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.@NYSFair attendance finishes above 900,000, but down from last year http://auburnpub. com/blogs/eye_on_ny/new-york-statefair-attendance-finishes-above-but-downfrom/article_2eb2aeee-55bd-11e5-89d4574051026113.html … Robert Harding @RobertHarding

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CNYBJ Briefs

Scalfone and Reed law firms relocate together to Armory Square SYRACUSE — In early July, two local law firms relocated their practices to the Hogan Block Building in Syracuse’s Armory Square. Scalfone Law PLLC and Reed CNY Business Law, P.C. announced in a news release that they “formed a collaborative relationship in a shared office suite with the intention of providing their clients with a broad range of expertise.” The new offices, located at 247 W. Fayette St., Suite 203, were developed with the help of Steve Case, now of Acropolis Development. The release didn’t say where the law firms were previously located. Melody Westfall founded Scalfone Law, which focuses on business development, environmental issues, and real-estate transactions, according to the release. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Syracuse University College of Law, and SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry. She also served in the U.S. Navy. David Reed, of Reed CNY Business Law, is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Syracuse University College of Law. He spent almost 20 years as in-house counsel for Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Bayer Pharmaceuticals, ending as general counsel at Osteotech, Inc. His law practice focuses on

WATERTOWN — Morrison’s Furniture recently leased 16,637 square feet of the retail storefront located at 1068 Arsenal St. in Watertown to open its second Watertown store. Christopher Clark of Cushman Wakefield/Pyramid Brokerage Company brokered this lease transaction, according to a news release from the real-estate firm. Financial terms were not disclosed.

New initiatives to aid Puerto Rico in energy & infrastructure, agriculture, tourism and business & tech development Andrew Cuomo @NYGovCuomo

Tempered expectations should follow freshman quarterback, @dougherty_jesse writes: http://bit.ly/1NYncJC The Daily Orange @dailyorange

Scalfone Law PLLC and Reed CNY Business Law, P.C.’s new home, the Hogan Block Building.

corporate operations, business sales and acquisitions, and international issues, according to the release. “We are extremely pleased to be in Armory Square, which is convenient for our clients, offers easy access to many governmental offices, and is the home of so many of Syracuse’s fine establishments,” Reed said in the release.

Morrison’s Furniture opens second Watertown store NEWS ALERTS

A handful of tweets that came across the @cnybj Twitter feed, discussing various local and regional topics:

Don’t know/no opinion

PHOTO CREDIT: SCALFONELAW.COM

September 28 List: DocumentManagement Companies

It’ll be an economic engine for the area

tweets

Morrison’s Furniture’s other Watertown store is located at 230 Factory St. and encompasses 100,000 square feet and six floors, according to the company’s website. Morrison’s Furniture, which was founded in 1921, sells furniture, mattresses, and accents from brands including Ashley, Benchcraft, Coaster Fine Furniture, Jackson Furniture, Millennium, and Sierra Sleep, according to the site.

VIP Structures to expand warehouse at American Granby CLAY — VIP Structures will begin work this fall on a 42,000-square-foot warehouse expansion at American Granby, Inc. in Clay. Syracuse–based VIP completed the first American Granby project in 2005, it said in a news release issued Sept. 3. The earlier work included the use of expandable end walls in planning for future expansion to the facility. The expansion will house additional product lines to complement its existing products. VIP said it takes on the project in a design-build capacity that includes architecture, engineering, and construction services. The company expects to complete the work next spring. Established in 1962, American Granby is a wholesale distributor of water-system supplies that serves the distribution needs of the wholesale pump and well, pool and spa, turf irrigation, and plumbing and heating markets, according to the firm’s website.


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BY NORMAN POLTENSON npoltenson@cnybj.com DeWITT — Seal & Design, Inc., headquartered in the Buffalo area, has bought the assets of Higbee, Inc., a Syracuse–area manufacturer of gasket and sealing products. The cash deal, which closed on Aug. 31, also includes a consulting contract and non-compete agreement. The parties did not use a broker in the transaction. The new corporate Higbee name is Seal & Design, Higbee Division. “After 40 years in the business, I knew it was time to retire,” Larry Higbee, former president and stockholder of Higbee, Inc., says about the decision to sell. Penman “There was no broker involved. Dean S. Penman [president of Seal & Design] and I talked for about three months before we came to an agreement.

and distribution building in Clarence in Erie County. In 2006, Seal & Design acquired Able O-Rings, a Canadian competitor which operates from a 15,000-square-foot plant in Toronto. The acquisition by Seal & Design of Higbee brings the company’s total employment to more than 150 and combined sales in 2015 are projected to top $50 million. The law firm of Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC and the accounting firm of Dermody, Burke & Brown, CPAs, LLC

PHOTO CREDIT: SEAL & DESIGN, HIGBEE DIVISION

Higbee sells to Buffalo–area firm

Higbee, Inc. headquarters, located in DeWitt. The firm is now a division of Seal & Design, Inc.

— both based in Syracuse — represented Higbee on the deal.

Larry Higbee says he is moving to Jacksonville, Florida. n

I think it’s a perfect fit for Dean, because our product line complements his, and he can offer more products to his existing clients.

I think it’s a perfect fit for Dean, because our product line complements his, and he can offer more products to his existing clients.” Higbee, Inc. was founded in 1932 by Higbee’s father Lyman. The company currently employs 47 people in a nearly 60,000square-foot building at 6741 Thompson Road in DeWitt. Higbee has retained ownership of the building and leased the premises to Seal & Design for three years with a couple five-year options. Higbee, Inc. generates about $10 million in annual revenue. Seal & Design was founded in 1989 by Penman’s father, Dean T. Penman. The company fabricates seals, gaskets, o-rings, and other die-cut products for the medical, automotive, aerospace, communications, electronics, pharmaceutical, and military sectors. Its headquarters is located in a 91,000-square-foot office, manufacturing,

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business Journal news network I september 14, 2015

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Steinberg to step down as SU Maxwell School dean after 2015-16 academic year BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com SYRACUSE — The man who has served as dean of Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs since 2011 is into his final months in that role.

James Steinberg recently announced that he’ll step down from the position following the 2015-16 academic year. Besides his role as dean, Steinberg is also a professor of social science, international affairs, and law at the school, the university said in a Sept. 1 news release.

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“It has been an honor and a privilege to work with so many talented and dedicated people on behalf of this exceptional school. Together we have made great progress, and I look forward to continuing to lend my efforts to the university and the Maxwell School as [a] university professor in 2016,” Steinberg said. During Steinberg’s time at the Maxwell School, it established the Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry. The school also started the Aging Studies Institute (ASI), a collaboration between the Maxwell School and the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. He also launched a collaboration between Maxwell and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, D.C. It provides a location for Maxwell teaching and research in Washington’s policyresearch centers, the school said. As part of its 90th anniversary celebration hosted at CSIS in 2014, the school launched its 10th Decade Initiative, which has secured nearly $1 million in its first year to support interdisciplinary faculty proposals focused on citizenship. In addition, the Maxwell School said it has raised nearly $27 million in charitable support during Steinberg’s four years as

dean, according to the Syracuse release. The support included the Tanner Lecture Series on Ethics, Citizenship and Public Responsibility, which was endowed and launched in 2012. The lecSteinberg ture series brought leaders to campus that included former U.S. Senator Bill Bradley, former New York Lt. Gov. Richard Ravitch, Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chaffee, and Harvard University professor Michael Sandel. Steinberg’s accomplishments also include helping to lead the Maxwell School to the top ranking in the U.S. News & World Report survey in 2012, according to the news release. “Jim has brought even greater recognition and prominence to our distinguished Maxwell School,” Liz Liddy, interim vice chancellor and provost, said. “Through his time here, he has graciously shared his vast knowledge and experience in public affairs and public service with our students and faculty.” Liddy, working with Syracuse Chancellor Kent Syverud, will develop a timetable for the search process to find the next dean of the Maxwell School. n

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New Audi dealership opens in Driver’s Village after $2 million construction project

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CICERO — Two years of planning and construction has culminated in the opening of the new Burdick Audi in Driver’s Village. The $2 million dealership formally opened its doors for new and returning Audi customers on Sept. 3, according to a Burdick news release. Roger Burdick first acquired the Audi franchise in Central New York in 1996, operating at its former site on Route 11 in Cicero. The store moved to Driver’s Village in 2003, sharing service facilities and adjoining showroom space with his Porsche franchise, according to the release. Burdick began planning for a new, standalone Audi

dealership in 2013, a move necessitated by the car brand’s growth locally and nationally. Construction began in late 2014 and the store officially opened Sept. 3. The new Burdick Audi store features triple the showroom space of its previous location. “We are proud to open the doors and welcome our customers to our phenomenal new store,” Roger Burdick, owner, said in the release. “This world class facility, staffed with the incomparable Driver’s Village team, represents our commitment to our Audi customers and the Central New York community.” Burdick is renovating the Porsche dealership as well, with the opening planned for 2016, according to the release. n

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An employee of Norwich Aero works on a sensor component at the Norwich plant. The parent company, Esterline, is closing the plant by the end of the year. Commerce Chenango is seeking a buyer both for the building and for the 120 employees.

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Norwich Aero: déjà vu all over again BY NORMAN POLTENSON npoltenson@cnybj.com NORWICH — “Well Mr. Chamber of Commerce, what are you going to do about that?” In early 2014, a friend put the question to Steve Craig, the Commerce Chenango president and CEO, in response to the sudden announcement by Norwich Aero’s parent company, Esterline Technologies, that it was closing the Norwich plant and moving production to its Tijuana, Mexico facility and some administrative functions to its Buena Park, California location. Local media highlighted the closing with bold headlines declaring that 120 workers would be laid off. “Esterline had told us late in 2013 that the company was reorganizing,” recalls Craig, “but we had no idea that meant … [shuttering] the plant. All we heard was that the Norwich plant was setting records for quality, on-time delivery, and [profit] margins. Despite our best efforts to have Esterline reconsider the decision, it was obvious they felt we couldn’t offer incentives to offset the total labor cost of just $5 an hour paid in Mexico. The role now of Commerce Chenango is to spearhead the effort to find a new operator who will not only utilize the plant but also the workforce.” Craig describes his organization as a combination of a chamber of commerce, an industrial-development authority, and local-development corporation all rolled into one. “This could be a very attractive opportunity for the right company,” says Steven Palmatier, the workforce and industrial liaison who is contracted by the Chenango County planning department and who shares office space at Commerce Chenango. “The building contains 57,000 feet on one level and includes a 6,500-square-foot, highbay area. It comes with industrial electrical service, natural gas, municipal sewer and water, a 25-horse [power] reciprocating compressor, and 24/7 building security and monitoring. The workforce is very skilled in making high-precision sensors for America’s

premier aerospace manufacturers, such as Boeing, G.E. Aircraft Engines, Airbus, and Pratt & Whitney. Norwich Aero is a vertically integrated company that does its own machining, welding, coil winding, encapsulation, harnessing, and cabling. Norwich Aero’s employees are also skilled in a variety of tests and inspections involving shock, humidity, pressure, and temperature. The only thing they don’t do in-house is electroplate coating.”

