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Special Report: Construction & Real Estate. Section B.

CNY BEST AWARDS INSIDE: Read about all the winners.

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Vol. XXVII • No. 23

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June 7, 2013 • $2.00

CNYBJ.COM

Upstate consumer sentiment rises in May

Scolaro law firm and health-care group separate, form new firms

BY ERIC REINHARDT

BY ERIC REINHARDT

JOURNAL STAFF

JOURNAL STAFF

ith the recent gains on Wall Street and the improving housing market, New York consumers indicated a greater willingness to spend money in May, but their plans didn’t include purchasing most big-ticket items. Upstate New York’s consumer sentiment rose 5.9 points to 73.9 in May, according to the latest monthly survey from the Siena (College) Research Institute (SRI) released June 5. Upstate’s overall-sentiment index of 73.9 is a combination of the current-sentiment and future-sentiment components. Upstate’s currentsentiment index of 80 is up 6.1 points from April, while the future-sentiment level rose 5.9 points to 70.1, according to the SRI data. The upstate figure was 3.3 points below the statewide consumersentiment level of 77.2, which was

Frito-Lay garnered nearly 4 million submissions through social media from American consumers for the contest. A panel of judges picked the three finalists whose recipes were developed by the company and the new products were placed on store shelves last February. Earlier this year, more than 1 million consumers cast ballots by text or via Twitter or Facebook to determine the winner. “This is one way the world’s numberone snack and food brand is listening to its customers,” says Mitchell T. Hamilton, director of manufacturing at Frito-Lay North America’s plant located at 10 Spud Lane in

SYRACUSE — The Syracuse law firm Scolaro, Shulman, Cohen, Fetter & Burstein, P.C. and its health-care practice group have separated, and each group of attorneys has formed new law firms. But the separated firms also plan to continue their respective practices in the same building at 507 Plum St. in Franklin Square. The Scolaro firm is changing its name to Scolaro, Fetter, Grizanti, McGough & King, P.C. The 11 partners in the new Scolaro firm include the five in the firm’s name: Richard Scolaro, who is now retired, Jeffrey Fetter, Anthony Grizanti, Stewart McGough, and John King. Fetter is serving as the firm’s president and CEO, King is the vice president and CFO, and Grizanti is the COO and secretary, according to Fetter. Besides the partners, the law firm also includes three additional attorneys, including New York Assemblyman William Magnarelli (D–Syracuse). The attorneys also include Alan Burstein, who was among the partners in the original Scolaro firm. He remains with the new firm but not as a partner. The new Scolaro firm has a total 33 employ-

See FRITO-LAY, page 11

See SCOLARO, page 10

W

See SENTIMENT, page 5

NORMAN POLTENSON/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

Mitchell T. Hamilton, director of manufacturing at Frito-Lay North America, surrounded by Frito-Lay products.

Frito-Lay: Do us a flavor BY NORMAN POLTENSON JOURNAL STAFF

KIRKWOOD — And the winner of “Do Us a Flavor” is — Karen Weber-Mendham of Land O’ Lakes, Wis. The date: May 6. The location: Eva Longoria’s upscale Beso Restaurant in Hollywood. Representatives of Frito-Lay announce that Weber-Mendham is the recipient of either $1 million or 1 percent of the 2013 net sales of her award-winning suggestion for “Cheesy Garlic Bread,” whichever is larger. The other two finalists, who submitted “Chicken and Waffles” and “Sriracha” (a hot sauce from Eastern Thailand), each receives $50,000.

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2 • The Central New York Business Journal

CNYBJ BRIEFS News of note for and about Central New York businesses

Friends of the Zoo hires development director SYRACUSE — Friends of the Rosamond Gifford Zoo announced it has hired Jill Allen as director of development and membership. “With more than 15 years of development experience, Jill brings a wealth of knowledge to our organization,” Janet Agostini, president of Friends of the Zoo, said in a news release. “As we continue with strategic and master planning, I look forward to working with her to continue advancing the Friends organization in support of the zoo.” Allen will develop and maintain ongoing fundraising activities for Friends of the Zoo and oversee new programs that arise from the strategic-planning process. Allen received a bachelor’s degree in communication from the State University of New York at Albany. A past president of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and a graduate of Leadership Greater Syracuse, she worked and volunteered at Menorah Park for more than 10 years. “I am thrilled to join Friends of the Zoo, a group of people who are passionate and dedicated to the animals and our community,” Allen said in the release. “I am excited to engage with donors and be part of the next phase of growth at the zoo.”

OCC and CCC forge agreement on medical-records degree AUBURN — Cayuga Community College (CCC) and Onondaga Community College (OCC) announced June 4 an agreement that allows CCC students to earn an associate degree in health-information technology at OCC. The agreement is in response to higher workforce demand for health-information technicians specializing in medical records in the regions that the Auburn school serves. Under the agreement, CCC students can take their liberal-arts classes at the Auburn campus and complete their degree requirements at OCC both online through the State University of New York (SUNY) Learning Network (SLN) and through onsite clinical-lab instruction, the schools said in a joint news release. “Our ability to collaborate and share resources with peers is one of the great strengths of the SUNY system, and we’re pleased to work in partnership with Onondaga to provide an easy option for our students to complete a degree in this high-demand field,” Anne Herron, provost and VP for academic affairs at Cayuga Community College, said in the news release. Students enrolling at CCC for the fall 2013 semester can begin taking advantage of the new agreement, the schools said.

email your company news to news@cnybj.com

June 7, 2013

Cuomo awards grants to area schools in NYSUNY 2020 Challenge BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

A

rea campuses of the State University of New York (SUNY) will share in newly announced grant funding benefitting four projects in the NYSUNY 2020 Challenge grant program. Gov. Andrew Cuomo on June 3 awarded a total of $60 million in equal amounts to the projects. The 19 SUNY schools collaborated, developed, and submitted the economicdevelopment projects. Cuomo Cuomo first unveiled the NYSUNY 2020 Challenge Grant program in May 2011. The governor signed the NYSUNY 2020 bill on Aug. 9 of that year, providing a “rational tuition policy” for the SUNY system, maintenance of state funding invested into each system, and capital funding for SUNY’s four university centers, according to the governor’s office. Cuomo announced the program’s second round in his 2012 State of the State address with the $60 million appropriation enacted as part of the 2012-13 state budget. The Democrat also announced a third round of $55 million in this year’s State of the State address, which is included in the 2013-14 budget.

SUNY Institute of Environmental Health and Environmental Medicine

SUNY ESF, Upstate Medical University, SUNY Oswego, and Onondaga Community College will share the $15 million awarded to the SUNY Institute of Environmental Health and Environmental Medicine. The project, described as “the first of its kind in the nation,” intersects medicine, environment, engineering, entrepreneurship, technology, and education. It will expand new research, provide academic and industry collaborations, and offer associate through doctorate degrees with a focus on improving health through understanding the environment’s impact on health and medicine. The Institute will collaborate with area industry partners including Welch Allyn, a medical-device maker headquartered in Skaneateles Falls; the C&S Companies, an engineering and architectural firm in Salina; O’Brien & Gere, a Syracuse–based engineering firm; Utica–based ConMed Corporation, a medical-technology company; and Philadelphia–based Colden

Corporation, an occupational health, safety, and environmental consultant that operates an office in DeWitt. The project expects to create 400 construction jobs, 651 permanent jobs in the wireless-technology field and other areas of development, and expanded-student enrollments. It also expects to contribute to 20 patents and at least 22 new start-up companies in five years, according to the governor’s office.

SMART

The SUNY Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) in Marcy, Mohawk Valley Community College, Herkimer Community College, and Morrisville State College are among the campuses sharing $15 million for the SUNY Manufacturing Alliance for Research and Technology Transfer (SMART). Through this collaboration, SMART will operate as “the educational core” for the Center for Global Advanced Manufacturing (CGAM). CGAM will directly support manufacturers by coordinating education and training of the workforce and by providing incubation, acceleration and technology-transfer facilities in the Mohawk Valley and MidHudson Valley regions. It’ll provide training in “areas of high demand” for both employers and students, according to the governor’s office. The initiative will generate or preserve an estimated 1,700 jobs in the two regions through new-product development; process improvements; access to regional, national, and global-supply chains; and employee training and education, the governor’s office said.

NYS Bioenergy Learning Collaborative

The SUNY College of Agriculture at Morrisville will share in the $15 million awarded to the New York State Bioenergy Learning Collaborative (NYSBLC), which proposes to develop three commercialscale, one megawatt (1 MW) anaerobic biodigesters at the SUNY campuses in Morrisville, Cobleskill, and Delhi. The anaerobic biodigesters are intended to result in energy production, waste reduction for an “expanding” dairy industry, and training academic and applied expertise for a scalable waste-reduction, energyproducing initiative. The project helps to create “an economical avenue to dispose of regional agricultural residuals,” including cow, horse, and other livestock manure, the governor’s office said.

It also includes partnerships with Greek yogurt producers Chobani and Fage; Orange County, N.Y.–based food processor Beech-Nut; and local fast food restaurant franchises including McDonald’s and Burger King; along with area dairy farms, feedlots, vegetable growers, apple growers, and other regional agri-businesses for feedstock supply. The NYSBLC is also expected to create 200 construction jobs and 30 engineering and project-management support jobs at each of the locations for a total of 690 jobs worth more than $8 million. The project can sustain about 75 private-sector jobs in dairy production, foodprocessing, and yogurt-manufacturing industries worth more than $3 million with $734,000 in annual payroll and benefits as academic support at the colleges, according to the governor’s office. Broome Community College will also share $15 million with three other SUNY campuses in Alfred, Corning, and Jamestown as part of the project, called “Retooling the Southern Tier.” The project responds to industry demand to provide more skilled and technical workers and to stimulate and grow the economy through the support and development of the local manufacturing base across the Southern Tier.

Retooling the Southern Tier

Retooling the Southern Tier is a training program with local advanced-manufacturing companies that includes The Raymond Corp. of Greene. It will expand manufacturing training programs by 50 percent to meet local demand. The initiative will provide training courses for the companies for up to 300 students annually who will become qualified candidates for new and expanded manufacturing jobs. Training would be linked to stated needs of companies across the region and identified through a collaborative Industrial Advisory Board, the governor’s office said. Each campus has plans to create a facility, develop training programs, implement and expand academic programs, while leveraging outside funds at a ratio of 1:1. The Retooling the Southern Tier initiative estimates that an additional 2,340 jobs will be introduced to the Southern Tier region by 2022, with an estimated 1,100 introduced within the first three years due to facility obligations, faculty hires, and industry hires and retention.  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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The Central New York Business Journal • 3 Simple Admit (Syracuse University): Simple Admit is an innovative new technology that replaces archaic, paper-based admissions processes at medical facilities. Through a convenient web-based system, patients can enter their complete medical history online for immediate review by their clinical team.

