ECOMMERCE SOLUTIONS EDI ELECTRONIC REPORTING EMBOSSING EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION ENGRAVING ENVELOPES (STOCK &CUSTOM) EXPANSION FOLDERS FILE FOLDERS FLAGS FLASHLIGHTS FLAT PRINTING FLIP & SEAL FOIL EMBOSSING FOLDING- CUSTOM FOLDOVER CARDS FOOD FULFILLMENT FULL COLOR PROCESS PRINTING GIFT CARDS/CERTIFICATES GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASSIONS GOLF BALLS/TEES/ACCESSORIES GRAPHIC DESIGN HATS HEALTH AND WELLNESS HOLIDAY GIFTS HOSPITAL FORMS HOTEL/MOTEL FORMS HOUSEWARES ID BADGES/RETRACTABLE BADGE HOLDERS INSIDE TINTED WINDOW ENVELOPES INSURANCE FORMS (HCFA, UB-92) INTEGRATED CARDS INVITATIONS INVOICES JOURNAL BOOKS JUMBO ROLLS KEY RINGS KITTING LABELS LANYARDS/BADGES LARGE FORMAT PRINTING LASER FORMS


The Central New York Business Journal • 3

December 21/28, 2012

photo courtesy of downtown decorations

A Downtown Decorations, Inc. employee installs a wreath to the outside of a local Wegmans store. The firm, a growing provider of holiday decorations around the country and internationally, is moving to its fourth building since launching in 2003.

Downtown Decorations moves again to keep pace with growth By Kevin Tampone Journal Staff

DeWITT — Downtown Decorations, Inc., a growing provider of holiday decorations around the country and internationally, is moving to its fourth building since launching in 2003. The company got its start in a basement and has since expanded to a 10,000-squarefoot location at 6604 Deere Road in DeWitt. The firm acquired its new 22,000-squarefoot building at 6724 Joy Road in DeWitt for $480,000 in October. Downtown Decorations provides largescale decorations mostly for shopping centers and municipalities. Locally, that includes customers such as Destiny USA, ShoppingTown Mall, and the city of Syracuse. But most of the firm’s business is outside Central New York. The company has customers in all 50 states as well as other nations including Mexico, Honduras, Ecuador, and the Bahamas. Downtown Decorations is already storing some of its inventory at its new building, says Garrett Peterson, vice president. Peterson co-founded and co-owns the business with his father Ted. The bulk of the firm’s inventory will move over after the holidays and the office will relocate in late February or early March. Downtown Decorations is out of room at its current building. “The office is bulging at the seams,” Garrett Peterson says. “The warehouse is bulging at the seams.” In addition to storing some material at the new building, Peterson leased a temporary warehouse for the holidays and is also using some storage containers outside the current building. Although the company’s busy season naturally occurs around the holidays, Downtown Decorations is not a seasonal enterprise. Planning and research is a year-

round affair, Peterson explains. He says he already has notes and ideas for next year. When customers start planning early, he adds, just about anything is possible. Firms that plan early also often get better pricing, he notes. Peterson credits the growth the business has generated since launching to its sales and marketing efforts, customer service, and design work. Nearly all of the company’s projects involve some level of customization and staff members do all of the design and engineering in-house, he notes. Downtown Decorations does its final assembly at its headquarters. The firm researches thoroughly, Peterson says. He, his father, and a designer make annual trips around the U.S., visiting hundreds of malls during the holidays to examine and photograph their decorations. The company also keeps up on industry news so when a customer calls looking for decorations for a new commercial building, Downtown Decorations often already has ideas to present, Peterson says. He also says the firm invested in its marketing efforts throughout the downturn. That meant taking on some smaller projects during the time period. The work eventually paid off. “We did a lot of business with people on very small-scale things,” Peterson says. “I’ve had clients who have done six-figure projects with me who started out [ordering] two bows and a box of light bulbs.” Downtown Decorations employs 14 people and has been adding a person or two each of the past two years. Peterson says more hiring is likely once the company moves to its new building. The Joy Road location should hold the company for at least 10 years, he adds. q Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com


4 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

empire: MACNY president comments, “It’s not surprising that we’re continuing to see some softness here.� Continued from page 1

the economy, according to Randall Wolken, president of the Manufacturers Association of Central New York, or MACNY. That is extending uncertainty that would normally disappear after a presidential election, he adds. “It’s not surprising that we’re continuing to see some softness here,� Wolken says. “Usually when someone’s elected you know what direction they’re headed in, but because we have some decisions yet to be made in Washington, I think it’s been prolonged.� The drop in the general business conditions index came as most of the survey’s other current indicators fell. The new-orders index skidded below zero, meaning demand for manufactured goods declined. It shed 6.8 points to decrease to -3.7. Shipments rose in December, but at a slower rate than in November, according to the shipments index, which dove 5.8 points to 8.8. Meanwhile, the unfilled-orders index moved in the opposite direction, climbing toward zero with a 4.8-point increase to -6.5. Delivery times posted little change, ac-

cording to the delivery time index. It edged down just over 1 point to -2.2. But manufacturers continued a drawdown of inventories from last month, as the inventories index moved up just half a point to -11.8. Manufacturers paid higher prices while the prices they received flattened, the New York Fed survey found. The prices-paid index ticked up 1.5 points to 16.1. The prices-received index dipped 4.5 points to 1.1. “It really is a continuation of a trend in the manufacturing sector where increasing your productivity or your top-line sales is how you maintain productivity and growth,� Wolken says. “Manufacturers have been dealing with this for many, many years, and they really have become quite accustomed to it. That’s why you see productivity being highest in this country in the manufacturing sector.� The Empire State survey’s final two indicators of current conditions, both of which deal with employment, stayed negative in December. The number-of-employees index stepped up 4.9 points to -9.7, indicating manufacturers reduced employee counts at a slower rate than last month. The average employee-workweek index edged down 2.9

points to -10.8, meaning manufacturers cut back on employees’ hours.

Brighter expectations about the future

Even as current indicators eroded, manufacturers held on to a brighter outlook for the future. December brought upward movement in all but two of the Empire State Manufacturing Survey’s forward-looking indicators, which measure expectations for a time six months in the future. The future general business conditions index added 5.8 points to move to 18.7. Almost twice as many manufacturers predicted better conditions in six months than predicted worse conditions — 40.2 percent versus 21.6 percent. Orders are in line for a surge, according to manufacturers who drove the future new-orders index 10.9 points higher to 32.3. They also anticipated a rise in shipments, as the future shipments index increased 4.1 points to 34.4. The future unfilled-orders index hovered just above zero, inching up just under 1 point to 3.2. The future delivery-time index did notch zero, meaning delivery times aren’t likely to change, according to manu-

facturers’ estimation. The future deliverytime index ascended 3.4 points to hit zero in December. Inventory levels are set to trend down, according to survey respondents. The future inventories index shed 4.4 points to -3.2. But price inflation probably won’t slow. The future prices-paid index jumped 12.3 points to 51.6, and the future prices-received index spiked 10.1 points to 25.8. Conditions are poised to improve for employees, the survey found. The future number-of-employees index soared 11.9 points to 10.8. And, the future average employee-workweek index tallied 5.4 after posting zero last month. Manufacturers haven’t reached the point of cutting back on their planned capital investments. The future capital-expenditures index gained 3.9 points to 12.9. The future technology-spending index slid 1.3 points to 4.3. The New York Fed polls a set pool of about 200 manufacturing executives in the state for its monthly survey, and about 100 executives typically respond. The Fed seasonally adjusts data. q Contact Seltzer at rseltzer@cnybj.com

AUDI: He takes over a president’s role previously held by his mother, Aminy Audi Continued from page 1

International division. He takes over a president’s role previously held by his mother, Aminy Audi. She will continue to be Stickley’s CEO and the chairman of its board of directors. The Audi family owns 100 percent of the company. “It’s a planned gradual handoff from my mother to the next generation,� Edward Audi says in an interview. “Over the past five years, my mother and I have worked very closely on all major decisions at Stickley. And this is just a natural progression with additional responsibilities for me in manufacturing, product development, and human resources.� Audi says he will also take on more strategic-planning duties. The company does not share revenue totals, but it hopes for “double-digit� percentage growth, he says. Stickley is working on developing a contract and hospitality division focused on four-star and five-star hotel properties, along

with increasing its institutional business. That follows the creation of its Campus Collection, which it started in 2011 when it furnished the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry’s first dormitory, Centennial Hall, in Syracuse. Stickley is already heavily involved in custom design for hotels, according to Edward Audi. But the company isn’t ignoring its retail business, which operates as Stickley, Audi & Co. It plans to open between five and 10 new stores in the next few years. The new stores will come in regions where Stickley already operates, he says. The company currently has 14 retail locations in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Colorado. “The contract division represents, I would say, the biggest growth opportunity for Stickley,� Audi says. “That would not interfere with our extremely important residential business.�

Stickley is currently hiring for manufacturing positions at its 425,000-square-foot manufacturing facility at its headquarters at 1 Stickley Drive in Manlius. Audi says the firm has nine open positions. The company has about 1,000 employees in Central New York and it employs roughly 1,400 companywide. The recent recession has been difficult for the entire furniture industry, Audi says. He believes conditions are slowly improving, however. And he points to the Audi family’s track record with employees since it purchased Stickley in 1974. “What I’m most proud of is our track record of never having had any layoffs in almost 40 years,� he says. “We had to reduce hours at one point. And I want to publicly thank our employees for their patience and hard work through those difficult times.� Edward Audi also gives credit to his mother for guiding the company through those tough years. “She has certainly earned the right to smell the roses and enjoy some good times

with book club, which is a group of friends she really enjoys being with,� he says. “She’s done a tremendous job navigating these uncertain times and bringing Stickley through this recession. I can’t ever imagine her not being involved in the business.� Aminy Audi expressed confidence in her son in a news release. “His deep appreciation for Stickley’s heritage and for our long-term commitment to our dealers and customers, combined with his vision, passion, and innovative spirit, will help him take the company to the next level,� she said. “During his tenure at Stickley, Edward has worked in almost every department and has become very familiar with every aspect of the business. He is well prepared for this new leadership role and has the support of everyone at Stickley.� In addition to Manlius, Stickley also has manufacturing operations in Archdale, N.C. and Vietnam. q Contact Seltzer at rseltzer@cnybj.com

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year in review

December 21/28, 2012

The Central New York Business Journal • 5

YEAR IN REVIEW: The second half started with local fallout from the Supreme Court’s health-care decision Continued from page 1

talized billings of $210 million for 2011.