History

For the residents of Norwich, it’s déjà vu all over again, to quote the illustrious Yogi Berra. In 1983, the community watched Lewis Engineering close down its sensormanufacturing plant and move its operation to Connecticut. A native of the region, William G. Ballard, led a group of private investors to create Norwich Aero Products, Inc. The New York corporation was certified on Sept. 19, 1983, and went into production with six employees by December of that year, in a 5,000-square-foot building at 10 Gladding Lane. Ballard was the company’s president. Minutes of the Common Council meeting from May 8, 1984, indicate unanimous approval of a request for a UDAG (Urban Development Action Grant) loan in the amount of $155,000. The loan supplemented $555,000 the company already had to buy machinery and equipment and to renovate the building. To accommodate its growth, Norwich Aero amended its certificate of incorporation on April 15, 1987, to increase the authorized shares from 100,000 to 5 million. In 1999, Roxboro Group, PLC, headquartered in the U.K., acquired all outstanding shares of the business of Norwich Aero from the group of private investors and management who had founded the company. Norwich Aero was then integrated into Roxboro’s Weston Aerospace operation, which also manufactured high-end sensors. On June 11, 2003, Esterline Technologies (NYSE: ESL) of Bellevue, Washington closed its acquisition of the Weston Group for $88 million. At the time, Esterline emSEE NORWICH AERO, page 10

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BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

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BY NORMAN POLTENSON npoltenson@cnybj.com ENDICOTT — In a 1979 report titled “The Job Generation Process,” David Birch, the president of Cognetics, Inc., a research firm headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, determined that only 3 percent of U.S. companies generated 70 percent of all new jobs. He found that most job generators were small companies (with a revenue base of $100,000 or more) that increased their revenue at least 20 percent compounded annually for four or more years. Birch called them “gazelles.” He went on to identify other companies as “elephants” and “mice”— Fortune 500 companies and mom-and-pop shops — which generated very few new jobs. ICS Solutions Group (ICS), which fits Birch’s description of a gazelle to a “tee,” also identifies its business in terms of animals: turtles, monkeys, lions, and camels. “I attribute a lot of our rapid growth to Dr. Larry Little,” says Kevin Blake, president of ICS. “He coached us based on his book, “Make a Difference,” which explains the power of relationships and how to understand your own personality as well as the personalities of the people you lead. Dr. Little challenged us to strategically perform at a high level in order to make a difference … The four animals represent four different personality

characteristics. All the employees here have a stuffed animal at their desks to identify themselves so we can communicate effectively.” ICS must be communicating well. Since Blake and his partner Travis Hayes bought the company in 2005, employment has grown from four to 62 people (48 in Endicott, 14 in Syracuse). The company, which currently occupies 7,000 square feet in its Endicott headquarters and another 4,500 square feet in the Syracuse location, is focused on opening a third office in Elmira by the first quarter of 2016. The company is exploring buying an existing business with similar products/ services and corporate philosophy, as well as the alternative of creating the new office de novo. Blake is also looking to buy or lease between 10,000 and 15,000 square feet in Endicott to provide adequate space for the company’s explosive growth. His goal is to occupy the new space by year-end. CNYBJ estimates that ICS will generate revenue of $8.5 million this year, based on 20 percent growth in Endicott and 25 percent to 28 percent growth in Syracuse. All of the revenue growth in the past five years has been organic. Blake and Hayes are the sole stockholders in the operating company and are shareholders in several other ventures.

NORMAN POLTENSON/BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

ICS Solutions Group runs like a gazelle

ICS Solutions Group president Kevin Blake oversees business development and management at the Endicott–based company.

Change in strategy

“When Travis and I bought the business, we inherited a reactive business model,” recalls Blake. “A customer’s hardware broke, and we fixed it. We changed the model to be proactive and set up a maintenancemonitoring program that would minimize a customer’s downtime. Today, ICS does a lot more than repair hardware. [Our menu of services includes] … IT-managed services, telephony, cyber-security, project design and implementation, business continuity and disaster recovery, helpdesk services, virtualization, and IP security cameras and access control. Our sweet spot is small- and mid-sized businesses with 20-100 employ-

ees on the company network. We serve a number of markets, including health care, dental, insurance, accounting, professional services, auto dealerships, manufacturing, convenience stores, financial, legal, and nonprofit. “The company’s geographical reach has also expanded. A decade ago we focused on the … [Triple Cities]; today, ICS services 19 counties of Upstate and three across the border in Pennsylvania.” In an Aug. 10 research list in CNYBJ, entitled “Computer/ IT Consultants” in Central New York, ICS Solutions Group was listed as the largest. SEE ICS, PAGE 8

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2015 I BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

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BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

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Alzheimer’s Association CNY Chapter names board members, officers BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com SYRACUSE — The Alzheimer’s Association, Central New York Chapter announced it has recently appointed two new members to its board of directors and elected its board officers for the 2015-16 fiscal year. The new board members are Kenneth B.

Jardin, VP and retail regional manager at M&T Bank, and Mary Koenig, administrator of Loretto’s Heritage Apartments. Officers for the new fiscal year are: • President: Robin Bennett, director of clinical services at Loretto Home Care • Vice president: Cynthia Nigolian, clinical manager of care coordination services for Accountable Care Coalition of Syracuse • Treasurer: Karl Jacob, partner at

Dannible & McKee, LLP • Secretary: Christina Hasemann, president of NY-Penn Nutrition Services • Member-at-large: Michele Gagne, certified six sigma consultant, command center team at UnitedHealth Group • Member-at-large: Thomas J. Grooms, retired attorney from Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC • Ex officio member: Keith B. Rung,

partner at Evans & Bennett, LLP. Board members serve two-year terms that may be renewed up to three times. Officers serve yearly terms on the board.

ICS: The firm is well positioned to keep running like a gazelle The ranking was determined by the number of IT consultants on staff. How does ICS sustain its rapid growth? “There are four things that make us successful,” Blake says. “First, we are customer-oriented. That means we listen to our customers, and we respond quickly. We also anticipate their needs and offer a one-stop shop to solve their problems. For many companies which don’t have technologists on staff, we act as the chief technology officer. The customer, then, can rely on our company to assume the responsibility to keep the network and IT systems running. “Second, Travis and I spend a lot of time working with our employees and motivating them to make a difference,” continues the company president. “We stress Dr. Little’s model of not only communicating internally with staff but also communicating with our customers. Many who are very skilled technicians are not comfortable communicating with the customers. Finding qualified tech-

nicians who can also communicate is the biggest challenge in sustaining our growth. Finding the best talent and ensuring a low turnover rate through job satisfaction requires a full-court press.” The third key to success involved ICS joining a group called HTG (Heartland Technology Group). “We joined HTG because it was comprised of a national peer group of similar size technology-support companies. The group of 12 businesses meets quarterly to share best business practices, solve common problems, and anticipate customer needs. It’s like having a board of directors. HTG has helped us capitalize on successful strategies and avoid costly mistakes. “Fourth, everyone has bought into the corporate culture,” observes Blake. “There are three principles we subscribe to: family, integrity, and loyalty. These aren’t principles made up by management: the entire staff considered a variety of options and collectively chose these three. The key is

Continued from page 6

to live the values.”

The partners

Blake and Hayes divide their functions at ICS. The former focuses on business development and management while the latter focuses on the technology side. To keep up with the rapid company growth, ICS hired Joseph Williamson in December 2014 to manage the Syracuse office. Also in 2014, ICS hired Robert LaFave as the COO, allowing Hayes to devote full time to overseeing the technology. ICS also depends on key professional advisers to support the company: M&T Bank for financial services, Salvatore R. Peretore, CPA (Endicott) as the company’s accounting firm, and John G. Dowd (Binghamton) for legal matters. Blake, 42, is a 1992 Maine-Endwell High School graduate who started working at ComputerLand in Binghamton in 1990. He graduated SUNY Oswego in 1996 with a degree in business and joined ICS two days after graduation. Hayes, 41, graduated from

Alexandria Central High School in Jefferson County. He met Blake at SUNY Oswego where the two were classmates. Hayes majored in political science and history. After graduation, Hayes worked at Eastman Kodak in Rochester before joining ICS in 1999. ICS is well positioned to continue running like a gazelle: The markets it serves are all projected to enjoy substantial, longterm growth. The International Association of Managed Service Providers reported on April 1 that the North American market generated $154 billion in revenue in 2014. According to a 2015 report by Deloitte & Touche, the traditional telecommunications sector is rapidly becoming more of an “interconnected ecosystem.” This offers new opportunities as well as an increasing demand for cyber-security and privacy solutions. Transparency Market Research reports that the video-surveillance market in the U.S. alone will grow at a 32 percent rate between now and 2020, when it will top $16 billion. n

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Binghamton seeks state funding for Hawley Street development project BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com BINGHAMTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The City of Binghamton is seeking state-grant funding for a mixeduse development project at 7 Hawley St., in a parking lot that the Binghamton Urban Renewal Agency (BURA) owns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before demolishing the Collier St. parking garage, the city should have a new parking facility in place or close to completion to offset the parking shortage resulting from the garage coming offline,â&#x20AC;? Binghamton Mayor Richard David said in a news release his office issued on Sept. 3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is essentially the first phase in the larger Collier Street Commons development. Once a new mixed-use facility is in place and our comprehensive parking study is complete, we can refine the overall plan for Collier Street Commons including size, scope, parking capabilities and cost, as it is one of the most strategic sites in downtown Binghamton.â&#x20AC;? BURA in July issued a request for proposals (RFP) for a public-private, mixed-use development project for the BURA-owned parcel at the intersection of Hawley and Washington streets, Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office said. BURA currently leases the parcel to Hartford, Connecticutâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;based LAZ Parking, which operates a surface parking lot, according to the news release. The general concept was to provide a combination of parking, commercial space, and market-rate housing. Vestalâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;based Newman Development Group, LLC was the only respondent to the RFP, Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office said. The firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design concepts included 8,500 to 13,000 square feet of ground floor commercial space on Washington Street and 310 to 362 parking spots. Designs called for residential space either above the parking and commercial space, or in a separate attached tower. During its July 22 meeting, BURA selected Newman Development Group as the preferred developer. It also approved a resolution in support of an application seeking regional economic-development council (REDC) funding of $3.6 million. The Southern Tier REDC recently named the 7 Hawley St. development to its list of priority projects but did not publi-

cally disclose the amount of recommended funding, according to the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s news release. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing concerns regarding the condition of the Collier Street garage made it important to consider all options to address parking and economic develop-

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ties.â&#x20AC;? Once completed, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing downtown-parking study will help â&#x20AC;&#x153;guideâ&#x20AC;? strategies for future redevelopment of the Collier Street parking-garage parcel and other downtown parking locations, he added. n

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BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

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NORWICH AERO: Craig and Palmatier are actively marketing the package ployed 5,000 people and generated $600 million in annual revenue.