June 7, 2013

CenterState CEO awards latest round of Grants for Growth BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — CenterState CEO on May 31 announced the winners in the 10th round of its Grants for Growth program. It’s a seed program that supports “innovative” applied-research

Impact to Date • 41 grants/investments totaling $2.3 million • $43.5 million leveraged in additional investments • 679 potential new jobs • $46.2 million in potential new revenue • 55 patents • 129 professors • 6 colleges & universities • 7 counties SOURCE: CENTERSTATE CEO

projects between universities and industry to improve business competitiveness and create jobs. CenterState CEO awarded six “emerging” regional companies a total of more than $398,000, the economic-development organization said in an email to its members. When leveraged against private sector and university-matching funds, this new investment will reach more than $936,000, according to CenterState CEO. The awards have the potential to create 114 new, high-paying jobs and $38 million in new revenue for the region, the organization said. Through 10 rounds, CenterState CEO has awarded grants totaling more than $2 million to more than 41 companies. For the first time, companies could apply for an award in one of two categories, including $25,000 “Proof of Concept” grants for early-stage companies, and $150,000 “Concept to Marketplace” investments for later-stage companies. In this round, CenterState CEO selected four recipients from a pool of 27 applications to receive a “Proof of Concept” grant, and it se-

Company

University

Blue Highway

SUNY Upstate Cornell University Cornell University SUNY Upstate SUNY ESF

Captura Diagnostics Motion Intelligence Zinnia Safety Systems Rapid Cure Technologies Simple Admit TOTAL

Syracuse University

Grantsfor forGrowth GrowthRound Round 10 X Recipients Grants Recipients Industry County Total Awarded Information Onondaga $23,680 Technologies Mechanical Tompkins $25,000 Engineering Biomedical Tompkins $25,000

Total Match $23,805

New Jobs 6

New Revenue $7,250,000

$28,407

3

$840,000

$15,834

50

$10,000,000

Biomedical

Onondaga

$25,000

$45,131

9

$2,500,000

Biomedical

Onondaga

$150,000

$323,063

6

$5,500,000

Computer Science

Onondaga

$150,000

$500,000

40

$12,000,000

$398,680

$936,240

114

$38,090,000

SOURCE: CENTERSTATE CEO

To date, Grants for Growth has awarded 41 grants and investments totaling more than $2.25 million. It has leveraged matching funds of $5.1 million and follow on funding of $38.4 million. partners anticipate 679and jobs will beas created as atem result of these projects, with lected twoIndustry companies from a field Science Forestry it works for managing care for cancer the to generate more than $46.2 millionits inproducts, new revenue for the regional economy. of 18 potential for “Concept to Marketplace” to commercialize ac- survivors when their treatment is investments. cording to CenterState CEO. complete and their care is transiSince its inception, for Growth has Admit, leveraged participation of companies several CenterState CEOGrants awarded Simple whichthe is collabotioned back to theirfrom primary-care industry sectors and higher educational partners across seven counties. Currently, 129 “Concept to Marketplace” grants rating with Syracuse University, providers. professors six colleges universities are working withBlue businesses to Rapid Cure from Technologies, Inc. and is described as a new technology Highwayonis Grants workingforin Growth projects patents were filed thoughpartnership the first nine rounds the and Simple Admit. in the region, and that 55 replaces paper-based admiswith the ofSUNY program. Rapid Cure Technologies de- sions processes at medical facili- Upstate Cancer Center. velops customer-specific chemis- ties. Using a web-based system, Captura Diagnostics will use its try and process products in the patients can enter their complete funding as it continues commerAbout CenterState CEO and medical history online for immedi- cializing technology developed at coating, adhesive, sealant CenterState CEO is a regional business organization, chamber of commerce, elastomer (or CASE) markets. ate review leadership by their clinical team. Cornell University to isolateand cireconomic development strategist, based in Syracuse, New York. We represent 2,000 members The firm is collaborating with The “Proof of Concept” grant culating-cancer cells from patientof all sizes and serve the primary business resource and catalyst for development in a the State University of NewasYork recipients include Blue Highway, twelve-county area. We advocate for smart business, facilitate regional growth and promote See GRANTS FOR GROWTH, page 6B (SUNY) College of Environmental Inc., which will prototype a sysT:10 in community prosperity through results-driven partnerships, planning and problem solving. www.centerstateceo.com ###

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4 • The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

Schneiderman urges 15 health plans to implement pharmacy-exemption rules BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

A

ttorney General Eric Schneiderman on June 3 sent letters to 15 New York–based health-insurance plans, calling on them to change their policies to permit certain members to purchase specialty-drug prescriptions at retail pharmacies instead of through mandatory mailorder services. The letters urge the 15 companies to adopt “Specialty Prescription Drug Fulfillment Hardship Exception Criteria,” similar to one the attorney general helped negotiate earlier this year with Empire BlueCross BlueShield (BCBS).

Schneiderman’s office has sent letters of inquiry regarding specialty-pharmacy exemptions to Rochester–based Excellus BCBS, Schenectady–based MVP Health Care, and Minnetonka, Minn.–based UnitedHealthcare (NYSE: UNH), and Albany–based Capital District Physicians Health Plan. It also sent letters to Hartford, Conn.– based Aetna Inc.; New York City–based AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company; and Philadelphia–based CIGNA (NYSE: CI); New York City–based EmblemHealth, Inc., Fidelis Care New York, Healthfirst, HealthNow New York Inc., Independent Health, Oxford Health Plans, LLC, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of

America, and Indianapolis, Ind.–based WellPoint, Inc. The attorney general’s push to release health-plan members from “unnecessarily burdensome” mail-order requirements comes as the office’s health-care bureau helpline has received dozens of “hardship” complaints from health-care plan consumers relating to mail order and non-retail pharmacies’ requirements, Schneiderman’s office said. The bureau first intervened with Empire, among New York’s largest health-care plans, after the company notified its members that, as of Jan. 1, 2013, drugs on Empire’s “Exclusive Specialty Drug List” must be purchased through its specialty mail-order

pharmacy, CuraScript, and could no longer be obtained through retail pharmacies. Negotiations with Empire came as members complained that the insurance company’s new mandate would pose “undue hardships” for them, including “compromised privacy, delivery challenges, and interference in physician changes in drugdosing schedules,” the attorney general’s office said. Empire agreed to implement procedures that will permit qualifying members to be exempted from its specialty mail-order pharmacy mandate.  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

Peacemaker Program expands into Madison County BY JOURNAL STAFF

UTICA — The Peacemaker Program, Inc. announced it is now the court-designated provider of dispute-resolution services to all of Oneida and Madison counties. Previously, Peacemaker was the Community Dispute Resolution Center for Oneida County only. The New York State Unified Court System Office of Alternative Dispute

Resolution and Court Improvement Programs awarded Peacemaker this opportunity through a grantapplication process, according to a Peacemaker news release. Community mediation and family mediation programs are now available to residents of Madison County through the Peacemaker Program (www.thepeacemakerprogram.org), which is headquar-

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tered in Utica. The coverage includes cases currently engaged with family court, small claims court, and municipal courts, the organization said. Mediation is a process where participants have an opportunity to find their own solutions with the help of a neutral third person, Peacemaker notes. The nonprofit contends

that the programs are confidential, faster than a trial, inexpensive or free, and produce lasting, meaningful agreements. The Peacemaker Program reported $317,600 in total revenue and $365,324 total expenses in 2011, according to the latest available IRS Form 990 filing from the organization.  Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 5

June 7, 2013

SENTIMENT: May was a good month for consumer sentiment Continued from page 1

up 3.3 points from April, SRI said. New York’s consumer-sentiment index was 7.3 points lower than the figure for the entire nation of 84.5, which jumped 8.1 points from April, as measured by the University of Michigan’s consumersentiment index. May was a good month for consumer sentiment, says Douglas Lonnstrom, professor of statistics and finance at Siena College and SRI founding director. “Nationwide, it was up over eight points and that’s a big jump in one month,â€? he says, noting it’s the highest national consumer-sentiment figure since July 2007. New York’s overall sentiment was up more than three points, and for the “first time in a while,â€? all three of the sentiment indexes (overall, current, and future) are above their break-even point where “the good answers are better than the bad answers,â€? Lonnstrom says. He pointed to the recoveries in the housing, stock, and job markets as factors leading to the more ebullient consumers. When compared with the previous three years, the state’s overall-confidence sentiment of 77.2 is up 0.6 points from May 2012, up 9.6 points from May 2011, and has increased 9.2 points compared to May 2010, according to the SRI data. The sentiment index measured 55.7 in May 2008. Besides determining consumer sentiment, SRI’s monthly survey also examines respondents’ plans for buying big-ticket items in the next six months. In May, buying plans were up 1 point to 17.6 percent for major home improvements. Buying plans were down 2.7 points to 9.1 percent for cars and trucks, slipped 0.9 points to 13.8 percent for computers, fell 0.9 points to 21.8 percent for furniture, and decreased 1.3 points to 3.9 percent for homes. Even though most buying plans were down in May, Lonnstrom doesn’t believe the data tells the full story. “Car buying has been enormous the first half of this year,â€? Lonnstrom says. “Home prices have jumped substantially in the past year. And so now that starts to make that market dwindle a little bit ‌ knocking some of the potential buyers out,â€? he says. Those figures really aren’t that negative, he notes.

Gas and food prices

In SRI’s monthly analysis of gas and food prices, 69 percent of upstate respondents said the price of gas was having a serious impact on their monthly budgets, which is up from 68 percent in April. In addition, 57 percent of statewide respondents indicated concern about the price of gas, down from 59 percent in April, according to SRI. When asked about food prices, 71 percent of upstate respondents indicated their grocery bill was having a serious impact on their finances, down from 72 percent in April. About 68 percent of statewide respondents expressed concern about their food

On the Rise

Downstate

New York State

Upstate

Consumer confidence rises across the state

75 70 65 60 55

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bills, down from 70 percent in April. The same analysis also gauges the combined concern about food and gas prices. About 58 percent of upstate respondents are worried about the cost of both, up from 57 percent in April. The analysis also found 49 percent of all New York respondents had concerns about the price of both food and gas, down from 50 percent in April. SRI conducted its consumer-sentiment survey in May by random telephone calls to

813 New York residents over the age of 18. As consumer sentiment is expressed as an index number developed after statistical calculations to a series of questions, “margin of errorâ€? does not apply, SRI says. Buying plans, which are shown as a percentage based on answers to specific questions, have a margin of error of plus or minus 3.4 points, according to SRI. ď ą Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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6 • The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

FINANCIAL PLANNERS

THE LIST

Ranked by Assets Under Management

Research by Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com (315) 579-3911 Twitter: @cnybjresearch

5. . 7. 8. 9. . 11. . 13. . . 16. 17. . 19. . . 22. 23. 24. .

IBN Financial Services, Inc. 8035 Oswego Road Liverpool, NY 13089 (315) 652-4426/ibrokernet.com MassMutual Central New York 432 North Franklin St., Suite 50 Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 449-3000/cnyagency.com NBT Financial Group 52 S. Broad St. Norwich, NY 13815 (607) 337-2265/nbtbank.com Pinnacle Investments, LLC 507 Plum St., Suite 120 Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 251-1101/pinnacleinvestments.com

170

Investment

$1,390

Small Business

4.

238

Tax

3.

$152.6

Estate

2.

No. of CNY Financial Consultants 338

College

1.