The first month of 2012 also brought news of a new three-year contract for Community Bank President and CEO Mark Tryniski. The deal pays a base salary of $620,000 and took effect Jan. 1. It expires Dec. 31, 2014. Tryniski’s previous employment agreement ran from March 18, 2009 to Dec. 31, 2011 and paid a base salary of $454,000. Tryniski is also eligible for incentive pay. His total pay in 2010 was more than $1.3 million, including bonuses and stock-based compensation, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. We told you as well in January about the sale of East Syracuse Chevrolet. Sidney Greenberg sold the car business to Gino Barbuto, an employee of East Syracuse Chevrolet for 25 years. Barbuto had been an operating partner, owning 15 percent of the dealership, since 2010. He had been its general manager since 2009 and had been discussing an ownership change with Greenberg for about five years.

FEBRUARY

February brought news of an acquisition for Tompkins Financial Corp. (NYSE Amex: TMP). The Ithaca–based community banking company closed its deal for VIST Financial Corp. (NASDAQ: VIST) of Wyomissing, Pa. on Aug. 1. The $86 million deal brought Tompkins a presence in southeast Pennsylvania. The acquisition gave Tompkins Financial $5 billion in total assets, $3.8 billion in deposits, $2.9 billion in loans, and 67 branches in Pennsylvania and the Central, Western, and Hudson Valley regions of New York. The company also owns insurance and financial advising subsidiaries. During the month, we first reported on job cuts at Anaren, Inc. (NASDAQ: ANEN). The company has reduced its workforce of 1,000 employees by 19 percent since July 2011, saving about $6.6 million on salaries and benefits. Anaren has locations in the Syracuse area, New Hampshire, Colorado, and China. The firm develops and manufactures components and subsystems for applications in sectors including satellite communications, defense, and wireless communications. We also learned in February that Aspen Athletic Clubs would open a location in downtown Syracuse. The downtown club, Aspen’s third, opened in Onondaga Tower, the former HSBC Tower, at 125 E. Jefferson St. The 6,000square-foot space includes cardiovascular equipment such as treadmills and elliptical machines, free weights, strength-training resistance machines, and a 10-person spinning room.

MARCH

In March, we learned Varian (NYSE: VAR) agreed to purchase privately owned InfiMed, a developer of medical-imaging hardware and software, for $15 million, plus payments based on the sales of InfiMed products over the next two years. The transaction included InfiMed’s headquarters at 121 Metropolitan Park Drive in Salina. Varian manufactures medical devices and software for treating cancer and other medical conditions with radiotherapy, radiosurgery, and brachytherapy. It supplies tubes and digital detectors for medical, scientific, and industrial X-ray imaging. InfiMed employed about 60 people at the time of the announcement. We also reported on the purchase of the Learbury Centre at 329 N. Salina St. by Syracuse Behavioral Healthcare (SBH). The purchase gave SBH, which provides treatment and rehabilitation services for people with drug and alcohol addictions, a new home for its Syracuse outpatient clinic. In 2013, the nonprofit organization plans to relocate its administrative headquarters to the newly acquired building. Finally in March, we told you about the acquisition of Watertown–based Sovie & Bowie CPAs, P.C. by Bowers & Co. CPAs, PLLC of

Syracuse. Bowers was looking to increase its presence in the North Country.

APRIL

In April, The Business Journal reported on expansion plans at MicroGen Systems, Inc., winner of the $200,000 grand prize in 2012’s Creative Core Emerging Business Competition. The company, based in Ithaca, planned to add four to five new employees in 2012 to its staff of five. MicroGen is commercializing a chip-sized power generator that can transform subtle vibrations into energy. The product will be used initially in commercial and industrial monitoring. The company closed later in the year on an initial round of $2.6 million in financing. We also told you during April about a new regional strategy to double exports in the Syracuse metro area developed by CenterState CEO in a partnership with the Brookings Institution. Plans call for increasing export activity among the region’s top exporters, focusing on small and midsize companies, and expanding service exports. We reported on a new expansion at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center in Syracuse as well. The $140 million project will add more than 181,000 square feet at the hospital. It will add new operating rooms, intensive-care units, private patient rooms, and more.

MAY

In May, we told you about the relocation of Burdick Chevrolet to the Driver’s Village campus. The dealership moved from its former home in Salina to the complex in Cicero. Roger Burdick, president of Driver’s Village, acquired his Chevy dealership from Jeffrey Crouse when it was known as Bresee Chevrolet in March 2011. Burdick Chevrolet shares space at Driver’s Village with GMC and Buick dealerships. Driver’s Village renovated the space for about $2 million to meet new General Motors brand image standards. We also reported in May on the closing of First Niagara Financial Group’s acquisition of HSBC’s upstate New York branch network. The deal closed May 18 and branches across Upstate reopened May 21 as First Niagara locations. First Niagara leaders said in the wake of the closing that it could look to open more branches in Central New York, where the bank did not achieve as much branch density as it did in some other markets. We told you about growth at Bankers Healthcare Group in May. The private-equity corporation originates, funds, and places loans to licensed health-care professionals. The company operates in 43 states and serves 50,000 clients. The firm has reached $1 billion in loans since it launched in 2001. Although headquartered in Florida, the company’s CEO is located in Syracuse and a number of the firm’s operations take place here.

JUNE

In June, The Business Journal reported on the sale of the Palmerton Group, a DeWitt–based environmental consulting firm, to Norwood, Mass.–based GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. GZA is an environmental and geotechnical consulting firm. It planned to operate the Palmerton Group as a wholly owned subsidiary that would retain its own name and offices. The Palmerton Group’s growing workload came in its oil and gas practice areas, as well as its other specialized areas, like sediment management, according to the company. It had 18 employees at the time of the acquisition and GZA planned to retain all of them. A second acquisition we covered in June was Berkshire Hills Bancorp’s (NYSE: BHLB) $132 million deal for DeWitt–based Beacon Federal Bancorp. The deal closed in October and Berkshire eliminated 11 of the 130 jobs at Beacon Federal. Berkshire Hills, based in Pittsfield, Mass., now has assets of $5.5 billion and 73 branches in Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, and Vermont. Berkshire Hills, parent of Berkshire

Bank, first entered the Central New York market in 2011 with its acquisition of Rome Savings Bank. Finally in June, we told you about the formation of the CenterState Chamber Alliance. Syracuse–based CenterState CEO and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce in Utica formed the group, which is aimed at sharing events, programs, advocacy efforts, and best practices. The Cayuga County Chamber of Commerce joined the alliance later in the year.

JULY

The second half of the year started with local fallout from the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 28 decision to keep nearly all of the 2010 federal health-care reform law intact. Central New York’s medical and business community reacted to that decision in our July 6 issue. “Most of the provisions of the law take place over time,” said Dr. Paul Kronenberg, president and CEO of the 506-bed Crouse Hospital in Syracuse. “We’re not going to really completely understand this bill and its unintended and intended consequences until we have a better understanding of how these things will become operational.” Experts anticipated the ruling’s effects trickling down to companies with 50 or more fulltime employees. Those firms needed to start laying the groundwork for offering health insurance by 2014 or risk paying a penalty under the law’s employer mandate, according to Hermes Fernandez, a health-law attorney at the Albany office of the Syracuse–based law firm Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC. “I think the largest piece now is, how do employers get out in front, how do they get lined up with the mandate, and how do they get their coverage done?” he said. “How do they make those decisions to provide coverage or pay the tax penalties?”