Marketing the facility

“There are a number of incentives available to assist a potential buyer,” notes Craig. “The Industrial Development Agency is empowered to confer property-tax relief, mortgage-recording-tax abatement, state and local sales-tax abatement, and bond financing. In addition, the Empire State Development Corp. offers grants up to 20 percent of the cost of capital investments in the project. [The frosting on the cake, of course] … is the combination of not just the plant but also a very skilled workforce. That’s quite a package.” Craig and Palmatier are actively marketing the package. “From May 12 to 14, we promoted Norwich Aero at the Eastec exposition in W. Springfield, Massachusetts,” explains Palmatier. “With somewhere between 500 and 1,000 exhibitors, this is New England’s premier manufacturing trade show. I would guess that we spoke to 1,500 people about Norwich Aero at this show. In June, we traveled to the Javits Center in New York City for the Atlantic Design & Manufacturing show. Both events gave us an opportunity to reach out to hundreds of manufacturers in a very short time. Our marketing plan [to date] also includes e-mailing more than 1,000 prospects in the Northeast, our website presence at www.50oharadrive.com, and collaborat-

In the 12 years since Esterline bought Norwich Aero, the parent company has grown from $600 million in revenue and 5,000 employees to approximately $2 billion and 13,000 employees. ing with CBRE (a Fortune 500 real-estate company). Future efforts include targeted Internet marketing, print, and cold calls in the Binghamton, Syracuse, Cortland, Utica, and Oneonta areas. We are also talking with three start-up companies as an option if we can’t find a single buyer.” Craig and Palmatier have been working closely with Esterline on the impending transition. “[The Bellevue Corporation] … underwrote the local effort to attend Eastec,” avers Palmatier. “Now we are waiting for a valuation on the property,” adds Craig. “There is also a serious flooding situation on the property, which has to be remediated. With Esterline planning

Continued from page 5

on leaving the building by the end of December, there are ongoing negotiations to deal with a number of questions.” In the 12 years since Esterline bought Norwich Aero, the parent company has grown from $600 million in revenue and 5,000 employees to approximately $2 billion and 13,000 employees. The growth has come largely through acquiring a dozen companies. Today, 50 percent of Esterline’s business comes from commercial aerospace, 30 percent from defense, and 20 percent from non-aero applications. The company holds the number-one or number-two position in each of its market niches. The company’s sensor division also has facilities in California, Tijuana, France, the U.K., and Singapore. In the event the effort to find a buyer for Norwich Aero is unsuccessful before the plant closes, the employees are eligible for a number of benefits. “While the U.S. Department of Labor is awaiting information from Esterline, the current employees will probably be eligible under the federal Trade Adjustment Assistance program for free job training up to and including the associate degree level,” asserts Craig. “At the state level, a department of Labor Rapid Response Team is already assisting employees who are eligible with the full range of services provided by the CDO Workforce office, including counseling, skills-assessment, and the development of individual employment plans. (CDO is a consortium of state and local agencies serv-

ing Chenango, Delaware, and Otsego counties.) Of course, the employees are eligible for unemployment-insurance payments.”

Background

Craig grew up in Jamestown and attended Harpur College (now Binghamton University). He spent 35 years as a broadcast journalist in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Florida before joining Commerce Chenango four years ago. Craig also serves as the county’s designee to the Southern Tier Regional Economic Development Council and sits on the board of the Southern Tier Region Economic Development Corp. Palmatier was born in Binghamton and graduated high school in 1974. He attended Verrazano College and subsequently owned and operated Gilbert Machine and Tool from 1975-2006, an aerospace machining, fabrication, and assembly shop. Gilbert, which was located in Greene, employed 50. Palmatier also has expertise in natural-gas development with a focus on best-practices for the industry and for localities. Commerce Chenango is optimistic that déjà vu will turn out as well in 2015 as it did in 1983. Craig and Palmatier are relying on two other Yogi aphorisms: “If you don’t know where you’re going, you may not get there;” and “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” Both have a map of where they are going, and when they come to a fork in the road, they will be sure to take the right one. n

2015 Honorees: Clarence L. Jordan - Director of Development, Mercy Works Former Executive Director, Rescue Mission Melanie Littlejohn - Vice President, Business Services, National Grid

Tuesday, October 6, 2015 Noon - 1:30 p.m. The Oncenter - Nicholas J. Pirro Convention Center

All proceeds benefit The Salvation Army of the Syracuse Area Changing lives in our community since 1883

thanks to our sponsors

Alpha Printing • C&S Companies • CNY Business Journal Century Heating and Air Conditioning • Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Galaxy Communications • Integrated Marketing Services J.W. Burns & Company • Lockheed Martin • M&T Bank Morse Manufacturing Company, Inc. • National Grid • Patricia Electric, Inc. P. Drescher Co., Inc. • RealtyUSA • SUNY Upstate Medical University The Eraser Company, Inc. • The Hayner Hoyt Corporation V.I.P. Structures, Inc. • Visual Technologies • Wegmans • Welch Allyn

Special Guest Speaker: Coach Mike Hopkins Tickets and Information (315) 434-1370 or sasyr.org


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Three ways to be more likable than your competitors

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â&#x20AC;&#x201A; etâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assume you have a great product â&#x20AC;&#x201A; or service. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suppose you have â&#x20AC;&#x201A; a price that fits your market. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assume you solve a major problem for people. Sounds like a great group of ingredients for a successful business, right? Not necessarily. If there are others that do something similar to you, you have to learn how to stand out. There is a gamechanging way to separate yourself from your competitors, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to leverage the power of likability. The more likable your brand and your team is, the more people will be drawn to you. Viewpoint However, be forewarned â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as Scott Deming, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Powered by Purpose,â&#x20AC;? told me during an interview, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likability without substance, value, and relevance is simply not enough.â&#x20AC;? If all you are is likable, but you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deliver on your promise, you will fail. But if you have a good product or service and good values, likability will be the key to creating an impenetrable moat around your business. Jason Dorsey, chief strategy officer at the Center for Generational Kinetics, a Millennial research firm, is an expert on emerging trends and talked to me about the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s findings. He said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likability has never been more important due to the transparency of information in each experience. This ranges from employment rating services like glassdoor.com to customer experiences like yelp. com, and social media. Every interaction is magnified in a good way or bad way due to technology; likability is the one thread that cuts across all experiences.â&#x20AC;? Likability is a surefire way to build relationships with people. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tool, in the same way having a good product, trustworthy sales experience, and genuinely caring are tools. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, likability isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t something that some people are born with and others are not. There is a process to it that any professional or business can start implementing. Here are three tips for how to increase the likability of your business, your brand, and your people: 1. Be hyper-responsive. Make it a goal to get back to clients or prospects quickly. Get back as fast as you possibly can, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I received your message and will get back to you soon.â&#x20AC;? You know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done this right when your clients/prospects say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wow! Thanks for getting back to me so quickly.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost ridiculous that people in the sales or client-service industry donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the importance of this. Make people feel special. Show them you care. If you are not just responsive but hyper-responsive, you will win business. 2. Use small talk as a way to gain crucial information. Most people engage in small talk as simply a pleasantry or a way to pass time as they transition into or out of a conversation. Instead, use small talk as a secret tool. Find out if your clients/prospects like a particular sports team, or if their child is in the school play. Most people hear this information, but then completely forget about it. Instead, you should remember a detail about the person and then put it into a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Warm and Fuzzy Fileâ&#x20AC;? on the person in your CRM system. Then when you speak to the person next, you can bring up his/her file and ask how little Suzie did in her big performance. It adds a human touch to your conversations with people. It shows you care. There is an old Chinese proverb that

Arel moodie

says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The faintest ink is more powerful than the strongest memory.â&#x20AC;? There is a reason to write things down. You do it for important things in your life in your calendar; do it for important people in your business life. 3. Do something they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect.  Go ahead â&#x20AC;&#x201D; give them a discount they qualify for but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about. Throw in something for free. Add some extra time to their warranty. Blow their mind with something special. The sky is the limit. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be something that costs you money. Maybe you send them an article that could help them in an area that you remembered was a problem of theirs. It shows you are different. Most people only

care about clients/prospects as a source of money â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see them as humans with feelings and emotions. Doing something clients or prospects donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect shows that you care and have their best interests in mind. As a bonus strategy, treat a prospect that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to do business with you currently with the same respect as someone who is a client. Often, business professionals will totally be turned off by a prospect once they have been disqualified. But even though prospects may not be a good fit now, they may be a good fit later. And if they had a great experience with you, you could be planning for tomorrow, today. Likability is a way for you to excel over

your competitors and offer a one-of-a-kind experience for the people who do business with you. In todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world, it pays to be likable, but this means nothing if you genuinely donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care. As Jason Dorsey points out, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you are likable, people will know. When you are not, even more people will know.â&#x20AC;? n

Gala Syracuse

Arel Moodie is an entrepreneur, author, and speaker on likability and leadership. He is founder of the Art of Likability, which provides research on leveraging likability for business success. Moodie grew up in Brooklyn and graduated from Binghamton University. Contact him at www.artoflikability.com, info@ artoflikability.com, or (800) 617-9648.

City-Wide High School reunion

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Only $75!

Sit down dinner, live music, giveaways, networking, dancing & more!

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Connecting current and past graduates of the syracuse city school district to actively support likeminded agencies and organizations, dedicated to nurturing the success of our precious resources, our youth.

This historical event is open to the public and all who attended Syracuse City Schools! For more information, call (315) 579-3918 or email jclance@bizeventz.com

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OPINION

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Business Journal

News Network SEPTEMBER 14, 2015 VOL. XXVIIII, NO. 37

NEWS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com STAFF WRITERS Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com Nick Kapteyn nkapteyn@cnybj.com Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com RESEARCH DIRECTOR Vance Marriner vmarriner@cnybj.com COLUMNISTS Will Barclay Arel Moodie Tom Morgan

SALES Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Dony Kuriakose dkuriakose@cnybj.com MARKETING BBB Marketing Inc.

CIRCULATION Circulation Management (315) 579-3927

ADMINISTRATIVE PUBLISHER Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com PUBLISHER EMERITUS Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com BUSINESS MANAGER Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

The Dangers of Runaway Executive Power R

egarding President Obama’s recent decision to rename Mount McKinley as Denali, the men who wrote the Constitution would toss in the towel. “There he goes again. We tried to stop him,” they would tell us. They knew power corrupts. They knew people who have power want more. They knew that government by the people would need a constitution that limited power. Limited it and Money Talk dispersed it — so that it was shared among the courts, Congress, and the president. They knew a president would come along who would want to skirt laws, ignore laws, and even break them. Many presidents have. This one in particular. So, he changed the name of North America’s tallest mountain to Denali (the traditional name given it by Alaska Natives). That’s a molehill of a thing. Big Apple bureaucrats renamed Sixth Avenue to the Avenue of the Americas. Nobody calls it that. But here is the problem. The president has ignored many of our immigration laws. Refused to enforce them. This affects all of us. His Justice Department refuses to move against so-called sanctuary cities for breaking our laws by not prosecuting illegal immigrants. It also has refused to enforce any number of other laws.

TOM MORGAN

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The president has told agencies to ignore various parts of the Obamacare statutes — because they were inconvenient. He has his agencies working overtime to usurp powers granted to Congress. Congress guys have no backbone. He spits in their faces. They come up smiling. This has become a trend. Our bureaucracies pour forth more regulations and more rules. Many thousands more every year. These choke parts of our way of life. More and more, they dictate what we can and cannot do. Every decree saps our freedom in some way. Every diktat shifts freedom that was yours to the government. Congress, meanwhile, passes fewer and fewer statutes. And, so we are governed more and more by bureaucrats and their red tape. And, less and less by Congress and its laws. There are problems with this scenario. One is that you can raise a racket with your Congressional representative. You can join others to vote against him or her. Or threaten to do so. What can you do when bureaucrats ruin your business? Sweet little. These days, bureaucrats have more power than legislators. And bureaucrats are controlled by the president. The president installs his political henchmen at the head of the federal agencies. He tells them what he wants them to do. We are following the path taken in Europe. The bureaucrats of the European Union (EU) have seized powers that belonged to local governments. And, powers that belonged to the various countries. They reign supreme over more of people’s

lives than our own bureaucrats do. And like here, nobody votes them in. And, nobody can vote them out. The United Kingdom (UK) will have a vote on EU membership within the next couple of years. It is possible the Brits will vote themselves out. If they do, a major reason will be what I have just described. Many of them feel the EU has taken power away from them. Not elected EU representatives. They have little power. Instead, the faceless EU bureaucrats have the powers that once belonged to the people of the UK. This is not a healthy trend we are copying. It shrinks the representative part of representative government. It cedes more and more power to the bureaucrats. And to the president who directs them. Our Founding Fathers worried about this very thing. They knew that people who gain power rarely want to share it. They rarely want to share it with people they represent — or with other branches of the government. The Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution in a way to spread the power. Many presidents have tested this principle. Many have trod on it. Some have totally trampled it. This president has done all three. And, danced on it to boot. Let’s call it the Denali Stomp. From Tom...as in Morgan. n Tom Morgan writes about political, financial, and other subjects from his home near Oneonta, in addition to his radio shows. Contact him at tomasinmorgan@yahoo.com

Synthetic Drugs Continue to Plague New York State

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ver the past three months, The New York Times has covered stories on the local impact of synthetic-drug use. In July, they published a story on the syntheticdrug problem that has been growing in the Syracuse region. On Sept. 2, they reported on the dramatic spike in the use of K2, synthetic marijuana, in Harlem and in other parts of New York City. The most-recent Opinion article noted that one particular city block in Harlem “appears at times to be a street of zombies.” K2, which is banned by the New York State Department of Health, is one of several synthetic drugs that are plaguing New York City, Central New York, and other parts of the state. Because the Department of Health’s ban does not go far enough to penalize selling synthetic drugs, it has left local communities grappling with increased

WILL BARCLAY

THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL (ISSN #1050-3005) is published every week by CNY Business Review, Inc. All contents copyrighted 2015. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher.

BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

synthetic-drug use and health and safety issues. I have long advocated for criminalizing the sale of synthetic drugs and have introduced legislation to that effect. Outlawing synthetic drugs has been a challenge because New York and the federal government outlaw drugs based on their chemical compounds. Because they are synthetics, manufacturers have been able to slightly change their chemical composition, so that they are no longer on the state’s controlled-substance list, and therefore, no longer illegal. In addition, synthetic drugs are often mislabeled and sold as products other than drugs (i.e., bath salts, shoe deodorant, and incense). However, the seller and the purchaser realize that the intended use of the synthetic drug is to provide a high for the user. My legislation addresses mislabeling, chemical swapping, and creates penalties for possessing and selling a synthetic-drug equivalent to the “street drug” counterpart. The bill contains two key provisions: (1) broader power is given to the Commissioner of Health to add synthetic drugs and their chemical compounds to the controlled-sub-

stance list, rather than having the state legislature act to add to the controlled-substance list; and (2) stores will be penalized for selling mislabeled products when they are clearly intended to be used as drugs. State Senator Patty Ritchie is the prime sponsor of this legislation in the State Senate. For reasons unknown, Assembly Democrats in the New York Assembly have continually blocked my legislation from getting to the floor of the Assembly for a vote. It is time for the Assembly Democrats to recognize the dangers of synthetic drugs and take action. They need to stop blocking legislation that will not only protect the citizens of the New York City area, but also all citizens of New York state from the evils of these drugs. n William (Will) A. Barclay is the Republican representative of the 120th New York Assembly District, which encompasses most of Oswego County, including the cities of Oswego and Fulton, as well as the town of Lysander in Onondaga County and town of Ellisburg in Jefferson County. Contact him at barclaw@ assembly.state.ny.us, or (315) 598-5185.


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Business Calendar SEPTEMBER 15, 17, 22, 23, & 24 n Checklist for Business — 20-Hour Course or Six Individual Seminars from 6 to 9 p.m. at SUNY Polytechnic Institute (Formerly SUNYIT), 100 Seymour Road, Utica, Kunsela Hall – Room A-225. The cost is $25 per course or $125 for the full series. The series is open to the public. Pre-registration is required. Call the Small Business Development Center at (315) 792-7547, or email: palazzp@sunyit.edu to register and to obtain details and up-todate information. september 16 n Greater Utica Chamber’s 2015 Community Business Expo at the Utica Memorial Auditorium, 400 Oriskany St., Utica. For more information about the 2015 Expo, please contact Kessler Promotions at debbie@kesslerpromotions.com or (315) 794-0695. n Employee Learning Week Information/Planning Session from 8:15 to 9:30 a.m. at AAA of Western & Central New York, 7485 Henry Clay Blvd., Liverpool. Presented by CNY ATD. For more information, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org september 18 n 7 Habits of 7 Highly Successful People from 7:30 to 10 a.m. at Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Hear from seven of the region’s most influential executives and community leaders who will share seven lessons that they have learned and used throughout their careers. The cost is $25 for CenterState CEO members and $35 for nonmembers. Visit CenterStateCEO.com for more information and registration information. september 22 n The Economic Impact of SmallBusiness Expansion power lunch from noon to 2 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Syracuse-Liverpool on Electronics Parkway. Congressman John Katko will discuss the impact of small business on the local, state, and national economy and what needs to be done to encourage expansion and growth of America’s small businesses. He will be joined by joined by Bernard Paprocki, SBA Syracuse District director, and Gregg Kidd, founder of Pinnacle Investments. The cost is $30 per person. To register, call (315) 4719393, ext. 245 or register on the SCORE website: Syracuse.score.org. Registration is required. september 24 n 1st annual Successful Business Women Awards from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Oncenter, Syracuse. Join the Business Journal News Network & presenting sponsor, Her HeartBeat. Visit www.BizEventz. com for more details and updates. n CNY ATD Orientation from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at CXtec, 5404 South Bay Road, North Syracuse. Learn about CNY ATD, the local affiliate chapter of Association for Talent Development (ATD), and how to make the most of a membership in CNY ATD. No cost to attend. To register, visit www.cnyastd. org. Contact CNY ATD at (315) 546-2783 or info@cnyastd.org for more information. n Speed Networking event from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. at TERACAI Corporation, 217 Lawrence Road E., North Syracuse. Presented by CenterState CEO, the cost for member tickets is $10; nonmember tickets, $25. Please pre-register by visiting www.CenterStateCEO.com

n Women’s Fund of Central New York Fall Luncheon Event, “Ingredients for Impact” at 11:30 a.m. at the Bellevue Country Club. Sheila G. Mains, creator of Sheila G’s Brownie Brittle, will give the presentation. Tickets are available for $55, and patron tickets are available for $75, which includes entry into a one-hour roundtable with Mains prior to the event. For more information or to buy tickets, visit http://bit.ly/ingredientsforimpact september 25 n Jefferson Leadership Institute Class of 2016 Kick-Off Dinner at Riveredge Resort Hotel, 17 Holland St., Alexandria Bay, from 6-9 p.m. Guest speaker is Tracy Leonard, deputy director, Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization. Admission fee is $50 per person, or $30 for Jefferson Leadership Institute alumni. For more information, contact Alekzandra Huttemann-Kall at events@watertownny. com september 29 n Learning Roadshow from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Raymond Corporation, 22 S. Canal St., Greene. Presented by CNY ATD, the program visits local organizations for a sharing of learning and development ideas. The cost for from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Raymond Corporation, 22 S. Canal St., Greene. Presented by CNY ATD members is $25; nonmembers pay $40. Register at www.cnyastd.org. For more information, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd. org september 30 n Syracuse Tomorrow Fall Candidate Reception from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Meet the area political candidates one-on-one at this annual event. The cost is $25 for CenterStateCEO members; $40 for nonmembers. For more information, contact Deb Warner at (315) 470-1845, or email: dwarner@centerstateceo.com October 1 n Leadership programs in product development and operations Webinar from Noon to 1 p.m. The webinar is for engineers, scientists, technical managers, and other professionals moving into mid- and senior-level management positions. Participants will learn about part-time graduate degree programs and professional certificates offered through RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering. All programs are fully online and students can enroll in one or two courses each semester to customize their pace of learning. Speakers: Mark Smith, director of multidisciplinary programs at RIT. No charge. To register, visit: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/ register/9143390630823360769 n 7th Annual Inspiring Success: The Women TIES Retreat at The Lodge at Welch Allyn, Skaneateles. For more information, visit www.WomenTIES.com n Business After Hours and Member Showcase from 5 to 7 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Business Class, 3179 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. The cost to attend is $15 for CenterStateCEO members, $25 for nonmembers. For more information, contact Lisa Metot at (315) 470-1870 or email: lmetot@centerstateceo.com October 2 n CNY ATD Breakfast Club from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Gem Diner, 832 Spencer St.,

cnybj.com

Syracuse. The topic will be international/ global training. For more information and details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@ cnyastd.org October 7 n Sunrise Breakfast & Awards from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Embassy Suites, Syracuse. The cost is $30. To learn more, visit bizeventz.com or contact Joyl Clance at (315) 579-3917 or jclance@bizeventz.com October 8 n Annual Tioga County Chamber Business Show — “History in the Making” at the Owego Treadway Inn and Conference Center. Tap into the Southern Tier marketplace and gain visibility at the region’s premier business-to-business trade show. Meet hundreds of decisionmakers from throughout the region. For more information, contact the Tioga County Chamber at (607) 687-2020, or visit: http://www.tiogachamber.com/ Chamber-Events/ October 9 n Upstate Venture Ecosystem Awards from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Turning Stone Resort in Verona. UVC & UVANY are hosting the first-annual Upstate Venture Ecosystem Awards. Entrepreneurial leaders will be recognized and celebrated for their achievements in five categories: Community Catalyst, Campus Connector, Magical Mentor, Deal of the Year, and Ecosystem Champion. For more information, visit: http://uvc.org/upstate-venture-ecosystemawards/ October 14 n 2015 B2B Marketplace from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Oncenter in Syracuse. Exhibitor registration is now open. For more information, visit www. CenterStateB2BMarketplace.com n 2015 Economic Champions Luncheon from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Oncenter in Syracuse. Each year, CenterState CEO recognizes local businesses as Economic Champions for their contributions to the economic growth of the CenterState New York region through capital expenditures, the hiring of new employees, expansion or relocation due to growth, and for state or national recognition. If you would like to nominate someone, download the nomination form from www.CenterStateCEO. com and return it to: kdejoseph@centerstateceo.com; or mail it to CenterState CEO, Attn: Karen Dejoseph, 115 W. Fayette St., Syracuse, NY 13202, by Sept. 25. The cost for CenterState CEO members is $55; nonmembers pay $65. Visit www.centerstateceo.com for details. n PLS SheFORWARD Event from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Ophelia’s Place/Café 407 in the village of Liverpool. This event focuses on women and leadership. The guest speaker is Mary Ellen Clausen, founding director, Ophelia’s Place/Cafe 407. No cost to attend. Register on or before Sept. 30 at www. DiscoverPLS.com/calendar October 15 n 9th Annual Syracuse Construction Career Day from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the New York State Fairgrounds. This event provides area high-school students, grades 9-12, the opportunity to discuss and explore the many types of careers in construction available to them. More than 35 organizations, colleges, and union trades participate in this annual event. Please contact Melissa Gould at mgould@ syrabex.com for more information.