Assets Under Management ($ millions) $2,476

Retirement

Rank

Name Address Phone/Website Security Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York 100 Court St. Binghamton, NY 13902 (607) 723-3551/smlny.com Primerica Inc. 6319 Fly Road East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 295-0642/primerica.com Northwestern Mutual —The Greater New York Group 34 Aspen Park Blvd. East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 671-1800/nmfn.com/thegreaternygroup AXA Advisors, LLC 120 Madison St., Suite 1900 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 425-6346/syracuse.axa-advisors.com

Financial

Types of Planning Offered

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

93 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Richard J. Doyle, Principal, RVP Christopher A. Royce, Principal

1977

An Alternate View—Reranked by No. of Financial Consultants

1,500 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Paul Dodd, Managing Partner

1879

1. Security Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York

338

2. Primerica

238

3. Northwestern Mutual- The Greater New York Group

170

No. of Fee-Paying Clients — Description of Compensation 0 — fee or commission

$1,573.5

75

1,000 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

$246

55

77 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

$990

55

2,700 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

$5,200

40

3,500 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Top Executive(s) Bruce W. Boyea, Chairman, President & CEO

Year Estab. 1886

1930

Y

Joseph DiMora, EVP Alexander Henn, VP Greg Ronneburger, VP Michael Fasulo, VP Steve DeRiancho, VP Richard J. Carlesco, CEO

Y

Y

Jon A. Law, President

2002

Y

Y

1856

1995

1995

4. AXA Advisors, LLC

75

5. IBN Financial Services, Inc.

55

Mass Mutual Central New York

55

7. NBT Financial Group

40

8. Pinnacle Investments, LLC

28

9. The Legend Group

25

M&T Bank

25

$1,150

28

2,600 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Timothy L. Brenner, EVP and President of Wealth Management Timothy J. Handy, Corporate SVP and COO Eric D. Krouse, CEO

$500

25

5,000 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Tom Bird, Registered Principal

1966

$1,000

25

— fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Allen J. Naples, President, Central New York Peter Newman, Binghamton Regional President

1856

$250

16

100 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y Daniel B. Jones, Managing Director

1857

$1,100

16

766 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

1870

$2,260.1

12

1,650 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

$1,500

12

— fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

David T. Griffith, President Scott A. George, President/CEO Retirement Plan Division

1947

$5

12

30 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Gregory S. Lesko, CEO Michael Lesko, President David J McClintock, CFO

1948

$880

10

450 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Alan R. Leist, Jr., CEO

1979

NOTES

$1,000

9

1,890 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Erik Hartmann, Senior Managing Director

1909

1. Company did not respond, Information is from last year.

$215

9

100 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Paul A. Spero, President

1985

Michael, Roberts Associates, Inc.1 112 Northern Concourse North Syracuse, NY 13212 (315) 428-1990/michaelrobertsassociates.com The Partners 825 Vestal Parkway West Vestal, NY 13850 (607) 754-1411/thepartners.com Diversified Wealth Strategies, LLC 5760 Commons Park Drive East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 446-5000/divwealth.com Ascent Wealth Partners 122 Business Park Drive, Suite 5 Utica, NY 13502 (315) 624-7300/ascentwealthpartners.com

$275

8

70 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Robert J. Dugan, President

1990

$300

8

70 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Edward P. Yetsko, SVP & Partner; Director of Financial Planning

1937

$121

8

0 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Gary R. Croniser, Comprehensive Wealth Manager

2008

What constitutes the CNY Region?

$300

7

50 — fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

2011

Blue Ocean Strategic Capital, LLC 333 W. Washington St., Suite 220 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 471-2672/boscllc.com AmeriCU Capital Management, LLC 231 Hill Road Rome, NY 13441 (315) 356-3300/americu.org Diversified Capital Management, LLC 100 Madison St., Suite 1200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 472-6221/diversifiedcapitalmanagement.com

$240

6

475 — fee-only

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Bradley M. Kowalczyk, Partner Mark E. Moshier, Partner Scott C. McCartney, Partner John L. Savage, Director, Retirement Plans Theodore J. Sarenski, President/ CEO Kevin E. VandenBerg, COO/CIO

Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

$100

5

500 — fee-only

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Mark A. Pfisterer, Chief Executive Manager

2004

$100

5

100 — fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

William T. Kriesel, Managing Member

1998

The Legend Group1 3532 James St., Suite 108 Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 422-5868/legendgroup.com M&T Bank1 101 S. Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 424-4039/mtb.com Northwestern Mutual — Utica 19 Campion Road New Hartford, NY 13413 (315) 731-5400/utica.nmfn.com First Niagara Financial Group 126 North Salina St., Suite 500 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 477-6000/firstniagara.com Tompkins Financial Advisors 119 E. Seneca St. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 273-0037/tompkinsfinancialadvisors.com M. Griffith Investment Services, Inc. 555 French Road, Building 2 New Hartford, NY 13413 (315) 797-0130/mgriffithinc.com Lesko Financial Services, Inc. 53 Chenango St., 2nd Floor Binghamton, NY 13901 (607) 724-2421/leskofinancial.com Strategic Financial Services 114 Business Park Drive Utica, NY 13502 (315) 724-1776/investstrategic.com RBC Wealth Management 5790 Widewaters Parkway Syracuse, NY 13214 (315) 423-1400/rbcwm-usa.com United Financial Services 4769 Buckley Road Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 451-5885/unitedfinancialservices.org

David A. Kavney, Central NY Market Executive

Gregory Hartz, President 1891 Michelle Benedict-Jones, Managing Director & Chief Operations Officer

1998

ABOUT THE LIST Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations.

Need a copy of a list? Electronic versions of all our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website, cnybj.com/Research.aspx

Want to be on the list? If your company would like to be considered for next year’s list, or another list, please email ncollins@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 7

June 7, 2013

50 is the Magic Number for Small Business this Year T

his year’s celebration of National Small Business Week (June 17-21) will mark the 50th consecutive year that the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has designated a special week to recognize this major engine in the national, as well as the Syracuse–area economy. Statistics speak for themselves about the significance of small business. The SBA reports that the United States is home to nearly 28 million small businesses, representing 99.7 percent of all employer firms and employing almost half of all private-sector employees. These small businesses pay 43 percent of the total U.S. private-sector payroll and have created 64 percent of net new jobs in the 18 years leading up to 2011. In the Syracuse metropolitan statistical area (MSA), 2010 U.S. VIEWPOINT Census figures show we have 11,998 small businesses (defined as those employing fewer than 500 employees) in Onondaga, Oswego, and Madison counties. Of those, 10,255 businesses, or 85 percent, have fewer than 20 employees. Overall, small businesses employ 125,829 individuals in the Syracuse MSA. But behind these numbers, the face of small business is changing — to one that is more seasoned than ever before. National studies show more people over the age of 50 are starting small businesses today. These so-called “encore entrepreneurs� are the fastest growing group of new business owners in the U.S. Why would seniors, at their stage in life, take on the financial and emotional risks of being an encore entrepreneur? The reasons are insightful. Some seniors are financially secure and want to pursue their dream business at last. Or they are in a position to offer a not-forprofit business service — one meeting a social need and providing a positive community impact. But other seniors are starting a business out of necessity. They need to supplement their retirement fund battered by the Great Recession or to find alternative employment in a difficult job market. Locally, this age group is sizable. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the median age for Onondaga County is 38.6 years, and the average among all three

PAUL PICHOSKE

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counties in the Syracuse MSA is 38.9 years. Additional figures show nearly one-quarter, or 23.7 percent, of Onondaga County residents, and 23.9 percent of all Syracuse MSA residents, are between the ages of 50 and 69 in the prime market segment for encore entrepreneurs. Financial institutions, like First Niagara Bank, are tailoring services to assist both senior start-ups as well as all small-business ventures. Last year, it created a special business unit dedicated to serving small-busi-

ness customers in its five geographic areas. Earlier this year, First Niagara supported that with enhanced business-checking products designed to save small-business owners money. For those age 50-plus looking to start their own business, the SBA also supports “encore entrepreneurs� through several partnerships, including one with AARP, and its own 50-plus tool kit to help them start or own their business. So as we salute the importance of small

business this June, 50 is the magic number to keep in mind — 50 for the consecutive years of celebrating National Small Business Week and 50-plus for the age group representing the hottest wave of new small-business owners. ď ą Paul Pichoske is Central New York small business team leader for First Niagara Bank, overseeing the Syracuse, Rochester, Binghamton, Utica, Ithaca, and North Country markets.

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Tompkins Financial Advisors has been helping people in Central New York to build, preserve and protect their wealth for over 100 years. Unlike many wealth managers, we offer a full suite of services. That enables us to fully customize a plan for youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whatever your financial objectives, risk tolerance or portfolio size. And with 100 years of experience, we have the knowledge to guide you through the inevitable ups and downsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and help you to achieve your goals. For generations, our team approach to managing wealth has given our clients peace of mind. We look forward to doing the same for you. Talk to one of our Wealth Advisors by calling 800-274-4003.

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8 â&#x20AC;˘ The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

FINANCIAL PLANNERS

THE LIST

Ranked by Assets Under Management Types of Planning Offered

. 33. 34. 35. 36.

Investment

.

Small Business

30.

Tax

29.

Estate

28.

College

27.

Retirement

26.

Financial

Rank

Name Address Phone/Website Lipe & Dalton Investment Counsel, Inc. 109 S. Warren St., Suite 1107 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 428-8588/lipeanddalton.com Primerica Inc. 6319 Fly Road East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 295-0642/primerica.com Diversified Wealth Strategies, LLC 5760 Commons Park Drive East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 446-5000/divwealth.com Blue Water Capital Management, LLC 1001 James St. Syracuse, NY 13203 (315) 438-8690/bluewatercm.com AmeriCU Capital Management, LLC 231 Hill Road Rome, NY 13441 (315) 356-3300/americu.org Koenig & Selzer Asset Management Group 134 Stanwood, Suite L Manlius, NY 13104 (315) 637-1640 /koenigselzer.com Diversified Capital Management, LLC 100 Madison St., Suite 1200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 472-6221/diversifiedcapitalmanagement.com Edward S. Green & Associates, LLC 110 W. Fayette St., Suite 900 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 701-6329 Cuddy Financial Services 7 William St. Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 252-3600/cuddyfinancial.com Armory Capital Management, LLC 110 W. Fayette St., Suite 900 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 701-6452/armorycm.com HighPoint Advisors, LLC 5900 North Burdick St., Suite 100 East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 627-0474/highpointadv.com

Research by Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com (315) 579-3911 Twitter: @cnybjresearch

N

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

93 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Richard J. Doyle, Principal Christopher A. Royce, Principal

1977

8

0 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Gary R. Croniser, Comprehensive Wealth Manager

2008

$119

3

370 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee-only

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

John A. Paganelli, COO & CFO

2007

$100

5

500 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee-only

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Mark A. Pfisterer, Chief Executive Manager

2004

$100

2

50 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Jon Selzer, Senior Partner Harvey Koenig, Senior Partner

1995

$100

5

100 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

William T. Kriesel, Managing Member

1998

WHAT CONSTITUTES THE CNY REGION? Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

Assets Under Management ($ millions) $202

No. of CNY Financial Consultants 2

$152.6

238

$121

No. of Fee-Paying Clients â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Description of Compensation 120 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee-only

Top Executive(s) Williard C. Lipe, III, Co-founder Patrick M. Dalton, Co-founder

Year Estab. 2004

$85

2

140 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee-only

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Edward S. Green, CEO, Principal

2000

$69

2

20 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee or commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Daniel R. Cuddy, President & CEO, Advisory Representative

2004

Gary A. Grossman, Principal Steven J. St. Amour, Principal Henry J. Wildhack II, Investment Advisor Y Kristopher Wadsworth, Managing Partner Mathew Barber, Managing Partner Adam (AJ) Loedel, Managing Partner

2009

$37

2

67 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee-only

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

$30

4

148 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fee and commission

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

2011

ABOUT THE LIST Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations.

NEED A COPY OF A LIST? Electronic versions of all our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website, cnybj.com/Research.aspx

WANT TO BE ON THE LIST? If your company would like to be considered for next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list, or another list, please email ncollins@cnybj.com

Strategic

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So when it comes to your retirement plan â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are you Strategic?

With a step-by-step approach, we hope to bring your most lofty dreams to fruition. We are a unique, fee-based fiduciary advisory, and we promise to make your financial wellbeing our first priority.

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investstrategic.com 6HFXULWLHVRIIHUHGWKURXJK&DGDUHW*UDQW &R,QF0HPEHU),15$6,3&6WUDWHJLF)LQDQFLDO6HUYLFHVDQG&DGDUHW*UDQWDUHVHSDUDWHHQWLWLHV


The Central New York Business Journal • 9

June 7, 2013

★★★★★★★ CNY BEST AWARDS ★★★★★★★

CNY ASTD honors BEST Learning and Performance Award winners CONTENT SUBMITTED BY THE CNY ASTD

SYRACUSE — The winners of the sixth annual CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards were announced at CNY ASTD’s (Central New York Chapter of the American Society for Training & Development) CNY BEST awards ceremony on Thursday, June 6. The CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards recognize excellence in learning and performance practices in the Central New York area. Organizations, consultants, and internships that have linked learning to strategic growth or success were recognized as CNY’s BEST in Learning and Performance. The keynote speaker for this year’s awards ceremony was Mark Britz, manager of corporate training for Systems Made Simple, who discussed “The Shift.” Britz described the opportunity for learning and development to lead organizations to even greater success through the ongoing changes in systems and structures in these turbulent times. Nominations for this year’s CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards represented a wide range of organizations. A panel of local and national judges representing the profession and community evaluated the nominations for quality of learning and performance practices, practice results, and demonstrations of how the practices linked to the strategic growth or success of the organization. The winners are as follows.

LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE INTERNSHIP

to be successful in post-secondary opportunities and/or employment. The judges stated there was “a clear alignment between the internship program and the success of students” noting that these internships were “a key component of an increase in high school graduation rates.”

CONSULTANT  goFLUENT, Inc. The consultant recognized for helping link learning to clients’ strategic growth or success was goFLUENT, Inc. for its English@O-I program. Responding to the needs of a Fortune 500 U.S.–based company, goFLUENT developed an innovative, personalized, blended learning (eLearning, telephone lessons, online coaching) business English training program to help employees improve business English skills to a level to facilitate accurate, efficient, and professional communication between employees and international clients. The program provides uniform quality of training for globally distributed employees, addressing the specific English needs of any employees regardless of their level, native language, or professional profile. The client’s learner level growth has improved across all countries, attracting more learners every year. The judges acknowledged a “creative, effective plan and friendly e-learning solution for a highly complex need and deployment.”

NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

 LaFayette Big Picture High School

 Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare

LaFayette Big Picture High School was recognized for its Learning Through Internship program providing internship opportunities for college or high-school students, contributing to the interns’ learning progress or success while linking to the organization’s strategic growth or success. At LaFayette Big Picture High School, internships are key to student learning. Internships enable students to improve their education and personal growth while addressing their interests, passion, and curiosity with personalized learning plans under the guidance of school advisers and workforce mentors. Working with local businesses and organizations, students start with job shadowing, and then develop projects that benefit their learning while also contributing back to the internship site. Students learn skills needed

The not-for-profit organization recognized for linking learning for its internal and external stakeholders to the organization’s strategic growth or success was Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare for its Aspiring Leader Program. Since the consolidation of two hospitals creating Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare, leadership development has been identified as an area of need. As learning opportunities for existing managers grew, Faxton St. Luke’s realized it needed to do more to develop future leaders. The Aspiring Leader Program provides a comprehensive approach with foundational skill development, an understanding of the organization culture, as well as experiential team projects that benefit the organization. Participation in the program has led to promotional opportunities for many of its graduates while providing Faxton St. Luke’s with a vehicle to increase leadership benchstrength with individuals who are committed

to the organization. The judges remarks included “excellent response to meet organization’s needs, excellent results with evidence of proven success, and strong focus on continuous improvement.”

FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION  SavOn, LLC The for-profit organization recognized for linking employee learning to the organization’s strategic growth or success was SavOn, LLC for its Managing the Legendary Guest Service Experience program. Following the implementation of a successful mystery shopper program, SavOn’s guest service experience had become good, but not exceptional or “legendary.” To stand out from the competition and drive customer loyalty, SavOn knew they needed to engage their employees at the grassroots level and shape their business culture to deliver consistently outstanding service. The SavOn Legendary Service Experience program engages SavOn employees in recognizing above and beyond moments in guest service through written nominations that then serve as examples of best practices for the rest of the SavOn team. This concentrated focus on guest service in its stores has significantly improved both its guest experience and retail-business metrics. The judges’ observations included “it’s clear that the company values customer service with a strong connection between their mission/values and their desire to improve their customer’s experience,” and “a very impressive customer centric program with a strong organizational investment.”

JOHN BURNS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS    

Steven DeHart Wendy Carl Isome Nona Gormley Stephen Sauriol

In addition to recognizing excellence in learning and performance practices, CNY ASTD awarded CNY ASTD John Burns Memorial Scholarship Awards to Steven DeHart and Wendy Carl Isome and recognized Nona Gormley and Stephen Sauriol for their recent CPLP designation. CNY ASTD established the CNY ASTD Scholarship Program to encourage and support continuing education and professional development in the field of workforce learning and performance. The scholarship awards are named in honor of CNY ASTD’s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award winner John Burns. The CPLP (Certified Professional in Learning & Performance) is a credential for learning and performance professionals offered by the ASTD Certification Institute. The CPLP designation is a recognition that

you have met performance standards, have an overall understanding of the body of knowledge of your field, and can apply your knowledge successfully.

About CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards CNY ASTD is in the sixth year of recognizing excellence in learning and performance practices in the Central New York area with the CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards. Past CNY BEST Learning and Performance Award recipients have included: Aspen Dental Management, Inc.; Completely Organized, Inc.; EnergyWright; Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce; Institute for Veterans and Military Families; ITT Technologies; Laboratory Alliance of CNY; LaFayette Big Picture School; Loretto; MACNY (The Manufacturers Association of Central New York); Mohawk Valley Manufacturers Consortium; New Horizons Computer Learning Center; North Syracuse Central School District; Oneida Nation Enterprises; Rescue Mission Alliance of Syracuse; SRC; Saab Sensis; SavOn; Time Warner Cable; and Westcott Community Center. This year, CNY ASTD received nominations representing a wide-range of organizations including: Crouse Hospital; Dale Carnegie of Central NY; Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare; goFLUENT, Inc.; ITT Corporation; LaFayette Big Picture High School; New Horizons Computer Learning Center of Syracuse and Rochester; REACH CNY, Inc. – HIV/STI & Viral Hepatitis Regional Training Center; SavOn, LLC; and Welch Allyn. The distinguished panel of judges for the 2013 CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards represented local and national individuals from the profession and community including: Jane Amico, CenterState CEO; Rita Barger, Insight Instrcutional Design and CNY ASTD president elect; Pamela Brunet, Leadership Greater Syracuse; Karen Zannini Bull, M.Ed., Onondaga Community College; Michelle Cooper, Oneida Nation Enterprises; Pamela E. Gavenda, CNY SHRM president; Kim Gessini, Suburban Propane, LLC; Bruce F. Hamm, MACNY; Eileen Hudack, independent business process analysis and learning consultant; Kelli Loveless, ESL Federal Credit Union and Genesee Valley ASTD president; Kevin McCartan, AXA Equitable; Jamie Millard, Lexington Leadership and ASTD national advisor for chapters; and Maria Salomone, ITT Corporation - Industrial Process. CNY ASTD (CNY Chapter of American Society for Training & Development) serves learning and performance professionals in Central New York. Celebrating its 40th anniversary, CNY ASTD has been connecting learning and performance professionals throughout the region while contributing to the growth of its members and the recognition of the profession. Currently, CNY ASTD has more than 125 members from various businesses in the region. 


10 • The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

SCOLARO: The firm’s former health-care practice group is forming its own law firm Continued from page 1

ees, most of whom are full-time employees, says Fetter.

Health-care practice group starts new firm

The Scolaro firm’s former health-care practice group is forming its own law firm with the name Cohen Compagni Beckman Appler & Knoll, PLLC. The five partners in the new firm are Stephen Cohen, Michael Compagni, Marc Beckman, John Appler, and Andrew Knoll. The new firm has eight lawyers who are leaving the Scolaro firm to form their new “boutique” firm, says Cohen. “We primarily do health-care work. We have clients from San Diego to Maine, from Florida to Oregon, and most of the places in between,” Cohen says. The firm employs a total of 13 people, including the eight attorneys, one paralegal, and support-staff members, Cohen adds. Word of the potential changes at the Scolaro law firm first surfaced in the middle of March. In an article titled, “Scolaro firm warns staff of possible health-care practice exit” in the March 22, 2013 issue of The Central New York Business Journal, former president and CEO Barry Shulman said the firm had notified the staff on March 18 that the health-care practice might break off to join a downstate law firm. Cohen, in a June 5 interview, confirmed that the health-care practice group had con-

photo courtesy of scolaro

The exterior of 507 Plum St. in Franklin Square where both law firms will continue their practices. sidered aligning itself with another “large, health-care firm” in the Long Island area. “We chose not to do that, but instead to form our own firm” Cohen says. At the same time, Shulman is also leaving the Scolaro firm to join the Syracuse law firm of Gilberti Stinziano Heintz & Smith, P.C., according to Cohen. The Scolaro firm also addressed the separation of its former health-care practice group. “Our former health care department has

established its own firm to service their clients’ special needs and we look forward to continuing to work with one another when our clients require services provided by the other,” according to a document the Scolaro firm provided The Business Journal, announcing its new name and structure. Cohen says that forming a new law firm was a logical move. “We felt that because of the sub-specialty that was involved in our practice … it just made sense to be in a

separate practice,” he says. The attorneys in both firms believe that they can “better serve” their clients in this structure, Fetter says in an interview. “What they do is so different from what we do … we’re going to continue together on the areas in which neither of us have our own expertise,” Fetter says. The two firms have an agreement whereby they serve “of counsel” to each other, Fetter adds. The firms started operating as separate entities at the start of this month and are signing separate leases with The Pioneer Companies for space on the third floor of their Plum Street building, Cohen says. With the health-care group now practicing on its own, the new Scolaro firm’s practice areas include tax, business, employee benefits, trusts, and estate administration. Its attorneys advise clients in areas that include the structure and operation of closely held and family businesses, according to the Scolaro firm’s announcement. Scolaro lawyers also work with business owners in developing estate and businesssuccession plans, as well as helping clients in acquiring, selling, or reorganizing their businesses, the firm said. The firm’s specialty areas also serve clients in matrimonial and family matters and business and estate litigation. Scolaro, Fetter, Grizanti, McGough & King also has offices in Rochester and Stuart, Fla., according to its announcement. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 11

June 7, 2013

FINANCIAL DATA

Kids Oneida

Revenue Sources

Contributions & Grants Program Services Investment Income Other

Phone: (315) 792-9039 www.kidsoneida.org

Total Revenue

KEY STAFF

PRESIDENT retired educator/administrator VICE PRESIDENT EVP of Administration at Herkimer County Community College TREASURER/SECRETARY Attorney

Nicholas Laino

Scott Godkin

BOARD MEMBERS Crystal Bass Steven J. Brown David Bruno Rosario Dalia Scott Godkin Nicholas F. Laino Gail Rice Robert J. Roberts, III James Salamy Paul Vitagliano, Jr.

Kids Oneida facts  Founded: 1996  Full-time Employees: 96  Volunteers: 15  Service area: Oneida, Herkimer, Delaware, Steuben counties

MISSION “Empowering children and families.”