AUGUST

A familiar face returned to Syracuse in August, as Nick Dereszynski came back from Seattle to lead Brown & Brown Empire State. The insurance agency headquartered at 500 Plum St. in Syracuse reintroduced Dereszynski as its president Aug. 2. He had been its chief from 2005 to 2011 before relocating to Washington state to become regional vice president for Brown & Brown Empire State’s Florida–based parent, Brown & Brown, Inc. (NYSE: BRO). Dereszynski stepped back into the Syracuse agency’s leading role while also retaining the title of regional vice president at its parent. The dual positions will give him better access to Brown & Brown leadership, he said. The comeback would coincide with hiring, Dereszynski vowed. Brown & Brown Empire State employed 95 people in three offices in Syracuse, Endicott, and Clifton Park, but its returning leader pledged to recruit an unspecified number of what he called high-quality candidates. He also declined to rule out acquiring other firms in the future. The Business Journal also reported on Syracuse–based Sutton Real Estate acquiring Midtown Plaza in Oswego. Sutton Real Estate will manage and lease the property for the new owner, SRE-Midtown Acquisitions, LLC. The 68,000-square-foot retail center is in the heart of Oswego, according to Sutton. The building includes two floors of retail and office space, including a Rite Aid Pharmacy, Joanne Fabric, The Green Planet Grocery, New York State Off Track Betting, and Oswego County Opportunities. Sutton is involved in other projects in Oswego, including rehabilitation of the former Seaway Supply Building into apartments. The firm also manages the Stevedore Building for another development group. The firm has found Oswego a good place to work, Sutton Real Estate President Louis Fournier says. Support from city and county economic-development officials is a big reason, he adds.

SEPTEMBER

Restructuring at Skaneateles Falls–based

Welch Allyn headlined the region’s business stories in September. The medical-device manufacturer said Sept. 10 that it planned to cut its global workforce by 10 percent over three years. At the time, it employed 2,750 people in 26 different countries. The privately owned company’s 350,000square-foot headquarters at 4341 State St. Road in Skaneateles Falls will dodge most of the job reductions, Welch Allyn President and CEO Steve Meyer told The Central New York Business Journal for our Sept. 14 edition. The headquarters, home to 1,300 employees, was in line to lose 45 positions. None of them would be manufacturing jobs, he said. A 2.3 percent federal tax on the sale price of medical devices in the United States helped spur the changes, according to Welch Allyn. Weakness in the European economy also played a part, it said. Welch Allyn would release details about its restructuring in Europe later in the year. The company will locate both a new Europe and Middle East regional headquarters and an operations center near Amsterdam, Netherlands, it said Dec. 10. Some business functions will move there from its facility in Navan, Ireland. Welch Allyn GmbH & Co. KG operations currently in Germany are also slated to move to Tijuana, Mexico.

OCTOBER

October brought news that Norwich–based NBT Bancorp, Inc. (NASDAQ: NBTB) planned to acquire Alliance Financial Corp. (NASDAQ: ALNC) of Syracuse in a $233.4 million deal. The banks expect the transaction to close early in 2013. Alliance executives felt compelled to move toward an acquisition because of new regulations coming after the financial crisis, its chairman, president, and CEO, Jack Webb, said in our Oct. 12 issue. The rules would drive staff hiring that wouldn’t generate more revenue, he said, while explaining that the sale to NBT will create a broader base for sharing regulatory costs. The sale will also allow the bank to compete on more loans, particularly commercial loans, he added. The deal gave NBT a way to enter the Syracuse market, something it had been searching for, according to the bank’s president and CEO, Martin Dietrich. Details about the acquisition’s staffing impact would come out in early December. About 100 jobs will be cut from Alliance’s Syracuse headquarters and its operations center in Oneida once the acquisition is complete. Alliance currently has 358 employees. In our Oct. 19 issue, we reported on 40 Below, a Syracuse–based young professionals group, launching Syracuse Coworks. It’s a co-working space that provides low-cost, professional office space at the Tech Garden in downtown Syracuse. The 1,500-square-foot space, located at the Tech Garden, has enough room for up to 25 tenants. Membership levels range from a $15 rate for drop-ins to $225 per month for full tenant members. Amenities available at different membership levels include wireless Internet access, printing services, and access to conference rooms.

NOVEMBER

Tessy Plastics Corp. is already working to expand a facility it built in 2010, we told you in our Nov. 2 issue. The plastic component and packaging manufacturer plans to spend between $5.4 million and $8 million to add nearly 100,000 square feet of warehouse space to a 90,000square-foot building on its headquarters campus at 488 Route 5 in Elbridge. Construction could finish as early as next June. The structure set for expansion is Tessy’s “south” building. It is one of three on the Elbridge campus, along with “east” and “west” plants of about 200,000 square feet each. Tessy also operates a 270,000-square-foot warehouse and See year in review, page 12


6 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

CHARITABLE AGENCIES SUPPORTED BY UNITED WAY OF CNY Ranked by Agency Allocation 2011-2014 Rank

Name Address Phone/Website

2011-2014 Agency Allocation $770,390

2011-2014 No. of Programs 14

2008-2011 Agency Allocation $788,864

No. of Programs Receiving Funding 14

$ Difference 2008 vs 2011 ($18,474)

1.

Catholic Charities of Onondaga County 1654 W. Onondaga St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 424-1800/ ccoc.us

2.

The Salvation Army, Syracuse Area 677 S. Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 475-1688/ sasyr.org Huntington Family Centers, Inc. 405 Gifford St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 476-3157/ huntingtonfamilycenters.org Vera House, Inc. 6181 Thompson Road Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 425-0818/ verahouse.org Center for Community Alternatives 115 E. Jefferson St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 422-5638/ communityalternatives.org Contact Community Services, Inc. 6520 Basile Rowe St. East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 251-1400/ contactsyracuse.org YWCA of Syracuse and Onondaga County 120 E. Washington St., Suite 415 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 424-0040/ ywca-syracuse.org ARISE Child and Family Services 635 James St. Syracuse, NY 13203 (315) 472-3171/ ariseinc.org Aurora of Central New York 518 James St. Syracuse, NY 13203 (315) 422-2429/ auroraofcny.org American Red Cross of Central New York 220 Herald Place Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 234-2200/ syrarc.org

$722,510

12

$676,650

12

$45,860

$355,975

6

$385,928

6

($29,953)

$255,720

4

$299,941

5

($44,221)

$211,650

4

$131,375

2

$80,275

$211,225

7

$223,253

6

($12,028)

$162,570

2

$163,000

2

($430)

$160,400

3

$207,750

3

($47,350)

$139,525

2

$90,000

2

$49,252

$137,500

2

$193,834

2

($56,334)

InterFaith Works of Central New York 3049 W. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13224 (315) 449-3552/ interfaithworkscny.org Spanish Action League of Onondaga County, Inc. 700 Oswego St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 475-6153/ laligaupstateny.org People’s Equal Action and Community Effort, Inc. 217 S. Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 470-3300/ peace-caa.org Boys & Girls Clubs of Syracuse 2100 E. Fayette St. Syracuse, NY 13224 (315) 472-6714/ bgcsyracuse.org Elmcrest Children’s Center, Inc. 960 Salt Springs Road Syracuse, NY 13224 (315) 446-6250/ elmcrest.org Child Care Solutions 6724 Thompson Road Syracuse, NY 13211 (315) 446-1220/ childcaresolutionscny.org On Point for College, Inc. 1654 Onondaga St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 440-3366/ onpointforcollege.org AIDS Community Resources, Inc. 627 W. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 475-2430/ aidscommunityresources.com Children's Consortium 2122 Erie Blvd. East Syracuse, NY 13224 (315) 471-8331/ childrensconsortium.org Hillside Children’s Center 215 Wyoming St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 703-8700/ hillside.com

$119,425

5

$82,900

3

$36,525

$115,375

4

$147,787

5

($32,412)

$108,725

2

$45,000

3

$63,725

$90,000

1

$175,000

2

($85,000)

$86,200

1

$100,615

1

($14,415)

$85,000

1

$166,750

2

($81,750)

$83,000

2

$60,000

1

$23,000

$79,105

3

$73,290

3

$5,815

$75,000

2

$15,000

1

$60,000

$56,840

1

$50,571

1

$6,269

Hiscock Legal Aid Society 351 S. Warren St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 422-8191/ hiscocklegalaid.org Food Bank of Central New York 7066 Interstate Island Road Syracuse, NY 13209 (315) 437-1899/ foodbankcny.org Samaritan Center, Inc. 310 Montgomery St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 472-0650/ samcenter.org Literacy Volunteers of Greater Syracuse, Inc. 2111 S. Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13205 (315) 471-1300/ lvgs.org Transitional Living Services of Onondaga County 420 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 478-4151/ tls-onondaga.org

$55,000

1

$100,000

1

($45,000)

$47,000

1

$51,000

1

($4,000)

$42,040

1

$36,000

1

$6,040

$35,000

1

$23,400

1

$11,600

$34,000

2

$35,422

2

($1,422)

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Revenue — Expenses (fiscal year) $50,391,896 — $49,805,4511 12/31/10 — $3,112,611 — $3,268,323 12/31/10 $3,312,959 — $3,172,637 12/31/10 $6,812,506 — $7,073,944 12/31/11 $2,745,764 — $2,711,366 12/31/10 $1,283,950 — $1,268,344 12/31/11 $12,620,294 — $2,519,811 06/30/11 $2,569,492 — $2,310,222 06/30/11 3,452,960,3872 — 3,422,010,386 06/30/11 $2,599,810 — $2,561,806 12/31/11 $892,255 — $879,144 12/31/10 $29,085,653 — $28,778,335 1/31/11 $1,412,725 — $1,779,580 12/31/10 $18,437,810 — $18,125,553 06/30/11 $3,341,853 — $3,317,958 8/31/11 $1,098,877 — $1,005,854 08/31/11 $3,823,929 — $3,773,927 06/30/11 $548,459 — $556,794 12/31/10 $107,508,1093 — $105,202,3453 06/30/11 $3,201,227 — $3,115,728 12/31/10 $17,002,838 — $16,354,248 06/30/11 $607,003 — $605,991 06/30/11 $155,939 — $183,369 12/31/10 $11,757,335 — $11,602,246 12/31/10