n Pitch the Impact program from 8 to 10 a.m. at The Palace Theatre, 2384 James St., Syracuse. Presented by CNY ATD, the discussion will focus on showing the impact of employee learning to management and employees. The cost for CNY ATD members is $20; nonmembers pay $30. To register, visit www.cnyastd.org. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org October 17 n Syracuse City-Wide High School Reunion Gala from 7-11 p.m. at the Oncenter in Syracuse. This event connects current and past graduates of the Syracuse City School District to support agencies and organizations that are nurturing the success of our youth. Sitdown dinner, live music, networking, dancing, and more. The cost is $75. For full event details and to register for the gala, visit www.bizeventz.com or contact Joyl Clance at (315) 579-3917 or email: jclance@bizeventz.com October 22 n Excellence in Health Care Awards from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Lodge at Welch Allyn. For category descriptions and other event information, visit bizeventz.com or email jclance@bizeventz. com n Good Morning Downtown Syracuse Progress Breakfast from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at SKY Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. Join CenterState CEO to celebrate the forward thinking that is recharging the landscape of downtown Syracuse. The cost to attend is $25. Visit www.CenterStateCEO. com to register. October 28 n The Art of Likeability - Presented by Arel Moodie from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Arel Moodie founded the College Success Program and wrote an Amazon bestselling self-help book. He gave TED talks on the topics of likeability and innovation and hosts the podcast The Art of Likability for Forbes and The Huffington Post. Learn ready-to-implement marketing and sales strategies. The cost is $10 for CenterStateCEO members, and $20 for nonmembers. Visit www.CenterStateCEO. com for details and to register. October 30 n 7th Annual You Can’t Fail Conference from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel near Carrier Circle in DeWitt. The theme is “Celebrating the Unexpected Leader: Skills to Help You Excel in Leadership.” Presented by Gwen Inc., the event provides professional women of color with skills to help them excel in leadership. It offers workshops, educational presentations, inspiring words from regional women, vendors, and live musical performances. The cost is $75. To register, visit www.eventbrite. com/e/you-cant-fail-conference-tickets18117420693 December 3 n Healthy Workplace Summit & Awards from 7:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. at SRC Arena on the OCC campus. This 5th annual event celebrates organizations putting into practice the culture and programs that create a thriving, healthy workplace. Keynote speaker is Dr. Jon Robison, certified intrinsic coach. Topic is “Beyond Wellness: Creating a Thriving Workplace Culture.” For full event details and to register, visit www.bizeventz.com or contact Joyl Clance at (315) 579-3917 or email: jclance@bi-

zeventz.com ONGOING EVENTS n Every Tuesday, Cayuga Toastmasters Club from 6 to 7 p.m., at Cornell University, Ithaca, Rhodes Hall, Hoy Road, 6th Floor Conference Room #655. Free parking is available on the first floor of the parking garage across the street from Rhodes Hall. For more information, visit the website at 4998.toastmastersclubs.org and select “Contact Us,” or email Jeff at jefurst52@ gmail.com n Every Tuesday, Gung Ho Referral Group from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday Restaurant, 3220 Erie Blvd., DeWitt. The cost is $10 and includes lunch. For more information, contact Paul Ellis (315) 475-0392 or email: Paul.Ellis@ ComfortSystemsUSA.com or go to www. GungHoReferrals.com n Every Tuesday, Referral Group from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 201 Lawrence Road, North Syracuse. Looking to expand your network and increase referral business? For more information, call Matthew Hunt at (315)416-8881, or email: mhunt@smile-therapy.com n Every Tuesday, Syracuse Business Connections from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at North Central Assembly Church, 7463 Buckley Rd., N. Syracuse, NY. The group meets to network and exchange referrals. For more information, email: Deb Angarano at dangarano@tsys.com n Every Tuesday, Syracuse Executives Association luncheon meeting, beginning at 11:45 a.m. at Bella Domani Banquet Facility, 5988 East Taft Road, North Syracuse. For more information, contact Linda Bennett, executive director, by email at: director@syrexecs.com n Every Tuesday, Syracuse Networking Connections at 8 a.m. at Dunkin Donuts, 7th North St. (Conference Room). No charge to attend. Contact Kim at (315) 414-8223. n Every Wednesday, 1 Million Cups at 9 a.m. at Syracuse CoWorks,
201 E. Jefferson St., 2nd floor, Syracuse. 1 Million Cups is a weekly educational program designed to engage, educate, and accelerate local startups/unique businesses. No cost to attend. For more information or to register to present, visit www.1millioncups.com/ syracuse n Every Wednesday, Small Business Development Center at OCC from 4 to 6 p.m., Introduction to Business Startup at Mulroy Hall. Please call 498-6070 or visit www.onondagasbdc.org n Every Wednesday, Syracuse Business Networking from 6 to 7 p.m. at Barbieri’s Restaurant (upstairs level) located on Main Street in the village of North Syracuse. For more information, call Kim Bachstein at (315) 414-8223 or email: info@SyracuseBusinessNetworking.com n First Wednesday of each month, Business Innovation Days meetings from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Entrepreneurs and small businesses can meet one-onone with a counselor from the SBDC for advice and customized assistance opportunities. Scheduled by appointment, call 315-498-6070 or email: SBDC@sunyocc. edu n First and third Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from

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BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

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Central New York LEADS BUSINESS CERTIFICATES ONONDAGA COUNTY AUGUST 1225, 2015 AUGUST 12 THE CHOPHOUSE ON WARING 200 WARING RD SYRACUSE, NY 13224 RRM II INC FAIRCHILD & MEECH DEWITT CHAPEL 3690 ERIE BLVD EAST DEWITT, NY 13214 FAIRCHILD, MEECH & BENTZ FUNERAL HOME INC INNER STRENGTH MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS 7271 STATE FAIR BLVD BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 PEASE, DEEANN PEASE, LOU

BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 BROKER1 INC SPAIN AGENCY ROBERT MCCARTHY’S STEAKHOUSE 200 WARING RD SYRACUSE, NY 13224 RRM II INC SPRING STREET ALTERATIONS AND TAILORING 414 E GENESEE ST FAYETTEVILLE, NY 13066 HOLLIDAY, RICHARD EARL, JR SUBURBAN TRANSIT 6327 EAST MOLLOY RD E SYRACUSE, NY 13057 SUBURBAN TAXI INC SUBURBAN TRANS SUBURBAN TAXI INC THE TECUMSEH CLUB CHOPHOUSE 200 WARING RD SYRACUSE, NY 13224 RRM II INC

JACKSON’S PUBLIC SERVICE 2363 VALLEY DRIVE NEDROW, NY 13120 JACKSON, SHERMANE

TRIBE LACROSSE 9300 BARTEL RD BREWERTON, NY 13029 SCHAD, RICHARD

LEON’S TAXI SERVICE 550 S CLINTON ST #901 SYRACUSE, NY 13202 BARRY, LEONARD J

AUGUST 13 ARMORY ARTWORKS 136 WALTON ST SYRACUSE, NY 13202 HARE, AMY LOBDELL, CATHY

LOCKHEED MARTIN SUSTAINABILITY TECHNOLOGIES 497 ELECTRONICS PARKWAY SYRACUSE, NY 13088 LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION MORO’S KITCHEN 28 JORDAN ST SKANEATELES, NY 13152 MORO’S GARAGE INC PILLARD’S LURE COMPANY 438 DELWOOD DR BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 PILLARD, DENNIS P, JR PIZZA VILLA 7273 STATE RT 31 CICERO, NY 13039 MAD DELIGHTS INC RE/MAX ONE 8481 GASKIN RD

BERSANI MEDIA 316 WILKINSON ST SYRACUSE, NY 13204 BERSANI, ANTHONY L LITTLE FLOWER FRAGRANCES 303 EASTERLY TERRACE DEWITT, NY 13214 WITHERS, ROCHETTE R PREMIER AUTO CARE 3266 RIVERKNOLL DR SOUTH, APT 807 BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 BROOKS, JOSEPH REGIONAL DONUT AUTHORITY 217 ELM ST N SYRACUSE, NY 13212 LICKFIELD, SUZANNA

Information to build your business

What is the LEADS page? Leads is a collection of information, primarily business certificates, that we have gathered from county clerks’ offices in some of Central New York’s largest counties. We gather these public records so you can gain a competitive edge by finding new and expanding businesses and new customers. RENT A WHIP 208 MAY AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13214 HADID, SALADIN S

PICS WITH BRAD 211 WOODSPATH RD LIVERPOOL, NY 13090 MCDUFF, BRADLEY WILLIAM

ATM GOD 650 S BAY RD N SYRACUSE, NY 13212 SULLIVAN, SHAWN P

SHAFE’S CONTRACTING 323 N SALINA ST, APT 34 SYRACUSE, NY 13203 SHAFER, JOSHUA PAUL

PLOWZNOW 6518 N KIRKVILLE RD KIRKVILLE, NY 13082 JESMER, ANTHONY J

TOTES AND HANDBAGS BY MS KAREN 8236 VERBECK DR MANLIUS, NY 13104 THIESS, KAREN L

POOLER STATISTICAL CONSULTING 202 OLD LYME RD SYRACUSE, NY 13224 POOLER EISENBIES, PENELOPE S

CUBS AND LOVE FAMILY DAYCARE 224 CRAIG ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 WILLIAMS, NIOKEY R

VIKING TRANSPORTATION 101 W MANLIUS ST E SYRACUSE, NY 13057 THALJI, MOHAMMAD K

WHAT’S NEXT CAREERS 105 THORNTON CIRCLE N CAMILLUS, NY 13031 FRIERS, AMY

YONNA NAIL SALON 226 TEALL AVE, ATE 6007 SYRACUSE, NY 13206 SMITH, KEIYONNA

AUGUST 17 COURT ST. PROPERTIES 2415 COURT ST LYNCOURT, NY 13208 REPPI SAMUEL PUFKY MICHELE A

AUGUST 14 BAGHDAD FOOD 817 GRANT BLVD SYRACUSE, NY 13203 BAHR, AL ULOOM WASAN HIRSCH TAXIDERMY WILDLIFE CREATIONS 128 GERTRUDE ST N SYRACUSE, NY 13212 HIRSCH, KERSTEN

DG BUSINESS SERVICES 101 RETFORD DR LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 GELLING, DANA A, JR 4 CORNER STONE CONSTRUCTION 147 WILMAN AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13205 OSELMO, ANTONIO JJ CONSULTING 511 SECOND NORTH ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 JACKSON, JEFFREY S SHONNARD STREET OUTLOOK 413 SHONNARD ST SYRACUSE, NY 13204 VANDUZER, CHRISTIE JULY

EAST FAYETTE GROCERY 2116 E FAYETTE ST SYRACUSE, NY 13210 SALEH, MOHAMMED H HOUSE OF HOBBIES 8409 SILVER SPRUCE CIRCLE LIVERPOOL, NY 13090 DUMAS, JACK F

INFINITY WELLNESS CENTER 442 SOUTH BAY RD N SYRACUSE, NY 13212 BISESI, JAMI

PME SCHOOL SERVICES 4902 LOOK KINNEY CIRCLE LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 EADI, PAUL M

JANTZI COURIER SERVICE 3283 WEST SENECA TPK SYRACUSE, NY 13215 JANTZI, DERRICK RAYMOND

SYRACUSE SHOTS AMATEURS PRO 513 CLAREDON ST SYRACUSE, NY 13210 COLLINS, TYSON

PETHUEL N TAIRLOR 7275 STATE FAIR BLVD BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 ALLMAN, BETZAIDA

AUGUST 18 ARCHITECTURAL MASONRY AND CONSTRUCTION 4170 GIBBS RD MANLIUS, NY 13104 NENTWICK, DANIEL P

SKIP TO FOCUS 4825 NORSTAR BLVD #311 LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 SCIPIONE, BRIAN T&G’S LANDSCAPING & HOUSE MAINTENANCE 461 LILLIAN AVE, APT 3 SYRACUSE, NY 13206 ODOM, GREGORY S PEASE, TERRENCE TANIKA STYLIST BOUTIQUE 213 HUBBELL AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13207 SMITH, TANIKA JONES, RAJSEAN AUGUST 19 JAIRO CONSTRUCTION 304 GRIFFITHS ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208

ESTEVEZ-RAMIREZ, JAIRO KIDS OF THE FUTURE 244 MILDRED AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13206 HERNANDEZ, ILIANA M VIEWPOINT CONSULTING 105 VIEWPOINT LANE CAMILLUS, NY 13031 LANE, EDWARD F AUGUST 20 BARNES LAWN AND LAND SERVICES 8558 BURNET RD CLAY, NY 13041 BARNES, TIMOTHY J THE DECORATIVE PAINTBRUSH 119 WILSON AVE LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 MOLLICA, MARY FAMILY OF BULLIES 2507 COURT ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 SQUADRITO, CELIA A FIORAMONTI FLOORS 8290 BREWERTON RD BREWERTON, NY 13029 FIORAMONTI, ANTHONY W WEALTH BUILDERS REALTY 211 WINTHROP ROAD SYRACUSE, NY 13206 MCDANIELS, WESLEY B AUGUST 21 K AND T PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 239 LINCOLN AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13207 SMITH, KYSHAUN SMITH, TANIKA