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Intensive Preventive, Step Down, Return Home Early, Kids Herkimer, Family Nurturing Center, case planning

RECENT ORGANIZATIONAL HIGHLIGHTS Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce Not-for-Profit Business of the Year, affiliation with Family Nurturing Center, White House Council for Community Solutions recognition, 2013 Executive of the Year in the Nonprofit Awards by BizEventz

PLANNING/FUNDRAISING OUTLOOK FOR 2013 Nicholas D. Laino Golf Classic to benefit Kids Oneida, Par 4 Kids Ladies Golf Tournament, PhotoVoice, Mental Health Luncheon, Mothers Day annual celebration, KO-Turkey Drive and Adopt-AFamily

$6,483,064

Expenditures Salaries & Employee Benefits Other

$2,724,290 $3,500,149

Total Expenses Surplus for the Year

$6,224,439 $258,625

it

Robert J. Roberts, III $94,216 Steven Bulger Ellie Luker Katie Weldon

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS Rosario Dalia

$23,096 $6,135,701 $8,009 $316,258

rof r np ne No or C

310 Main St. Utica, NY 13501

CEO/Executive Director CEO/Executive-Director Compensation Director of Operations Controller/General Counsel Interim Clinical Director

Profiling local nonprofit organizations

Fiscal year ending Dec. 31, 2011

Kids Oneida grows, collects honors BY NICOLE COLLINS JOURNAL STAFF

UTICA — Kids Oneida is gaining recognition from one organization after another, while growing its staff and programming throughout the Mohawk Valley. Kids Oneida is a home and communitybased organization that provides individualized traditional and non-traditional services to the highest risk youth with social, emotional, and behavioral challenges, with the vision of “keeping families together.” In 2012, Kids Oneida helped more than 800 families in four counties — Oneida, Herkimer, Steuben, and Delaware. In February 2012, two Kids Oneida programs were recognized by the White House Council for Community Solutions for having a positive impact on the community. Kids Herkimer and the Return Home Early programs were described in a Herkimer County case study as programs that helped reduce the number of children in foster care by 54 percent from 2003-2011. It was this reduction that caught the council’s attention. The White House Council for Community Solutions, established by President Obama in 2010, draws on a diverse group of national leaders to connect communities with resources and strategies that will continue to help them affect positive change, the council says. In December, Kids Oneida was recognized as a Nonprofit Business of the Year by the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce. In March, CEO and Executive Director Bob Roberts won an Executive of the Year award at the annual Nonprofit Awards, an event produced by The Mohawk Valley Business Journal’s sister company, BizEventz. The organization is also in the clinic application process with the New York

State Office of Mental Health to become a local mental-health clinic. Roberts anticipates the application to be approved sometime later this year. On March 1, the Family Nurturing Center of Utica became a division of Kids Oneida. When the founder of the Family Nurturing Center, Donna LaTourElefante, died in October 2012, the board did not have a succession plan in place. Roberts approached the board and suggested an affiliation between the two organizations because they have similar missions. The center’s mission was to enhance personal development, relationship and family-functioning of children, adolescents, and adults through nurturing interaction, educational services, and information. As a result, the alliance provides a new division that further strengthens Kids Oneida’s overall goal to keep families together. So far, the transition has been smooth, and the staff has embraced the change, according to Roberts. “Everyone’s done their best to keep up with their end of the bargain,” says Roberts. One of the next steps will be integrating and rebranding the Family Nurturing Center program, but Roberts says the details of that haven’t been addressed yet and it’s too premature to cut anything. The Family Nurturing Center this year could add $1 million in revenue to Kids Oneida, which generates more than $6 million. Kids Oneida has also seen growth in employees since Roberts took the helm in January 2010. In addition to the 37 staff members from the Family Nurturing Center, another 20some employees joined the Kids Oneida staff, bringing the organization to a total of 96 full-time employees. About four years ago, Kids Oneida bought the three-story building on 310

Main St. in Utica for its expanding organization. “It made good business sense to purchase our own property,” Roberts says. The organization outgrew its previous space on 1500 Genesee St., about a mileand-a-half away. The Family Nurturing Center staff moved from their location on Elizabeth Street and now occupies the third story of the Kids Oneida building. Even with 31,000 square feet, Roberts says the nonprofit is already outgrowing this space. At press time, only two desks were open. A few staff members also work from of county office buildings Roberts has been affiliated with Kids Oneida for more than 10 years. He worked with Kids Oneida while in college at SUNYIT studying finance. He worked as a contract provider in 2002, left for a bit to work in the private sector, then was recruited back in 2007, starting in the role of director of business and finance. Shortly after, the former CEO and Executive Director, J. Michael Daly, promoted him to chief operating officer. After Daly left, the board of directors performed a search for a new director, and Roberts was appointed CEO and executive director in January 2010. “I feel very fortunate to have a great career at my age in my home community,” says Roberts. He is 34 years old. Originally from the Utica area, Roberts is an advocate for living and working in one’s home community. He attended college here and now lives here with his own family, which, like the organization he runs, is also growing. He and his wife welcomed their second child, a daughter, in February. They also have a two-and-ahalf-year-old son. “This is a great place to raise a family,” say Roberts.  Contact Collins at ncollins@cnybj.com

FRITO-LAY: The plant is a model of energy-efficiency and recycling Continued from page 1

Kirkwood, just a few miles from downtown Binghamton. Listening to its customers yielded Frito-Lay $13.6 billion in revenue last year and an operating profit before taxes of $3.65 billion (26.9 percent profit margin). Of the 48,000 employees companywide, the “Kirkwood plant employs 530 — 330 in manufacturing, 100 in traffic, and 100 in the warehouse,” notes Hamilton. “The plant opened in November 1974 with 130,000 square feet and about 120 employees. In 1978, we added a warehouse

with 65,000 feet and another 46,000 feet in the 1990s,” continues Hamilton. “The plant now [covers] close to 250,000 square feet and is [sited] on 43 acres (The company owns the site and building.) … [Our facility] has eight production lines going three shifts a day, seven days a week, and produces more than 100 million pounds of finished product annually, which includes Lay’s Potato Chips (regular, salt and vinegar, BBQ, sour cream and onion, cheddar), Ruffles, Lay’s Wavy, Fritos, Doritos, Tostitos, and Santitas. “Kirkwood is a highly automated opera-

tion,” says Hamilton. “Frito-Lay takes in 2 million pounds of potatoes every week … We unload the trailers at one end of the plant, wash and peel them; slice them according to the product; and fry, flavor, and package them for storage and shipment at the other end … Sourcing relies on justin-time inventory deliveries … The plant also processes about 52 million pounds of corn annually … We have 30 maintenance people on staff to ensure our production schedules and 35 tractors and 200 trailers for delivery to our customers, which are located primarily in Upstate and in New

England.” Kirkwood inventories 228 different stock-keeping units. “We buy potatoes from all over the country, although 50 percent of our supply comes from [the province of] Ontario,” adds Hamilton. From the time the crop arrives, we turn it into potato chips within a day and a half. Our corn supply comes by rail from Sydney, Ill., and our corn oil comes in by truck … The purchasing is done from [corporate headquarters] in Plano, Texas … Binghamton is well-located to serve our See FRITOLAY, page 15


Inc. in 2006. The firm grew its presence with the acquisition of certain clients from DM Systems, Inc. of Syracuse the following year. a reseller accounting, human12SWK â&#x20AC;˘ TheisCentral Newof York Business Journal resources, and customer-relationship-management applications from Sage Software of Irvine, Calif. SWK, a subsidiary of SilverSun Technologies, Inc. (OCTBB: SSNT), is also a certified developer for Sage, meaning it can modify and customize Sage applications and even create new programs based on Sage code. The software-reselling industry has gone through a series of consolidations over the years, Melvin says. The SWK business model is to â&#x20AC;&#x153;go out and acquire smaller resellers that either â&#x20AC;Ś donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

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June 7, 2013

OPINION

BUSINESS JOURNAL C E N T R A L

N E W

Y O R K

Color my pork purple

Volume 27, No. 23 - June 7, 2013 NEWS Editor-in-Chief .......................Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com Associate Editor ............Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com Staff Writers ............................. Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com ....................................................Norm Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Contributing Writers ...............Traci DeLore Production Manager ......................Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com Research Manager................. Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com SALES Sr. Account Managers ...................................... Bernard B. Bregman bbregman@cnybj.com Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Marketing ......................BBB Marketing Inc. CIRCULATION Circulation Management...(315) 579-3927 ADMINISTRATIVE Publisher..........................Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Chief Operating Officer .....Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com Business Manager .................... Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL (ISSN #1050-3005) is published every week by CNY Business Review, Inc. All contents copyrighted 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. Cover Price $2 Subscription Rate $89 per year Call (800) 836-3539

HOW TO REACH US MAIL: Send letters to: Editor, The Central New York Business Journal 269 W. Jefferson St. Syracuse, N.Y. 13202-1230 EMAIL: letters@cnybj.com PHONE: (315) 472-3104

The Central New York Business Journal • 13

M

ix red and blue colors and you get a purple byproduct. The same thing happened when Republicans (red) and Democrats (blue) in Congress offered up their latest versions of the farm bill. The last farm bill was authorized in 2008 and projected spending $604 billion over 10 years. The new House and Senate agricultural-committee versions project a 60 percent increase over the 2008 allocation, according to the Congressional Budget Office. The basic disagreement now between the House and Senate agricultural committees is limited to whether the new authorization FROM THE should be $963 billion PUBLISHER or $950 billion over 10 years. When I see the term “farm bill,” I instinctively think images of “The Grapes of Wrath,” starring a poor, struggling farmer in overalls plowing a field with a withered horse. Remember that the original farm bill was written in 1933, during the depths of the Great Depression, to help farmers survive the hazards of the Dust Bowl. The image, however, bears no resemblance to reality. Former President Jimmy Carter and his family pocketed $272,288 in subsidy payments between 1995 and 2012. During the same period, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack received $82,874 while his undersecretary collected over $1 million. Mark and David Rockefeller were beneficiaries of farm-bill payments to the tune of $947,075, and elected Congressional representatives Frank Lucas and Charles Grassley took in a $1 million together while sitting on their respective agricultural committees. Topping the list is Riceland Foods, Inc., the world’s largest miller and marketer of rice. The company, with more than $1.5 billion in annual sales, collected $554.3 million. It’s clear that the farm bill has morphed from a government effort to help desperate farmers stabilize crop prices and insure any crop losses, to a welfare program for

NORMAN POLTENSON

Calling All Opinion Writers The Business Journal is seeking to provide its readers with more opinion articles and more opposing viewpoints. The goal would be to publish a set of “Points/Counterpoints” on various issues of importance to businesses. The topics could include: • Economic-development policies • Entrepreneurship • Green business • Government spending • Taxes and regulations • Public-sector compensation and

“What’s most interesting to me is that no one inside the Beltway is asking whether farmers still need government assistance to manage the risks associated with farming.” prosperous farmers and even for those who don’t operate farms. I’m pretty sure there are no farms in Manhattan, yet the government still disbursed $9 million in subsidies over seven years to borough residents. Add to this $4.7 billion in subsidies for the Nature Conservancy (1995-2012) which, ironically, opposes the conversion of natural habitat to cropland, and the Audubon Society, which accepted $932,801. In addition to subsidizing prosperous Americans, the so-called farm bill also dispenses large sums for the nation’s foodstamp program, forestry projects, the energy and telecommunication (broadband deployment) industries, and for rural development. In fact, almost 80 percent of the nearly $1 trillion proposed supports just food stamps, which leads some to suggest that we rename the legislation the “foodstamp bill.” What’s most interesting to me is that no one inside the Beltway is asking whether farmers still need government assistance to manage the risks associated with farming. In the 80 years since the original farm bill was passed, technology has eliminated many of the risks that used to plague farmers, who today can manage their businesses without taxpayer subsidies by purchasing futures contracts, using credit reserves, employing crop diversification, and buying private insurance. The time seems appropriate to consider ending taxpayer subsidies, since the USDA forecasts that net farm income will reach $128 billion this year, the highest level in four decades. Is Congress likely to reduce its support of those feeding at the “farm-bill” trough? The pork dispensed in this 1,000-page piece of benefits • Unions • Health-care reform and costs Have an opinion about any of these topics or others? Please send us your opinion in the form of a letter or opinion article to letters@ cnybj.com. Here are some general guidelines for how to compose your opinion piece: • Length should be no more than 800 words. • It should be written for a business audience — specifically business owners and managers. The topic must affect and appeal to this audience. • Pick a theme or trend you want to focus on and then build your opinion around that,

legislation is too tempting, especially since urban and rural interests have been bundled with those of environmentalists and the energy and telecommunications industries. Any differences between Republicans and Democrats on the final farm-bill legislation are only at the margins. The effects of the new farm bill will be particularly perverse. Wealthy farmers will become even more wealthy, driving up their demand for farmland. This, in turn, raises the price to small farmers and squeezes them out of the market or into niche markets. The nation’s obesity problem is concentrated among the recipients of food stamps, who now will benefit from a 60 percent increase in taxpayer largesse. The taxpayers can also be expected to pick up the bloated health-care tab as the food-stamp recipients require more medical care. Environmental groups will receive more money to convert our natural resources into farmland, which runs counter to their mission. They are encouraging wealthy farmers to plant crops on marginal farm lands that will require more chemical management. And the legislators, who benefit from the very bills they pass, will continue to ignore the obvious conflict of interest that would be considered criminal in the private sector. What a deal! Taxpayers pay the bill and consumers pay higher prices for the food they buy. I hope that our elected representatives in Washington will be struck by a bolt of logic, but optimism eludes me. If they can’t go cold turkey and eliminate the farm bill that’s now being considering for renewal, let them at least seriously reform the program by separating food stamps from agricultural programs, eliminating direct payments, cap the crop-insurance subsidies, and limit farm subsidies to small farmers. Painting pork purple does not help the commonweal. Republicans and Democrats would better serve the country by delivering a powerful example of cutting federal spending and thereby setting the economy on a course toward fiscal soundness.  Norman Poltenson is publisher of The Central New York Business Journal. Contact him at npoltenson@cnybj.com making your key points. We find that lists and bullet points work well to get your views across to the reader. • Include a tag line at the bottom that tells the reader who you are (name, hometown, organization) and how to contact you (e-mail address). For example: John Doe of Syracuse is managing partner at Doe Wood Smith LLC. Contact him at jdoe@dwsllc.com. • Article must be in Word format • The Business Journal will edit the article, including cutting out portions, to fit space as it sees fit. So whether you’re a conservative, progressive, or anything in between, please get your opinion seen and send it to: letters@cnybj. com