Agency-allocation data provided by United Way of Central New York. Revenues and Expenses from most recent fiscal year IRS Form 990, annual financial report, or provided by listed organizations. 1

Total for Catholic Charities of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse Figures reflects corporate revenue and expenses. Individual Red Cross chapters do not file a 990. 3 Total for all the Hillside Children's Centers across Central and Western New York. 2

Executive Director of Agency Michael F. Melara, Executive Director

Year Estab. 1923

Major George Polarek, Area Coordinator for Syracuse Area Services Linda M. Wright, Executive Director

1883

Karla Green, Deputy Executive Director

1919

Randi K. Bregman, Executive Director

1977

Marsha Weissman, Ph.D., Executive Director

1981

Patricia R. Leone, Executive Director

1971

Joan Durant, Executive Director

1885

Thomas McKeown, Executive Director

1979

Debra L. Chaiken, Executive Director

1917

Rosie Taravella, Regional CEO

1881

Beth A. Broadway, Executive Director

1976

Rita Paniagua, Executive Director

1969

Joseph E. O’Hara, Executive Director

1968

Tina Dee, Director of Club Programs

1982

Joseph Geglia, Executive Director

1845

Peggy Liuzzi, Executive Director

1975

Virginia Donohue, Executive Director

1999

Michael Crinnin, Executive Director

1983

Linda Cleary, Executive Director

1973

Elizabeth Nolan, Central Region Service Leader

1975

Susan R. Horn, President & CEO

1949

Thomas F. Slater, Executive Director

1985

Mary Beth Frey, Executive Director

1990

Marsha L. Tait, Executive Director

1972

Robert A. Goodfellow, Jr., Executive Director

1974

RESEARCH BY NICOLE COLLINS 12/12 ncollins@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 7

December 21/28, 2012

EDUCATION & TRAINING SPECIAL REPORT

Northside UP aims to foster entrepreneurship with grant BY KEVIN TAMPONE JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — A grant from the Central New York Community Foundation will help the Northside Urban Partnership (Northside UP) launch a business incubation project on the city’s Northside. The project will assist entrepreneurs in starting small businesses in Northside neighborhoods by providing support, education, and lending assistance, according to the foundation. The foundation made the $85,000 grant in celebration of its 85th anniversary. Northside UP beat out 15 other applications. Northside UP is a collaboration of business and community organizations aiming to revitalize the Northside neighborhood of Syracuse. It is led by organizations including St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, CenterState CEO, and Catholic Charities. The Community Foundation-funded project is an outgrowth of work Northside UP has already been doing, says Dominic Robinson, director of Northside UP. One of the organization’s main goals throughout its history has been to develop neighborhood businesses. But the group was finding that some people it helped faced challenging barriers to success, including lack of business knowledge and basic education. Many Northside residents are recent immigrants or refugees and their ideas were good, Robinson notes. But their lack of experience was a major obstacle.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CENTRAL NEW YORK COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

Peter Dunn, left president & CEO of the Central New York Community Foundation presents a grant check to Dominic Robinson, right, director of Northside UP. “It really prohibited them from pursuing those ideas any further,” Robinson says. Others the group worked with were able to get businesses off the ground, but then needed lots of help after the fact dealing with zoning issues, permitting problems, and basic financial reporting. The new grant will allow Northside UP to establish a formal program that will allow the group to select participants with the best chance for success. Participants will go through an intensive training program over several weeks that will provide a

grounding in business basics and entrepreneurship and help them refine their ideas, Robinson says. The plan is then to help participants launch their business in an incubator setting and continue to provide them with counseling and support as they get their ventures off the ground. Launching first in an incubator will allow participants to determine whether their ideas are truly viable, Robinson says. Plans are in place for a pilot program this spring with three to five participants, who will incubate their companies at the Central

New York Regional Market and Downtown Farmers’ Market in Syracuse this summer. Northside UP eventually wants to open a marketplace for program participants on the Northside, Robinson says. After the pilot program, the organization will launch a larger version next summer with seven to 12 participants. The goal is to run two to three program sessions per year, Robinson says. Although Northside UP has been working on developing local businesses for years, the new program is a big step forward. “There really are needs beyond what we’ve been doing,” Robinson says. The Community Foundation is a charitable foundation with assets of more than $130 million. It awards close to $6.7 million in grants to nonprofit organizations annually. Northside UP’s application stood out for the level of collaboration it involved, says John Eberle, vice president for grants and community initiatives at the Community Foundation. Some partners on the project include Syracuse Cooperative Federal Credit Union, the Tech Garden in downtown Syracuse, and ProLiteracy. Many of the residents on the Northside have incredible skills and creative ideas they could transform into vibrant businesses with a little help, Eberle adds. “The idea of helping create pathways for entrepreneurs to start businesses and create jobs — that was just really exciting,” he says. “It really resonated with us.”  Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com

CDI hoping to grow after starting HIPAA group in 2012 BY RICK SELTZER JOURNAL STAFF

DeWITT — Cyber Defense Institute, Inc. (CDI) has received plenty of interest since it set up a HIPAA security division about nine months ago. The division carries out compliance audits, risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and penetration testing to help medical organizations conform to security rules that are part of HIPAA. That’s the acronym for the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, a federal law that established standards Shea for securing electronic health information, among other things. “We’ve been doing these kinds of assessments for several years,” says James Shea, co-founder and CEO of CDI. “We decided

to put more resources into it and focus more on it.” There’s a reason CDI, which also offers computer-security training, consulting, and professional services for governments, the military, and corporations, decided to invest more in its HIPAA compliance services this year. The field has been garnering more attention from medical providers because of another piece of federal legislation, the 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, better known as the HITECH Act. “The HITECH Act kind of put some more teeth into HIPAA in terms of penalties and fines,” Shea says. “It tightened the regulations a bit.” CDI’s HIPAA Security Division targets medical practices of different sizes, although those with about 25 employees seem to frequent it, he adds. The division typically performs risk assessments and vulnerability assessments simultaneously. “One is more of a management questionnaire, and the other, the vulnerability

assessment, is a very technical process,” Shea says. “We go in and scan their whole network.” To establish its HIPAA Security Division, CDI hired one full-time employee dedicated to assessments and penetration testing. The business has been growing since then, according to Shea, although he declines to share specific revenue totals for the division or CDI. The company targets 10-percent revenue growth every year, he says. Shea is hoping to add more employees in the future, but stopped short of sharing specific goals. The new HIPAA Security Division isn’t the only change at CDI this year. This spring, the company relocated from Syracuse University’s CASE Center to a new headquarters at 6647 Old Thompson Road in DeWitt. Moving doubled CDI’s space, Shea says. The firm had 2,000 square feet at the CASE Center and now has 4,000 square

feet. Midcourt Builders Corp. owns the building where CDI now leases space, according to records from Onondaga County’s Office of Real Property Tax

Services. “We wanted room to expand, and there was no more room at the CASE Center,” Shea says. “It was a good location for us for a couple of years.” CDI employs three people full time, including Shea. It has five employees total, including contractors. Shea co-founded the company in November 2009, along with Carlos Villalba. Both men had previously been with Syracuse University’s Center for Business Information Technologies (CBIT) and founded CDI shortly after CBIT closed in 2009. But Villalba is no longer with CDI, according to Shea. He departed about a year See CDI, page 14


EDUCATION & TRAINING

8 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

Revolving loan fund to aid rural small businesses Program includes SBDC at OCC providing technical support to loan recipients BY KEVIN TAMPONE JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — A federal grant will help support a new revolving loan fund for small businesses in rural parts of the greater Syracuse area. The Central New York Regional Planning and Development Board applied for $500,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to fund the program. The loan fund will get $400,000, with the rest of the money going toward technical support for loan recipients from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Onondaga Community College (OCC). Applicants must come from rural areas in Onondaga, Oswego, Cayuga, Cortland, or Madison counties. The program is specifically targeted at very small firms with fewer than 10 employees, says Michael Rosanio, regional loan manager for the planning and development board. The maximum loan amount is $50,000, which can cover up to 75 percent of a project’s cost. “There’s generally kind of a lack of money for small rural businesses all in all,” Rosanio

PHOTO COURTESY OF OCC

OCC students work in a computer lab. A federal grant will help support a revolving loan fund for businesses in the rural parts of the greater Syracuse area. Some money will go toward technical support for loan recipients from the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Onondaga Community College (OCC). says. The loans will go toward actions like equipment purchases or they’ll help provide working capital, he adds. Loan terms will generally be limited to seven years or less so major construction projects or real-estate transactions aren’t in the cards. The goal, Rosanio adds, is to focus on companies that are key pieces of their local communities. The region’s small villages are important economic assets, he notes. But most of the