SMART CARS 205 CAMBRIDGE AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13208 SMART DONALD J

MKAY AT HOME 704 TULIP ST LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 ROE, MARY K

STAY PLAY AND GROW 6 WOOD STREET BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 SIEDLICKI, JENNIFER A

ROE OF BOOKS 209 OSWEGO ST LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 ROE, MARY K

WENDY ANN’S GRILL 9191 FENNER RD PHOENIX, NY 13135 LEROY, WENDY A

UNIQUES INTERNATIONAL 514 HULBERT ST MINOA, NY 13116 DIN, UNICK

AUGUST 24 ALL SERVICES 8100 MAPLE RD CLAY, NY 13041 BERGOVEC II, MATO

ZACK’S DELIVERY SERVICES 204 BREMAN AVE MATTYDALE, NY 13211 SCIACCA, ZACHARY

BEST FACE FORWARD 131 FLINT PATH SYRACUSE, NY 13219 SMITHSON, CHERYL

AUGUST 25 ADRIANA’S CLOSET 829 N SALINA ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 BRUNDIGE, ADRIANA

CANDLEWICK ANTIQUES 704 TULIP ST LIVERPOOL, NY 13088 ROE, MARY K

BRYCE TALLINI ENTERPRISE 208 BROWN AVE #1 SYRACUSE, NY 13211 TALLINI, BRYCE E

CNY CULTURAL TRAVELERS 42976 CRESTED BUTTE RUN SYRACUSE, NY 13215 DOWDELL, CURRY ELOISE R

5 LITTLE ANGELS 1513 E FAYETTE ST SYRACUSE, NY 13210 JIMENEZ, MARCIA MACHADO

COTTAGE 4400 HERITAGE DR, TH-4D LIVERPOOL, NY 13090 ROE, MARY K

GROWING STARS 5705 THOMPSON RD SYRACUSE, NY 13214 RECIO, GEORGINA CABALLERO

CYNTHIA B. JONES, M.D., PH.D., LICENSED MEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE 1451 APULIA RD APULIA STATION, NY 13020 JONES, CYNTHIA B

HAPPY DIETARY 7514 HIGHLAND DR BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 FABRIZIO, ANTHONY

EAST SIDE HOT SPOT 1703 E FAYETTE BLVD SYRACUSE, NY 13210 ADAMS, CHRISTOPHER GARDENS OF VENUS FLORIST (THE) 406 EAST HEMAN STREET E SYRACUSE, NY 13057 EBER, ELLEN COLLETE, CAROLYN GARDENS OF VENUS FLORIST AND GIFT BASKETS (THE) 406 E HEMAN ST E SYRACUSE, NY 13057 EBER, ELLEN

NEW FLY ORDER (NFO) 1715 E FAYETTE ST SYRACUSE, NY 13210 DEMPS, DARRELL

JUMP & SKATE 5979 S SALINA ST SYRACUSE, NY 13205 CAMBY, MARLON D

HIRSCH TAXIDERMY WILDLIFE CREATIONS 501 BARTEL RD, SUITE 11 BREWERTON, NY 13029 HIRSCH, KERSTEN HK LEGAL BILLING SERVICES 5549 CHATEAU LN CLAY, NY 13041 KOSLOSKI, HEATHER WES JOHNSON PROMOTIONS 752 ALLEN ST SYRACUSE, NY 13210 JOHNSON, WES X BLADE DEPENDABLE LAWN CARE 1068 STATE RT 80 TULLY, NY 13159 BAKER, DAVID JAY

BUSINESS CARD GALLERY VIDEO PRODUCTION

James B. Hainzl

Professional Employer Consultant 149 Northern Concourse North Syracuse, NY 13212

EVENT STAGING

315-641-3600

Fax: 315-641-3601 800-31-STAFF (78233) jhainzl@staffleasing-peo.com

SALES / RENTAL

We let you concentrate on the business you know best.

ADVERTISE IN OUR BUSINESS CARD GALLERY Call 579.3907 for more information

315.423.2000 visualtec.com Let’s plan your perfect meeting or event TOGETHER


I 15

september 14, 2015 I Business journal news network

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People on the Move NEWS accounting

education & training

The Bonadio Group has appointed the following partners to lead its Syracuse SBA, Tax and GCL (Government, Compliance and Labor) teams. FRANK DISCENZA, SBA team leader, has Discenza more than 40 years of experience providing financial and tax expertise to clients. He is a graduate of Le Moyne College and a CPA. CHRISTOPHER ANDERSON, Syracuse tax team leader, has more Anderson than 36 years experience providing a wide range of special tax services. He is a graduate of St. Bonaventure University and a CPA. GREGG EVANS, Syracuse government, compliance & labor team leader, has 20 years Evans professional experience providing auditing, consulting, and accounting services to a variety of clients. He is a graduate of Le Moyne College and a CPA.

St. Lawrence University announced that the following faculty received tenure and were promoted to associate professor: CHRISTOPHER BUCK, associate professor of government; HOWARD EISSENSTAT, associate professor of history; WENDI HAUGH, associate professor of African studies and anthropology; KARIN HECKMAN, associate professor of biology; XIAOSHUO HOU, associate professor of sociology; IVAN RAMLER, associate professor of statistics; and LISA TORREY, associate professor of computer science. The following faculty were promoted to professor: CYNTHIA BANSAK, professor of economics; ERIKA BARTHELMESS, professor of biology; EVELYN JENNINGS, professor of history; and MICHAEL SCHUCKERS, professor of statistics.

banking & finance NBT Bank has promoted MICHAEL WADE to senior vice president and regional commercial-banking manager. He will manage NBT Bank’s regional loan portfolio and commercial-banking team in Wade the Mohawk Valley. Wade has 21 years of banking experience. He joined NBT Bank in 2008 as commercial-banking relationship manager serving commercial customers in the Mohawk Valley. Previously, Wade was vice president and commercial-loan relationship manager for M&T Bank and its predecessor, Partners Trust Bank, in Utica. He has an MBA from the College of Saint Rose and has also completed industry courses through the Commercial Finance Association.

media WCNY has appointed the following new staff members. TAMAR JACOBSON was named community engagement coordinator. She previously worked as director of volunteers at Westchester Jewish Jacobson Community Services. Jacobson earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Brandeis University and an MBA in nonprofit management. DONALD MABBETT was named staff accountant. He previously worked Mabbett as a financial administrator at DeWitt Community Church. Mabbett earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from SUNY Brockport and recently passed the CPA exam.

medical products suppliers VINCENT ST. JAMES has joined Danlee Medical Products, Inc. as e-commerce marketing assistant. He is a graduate of SUNY Oswego and holds a bachelor’s degree in communications and so-

n Fourth Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Chenango County Council of the Arts, 27 W. Main St., Norwich. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://1427.toastmastersclubs.org or email: contact-1427@ toastmastersclubs.org

n Every Thursday, Free Business Counseling with SCORE from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Tioga County Chamber of Commerce, 80 North Ave., Owego. Contact the Tioga County Chamber of Commerce to make an appointment at (607) 6872020. n Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at Northland Communications One Dupli Park Drive in Franklin Square. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802.

nonprofits Three new staff members have joined Seneca Cayuga ARC’s Intensive Clinical Services team. Physical therapist AMY BAXTER has a clinical doctorate in physical therapy from Shenandoah Baxter University in Winchester, Virginia and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from University of Buffalo. She has spent the majority of her 20year career working with children and adults with developmental disabiliWard ties. Baxter also maintains credentials as an assistive technology professional. LYNDSAY WARD has been hired as a clinical services social worker and holds a master’s degree in social work from Syracuse Frechette University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from SUNY Oneonta. LOU FRECHETTE holds a doctorate in physical therapy from SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Binghamton University. He has worked at Upstate Medical Center in acute care and orthopedics, including aquatic therapy, and spent the past two years as a traveling physical therapist.

sports

St. James

Business Calendar noon to 1 p.m. at Golden Artist Colors, 188 Bell Road, New Berlin. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217.

cial interaction. MARY JO TORRICK has joined the firm as a production assembler. She has more than 30 years experience in the manufacturing and production sector, most recently working Torrick for 19 years at Advanced Motors & Drives in East Syracuse.

The Syracuse University athletics program has appointed MIKE BOSCH as softball head coach and ALISA GOLER and KRISTYN SANDBERG as softball assistant

coaches. Bosch has been the interim head coach of the program since June 2015, and was an assistant at Syracuse for two NCAA Tournament teams. He was previously head coach at Iowa Lakes Community College for 14 years. Bosch earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics education from Southwest State University, completed his master’s degree in mathematics from Mankato State University in Minnesota, and served as a mathematics professor at Iowa Lakes Community College. Goler joins the Orange after serving as the hitting coach at Roosevelt University. She is also a professional fastpitch softball player. Goler earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in recreation and leisure studies from the University of Georgia, where she was a three-time All-American player. Sandberg joins the Orange after serving as a graduate manager at Louisiana State University (LSU) for three seasons. She is also a professional fastpitch softball player. Sandberg, a native of Long Island, was a second-team All-American at the University of Georgia, where she earned her undergraduate degree in health and physical education. She received a master’s degree in kinesiology from LSU.

transportation New York Bus Sales LLC, a Blue Bird school bus dealer, has hired BOB GILKINSON as an on-road service technician. He completed the diesel technology diploma program at the University of Northwestern Ohio. Before joining New York Bus Sales, Gilkinson worked at the former Fire Equipment Sales and Service as a heavy-equipment mechanic for nine years. Prior to that position, he worked for the Cassadaga Valley Central School District as an assistant head mechanic and transportation supervisor for the schools’ buses. Gilkinson is a 19-A certified examiner and is certified as a school-bus driver instructor in New York state. n

Send your People-on-the-Move news via email to: movers@cnybj.com

n Every Friday, 40 Above: Workers in Transition from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the library in North Syracuse (NOPL) at 100 Trolleybarn Lane, North Syracuse. Helping workers/job seekers aged 40 and above in search of work. Contact John A. Cruty at (315) 569-3964, or at crutij@ yahoo.com

Day with SCORE by appointment at The Tech Garden. Counselors provide free, confidential, individual business mentoring to prospective or current business owners. For more information or to make an appointment, contact Lynn Hughes at (315) 579-2862 or email Lynn@ TheTechGarden.com

n Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 430-5249 or email: bbregman@cnybj.com

n Every second Friday, The Professional Consultants Association (PCA) of Central New York at 8:15 a.m. from September to June at OneGroup Center, 706 N. Clinton St., Syracuse. PCA helps businesses and organizations locate professional consulting services based in CNY.

n First Friday of each month, Toolkit

Continued from page 13

The first visit is free. For a full schedule and to register visit, www.pcaofcny.com n Every second and fourth Friday of each month, The SUN Group (Sustainable Upstate Network) meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Tony’s Family Restaurant, 3004 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. For more information, contact Andy Picco at (315) 657-0135 or email: andrewpicco@ gmail.com To list your meetings or events in the Business Calendar, email them to movers@cnybj.com


16 I

business Journal news network I september 14, 2015

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september 14, 2015 I Business journal news network

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ENERGY/Environment

Photo credit: Snug Planet, LLC

James Dulle, an energy technician at Snug Planet, LLC in Enfield, handles a sidewall insulation job.