14 • The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

Business Calendar

OF EVENTS

June 10 n Cayuga County 20th Annual Chamber Cup Tournament at the Lakeview Country Club in Auburn. Follow this link to register: https://adobeformscentral. com/?f=PKJ9wADzTekS-diyOUzRCQ

June 12 n Women TIES Greater Skaneateles Luncheon: “Growing Your Business with Great Online Marketing” from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sherwood Inn, 26 W. Genesee St., Skaneateles. The presenter will be Janelle Fields, owner of JFields Marketing. This program is open to women entrepreneurs and independent sales women. The cost is $29. For more information on the program, or to make a reservation by June 10, visit www.womenties.com or call (315) 708-4288.

June 18 n Social Media & Internet Tools Group from 9 to 10 a.m. SUNY Center for Professional Development, 6333 Route 298, Suite 102, DeWitt. CNY ASTD hosts an informal group for discussions on social media and internet tools in a research, sharing experiences, and learning environment; the topic will be password management. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@ cnyastd.org n Syracuse Chapter of International Association of Administrative Professionals meeting at 6 p.m. at VHA Empire-Metro, 5000 Campuswood Drive, East Syracuse. RSVP by June 13 via this link: www.jotform.com/form/12401111357. The program is free for members and waived for students and non-Syracuse Chapter members. The dinner and program cost is $12 for members, $12 for students and non-Syracuse Chapter members. For more information, visit www.iaap-syracuse.org or contact Theresa at iaapsyrvicepres@ gmail.com

June 19 n Business At Its Best 2013 – Greater Oneida Chamber of Commerce to honor Kingsley Real Estate at noon at the Kallet Civic Center in Oneida. The Greater Oneida Chamber of Commerce awards the Business At Its Best honor annually to an area busi-

ness for its extraordinary hard work and dedication and positive impact in our community. Tickets are available for the event at $25 per person and include lunch. For more information or to buy tickets, visit www. oneidachamberny.org/batb2013, or call the chamber at (315) 363-4300. n 2013 Albany Matchmaker & Expo – Opening Doors to Government Contracting SBA from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Albany Marriott, 189 Wolf Road, Albany. The cost is $45 per person, maximum two attendees per small business. For details and registration information, visit www.sba. gov/albanymatchmaker

June 20 n CNY ASTD Member Orientation from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Sandler Training/DB&B Peak Performance Management, 443 N. Franklin St., Ste. 100, Syracuse. CNY ASTD will discuss why and how to make the most of membership in CNY ASTD. No cost to attend. To register, visit www.cnyastd.org, call (315) 546-2783, or email: info@cnyastd.org n CNY ASTD Happy Hour event from 5 to 7 p.m. at Coleman’s, 100 S. Lowell St., Syracuse. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org

June 27 n 2013 Financial Executive of the Year Awards from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the SRC Arena & Events Center at OCC. Visit bizeventz.com to get more information or to register to attend. Or, contact Joyl Clance at (315) 579-3917 or jclance@bizeventz.com

July 16 n Sharing the BEST CNY ASTD Annual Program from 7:30 to 10 a.m. at The Palace Theatre, 2384 James St., Syracuse. This program is where CNY BEST Learning and Performance award nominees share information about their nominated practices. The cost is $25 for members and $40 for nonmembers. To register, visit www. cnyastd.org; for details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org

ONGOING EVENTS n Every Tuesday, Cayuga Club Toastmasters from 6 to 7 p.m. at Cornell University, Ithaca, Rhodes Hall, 6th Floor,

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Conference Room #655. Free and easy parking is available nearby at Peterson Lot. For more information, contact Julia Reich, (315) 364-7190 or email: juliareichdesign@gmail. com n Every Tuesday, Syracuse Business Connections from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Hummel’s Office Plus, 6731 Old Collamer Road, DeWitt. The group meets to network and exchange referrals. For more information, email Deb Angarano at dangarano@ tsys.com n Every Wednesday, Small Business Development Center at OCC from 4 to 6 p.m., Introduction to Business Startup at H-1 Hall. Please call 498-6070 or visit www. onondagasbdc.org n Every Wednesday, Syracuse Business Networking from 6 to 7 p.m. at Barbieri’s Restaurant (upstairs level) located on Main Street in the village of North Syracuse. For more information, call Kim Bachstein at (315) 414-8223 or email: info@ SyracuseBusinessNetworking.com n First Wednesday of each month, Business Innovation Days meetings from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Entrepreneurs and small businesses can meet one-on-one with a counselor from the SBDC for advice and customized assistance opportunities. Scheduled by appointment, call (315) 4740910 or email: info@thecleantechcenter. com n First and Third Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at Golden Artist Colors, 188 Bell Road, New Berlin. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Fourth Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Chenango County Council of the Arts, 27 W. Main St., Norwich. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://1427.toastmastersclubs.org or email: contact-1427@ toastmastersclubs.org n Every Thursday, Liverpool Linguists

from 7 to 8 p.m. First Thursday of every month at Liverpool Public Library and the remaining Thursdays at Liverpool First Methodist Church, 604 Oswego Road, Liverpool. For details, visit http://Liverpool. toastmastersclubs.org or call (315) 884-2668 or 457-2581. n Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at C&S Companies, 499 Col. Eileen Collins Blvd., near Hancock Airport. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802. n Every Friday, 40 Above: Workers in Transition from 9 to 11 a.m. at the library in North Syracuse (NOPL) at 100 Trolleybarn Lane, North Syracuse. Helping workers/ job seekers aged 40 and above in search of work. Contact John A. Cruty at (315) 5693964, or at crutij@yahoo.com n Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 472-3104, ext. 103 or email: bbregman@cnybj.com n First Friday of each month, Toolkit Day with SCORE by appointment at The Tech Garden. Counselors provide free, confidential, individual business mentoring to prospective or current business owners. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Lynn Hughes at (315) 579-2862 or email Lynn@TheTechGarden. com n Every second and fourth Friday of each month, The SUN Group (Sustainable Upstate Network) meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Tony’s Family Restaurant, 3004 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. For more information, contact Andy Picco at (315) 657-0135 or email: andrewpicco@gmail.com n CNY Connects is a networking organization offering 12 groups from which to choose. If you are interested in learning more, contact Amy Kaschel of AK Consulting at akconsult@twcny.rr.com or call (315) 882-6127 or visit www.cnyconnectsonline.com To have your meetings or events in the Business Calendar, email them to movers@ cnybj.com

www.cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 15

June 7, 2013

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: new hires & promotions banking & finANCE Key Private Bank has named Scott L. Harris vice president/ relationship manager for KeyBank’s Central New York district. He is responsible for managing banking, investment, and trust needs Harris of affluent clients throughout the bank’s Central New York markets. Harris is based in the Central New York District headquarters office at 221 South Warren St. Prior to joining Key, he was a wealth-planning advisor for Sagemark Consulting/Lincoln Financial Advisors and was a select member of Sagemark Private Wealth Services. Harris was also a financial representative for John Hancock Financial Services and New England Financial. He has more than 25 years experience in the financial-services industry. Harris earned a bachelor’s degree from Ithaca College. He is FINRA Series 6 and 63 securities registered and holds life, accident, and health licenses in multiple states.

employment services Kelly Services has appointed Susan Schrader as district manager and Dawn Upright as senior staffing supervisor in Utica. Schrader is responsible for the overall sales and operations and for providing

best-in-class service to customers and temporary employees. Schrader and Upright both bring Kelly Services with 15 years experience in the staffing industry. Natalie Betterton recently joined ISSI Technology Professionals as a marketing and research assistant. She is a graduate of Le Moyne College with a bachelor’s degree in English Betterton with a minor in communications. Prior to joining ISSI, Betterton was an administrative and sales assistant at Blue Rock Energy.

government Rep. Dan Maffei (D–DeWitt) has welcomed Brian Knapp as the newest addition to his Congressional staff. Knapp joined the office through the Wounded Warrior Program, a program Knapp established to create fellowships that provide employment opportunities for wounded or disabled veterans within the U.S. House of Representatives. Knapp served in the Marine Corps for five years. He was wounded in Afghanistan in 2008, when his vehicle drove over an improvised ex-

plosive device. Knapp graduated from Cayuga Community College with honors earlier this month and was a 2013 SUNY Chancellor’s Award recipient. Knapp will have a leadership role in Maffei’s veteransoutreach efforts throughout the district and with veterans’ case work. He will work from the Congressman’s Syracuse and Auburn district offices.

nonprofits MACNY, The Manufacturers Association, recently hired Cindy Nave as chief operating officer. She will facilitate and oversee all internal operations of the organization and oversee all member-engagement and satisfaction efforts on behalf of the organization and its 330 members. Nave Nave joins MACNY with more than 19 years experience in managing business operations, developing new business opportunities, and coordinating company efforts. Her most recent role was as vice president of Professionals Brown Incorporated. During her first five years at Professionals Inc., Nave served as general manager for Contemporary Personnel

Staffing where, previously, she also served as operations manager. In addition to her work experience, Nave is a certified professional consultant. Debbie Brown has joined MACNY as controller. MacIntyre She will be responsible for all the financial operations and facilitation at MACNY and its affiliates. Previously, Brown was the controller at the not-for-profit agency, Central New York Health Systems Agency, Inc. (CNYHSA) for more than five years. Prior to CNYHSA, she worked as a federal government accountant. She holds a master’s degree in accounting and a bachelor’s degree in finance with a minor in mathematics from SUNYIT. Katie MacIntyre has joined MACNY as director of membership and marketing. She will shape and execute all member development and communications for the manufacturing association while cultivating new members across upstate New York. Prior to MACNY, MacIntyre worked for the international specialty glass company, SCHOTT for 12 years, the Museum of Science & Technology in Syracuse, and Brunschwig et Fils. Her background includes sales, marketing, customer service, and public-relations roles in numerous locations. MacIntyre holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a biology minor from Marymount College of Fordham University and a certificate in professional marketing from Georgetown University.