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area’s economic-development efforts focus on Syracuse as the region’s urban core. The loan fund is a way to help tap into the potential of small businesses in lesspopulated areas. “We believe they’re important economic and cultural and social assets in our region,” Rosanio says. “This sort of program could help get economic activity going in those areas again.” Banks, Rosanio adds, don’t often provide loans at the amounts this program will sup-

port. They’d rather see a business owner tap into home equity or open some other line of credit for smaller projects, he says. “They don’t do smaller commercial loans,” he says. “A lot of these [small businesses] are pretty tapped out. They’ve already tapped into their home equity and their savings.” Other loan funds sometimes have strict jobcreation requirements that very small firms cannot meet, he adds. Worthwhile projects end up falling through the cracks as a result. The SBDC will provide one-on-one counseling for recipients of the loans. Recipients will also be required to attend the center’s 20-hour class on business basics. Counselors could work with the business owners on developing a business plan or marketing strategy, depending on what they need, says Joan Powers, the SBDC’s assistant director and a certified business adviser. The center is also developing a workbook targeted specifically at marketing businesses in rural areas. The SBDC will be able to provide companies some help with market research as well by providing access to the State University of New York research network, Powers says. The businesses will have access to information on trends and various demographic statistics that could help them refine their strategies. Counselors will also help business owners work on projections to determine if their companies are financially viable.  Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com


December 21/28, 2012

education & training

The Central New York Business Journal • 9

SUNYIT, nfrastructure launch internship program By Kevin Tampone Journal Staff

MARCY — The State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/ Rome (SUNYIT) and Clifton Park–based nfrastructure are launching a new program to help develop the state’s informationtechnology workforce. The program will allow students to work on projects at the nfrastructure Center of Competency in Information Technology (NCCIT) site on the SUNYIT campus. The center is a public-private partnership among nfrastructure, the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany, and SUNYIT. The center works on technology projects for local and state-government entities, institutions of higher education, and health-care facilities. Nfrastructure designs, builds, and operates technology infrastructure for public and private entities. Students in the new program at SUNYIT could end up working on just about anything nfrastructure has in its pipeline, says Larry Delaney, president of the NCCIT. “Employers don’t just want book smart,” Delaney says. “They want guys and gals that have put their hands on things. They’ve designed networks. They’ve worked in a data center.” Delaney says he’s not sure how many students will be involved in the program yet, but he is planning to start with two and scale from there. The program will also

photo courtesy of baker public relations

SUNYIT president Wolf Yeigh, right, speaks to New York Governor Cuomo, left, about SUNYIT’s progress on the Computer Chip Commercialization Center (Quad-C) on the Governor’s Nov. 28 visit. help SUNYIT students with required senior projects. Nfrastructure staff members will mentor those efforts, Delaney says. The effort at SUNYIT is just the beginning of what NCCIT wants to accomplish, he adds. The center also has an office at the University at Albany and a partnership with Stony Brook University. “This is the first iteration of something we intend to repeat at lots of SUNY schools,”

Delaney says. Students could work on projects including network monitoring, upgrades, design, equipment installation, and more, he adds. The program makes sense for nfrastructure as well. One of the company’s priorities is to attract and retain top technical talent, Delaney says. Working closely with SUNYIT and other schools will give the firm first crack at hiring some bright students. The NCCIT has

six employees at SUNYIT. That total could grow to 60 or 70 or more given the pipeline of customer opportunities in place, Delaney says. Nfrastructure employs more than 150 people companywide. Students will receive academic credit for the internships and be paid as well, says William Durgin, SUNYIT provost. It’s a terrific opportunity for them to gain experience on projects for actual, real-world clients, he adds. Students, he notes, are quick to detect projects that are designed by faculty as good academic experiences. “There is no substitute in terms of engagement for real-world projects,” Durgin says. Companies running programs like this one often give students backburner projects that accumulate over time, he adds. They’re often initiatives companies want to move forward, but simply don’t have the time or resources to execute. SUNYIT is working to launch similar internship programs with other area companies, Durgin says. The school is looking to work with M. A. Polce Consulting, an information-technology consulting firm, on a program and wants to explore partnerships in advanced manufacturing and engineering as well. M.A. Polce is based in Rome and has an office in Syracuse. q Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com


10 • The Central New York Business Journal

education & training

December 21/28, 2012

Employer Social-Media Policies Are Under Scrutiny

T

  he explosion of social-media outlets   such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn   and other electronic-communication forums has resulted in a corresponding dramatic increase in the external discussion of matters once confined to the workplace. These communications often touch on topics thought by employers to be confidential. Many employers have been quick to respond with new policies addressing the use of social-media forums, and with disciplinary actions in response to employee discussions of work-related matters. The application of legal principles established under federal labor law to social-media communications has resulted in determinations that many of these policy formulations and

disciplinary actions are unlawful. The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is generally known as the federal law that governs private-sector employers with union relationships or union activity in their workplaces. Less known is the fact that the NLRA protects the rights of nonunion employees to engage in what are known as “protected concerted activities.” It has long been held that an employer cannot interfere with the rights of employees to discuss employment terms and working conditions, this being considered a form of protected concerted activity. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has held that employment policies that prohibit employees from discussing salary levels and wage rates, for example, are unlawful. While individual gripes are generally not considered protected concerted activity, communications between employees about working conditions or matters which may be of interest to more than one employee are protected. The concerns generated by application of the protected concerted-activity analysis to social-media communications has prompted the General Counsel of the NLRB to issue three reports in the last year addressing the legality of social-media policies in dozens of cases. Employer policies were found to be unlawful in nearly every case. The General Counsel has advised that a wide variety of general socialmedia policy prohibitions directed to confidential information, offensive or disparaging comments, and even statements harming the employer’s image, will be considered unlawful unless expressly limited to matters that do not relate to employment terms and working conditions. Decisions issued by the NLRB this

past September confirm the scope of these rulings. Employers need to recognize that the NLRB’s analysis of employment policies in many instances will be overly technical and largely counterintuitive. Thus, while a specific prohibition against discussion of trade secrets, products, or processes in social-media sites would be lawful, a general prohibition against the discussion of “confidential and proprietary information” would be considered unlawful as it potentially extends to matters relating to working conditions. A social-media policy prohibiting electronic postings, which “damage the Company, defame any individual or damage any person’s reputation” would be considered unlawful as it potentially prohibits criticism of the employer’s employment policies or treatment of its employees. A social-media policy instructing employees to think carefully about “friending” their coworkers on Facebook likewise would be considered unlawful as it would tend to discourage communications about working conditions. A general social-media policy that requires the prior permission of the employer to discuss any aspect of employment would also be considered unlawful by the NLRB. In one notable case from Buffalo, a nonprofit organization that provided advocacy services to victims of domestic abuse discharged several employees for harassment following their negative Facebook discussion of a coworker. The coworker had criticized employees for not doing enough for the organization’s clients. The NLRB issued a complaint upon a finding that the Facebook discussion was a protected concerted activity. An Administrative Law Judge agreed, and determined that the

employees were entitled to reinstatement to employment with back pay. Private-sector employers need to be cognizant of the restrictions presented by federal law on the formulation of viewpoint policies and the administration of disciplinary actions that may have an impact on “protected concerted activities” in social-media communications. Employers have a legitimate interest in safeguarding their business images, customer relationships and proprietary information, and likewise have legitimate expectations that their employees will take care to preserve, if not advance, these interests. Employers should expect their social-media policies to come under scrutiny, and should review and update them as appropriate. With proper attention to this evolving area of socialmedia law, employers can achieve a workable balance. q

john t. mccann

John T. McCann is a partner in the Labor & Employment Practice of Hancock Estabrook, LLP, a Syracuse–based law firm. He represents management in connection with employment litigation, collective bargaining, labor arbitrations, employment contracts, employment policies and practices, affirmative-action plans, investigations, labor audits, supervisory training, and compliance with all applicable employment laws and regulations. Contact McCann at jmccann@hancocklaw.com.

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The Central New York Business Journal • 11

December 21/28, 2012

TOP RANKS: COMMERCIAL REAL-ESTATE FIRMS Ranked by No. of Agents & Brokers Rank

Name Address Phone/Website

No. of Agents & Brokers — Total No. of CNY Employees

No. of Commercial Properties Listings in CNY

No. of CNY Commercial Property Transactions in 2012 YTD

Types of Commercial RE Handled1

Key Executives

Year Estab.

1.

Pyramid Brokerage Company 5786 Widewaters Parkway Syracuse, NY 13214 (315) 445-1030/ pyramidbrokerage.com

54 — 9

643

472

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

John L. Clark, President & CEO Robert Berkey, COO Mike Kalet, Director Sales

1971

2.

CBRE | Syracuse 313 E. Willow St., Suite 202 Syracuse, NY 13203 (315) 422-4200/ cbre.com/syracuse

17 — 19

NA

NA

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Michael Finn, Managing Partner Peter Finn, Executive Vice President

1999

3.

Prudential Joseph R. Carucci Real Estate 600 French Road New Hartford, NY 13413 (315) 733-0463/ prudentialcarucci.com

15 — 15

26

15

AC, CB, FI, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Edward H. Jekel, Broker of Record

1969

4.