Making Homes Snug Snug Planet works to make homes more energy efficient BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com ENFIELD — Snug Planet, LLC — an energy-efficiency company based in Enfield, west of Ithaca — grew its revenue 40 percent in 2014 compared to the previous year. “We had years of slow, incremental growth and [it] was just a really big year,” says Jon Harrod, who co-owns Snug Planet, along with his wife, Elisabeth. The firm projects 20 percent revenue growth in 2015. Harrod spoke with CNYBJ on Sept. 3. Before 2014, Snug Planet had more demand for its services than it had capacity to deliver the services, he noted. Harrod says the company made a “big” investment in systems for its sales, production, training, and equipment “so that we

had more capacity and so we could take on more and bigger jobs.” The firm’s customer base “is more than 90 percent residential,” he adds. Snug Planet can handle home-performance assessments, or what are known as energy audits, and any improvements to increase energy efficiency. The improvements could include installation of insulation, storm windows, ventilation, or air sealing and weatherstripping, according to the company’s website. Snug Planet also handles the contracting work for any improvements on a given home. It can tackle “most” jobs, including insulation, air sealing, and moisture-control measures, Harrod says. If the job involves improvements to a home’s heating system, then Snug Planet will subcontract the work to “a couple trusted partners,” which Harrod declined

to name. “Typically, people who call us have some combination of high energy bills, comfort problems like drafts, or rooms that they can’t keep warm,” says Harrod. The firm is located in a 4,000-squarefoot space at 1730 Mecklenburg Road in Enfield. John Rancich is their landlord, according to Harrod. Harrod launched the business in 2006. Snug Planet employs 12 full-time workers, including Harrod, and four part-time employees.

About the company

Snug Planet seeks to reduce a building’s energy usage and “improve people’s comfort in ways that make sense for customers and also for the planet,” says Harrod. The company has what some people refer to as a “triple bottom line guiding” the

business. “We want to do right by people, by the planet, and, at the same time, run a profitable business,” says Harrod. The Malta, New York–based Building Performance Institute Inc. (BPI) has certified Snug Planet as a building analyst and accredited the firm as a contractor, according to the Snug Planet website. The firm is “certified to conduct blowerdoor tests, combustion-appliance inspection and repair, air quality testing including carbon-monoxide detection, duct testing and airflow testing in addition to our other contracting services,” its website says. Harrod describes a blower-door test as a “big fan” that Snug Planet connects to a house’s door. It “depressurizes” the house, enabling Snug Planet “to go around and See snug planet, page 4B

4


2B I

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/SUSTAINABILITY

BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

CNYBJ.COM

The Syracuse Builders Exchange honors exceptional craftsmen and women at the annual Craftsmanship Awards event, which will be held in November 2015. This is the construction industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only regional Craftsmanship Awards event where the employee and company are both honored.

Across 16 Counties in CNY EXTENT OF THE PROGRAM Exceptional craftsmanship in the execution of work in these divisions: Structural, Interior/Exterior Finish Mechanical, Electrical, Rigging 3URMHFW6XSHUYLVLRQ5RRĂ&#x20AC;QJ Site-Landscaping, Residential, Other Each individual winner will be recognized during the event by the presentation of awards to the mechanic and employer. Nominations may be submitted via the Syrabex.com web site under Craftsmanship Awards and may be accepted through September 31, 2015.

syrabex.com

Contact Sandy Church at 315.437.9936

BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com GEDDES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The butter from the annual butter sculpture at the New York State Fair isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t heading for any piece of toast, muffin, or stack of pancakes. The Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency (OCRRA) describes the butter as â&#x20AC;&#x153;inedible.â&#x20AC;? It is now in the recycling process. OCRRA on Sept. 8 worked with Cornell Cooperative Extension and the American Dairy Association and Dairy Council Inc. (ADADC) to dismantle the sculpture. Once taken apart, OCRRA transported the 800 pounds of butter to its compost facility in Amboy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to compost it in with all the other food waste weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting from local restaurants and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to make it into a beneficial product for the community,â&#x20AC;? says Ann Fordock, recycling specialist at OCRRA. She spoke to CNYBJ in the Dairy Products Building at the State Fairgrounds. OCRRA turns the butter into compost for

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Ann Fordock, recycling specialist with the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency (OCRRA), on Sept. 8 works to dismantle the annual butter sculpture in the Dairy Products Building at the State Fairgrounds. OCRRA transported the butter for recycling at its Amboy compost facility.

gardens and landscapes, she added. The entire composting process could take between 90 and 120 days, according to Fordock. The 2015 butter sculpture was called, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanks for the Milk, Moo York,â&#x20AC;? according to a news release the ADADC issued Aug. 26. The sculpture paid tribute to all who took part in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great American Milk Drive,â&#x20AC;? the ADADC said. It featured a dairy farmer, a milk processor and retailer each holding gallons of milk, and elements representing New York communities behind them, including the Carrier Dome and Statue of Liberty. It takes the sculptors about 10 days, working between eight and 10 hours each day, to create the sculpture, says Elizabeth Meyer, vice president of communications for ADADC. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then we tear it down in just a couple hours,â&#x20AC;? says Fordock. The cooler remained on during the deconstruction process to prevent the butter from melting, she added. Artists Jim Victor and Marie Pelton of Conshohocken, Pennsylvania have created the sculpture every year since 2003, according to the ADADC news release. The New York State Fair ended its 12-

day run on Labor Day. Vendors returned to the fairgrounds the following day to pack up their equipment and supplies. More than 908,000 people attended this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair, down from more than 965,000 in 2014.

Composting process

On its website, OCRRA describes how it makes compost at the Amboy facility. The agency mixes food waste with a bulking agent, such as yard waste and wood chips, in a 3-to-1 ratio. OCRRA then arranges the combination in concrete bunkers that have a system of pipes running beneath them. The pipes are powered by electric blowers that pump air through the piles at scheduled intervals. The pipes allow air to circulate through the piles and create â&#x20AC;&#x153;optimalâ&#x20AC;? conditions for decomposition. After the food waste has decomposed and has met all of the temperature and monitoring requirements, the finished compost is screened for use as a soil amendment. OCRRA then provides the compost for sale at multiple retail locations and at the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amboy and Jamesville compost sites. n

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I 3B

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/SUSTAINABILITY

SEPTEMBER 14, 2015 I BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

CNYBJ.COM

ENFIELD — Construction on the Black Oak Wind Farm, a seven-turbine project about 10 miles west of Ithaca in the town of Enfield, is expected to begin this fall, nearly 10 years after the project was first envisioned. Black Oak Wind Farm is a for-profit company owned by 150 investors, about half of whom are accredited, according to project manager Marguerite Wells. She is also the VP on its board of directors, and one of the project’s investors. All but six of the investors are New York state residents — those six are family and close friends of other investors, according to Wells. About 100 of the investors live in Tompkins County. “This is the first example I know of [in New York] where people came together and said, ‘we actually want a wind farm and we’re going to build it ourselves,’ ” rather than having an outside developer making a pitch to a town, Wells says. She is awaiting approval for building permits she applied for on Sept. 4. The first construction will focus on the installation of the wind farm’s substation, Wells says, where it will interconnect with the existing power grid owned by utility company New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (or NYSEG). Installation of the seven turbines should begin in the summer of 2016, and the wind farm is expected to be operational later in the year. The total cost of the farm — which will be situated on about 1,000 acres of land off Black Oak Road in Enfield — should be between $40 million and $45 million, and will be financed through a combination of private equity, tax equity, and bank debt, says Wells. She has raised $3 million in investment capital over the past four years, and is working to finalize a financing package in the coming weeks that will provide the rest of the capital. She declines to disclose terms, or identify the bank. Four land owners are leasing the acreage to the wind farm, she adds. General Electric (NYSE: GE) designs and sells the turbine model to be constructed at the site. It has a 2.3-megawatt capacity, giving the farm a maximum capacity of 16.1 megawatts, according to the Black Oak website. Each turbine will stand 483 feet tall where the tip of a blade reaches its highest point, and the base of the turbine is about 15 feet in diameter. GE will handle the operation and maintenance of the turbines once they are assembled. Those services come with the purchase of the turbines, according to Wells. She anticipates the wind farm will have a 32 percent net capacity factor, which is the farm’s average rate of output at any given time over an entire year, factoring in periods when there is less wind. That output would provide enough electricity to power about 5,000 local households, according to

Wells. The company has a power-purchasing agreement in place with Cornell University. Wells declines to disclose the price, but SEE BLACK OAK, PAGE 6B

Visual projection of a portion of the Black Oak Wind Farm upon its completion.

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Regulatory Compliance and Oversight Economic Development Opportunities Environmental Permitting and Compliance Wholesale Energy Market Matters Renewable Energy Development Incentives Risks and Opportunities Associated with Climate Change

It ’s in our power.

Image used is stock photography.

BY NICK KAPTEYN nkapteyn@cnybj.com

RENDERING CREDIT: BLACKOAKWINDNY.COM

Community-owned wind farm nears construction west of Ithaca

Led by the only former head of both the New York State Public Service Commission and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, our robust Energy Industry Team of multi-disciplinary attorneys has made Harris Beach the go-to law firm for energy and related issues across New York state and beyond. Our Energy Industry Team combines the knowledge and experience of a broad range of relevant practice areas. Drawing upon our extensive industry experience, we take pride in helping public and private entities save money, manage risk and capitalize on an ever-changing energy landscape. To find out how Harris Beach can help your organization, contact Susan M. Crossett in our Syracuse office at 333 West Washington Street, Syracuse, NY 13202, our Ithaca office at 119 East Seneca Street, Ithaca NY 14850, by phone at 315.214.2044, or visit our web site at www.harrisbeach.com.

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energy/environment/sustainability

business Journal news network I september 14, 2015

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BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com SYRACUSE — Cortland Research, LLC is developing a technology called the Pounce system, which the company says can help control a building’s energy use. Pounce, which Cortland Research has trademarked, is an acronym for point-ofuse, network-controlled, energy-management system. That’s according to Steve McMahon, majority owner of Cortland Research. “It’s a point-of-use system, so [when] you are in a building, if there’s one of our sensors near you, you’re interacting with our system,” says McMahon. McMahon spoke with CNYBJ on Sept. 2 at the Syracuse Tech Garden. Cortland Research started with parttime operations as a portfolio company in the Tech Garden’s Clean Tech Center in 2010, he says. It graduated from the center in 2014. The firm’s website lists contact information for a post-office box in Homer in Cortland County. The Pounce system involves a network of devices that interact with each other through a controller to help a building control its energy usage based on occupancy, according to McMahon. Each Pounce device has an occupancy sensor. A building with Pounce installed responds to the presence of people in specific areas and it also reacts accordingly when people vacate the building, he says. A user can log on to the “dashboard,” a web page that’s available with software included with the Pounce system-control unit, or the controller. An example of the dashboard is on display at the Tech Garden. The user can configure each device to “interact with people in the building,” turning lights on or turning the heat up, based

on occupancy. McMahon calls it a “presence-based” system that automatically adjusts to an efficient mode when the building is empty. “We have a third-party analysis that predicts 18 percent reduction of energy,” he says. Taitem Engineering, PC, an Ithaca–based energy consultant, provided the analysis. The company is “highly regarded by NYSERDA,” according to McMahon. NYSERDA is the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. McMahon has worked as an electrical engineer and an electrician, so he says he has experience in building wiring as an electrician and sensors as an electrical engineer. “So, I combined the two of those into the [Pounce] system,” says McMahon. McMahon focuses on the electronichardware side, and his son, John, concentrates on the software side, he says.