FRITO-LAY: The company employs more than 300,000 and boasts 19 different product lines Continued from page 11

customers, who are mostly distributors and a few, large, retail customers [to whom] we sell direct. The site’s drivers average about 425 miles a day [round-trip].” Frito-Lay, a division of PepsiCo, Inc., has been focusing its attention since 2007 on the changing global, consumer environment. That was the year Indra K. Nooyi was appointed chairman and CEO of PepsiCo. Her letter in the 2012 PepsiCo corporate annual report noted continuing consumer shifts. In 2006, emerging markets represented 24 percent of the parent company’s net revenue. At year-end 2012, it was 35 percent. And while consumption is shifting more to Asia, American tastes are also changing, along with a concern for food safety and a heightened environmental consciousness. “We have eliminated trans-fats from our snack chip, as well as reduced the amount of sodium in many products,” says Hamilton. “We also offer baked products as an option to frying … and introduced multi-grains and whole grains.” In addition to the country’s concern for healthful foods, Christopher T. Kuechenmeister, the senior director of public relations for Frito-Lay, notes America’s changing tastes. “Americans now prefer more flavorful [products] … [foods that are] more robust. There is a move to more ethnic foods and a

more international [cuisine].” Quality control is a major focus at Kirkwood. “Customers are very sensitive to the taste and freshness of our products,” avers Hamilton. “Analytics don’t tell us everything … We check the raw materials when they are received and each line tastes the product twice each shift while it is being produced. And it’s not just one person; we have a team that rates the product against a benchmark … We offer sensory training onsite and assign three to five members to each tasting team … We also lay a nitrogen barrier into some products to ensure the freshness once the chips are in the package.” The plant is a model of energy-efficiency and recycling. “Kirkwood buys its electricity off the grid from NYSEG (New York State Electric & Gas). We have multiple ovens running at 350 to 400 degrees (Fahrenheit), and we recover much of that energy to make steam … Of all the waste we produce, less than 1 percent ends up in a landfill … [For example], we collect the starch from our potatoes and bag it for resale. Each truck we fill generates $7,000 [to the company], and the starch is turned into glue for commercial purposes. In the decade from 2000 to 2010, Kirkwood reduced its consumption of BTUs by 31 percent (natural gas), our water consumption declined 63 percent, and electricity usage fell (BTU/lb.) by 29 percent.” Hamilton is a 28-year veteran at Frito-Lay,

Quality control is a major focus at Kirkwood. “Customers are very sensitive to the taste and freshness of our products,” says Hamilton. with a background evenly split between manufacturing and service/distribution. Born in Kentucky, he started with the company in 1985 and has worked at five different sites. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, Hamilton was an hourly worker at Frito-Lay while earning his degree. In addition to Hamilton, the leadership team at Frito-Lay/Kirkwood includes Jeff Hadwin, senior planning manager; Brian Blackham, human-relations director;

Brian Watson, director of logistics, distribution, & traffic; and Tim Polman, director of technology. PepsiCo, headquartered in Purchase, is the largest food-and-beverage business in the U.S. and the second largest in the world with 2012 annual revenue of $65.5 billion and operating profit before-taxes of $9.1 billion (13.9 percent margin). Net revenues for food and beverage are almost equal. U.S. revenues equal 37 percent of the total and represent 52 percent of companywide profit. Over the last 13 years, PepsiCo shareholder return was $201 on $100 invested; the S&P 500 return was $146. The company employs more than 300,000 and boasts 19 different product lines that generate more than $1 billion each in annual retail sales. In addition to Frito-Lay, PepsiCo brands include Quaker, Pepsi-Cola, Tropicana, and Gatorade. Its products are distributed in more than 200 countries. Frito-Lay is the result of a 1961 merger between the Frito Co. and the H. W. Lay Company. In 1965, the new entity merged with Pepsi-Cola to become PepsiCo. Both of the original snack companies were launched in 1932. Frito-Lay brands currently account for 59 percent of the U.S. snackchip industry’s sales. q Contact Poltenson at npoltenson@cnybj.com


16 • The Central New York Business Journal

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Construction SPECIAL REPORT

& REAL ESTATE

Indian Springs starts manufacturing-facility expansion in Lysander by eric reinhardt journal staff

LYSANDER — Indian Springs Manufacturing Co., Inc., a manufacturer of hazardous-materials containment equipment and custom-machined products, is expanding its operation at 2095 W. Genesee Road in Lysander. Construction on the $1 million project started April 3, says Shawn Ferguson, company president. The firm currently operates in a 9,000square-foot structure. The expansion covers an additional 9,000 square feet, but it’s also replacing part of the existing structure. When completed in mid-August, the expansion will grow the company’s space from 9,000 square feet to 13,000 square feet, Ferguson says. Parts of the building date back to the 1950s and they’re becoming outdated, Ferguson says. “Our manufacturing workflow was not optimized because it was kind of a patchwork of building additions over the years,” he adds. The firm is using several sources to cover the $1 million cost of the expansion. “It’s a combination of bank financing, government-backed loans, and company assets,” Ferguson says. Indian Springs is using a loan from M&T Bank, but Ferguson declined to disclose the amount of the loan. A 504 loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration is covering 40 percent of the financing package, he adds. Architect Jill Fudo of Auburn designed the project. Construction Associates, LLC of Phoenix serves as the project manager, Ferguson says. Subcontractors include Fingerlakes Construction Co., Inc. of Clyde, which is handling construction of the building. BS Enterprises LLC of Baldwinsville is handling the site work. Halco of Phelps is doing the electrical and mechanical work on the project, Ferguson says. Beyond the construction, crews will also install climate-control systems for the shop. “So the entire manufacturing facility is going to be air conditioned,” Ferguson says. The firm is also installing all LED (lightemitting diode) lighting inside the expanded manufacturing area for energy efficiency. The floor plans are designed for a more efficient flow of materials, Ferguson adds. Indian Springs also has potential work “opportunities” later in 2013 and in 2014 that are going to require additional equipment and space, Ferguson says.

Construction continues on the 9,000square-foot expansion at Indian Springs Manufacturing Co. in Lysander. The firm manufactures hazardous-materials containment equipment and is a regional manufacturer of custom-machined products, primarily metal parts, for the industrial market.

eric reinhardt/The Central New York Business Journal

Those opportunities, he says, will impact both the contract-manufacturing and hazardous-materials equipment sides of the business.

About Indian Springs

Indian Springs Manufacturing is a contract-manufacturing company, producing a variety of different parts to customer specifications for industrial and commercial clients. Clients for the contract-manufacturing side of the firm’s business are “primarily” from New York but that customer base does expand outside the state as well, Ferguson says. “We serve a variety of markets from military, to LED lighting, to custom manufacturers that use our components in their products,” he says. On the contract-manufacturing side, Indian Springs is a computer-numerically controlled (CNC) machine shop for the manufacture of parts (meaning it doesn’t involve molding, bending, or fabricating),

Ferguson says. “Typically, they’re metal parts for which the customer will provide specifications on [a] drawing,” he explains. In addition to contract manufacturing, Indian Springs, also makes several products used in the hazardous-materials safety industry, including a “core” set for emergency kits. “These kits will stop leaks in containers that have hazardous chemicals in them,” Ferguson says. Additionally, the firm makes safety clothing, breathing apparatuses, training devices, training videos, and accessories for use with the hazmat equipment, Ferguson says. On the hazardous-materials equipment side, about 40 percent of the Indian Springs products ship “internationally,” he adds. Incorporated in 1958, the owners of Indian Springs Manufacturing include Ferguson, his parents Maurice and Patricia Ferguson, and Wendy Racha. The elder

Fergusons are the majority owners, while Shawn Ferguson and Wendy Racha are minority owners, according to the younger Ferguson. He declined to disclose their percentage of ownership. Shawn Ferguson serves as the company president, and Robert (Rob) Wolniak is the company’s vice president. Indian Springs employs 13 people, including nine full-time workers. The staff also includes four part-time employees, according to Ferguson.  The firm has no current plans to add staff during 2013. Both Maurice and Patricia Ferguson own the company’s facility as 2095 West Genesee Road Associates, LLC. Ferguson declined to disclose the amount of revenue Indian Springs generated during 2012, but said the revenue figure increased 5 percent compared to 2011. The firm anticipates a 10 percent revenue increase in 2013. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com


CONSTRUCTION/REAL ESTATE

2B • The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

MCK Building Associates expands management team, plans growth BY TRACI DELORE CONTRIBUTING WRITER

SYRACUSE — MCK Building Associates, Inc. recently took some steps to not only grow the construction business, but also to expand its management team and groom the next leaders. Robert Medina and Ted Kinder, hammers at their sides, founded MCK Building Associates in 1978 working on small residential properties. Through the years, the size of the projects grew and the company expanded as well. As MCK took on larger commercial and institutional projects, employment grew as well from that initial two-man operation to today’s 22-employee company. “We continued to grow all the way through the 90s,” says Kinder, now the company’s secretary and treasurer. Along with expanding into commercial and institutional projects, MCK Building Associates took on the role of developer. With a variety of partners, Syracuse–based MCK has a hand in more than 10 different projects — ranging from townhouses and lofts to commercial properties. Kinder has enjoyed watching the company expand over the years, but both he and Medina are looking ahead to retiring within the next five to seven years. To prepare, MCK Building Associates made some recent management changes. While Medina remains CEO, Kinder has stepped down as company president, making room for Timothy Stitt to take over that role while

PHOTO COURTESY OF MCK BUILDING ASSOCIATES

From left: MCK principals Tim Stitt, Ted Kinder, Jamie Kinder and Robert Medina. Kinder’s son Jamie Kinder assumes the role of vice president. “We’re moving forward with Tim and Jamie taking over the construction side of the business,” Ted Kinder says.

When they founded the business, Kinder oversaw the procurement side of the business, working with subcontractors and suppliers, while Medina looked after the financial end of things. Going forward, Stitt

BUILD FROM OUR EXPERTISE Working with our land use and taxation practices, you’ll learn that expertise means reducing a sales tax assessment on hazardous waste disposal on behalf of a Fortune 500 company. Counseling the region’s largest municipalities and businesses in regard to the tax status of their properties. Representing the developers of some of the most popular shopping malls and grocery stores in their development of neighborhood friendly projects.

will take over those banking duties while Jamie Kinder oversees the procurement side. Stitt has been with MCK Building Associates for 28 years, starting as a form carpenter and working his way up the ranks to supervisor and project manager. Jamie Kinder has been with the company for nine years, although he grew up working in the business, and most recently served as a project manager. One of the first projects the new management team is tackling is updating the company’s website with help from Syracuse Design Group. The goal is to make the website, www.mckbuildingassociates.com, more interactive and user-friendly. Jamie Kinder says he hopes the new site is live by the end of summer. Also on the technology front, Kinder says “we’re also looking at various estimating software and project-management software that we can use to streamline things a little more.” “We have a great product here,” Stitt says. The technology improvements will only enhance that. New marketing efforts will also help spread the word about MCK, Ted Kinder says. The company plans to do some direct mailing as well as some print advertising and networking with other developers. The goal is to grow both public and private business, Kinder says. MCK Building Associates has carved out a solid niche over the years with historic building renovations, but he hopes to further expand the company’s commercial and institutional projects. Right now, about 50 percent of MCK’s work involves public projects, with the other half in private work both on its own as a developer or in partnership with other developers. The company’s revenues are currently in the $8 million to $12 million range, and Kinder hopes to grow that with the new management team, technology, and marketing efforts. He declined to share a specific revenue goal. This year is already off to a good start, Kinder says, with a development project in Rochester and several school projects under way. The work includes five elementary schools in the Baldwinsville area, Lansing High School, and a $3.5 million renovation project on Syracuse’s West Street in partnership with the Syracuse Housing Authority and the National Housing Trust. Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

At Mackenzie Hughes, we’ve hand picked individuals who make it their job—and their duty—to know the latest developments in the land use and taxation communities. Furthermore, our ranks include some former chief attorneys from state and municipal government whose experience and insight will directly benefit you. Our attorneys can counsel you through start-up ventures, real property tax exemptions, “right-to-build” hearings, etc.—whether you’re an owner, developer, lender, public authority, or municipality. And they do it in plain English. Because the more you build on your knowledge of the law, the better decisions you’ll make. To benefit from our advice, call us at 315.474.7571 or visit us at www.mackenziehughes.com.