Longley Jones Management Corp. 1010 James St. Syracuse, NY 13203 (315) 424-0200/ longley-jones.com

12 — 120

23

18

AC, FI, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

E. Carlyle Smith, CEO

1958

.

Pioneer Companies 333 W. Washington St. Suite 600 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 471-2181/ pioneercos.com

12 — 35

20

50

AC, FI, HM, OB, OC, RS, SC

Michael P. Falcone, Chairman & CEO John F. O'Brien, Managing Director William L. Cappelletti, Managing Director

1987

.

Sutton Companies 525 Plum St., Suite 100 Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 424-1111/ suttoncos.com

12 — 100

75

100

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Louis G. Fournier, III, President Ann Vinette, CFO Linda Charles, VP Joseph Lewis, VP

1933

7.

COR Property Services LLC 540 Towne Drive Fayetteville, NY 13066 (315) 468-3051/ corcompanies.com

10 — 30

275

90,110

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Steven F. Aiello, President Louis P. Aiello, EVP Paul M Pelletier, COO

2002

8.

JF Real Estate 2 Clinton Square Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 472-2020/ jfrealestate.com

8 — 12

104

188

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

John Funiciello, President Edward L. Rogers, VP Sales/Marketing Len Brown, VP Sales/Marketing Martin D. McDermott, VP Sales/Marketing

1992

The Bell Group2 120 Walton St., Suite 400 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 476-7112/ bellgrouprealestate.com

8 — 11

0

50

FI, GF, MP, OB, OC, WD

Mark Bethmann, President

1986

10.

CBD Brokerage, LLC 125 E. Jefferson St., Suite 400 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 295-1900/ cbdcos.com

7 — 25

72

70

FI, GF, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Charles G. Sangster, President

2009

11.

Upstate Companies 236 W. Genesee St. 2nd Floor Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 449-1988/ upstatecos.com

5 — 11

61

47

AC, CB, FI, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Andrew Devorsetz, Member Eric Paparo, Director of Operations

2002

The John Lynch Company, Inc. 301 Plainfield Road Syracuse, NY 13212 (315) 451-0940/ jlynchco.com

5 — 7

2

0

GF, HM, OB, OC, RS, SC

Michael J. Dillon, President Alan J. Rainbow, VP

1986

13.

Bouck Real Estate 32 E. Genesee St. Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 252-7503/ bouckrealestate.com

4 — 5

62

45

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, RE, RS, SC, WD

John F. Bouck, President & Broker

1963

14.

Oliva Companies 6724 Thompson Road Syracuse, NY 13211 (315) 463-8684/ olivaco.com

3 — 20

50

30

GF, MP, OB, OC, WD

Anthony S. Oliva, President Stephen A. Oliva, Jr., Vice President

1951

15.

Allegiance Realty LLC 522 Liberty St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 295-2409/ allegiancerealtyllc.com

2 — 0

10

8

AC, CB, FI, GF, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Jeffrey C. Kelsen, Principal Broker

2008

Edgewater Management Company 225 Greenfield Parkway Suite 102 Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 471-4420

2 — 6

4

10

HM, OB, OC, RE, SC

Thomas R. Kennedy, President Gary J. Malfitano, Director

1988

17.

Greenwood Commercial Investment Realtors Inc. 2949 Erie Blvd. East, Suite 106 Syracuse, NY 13224 (315) 432-8132/ gcir.com

1 — 22

NA

NA

OB, OC, RS, SC, WD

Thomas H. Greenwood, President

1971

18.

JGB Properties, LLC 238 W. Division St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 234-4184/ jgbproperties.com

0 — 9

12

44

AC, HM, MP, OB, OC, RE, RS, SC, WD

Dan Pigula, Managing Director Christine Stevens, Deputy Director

1999

.

.

.

Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. 1

MP = manufacturing plants, SC = shopping centers, OB = office buildings, FI = financial institutions, RS = retail stores, GF = government facilities, AC = apartment complexes, RE = restaurants, WD = warehousing/distribution sites, HM = hotels/motels, CB = church buildings, OC = office complexes The Bell Group is a tenant representative firm.

2

Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

RESEARCH BY NICOLE COLLINS 12/12 ncollins@cnybj.com


YEAR IN REVIEW

12 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

YEAR IN REVIEW: In our Nov. 23 issue, we reported on ITT Corp. Continued from page 5

assembly location in the town of Van Buren. Tessy expects to hire 30 new workers once the addition is complete. The company employed about 820 workers in Central New York before the expansion. About 100 of those workers were temporary. Central New York revenue totaled $180 million at Tessy in 2011. The company generated about $220 million between New York locations and sites in Lynchburg, Va. and Shanghai, China. It expected to grow sales by 10 percent in 2012. In our Nov. 23 issue, we reported on ITT Corp. (NYSE: ITT) adding 75,000 square feet of new manufacturing and research and development space at its Seneca Falls site as the company’s business in the oil and gas sector expands.

The Seneca Falls location is the headquarters for ITT’s industrial process business, which provides engineered valves, monitoring and control equipment, and aftermarket services and parts in a range of industries. The business also includes ITT’s Goulds Pumps brand, a line of industrial pumps and the focus of the expansion in Seneca Falls, where Goulds is based. ITT acquired Goulds Pumps in 1997. The existing facilities in Seneca Falls simply weren’t designed to manufacture the larger pumps ITT makes for the oil and gas industry, ITT officials say. The expansion of manufacturing space will provide needed room for the business.

DECEMBER

Another plastic manufacturer’s expansion topped the news at the start of December. Currier Plastics of Auburn shared details about

its 55,000-square-foot addition, already under way for several weeks. Construction, which will almost double the company’s headquarters at 101 Columbus St. to 120,000 square feet, had been delayed since late 2011 as Currier Plastics sought state aid. The Central New York Regional Economic Development Council recommended $1 million in Excelsior tax credits and a $750,000 capital grant tied to the project in 2011, but the state only awarded tax credits. Currier Plastics then looked for ways to close the $750,000 funding gap. Empire State Development eventually gave the project an Economic Transformation Grant of that size in May, allowing work to enlarge the building to start late this fall. The 55,000-square-foot expansion is part of a $21 million project that includes new equip-

ment to be purchased over five years. Work on the larger facility could wrap up by the end of February. Aspen Athletic Clubs stretched its footprint for the third time this year with a Dec. 1 acquisition of Fitness Forum Health Club in DeWitt. The move gives Aspen its fifth location in 24,000 square feet at 6800 E. Genesee St. — its first club to the east of Syracuse. It also takes Fitness Forum out of the health-club field, leaving the company to focus on its 28-clinic physicaltherapy business. It is the first time Aspen has grown through an acquisition. The company launched its two other new locations in 2012 from scratch. It started a 30,000-square-foot club at 3440 W. Genesee St. in Camillus in September, a few months after opening a 6,000-square-foot location at 125 E. Jefferson St. in downtown Syracuse.  Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

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The Central New York Business Journal • 13

December 21/28, 2012

Business Journal C e n t r a l

N e w

opinion

Y o r k

Volume 26, No. 51/52 - Dec. 21/28, 2012 NEWS Editor-in-Chief........................Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com Assistant Editor..............Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com Staff Writers........................... Kevin Tampone (Online Editor) ktampone@cnybj.com ..............................................................Rick Seltzer rseltzer@cnybj.com ....................................................Norm Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Columnists...................................Brian M. Kolb Tom Morgan Production Manager.......................Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com Research Manager.................. Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com SALES Sr. Account Managers....................................... Bernard B. Bregman bbregman@cnybj.com Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Marketing .......................BBB Marketing Inc. CIRCULATION Circulation Management....(315) 579-3927 Administrative Publisher..........................Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Chief Operating Officer......Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com Business Manager..................... Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

My Policy Priorities for the 2013 State Legislative Session

W

  hile the 2013 New York legisla  tive session does not “officially”   kick off until early January, I have always been a firm believer in hitting the ground running.  With so much to do and no time to waste, these past few weeks were especially busy as I have been busy listening to constituents and formulating my policy priorities for the new session. My policy priorities for our 2013 session opinion include protecting taxpayers and localities by stopping Albany’s unfunded mandates and by fixing the broken Thruway Authority by passing my “Thruway Authority Accountability Act.” Each of these priorities flows from my core values of opportunity, prosperity, community, and a better quality of life for all New Yorkers.

brian m. kolb

Stopping Albany’s unfunded mandates

Unfunded mandates are whenever Albany tells local governments to do something — start a program, provide a service, build a school — but does not provide any funding for it.  Localities and school districts are forced to raise property taxes to make up the shortfall. Instead

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  ou don’t need me to tell you labor   unions just lost another battle.   Michigan became a “right-to-work” state. So workers there no longer have to join a union to get certain jobs. Last year the battleground was Wisconsin. Unions lost there, too. Union leaders clanged alarm bells over the Michigan loss. Union thugs warned that blood will run in the streets. President Obama proclaimed that right-to-work laws are about the “right to work for less money.” He is correct, in a sense. He also demorgan clared that such laws “don’t have to do with at large economics — they have everything to do with politics.” In this, he could not be more mistaken. Right-to-work measures have everything to do with economics. So do the unions’ problems. Everything. Especially that ingredient of economics called competition. Unions do not do well against competi-

tom morgan

HOW TO REACH US MAIL: Send letters to: Editor, The Central New York Business Journal 269 W. Jefferson St. Syracuse, N.Y. 13202-1230 E-MAIL: letters@cnybj.com PHONE: (315) 472-3104