Starting, growing the business

McMahon was working for the Sensis Corp. in DeWitt when he set up Cortland Research in 2010, he says. As a young firm, McMahon admits that generating sales has been difficult and Cortland Research had to cut three engineers about a year ago. “We had to downsize to maintain our existence,” he says. As McMahon put it, Cortland Research is in that “chasm … crossing that gap between early adopters and getting into the mainstream market.” Kickstarter Inc. accepted Cortland Research’s request for a crowd-funding campaign on its website. The fundraising on the Kickstarter campaign started Aug. 27 and continues until late September, he says. “We have a whole list of … rewards. We’ve put prices on different things like a T-shirt, one hour of consultation, a starter

eric reinhardt/business journal news network

Cortland Research develops Pounce system to manage building energy use

Steve McMahon, majority owner of Cortland Research, LLC, holds a component of the Pounce system at the Syracuse Tech Garden. Cortland Research designed Pounce to use a combination of wireless hardware and software to report and control real-time energy usage at the plug-load level. Cortland Research is a 2014 graduate of the Clean Tech Center at the Syracuse Tech Garden.

kit … that’s their reward for donating,” he says, noting the goal is $56,000. As of Sept. 8, the campaign has generated just under $2,400, according to the Cortland Research page for Pounce. If Cortland Research reaches its goal, then Kickstarter gets a percentage and the company fulfills all of the reward requests from the donors. Kickstarter then advances the funding to Cortland Research, McMahon says. At the same time, Cortland Research is still seeking investors, he adds. “We have sales agents. I have one in Poughkeepsie, one in Buffalo, and one in Charlotte, North Carolina. They’re all independent sales reps.” They’re called VARS, or value-added resellers. They’ll also handle any installations necessary, he notes.

Partners, clients

Companies “within an hour” of Syracuse are handling the manufacturing of the Pounce system, says McMahon. Square Stamping Manufacturing Corp. in Barneveld makes the metal-stamp parts. Chenango Valley Technology Inc.

SNUG PLANET: Most New York homeowners can get a free home-energy assessment find where air leaks are happening.” BPI “develops standards for energy efficiency retrofit work using an open, transparent, consensus-based process built on sound building science,” its website explains. Snug Planet is also a partner in the Energy Star program. Energy Star is a joint, voluntary program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy that “helps businesses and individuals save energy and fight climate change

through energy efficient products, homes, and buildings,” according to the Energy Star website. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) is a partner with the EPA with its Home Performance with Energy Star and other related programs, according to NYSERDA. Most New York homeowners can get a free home-energy assessment and a lowinterest loan to help pay for any work to

make improvements for better energy efficiency, NYSERDA says.

About Jon Harrod

Harrod, a New Jersey native, earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from Harvard University in 1993. He later earned his doctorate of philosophy in ecology at the University of North Carolina in 1999. From there, Harrod served as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard through the end of

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in Sherburne provides the plastics for the system. And C&D Assembly Inc. in Groton manufactures the circuit boards and handles final assembly and testing, according to McMahon. Cortland Research is providing products for Onondaga-Cortland-Madison Board of Cooperative Educational Services, which has used the Pounce system since October 2013. Onondaga Community College uses the system in a house it uses for energy research, he says. It also has a pilot system on some air conditioners in the school district serving New York City, he adds. “We’re controlling those air conditioners based on occupancy and temperature,” says McMahon. The “Achilles heel” that Cortland Research faces in selling the product is that it “just looks like” an average receptacle that a consumer can buy in a retail outlet. “So what we have to convince the customer is that it’s really a system they’re buying,” he says. “It’s automation that you don’t get from any other type of plug or receptacle.” n

Continued from page 1B

2000, he says. The Harrods then moved to Ithaca where Jon Harrod started working for Performance Systems Development between 2001 and 2006. The Ithaca–based firm “specializes in translating building science expertise into powerful software tools and innovative program services for energy service professionals, building performance contractors, commercial property owners, and program implementers,” according to its LinkedIn page. n


SEPTEMBER 14, 2015 I BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

I 5B

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/SUSTAINABILITY

CNYBJ.COM

Nirvana Spring Water delays closure, 70 layoffs at Oneida County plant BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com FORESTPORT — Nirvana Spring Water Inc., which disclosed in June that it will close its bottling plant in northeast Oneida County, has delayed when it will begin cutting 70 jobs until the second half of November. The cuts were originally expected to begin in early September, according to an Aug. 21 posting on the state Department of Labor website (Worker Adjustment and Retraining

Notification page). Nirvana Spring Water filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy in June, and is being put up for auction on Oct. 14 for interested parties to buy it out of bankruptcy, according to a June report on bankruptcynews.dowjones.com. The company’s bottling plant is located at 1 Nirvana Plaza in Forestport.

Previous company news

In late August 2013, New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli and the New

York Business Development Corp. (NYBDC) announced a loan of $3.2 million to Nirvana. With the NYBDC loan, and other funding sources, Nirvana purchased a high-speed bottling line that was supposed to produce 12 million cases of bottled water annually and increase the company’s workforce by 50 people, the state comptroller’s office said in a news release then. Nirvana, a family-operated business, employed more than 100 people at that time. The company obtained its water supply from

the Nirvana Springs located on 2,000 acres of wilderness, and distributed its bottled water under the company’s own label throughout the Northeast as well as to customers in the Midwest and Southwest. n

Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder and in the Eye of the Planning Board

S

W. BRADLEY HUNT Viewpoint

ometimes a planning or zoning board objects to a project based on how it looks. Aesthetic issues that come up in site plan, subdivision, or variance review may include the size and shape of a building, the materials used for a project, or even the color of a building or sign. The question often arises whether it is proper for a zoning board to deny approval, or to condition approval, based on such aesthetic concerns.

The answer is it depends. The law is clear that, in appropriate circumstances, a municipality may regulate aesthetic aspects of projects. The New York Court of Appeals, in the 1967 case, Cromwell v. Farrier, explained that, “examples of ugliness . . . are just as much subject to reasonable controls, including prohibition, as enterprises which emit offensive noises, odors, or debris. The eye is entitled to as much recognition as the other senses . . . .”

However, a zoning board does not have unlimited discretion to reject a project simply because the board dislikes how it looks. The general rule: if a zoning board wants to disapprove or limit a project based on an aesthetic issue, the board should point to a specific standard — from the zoning law, or the municipal comprehensive plan, or the design guidelines that have been adopted by the municipality — as the basis for its action.

Where there is no standard on which the board may rely, courts will strike down a municipal decision denying an application. For example, in the 1978 case, DeCena v. Board of Zoning Appeals of the Incorporated Village of Hempstead, the zoning board denied an area variance for a narrow house that the board deemed an “aesthetic abomination” with a “bowling alley appearance.” The

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SEE HUNT, PAGE 6B


6B I

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/SUSTAINABILITY

BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I SEPTEMBER 14, 2015

CNYBJ.COM

BLACK OAK: In 2011, Wells bought out Rancich and founded Black Oak says it “escalates at a fixed percentage year-to-year.” Black Oak Wind Farm is working on the short list of bids for the construction contract, Wells says. About $500,000 has been spent on the environmental impact statement, most of which went to New York–based firms.

Project history

The seeds for Black Oak Wind Farm were first planted about 10 years ago when Wells’ neighbor, John Rancich, put up a small wind turbine on his property that underperformed. He began exploring the idea of building a commercial-grade turbine nearby, according to Wells. Rancich found a good location about a mile from his house — the site where Black Oak Wind Farm will be built — with plenty of wind, open space, and a transmission line going across it. “Those are sort of the bare bones of what you need to get started,” says Wells, who joined the project eight years ago when she approached Rancich, asking how she could help. Her role quickly escalated to that of project manager, and for four years she devoted time to the farm’s development while Rancich financed it through the company he had started, called Enfield Energy. Neither person had any prior experience

in wind energy, other than the unsuccessful small turbine with which Rancich had experimented. “It was just a question of learning it and figuring it out and doing it,” Wells says. In 2011, Wells bought out Rancich when he no longer had the assets to fund the project, and founded Black Oak Wind Farm. However, Rancich remains an investor in the project, Wells says. “It was going to die if I didn’t come up with a new plan,” Wells says. “We had tried shopping it around to big wind developers, and nobody wanted a seven-turbine project. It’s just too small for most of the developers to be interested in.” Near the beginning of the project’s introduction, the town was asked if it would like to own the farm, and it declined due to the financial risk and complexity involved, Wells notes.

Finding its footing

In her pursuit of a viable option to keep the wind farm alive, Wells says she discovered a seven-turbine farm in South Dakota that is owned by about 600 South Dakota residents. “It was a neat community-ownership model, and they got it done,” she says. Wells reached out to South Dakota–based firm Val-Add Service Corporation, which had assisted in the development of that

Continued from page 3B

wind farm, and hired it as a consultant on her own. “They gave me a road map on how to raise community money, because I had no idea how any of that worked,” she says. Wells proceeded to raise $2 million in development capital, which she says was used to move forward several elements of the project, such as attaining the power purchasing agreement with Cornell University, the environmental work for the environmental-impact assessment, the interconnection process needed to tie into the electric grid, attaining a contract with GE for the turbines, as well as a contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (or NYSERDA) for renewable energy credits. Wells raised another $1 million in 2014 in construction capital to begin paying for critical infrastructure that needed to be ordered, like an electrical transformer. All $3 million she has raised came from community investors. None of the project cost will be covered through financial incentives from any level of government, says Wells. “The incentives come when you generate [power].” Black Oak Wind Farm has forged a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement with the Tompkins County Industrial Development Agency (TCIDA) for the land on which the farm will be built. Wells says

the flat-rate, 15-year PILOT requires the wind farm pay $8,300 per year for every megawatt installed, which equals about $130,000 annually.

From plants to power

Wells used to co-own a wholesale plant nursery called Mother Plants with her wife that specialized in green roofs. “We supplied almost every green roof in Syracuse, and about half of them in Rochester,” as well as projects in New York City, Boston, and Philadelphia, Wells says. She originally expected to return to the nursery business after the wind farm was completed, but Wells says she is having too much fun, and she doesn’t want to go back and let die the eight years she has invested in education for the wind farm. “I want more projects,” she says. In spring 2015, the couple sold Mother Plants to a Canada–based company, and the business now operates from Ontario under the same name. “We still have a small amount of nursery left, but the majority of our business is downsized because we just didn’t have time, frankly,” Wells says. The remaining nursery is now called Two Mothers Farm, Inc., and offers soil for green roofs, interior living walls, and consulting services for horticultural projects, according to its website. n

HUNT: A zoning board has broad authority to condition or deny applications on aesthetic grounds New York Court of Appeals struck down this decision because the zoning law did not give the zoning board power “to deny an area variance on aesthetic grounds.” In addition, when a zoning board disapproves a project for aesthetic reasons, the board should demonstrate that the aesthetic issue is more than a mere matter of preference, and in fact relates to the general welfare of the community. The board should show that “the offense to the eye” is “sub-

stantial,” with a “material effect on the community or district pattern,” according to the Cromwell decision. In the 1984 case, Sackson v. Zimmerman, the court struck down a planning board’s denial of a subdivision application that sought to divide a large estate with a mansion in the middle. The court reasoned that: “the planning board’s denial must be based on evidence more substantial than a generalized feeling that neighbors should have the

Continued from page 5B

aesthetic pleasure of viewing a mansion on the central portion of a lot some four times the size of their own.” If a zoning board follows these general principles, it has broad authority to condition or deny applications on aesthetic grounds. Indeed, courts have upheld zoning laws giving municipal boards power to regulate aesthetic matters such as the color of signs (Lisa’s Party City v. Town of Henrietta, 1998), and the placement of clotheslines in yards

(People v. Stover, 1963).

W. Bradley Hunt is a partner in the Syracuse– based law firm Mackenzie Hughes, LLP. His practice focuses on commercial litigation, zoning, and land use law. Hunt has broad commercial litigation experience. He has litigated cases on subjects including insurance coverage, real estate, zoning, environmental issues, and construction projects. This viewpoint article is drawn from the Mackenzie Hughes blog, “Plain Talk.”

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