Enacting my “Thruway Authority Accountability Act”

For several years, I have called for accountability and fiscal responsibility at the Thruway Authority, which has recklessly enacted four toll hikes in the past six years, and this year sought a fifth toll hike with a proposed 45 percent toll increase on trucks before recently hitting the brakes on the proposal. To fix the chronic problems at the broken Thruway Authority, I introduced the “Thruway Authority Accountability Act.” My proposal merges the Thruway Authority with the State Department of Transportation (DOT); creates a new Thruway Authority board whose mem-

“Unfunded mandates are whenever Albany tells local governments to do something — start a program, provide a service, build a school — but does not provide any funding for it. bers must have either transportation or financial expertise (or both); makes the DOT Commissioner chair of the Thruway Authority board; sets a forensic audit of Thruway Authority finances every three years; requires any proposed Thruway toll hikes be clearly identified in the DOT’s budget; and saves taxpayer dollars by streamlining the Authority through attrition.  Getting this much-needed legislation on the books will be one of my top priorities during the upcoming session. q Brian M. Kolb (R,I,C–Canandaigua) is the New York Assembly Minority Leader and represents the 129th Assembly District. Contact him at (315) 781-2030 or kolbb@assembly. state.ny.us

What Right-to-Work Really Means

Y

The Central New York Business Journal (ISSN #1050-3005) is published every week by CNY Business Review, Inc. All contents copyrighted 2012. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher.

of helping, Albany has been hurting: from 2001 to 2012, the Assembly voted 120 times to pass unfunded mandate legislation with a fiscal impact totaling more than $85 billion. In order to stop Albany’s mandate madness, I introduced the “Taxpayer Protection and Mandate Relief Act,” which prohibits any new unfunded mandates, freezes county Medicaid costs at their current level, allows counties to opt out of optional Medicaid services, and caps state spending.  I also authored the “NYS Mandate Relief for School Districts Act,” which provides real mandate relief for overburdened school districts.  I have re-introduced both initiatives and will push for their enactment this session.  

tion. They deliver a lot of benefits to members. They truly do. Better wages. More generous health care and pensions. But these benefits jack up costs for employers. Simple as that. If employers face no competition from non-union shops, fine. They raise prices. Pass costs along to customers. Your mom and dad paid extra for their Oldsmobile. The extra paid the union benefits. We all shell out extra school taxes — to pay for teacher pensions and health-care benefits and good pay. We pay extra in taxes to cities and states — to pay for retirements for workers after only 20 years. Used to be, none of these industries had competition. When employers face competition from non-union shops, the unions try to close down those competitors. Example: Teacher unions spend millions to kill vouchers that kids would use to attend private schools. Those unions fight against charter schools. They try to unionize their workers. We used to see efforts like these in the private sector. Well, unions are losing battles these days because they cannot do much about the competition. In the public sector, they usually have no competition. But in manufacturing and many service industries they do. And that competition is from non-union

workers in China, India, and other Asian countries. The greatest problems private-sector unions face are from workers in other countries. Union shops in Michigan cannot compete against non-union factories in China. If our unionized schools and state and local governments had to truly compete against non-union shops, they would lose, too. If unionized colleges had to compete openly against non-unionized schools, they also would lose. Union operations work best when they are protected from competition. That protection is long-gone in the private sector. And that is why most union jobs in that sector are long-gone. There is no question that millions of jobs pay less and give fewer benefits than they did years ago. The decline of unions has reduced the standard of living of many Americans. Until Asian and Indian workers earn $20 an hour, we are not likely to see much improvement. From Tom...as in Morgan. q Tom Morgan writes about financial and other subjects from his home near Oneonta. E-mail Morgan at Tomasin@wpe.com


14 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

JANUARY 4 ď Ž CNY ASTD Breakfast Club from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at The Gem Diner, 832 Spencer St., Syracuse. The topic will be: Improving Human Performance. For details or to register, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org.

JANUARY 10 ď Ž CEO Economic Forecast Breakfast from 7:30 to 10 a.m. at the Oncenter, 800 S. State St., Syracuse. Join hundreds of fellow CenterState CEO members, business leaders, and executives for the presentation of the 2013 Economic Forecast. The cost is $30 for CenterState CEO members and $40 for nonmembers. Registration deadline is Jan. 4. For more information, contact Lisa Metot at (315) 470-1870 or email: lmetot@ centerstateceo.com

JANUARY 17 ď Ž How To Attract and Retain Quality Employees from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at CenterState CEO headquarters, 572 S. Salina St., Syracuse. For more information or to register, visit www. CenterStateCEO.com

JANUARY 17 & 24 ď Ž The Achievers Guide to Time Management: How to Get Things Done interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at the South Side Innovation Center, 2610 South Salina St., Syracuse. The instructor is Kathy Barany of Strategic Management Solutions. The cost is $20 per class, $40 for series (free to PRIME/EAP & resident clients). To register, contact Crystal Ross at (315) 443-8466 or email: crross@syr.edu

JANUARY 24 ď Ž Close the Deal or Close the File presentation from 8 to 9 a.m. at CenterState CEO headquarters, 572 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Richard Olszewski, CEO/owner of Sandler Training of Central New York, is the presenter. To register or obtain more information, visit www.centerstateceo.com/events

BUSINESS CALENDAR

OF EVENTS

JANUARY 29 ď Ž CenterState CEO Business After Hours event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Koto Japanese Steakhouse, 2841 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. The cost is $10 for members and $20 for nonmembers. For more information, contact Lisa Metot at (315) 470-1870 or email: lmetot@centerstateceo.com or visit www.centerstateceo.com/events

APRIL 10 ď Ž Wisdom Keeper Award event from 5 to 8 p.m. in the ballroom at the Nicholas J. Pirro Convention Center at the Oncenter in Syracuse. The award will be presented to Dr. Cornelius (Neil) Murphy, president of ESF. The cost to attend is $100-$150 per person. For details and reservation information, call F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse at (315) 448-8732 or visit http://www.focussyracuse. org/2012/11/2013-wisdom-keeper

ONGOING EVENTS ď Ž Every Tuesday, Cayuga Club Toastmasters from 6 to 7 p.m. at Cornell University, Ithaca, Rhodes Hall, 6th Floor, Conference Room #655. Free and easy parking is available nearby at Peterson Lot. For more information, contact Julia Reich, (315) 364-7190 or email: juliareichdesign@gmail.com ď Ž Every Tuesday, Gung Ho Networking Group from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday Restaurant, 3220 Erie Blvd E., DeWitt. Possible referrals for you; this is not a tip club. First visit free. Contact Paul Ellis at (315) 677-0015 or visit www.

GungHoReferrals.com ď Ž Every Wednesday, Small Business Development Center at OCC from 4pm to 6 p.m., Introduction to Business Startup at H-1 Hall. For more information, please call 498-6070 or visit www.onondagasbdc.org ď Ž Every Wednesday, Syracuse Business Networking from 6 to 7 p.m. at Barbieri’s Restaurant (upstairs level) located on Main Street in the village of North Syracuse. For more information, call Kim Bachstein at (315) 414-8223 or email: info@SyracuseBusinessNetworking.com ď Ž First Wednesday of each month, Business Innovation Days meetings from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Entrepreneurs and small businesses can meet one-on-one with a counselor from the SBDC for advice and customized assistance opportunities. Scheduled by appointment, call (315) 474-0910 or email: info@thecleantechcenter.com ď Ž Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://1427.toastmastersclubs.org or email: contact-1427@toastmastersclubs.org ď Ž Every Thursday each month, Liverpool Linguists from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Liverpool First Methodist Church, 604 Oswego Road, Liverpool. For details, visit http://liverpool.toastmastersclubs.org or call (315) 884-2668 or 457-2581.

ď Ž Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at C&S Companies, 499 Col. Eileen Collins Blvd., near Hancock Airport. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802. ď Ž Every Friday, 40 Above: Workers in Transition from 9 to 11 a.m. at The Westcott Community Center, 817 Euclid Ave., Syracuse. Helping workers/job seekers aged 40 and above in search for work. Contact John A. Cruty at (315) 569-3964, or at crutij@yahoo.com ď Ž Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 472-3104, ext. 103 or email: bbregman@cnybj.com ď Ž First Friday of each month, Toolkit Day with SCORE by appointment at The Tech Garden. Counselors provide free, confidential, individual business mentoring to prospective or current business owners. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Lynn Hughes at (315) 579-2862 or email Lynn@TheTechGarden.com ď Ž Every second and fourth Friday of each month, The SUN Group (Sustainable Upstate Network) meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Tony’s Family Restaurant, 3004 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. For more information, contact Andy Picco at (315) 657-0135 or email: andrewpicco@gmail.com ď Ž Every week, Syracuse Networking Professionals. Five meetings to choose from. For details, call Kevin M. Crook at (315) 4391803, or email KevinSNP@twcny.rr.com or visit SyracuseNetworkingProfessionals.com ď Ž CNY Connects is a networking organization offering 12 groups from which to choose. If you are interested in learning more, contact Amy Kaschel of AK Consulting at akconsult@twcny. rr.com or call (315) 882-6127 or visit www.cnyconnectsonline.com To have your meetings or events in the Business Calendar, email them to movers@cnybj.com

CDI: Another change CDI underwent in the last year was the closure of its office at Griffiss Institute in Rome Continued from page 7

ago to move to Phoenix, Ariz. So about 10 months ago, Shea added a new partner, Richard Garza. Garza had been with CDI as an associate before becoming a partner in the business, according to Shea.

Another change CDI underwent in the last year was the closure of its office at Griffiss Institute in Rome. That office, which CDI launched at the end of 2010 by staffing it with Syracuse–based employees, closed in December 2011 due in part to a new program at Mohawk Valley Community

College, Shea says. “We were primarily doing training over there,� he says. “Mohawk Valley Community College got a grant to do cyber-security training for free. That kind of knocked us out of there. It’s tough to compete against free.� CDI’s business strategy has not changed,

however. “We’re still teaching security classes,â€? Shea says. “We’re still doing audits and penetration testing for corporations of all kinds.â€? ď ą Contact Seltzer at rseltzer@cnybj.com

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The Central New York Business Journal • 15

December 21/28, 2012

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: new hires & promotions ACCOUNTING Firley, Moran, Freer & Eassa, CPA, P.C. has promoted the following individuals within the firm. Promoted to advanced staff accountants in the audit and accounting department are Christopher M. Battaglia, Br ystal Bunn, Kelly Renee Curtis, Kathryn Hofbauer, Steven P. Kelley, and Brian J. Snepenger. Battaglia is a graduate of SUNY Buffalo, where he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Bunn is a graduate of Wheaton College and pursued further accounting studies at Le Moyne College. Curtis is a graduate of Le Moyne College, where she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Hofbauer is a graduate of SUNY Oswego, where she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Kelley is a graduate of St. John Fisher College and received his master’s degree from SUNY Oswego. Snepenger is a graduate of Nazareth College and received his master’s degree from Syracuse University. Jill Richmond has joined Dannible & McKee, LLP as marketing director. She was previously the assistant director of marketing at Hiscock & Barclay, LLP. She holds a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Oswego and an Richmond associate degree from Onondaga Community College. Richmond is a past honoree in the 40 Under Forty award program put on by BizEventz, Inc., and is also a Leadership Greater Syracuse alumna. The Bonadio Group announced the following additions. Kaitlyn Astafan has been hired as an assistant for the commercial team. She previously worked as an accounting intern with Carthage Area Astafan Hospital. Astafan received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration from SUNY Oswego. Amanda Daum has been hired as an assistant for the health care/tax-exempt central team. She was previously an intern with Daum the firm. Daum holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting and an MBA from Le Moyne College. Kyle Lyskawa has been hired as an assistant for the health care/tax-exempt central team at Bonadio. He received his bachelor’s degree in business economics from SUNY Cortland, and his MBA from SUNY Oswego.

Corporation. Prior to that, he worked at a Syracuse–based ad agency as well as Ogilvy & Mather. Read earned a dual bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology from Hartwick College.

Read

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Brett Smock has joined the Merry-GoRound Playhouse and Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival as general manager and associate artistic director. He is a well-known creative producer, director, and choreographer within the theater industry with a special interest in developing new plays and musicals. Smock is familiar to Central New York audiences and has a lengthy history with the Merry-Go-Round Playhouse as a director and choreographer for more than 32 productions since 1992. During his career, he has directed and/or choreographed more than 80 shows across the country. He has held adjunct-faculty positions at several universities and also served as personal business and creative liaison for a celebrity CEO/private-equity firm in New York City. Smock holds a bachelor’s degree in theater from American University in Washington, D.C.

EDUCATION & TRAINING John Hunter has been named director of financial technology in the Madden School of Business at Le Moyne College. He has more than 13 years experience in the financial services industry, where Hunter he worked for UBS and Morgan Stanley and more than 18 years of international management experience, having served as the senior manager for Carrier in the United Arab Emirates, as an economic-development adviser to the government of Dubai, and as a senior management consultant working with a wide range of internationally based corporations. He served as president of the American Business Council in Dubai and vice-chairman of the Dubai Business Group. Hunter holds a master’s degree in business administration from Thunderbird, the American Graduate School of International Management. ProductivityLeadership Systems has promoted Jennifer Terzini to director of client services. She joined PLS in 2008. Terzini is a certified professional coach by the Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching. Terzini

ADVERTISING AGENCIES

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

Eric Mower + Associates has hired Matt Read as senior marketing services manager. He has more than 12 years marketing experience, on both the client and agency sides. Most recently, he was marketing director at EarQ, PPC, and Marietta

Mayadeh Sousou has joined the team at C.R. Fletcher Associates as an executive recruiter, specializing in the placement of accounting and finance professionals. She has more than four years of hands-on accounting experience at Big 4 accounting firms. Sousou

previously worked as a senior tax associate with KPMG and began her career with PricewaterhouseCoopers as an associate. She is a Syracuse native and received a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Syracuse University.

Sousou

elor’s degree from Saint Bonaventure University and a master’s degree from Rowan University. In addition, he has earned the FINRA series 7, 63 FINRA securities registrations in New York, and his New York State life and health licenses.

Mills

ENGINEERING

LAW

Bergmann Associates announced that John Allen has joined the firm as a mechanicaldesign engineer in its Syracuse office. Before coming to Bergmann, he worked for M/E Engineering Allen in Syracuse as a senior project designer. Beardsley Design Associates Architecture, Engineering & Landscape Architecture, P.C. has named Carmen J. Lapine a principal of the firm. He is a New York State licensed engineer with a degree in civil and environmental engineering from Clarkson University. Lapine has been with Lapine the firm for 20 years. He began as a civil engineer and ascended the ranks serving as discipline head of the civil engineering department, project manager, studio leader of the Syracuse Office, and senior associate of the firm.

Bond Schoeneck & King, PLLC announced that Jeannie M. Larrea-Manzano has joined its e-discovery and information management practice group as support manager. She is a graduate of New York University, College of Arts and Science. The Olinsky Law Group has named Karen S. Southwick a partner. She is the lead attorney for the Federal Court Practice Group and was also selected to serve on the board of trustees Southwick for the Federal Court Bar Association for the Northern District of New York. Before joining Olinsky Law Group, Southwick served as a judicial law clerk to U.S. Magistrate Judge George H. Lowe for the Northern District of New York. She is a graduate of Syracuse University College of Law. Jason C. Halpin has joined Hiscock & Barclay, LLP as an associate in the firm’s Syracuse office. He is a graduate of Brooklyn Law School and Syracuse University and has served on Halpin the Onondaga County Bar Association’s Volunteers Lawyers Project. Before joining the firm, he worked as an associate at Menter, Rudin & Trivelpiece, P.C. and as a law clerk in the Chambers of the Honorable Glenn T. Suddaby, U.S. District Hotchkiss Judge. Hiscock & Barclay has promoted Peter Hotchkiss to director of information technology. He has been with the firm since 1999. Prior to his new role, he served as the firm’s network manager.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Blue Ocean Strategic Capital, LLC has hired Stephen Chow and Jeffrey Moro as members of its finance team. Chow has been named president and has 36 years experience working for Morgan Stanley Chow Smith Barney and its predecessor companies. He most recently held the positions of senior vice president, financial advisor and senior portfolio management director. Chow holds a bachelor’s degree in ecoMoro nomics from Syracuse University. Moro has been named client relations manager. He has recent experience as a registered representative and investment advisor at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from SUNYIT. Donald Mills has joined the Syracuse branch of AXA Advisors, LLC. Prior to joining AXA Advisors, he worked for 20 years in education as a science teacher as well as an administrator. Mills holds a bach-

MANUFACTURING The Eraser Company, Inc. has appointed Rob Mastrangelo to its inside sales team. Most recently, he worked as an inside sales representative for Unishippers in Las Vegas. Mastrangelo Mastrangelo holds a business administration degree from Ithaca College and has more than six years of sales experience. q


16 • The Central New York Business Journal

December 21/28, 2012

LEGACY

Awards Presents

Congratulations to the 2012 Legacy Honorees and Thank You to Our Sponsors!

From left to right: James Gaspo, RBS Citizens; Ray Halbritter, Oneida Nation Enterprises; Joe Mirabito, Mirabito Holdings, Inc.; Jud Gostin, Sensis Corp.; Orrin B. “Mac” MacMurray, C&S Companies; Bill Byrne, Byrne Dairy; and Norm Poltenson, CNY Business Journal.

Bill Byrne of Byrne Dairy, left, and Norm Poltenson of The Business Journal, right.

Jud Gostin of Sensis Corp., left, and Norm Poltenson of The Business Journal, right.

Ray Halbritter of Oneida Nation Enterprises, left, and Norm Poltenson of The Business Journal, right.

Presenting Sponsor: Media Sponsor:

Orrin B. “Mac” MacMurray of C&S Companies, left, and Norm Poltenson of The Business Journal, right.

Joe Mirabito of Mirabito Holdings, Inc., left, and Norm Poltenson of The Business Journal, right.

Produced By:


Central New York Business Journal 12/21/2012