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INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY RESULTS Bonus Calculation Methods

CONSTRUCTION/REAL ESTATE

June 7, 2013

Survey: NY contractors maintain employment levels, pay higher health-care costs

Options for Controlling Costs Increase Employee Payroll Contribution Redesign Health Plan Implement New Health Plan Providers Implement New Funding Arrangements Use Disease Management Use Wellness Program Increase Employee Cost Sharing Implement Health Savings Accounts Implement Health Reimbursement Arrangements Move to Experienced Rated Plan

The Central New York Business Journal • 3B

Not Considering

Some Interest

Significant Interest

Key Strategy

21.1% 24.3% 24.3% 45.7% 85.3% 34.3% 15.8% 32.2% 57.1% 60.6%

42.1% 29.7% 43.9% 35.3% 11.8% 40.0% 26.3% 23.9% 25.1% 27.3%

31.5% 35.2% 21.7% 7.6% 2.9% 8.6% 44.7% 25.0% 11.4% 9.1%

5.3% 10.8% 8.1% 11.4% 0.0% 17.1% 13.2% 28.9% 11.4% 3.0% SOURCE: BONADIO SURVEY

BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

C

ontractors in upstate New York are “strategically and tactically” trying to stretch their dollars to survive as they strike to satisfy their employees’ needs. That’s according to the 2013 Upstate New York Contractors Compensation and Benefits Study that The Bonadio Group, released in late May. Headquartered in Rochester, The Bonadio Group is an accounting and business-advisory firm that operates seven offices in upstate New York, including Syracuse and Geneva, along with New York City and Rutland, Vt., according to the firm’s website. The Bonadio Group has about 300 clients that are either contractors or companies that service the construction and real-estate industry, says Scott Cresswell, a Bonadio partner who leads the construc-

tion group in Rochester. “People constantly100% ask and we try to give our clients a feel for90% how they’re doing; benchmarking them to their peer group,” 80% he says. The Bonadio Group70% conducted the survey early in 2013. The 60% firm notifies its clients through a letter50% and provides a link where they complete the survey online. 40% Respondents had between the start of the year and the end of30% February to submit their data. On average, 20% about 100 participants take part in the survey, Cresswell 10% says. 0%

Employees, health-care costs

When asked about employment levels, respondents indicated the differences between 2012 and 2013 would be “minimal,” according to the Bonadio report. The survey found most firms are either holding the line or adding employees, Cresswell says. Less than 10 percent said

that they were reducing employment levels in 2013, he added. However, the survey also indicates a shift toward some employment growth. For 2013, about 34 percent of respondents said that employment levels in their company will increase; about 5 percent plan to decrease their employee count; and 61 percent anticipated no change, according to the Bonadio survey. About 93 percent of respondents said their company provided employees with a health-care plan, which is up from 85 percent in 2012, according to the report. “It’s not surprising to see that the number of companies having some type of health-care plan has increased,” the report says. Both figures are up from 78 percent in the 2011 survey. With the Affordable Care Act requiring health-care coverage in 2014, the trend “will most likely continue,” according to the

Bonadio report. The survey also found most respondents (90 percent) reported an increase in healthcare costs. Only 7 percent indicated a decrease in their health-care expense. Most of the responding firms are either offering their employees health-maintenance organization (HMO) or preferred-provider organization (PPO) plans. Traditional plans are down 70 percent from the 2011 survey NotConsidering and health-savings accounts (HSA) have increased from 10 percent in 2009 to 33 SomeInterest percent in 2013. For health-care coverage of a given SignificantInterest family, the report indicated small firms covered 83 percent of KeyStrategy the premium cost; mid-sized firms covered 61 percent; and large firms covered 83 percent of healthinsurance costs. The respondents indicated reducing their health-care costs is the biggest conSee SURVEY, page 6B

Doing it right can avoid doing it over. 



About the Construction Survey Respondents—Overall

 The most prevalent key and significant strategies for future control of health care costs appear to be redesigning health plans and increasing employee contributions. For the most part, firms are not considering new funding arrangements to pay for health care costs. Finally, as seen earlier, HSAs are becoming much more popular.

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CONSTRUCTION/REAL ESTATE

4B • The Central New York Business Journal

June 7, 2013

Heritage Landing Drive office Crouse adds patient-tracking system condo sold for $125,000 in operating room waiting area DeWITT — JF Real Estate recently completed the sale of a 2,100square-foot office condominium located at 5848 Heritage Landing Drive in DeWitt. Hans B. Christopherson bought the property from RMS Properties Inc. for $125,000. The buyer plans to occupy the building for his current business, Christopherson Land Surveying, according to a JF Real Estate news release. Edward Rogers, senior vice president of sales and leasing at JF Real Estate, represented the seller, and Jeff Foster of Longley-Jones Management Corp. represented the purchaser in the negotiations, according to the release. 

BY JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — Crouse Hospital has installed a patient-tracking system in the family-waiting area of its Witting Surgical Center. The technology provides families with real-time, patient-status updates during the surgical process through a virtual view on a flat-screen monitor. Each surgical patient has a unique identification (ID) number. Crouse makes the number available to any family member or friend that the patient authorizes to have the number. As the patient moves through the surgical process, status updates labeled with the patient’s ID number will appear on the flat-screen monitor in colored bubbles, Crouse said. The bubbles are color coded and denote various stages of the surgical process, the hospital said. A red-colored bubble indicates the patient is in the pre-operative area, and a blue-colored bubble means the patient is in the operating room. As the process continues, a green-colored bubble signifies that surgery has started, and the bubble turns pink when the patient returns to the recovery area following the procedure, according to the hospital.

Sports & Fitness, LLC purchases Sports Center 481 indoor sports facility DeWITT — A new entity, Sports & Fitness, LLC has purchased the Sports Center 481 indoor sports facility in DeWitt. Dylan Bruns of JF Real Estate represented the Sports Center 481, LLC, Collamer Road, LLC, and Delta Development, LLC, and was the sole broker in the transaction. The price and other financial details were not disclosed. Sports Center 481, located at 6841 Collamer Road in DeWitt, hosts youth soccer and lacrosse leagues, as well as adult soccer, volleyball, softball, and flag football leagues, according to its website. It also allows groups to rent its field or host parties there. 

Operating-room staff members enter patientstatus updates into the system in real time. The clinical staff is also able to monitor the updates in the operating room, according to Crouse. Information-desk volunteers and staff of the hospital’s patient and guest-relations department also have access to the patient-status updates, the hospital added. Providing the “best patient care” depends on effective, timely communication, not just with patients but also with their family members, Jill Hauswirth, director of surgical services for Crouse Hospital, said in a news release. “By providing the ability to receive ‘real-time’ surgical status updates, we believe this will advance the overall communication and educational process for patients and their family,” Hauswirth said. 

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CONSTRUCTION/REAL ESTATE

June 7, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 5B

Summit Auto Group expands into Oneida Establishes Chrysler and Jeep dealership in $3.5 million project BY TRACI DELORE CONTRIBUTING WRITER

ONEIDA — Summit Auto Group kicked off June with a brand new location in Oneida, expanding the Syracuse–based auto dealership’s reach to the east. Located where Routes 365A and 5 meet, just across from the Walmart Supercenter, the new 18,000-square-foot Chrysler and Jeep dealership features a showroom, sales area, parts department, and service center, says Stephen DiMarco, CEO/CFO and partner at Summit. Summit Auto Group purchased several parcels of land, totaling just under five acres, from the Cook family. When all is done, Summit will spend $3.5 million on the project. The company worked with Oneida

“We wanted to be able to have the Chrysler and Jeep products to complement the Dodge and Ram” dealership in Syracuse, DiMarco says.

WWW.SUMMITCRS.COM

Summit Auto Group kicked off June with a brand new location in Oneida, expanding the Syracuse–based auto dealership’s reach to the east. Savings Bank for the mortgage as well as the construction loan, DiMarco says. The new dealership is located just down the street from a Nye Automotive Group dealership, and DiMarco says he expects both Summit and Nye to benefit from his new location. “The more dealerships in the area, the better, because it brings more people,” he says. At press time, the project was nearly

complete with some paving and landscaping left. DiMarco hoped to open the first week in June. Currently, Summit Auto Group (www. summitcars.com) operates a Dodge and Ram dealership in Syracuse; a Ford and Lincoln dealership in Auburn; a Chevy, Buick, and GMC dealership in Auburn; and a Goodyear Tire, CARQUEST Auto Parts, and collision center in Elbridge.

“We wanted to be able to have the Chrysler and Jeep products to complement the Dodge and Ram” dealership in Syracuse, DiMarco says. Oneida is the ideal location for the new dealership because it spreads Summit’s reach further east, but is still within easy reach of the company’s Syracuse headquarters, he contends. On top of that, the markets are close enough where radio and television stations overlap, which means marketing costs won’t increase, he adds. The timing was right to take the leap, DiMarco says, of the new location. “We’ve seen a pretty good upswing in car sales year over year and we hope to see that continue,” he says. Summit Auto Group sells between 3,000 and 3,500 cars annually between all its locations, and DiMarco expects the Oneida dealership will add another 1,000 vehicles to that total. The auto dealership has hired about 20 employees so far and expects to add more in the sales, service, and parts department, as well as the office, once the dealership is up and running at full speed. Summit Auto Group hired Rich & Gardner Construction Co. of Syracuse as the project’s construction manager. Woolley Morris Architects of Syracuse and W.M. Engineers of Camillus also worked on the project.  Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

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6B • The Central New York Business Journal

construction/real estate

June 7, 2013

SURVEY: The Bonadio Group sought responses from small, medium, and large contractors Continued from page 3B

cern about their overall benefits package, Cresswell says. The survey asked respondents to consider 10 options for methods of controlling health-care costs. Of those options, respondents indicated “significant interest” in redesigning their health plan (35 percent), increasing employee-payroll contribution (31 percent), and increasing employee cost sharing (44 percent), according to the report. About one-quarter of the respondents also indicated significant interest in implementing health-savings accounts.

Cresswell doesn’t foresee construction firms providing family coverage at 80 percent of the cost in the future because of the overall expense. “The cost of insurance is just growing exponentially; it’s crazy,” he says.

About the respondents

The Bonadio Group sought responses from small (under $10 million in annual revenue), medium (between $10 million and $50 million), and large (more than $50 million) contractors. Small firms provided 46 percent of the responses; medium-sized firms, 39 percent; and the large firms gave 10 percent of

the responses, according to The Bonadio Group. The categories of contractors included those focused on construction management, general construction, heavy highway, mechanical, and specialty contractors. The specialty contractors focused on areas including electrical; environmental; plumbing and heating, air conditioning, and ventilation; roofing and siding; and utilities, according to the Bonadio report. Just over half (51 percent) of the respondents are specialty contractors, 24 percent are general contractors, 21 percent focus on heavy-highway projects, and the remaining respondents are construction

managers. Only 6 percent of responding firms have headquarters in Central New York, and 3 percent have their headquarters in the Southern Tier. About half the respondents have headquarters in Western New York, and another 35 percent are headquartered in the Capital District. Since 2013 is an odd-numbered year, this survey focused on construction firms’ benefits and compensation. In even-numbered years, the focus is on the state of the industry, Cresswell says. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

GRANTS FOR GROWTH: Program has a “proven” record of success, CenterState CEO contends Continued from page 3

blood samples. A third recipient, Motion Intelligence, is also working with Cornell to develop products meant to enhance the understanding of sports-related concussions. In addition, Zinnia Safety Systems will use its grant as it works on the first medicaldevice system developed for monitoring individuals at risk for suicide.

Zinnia is working with SUNY Upstate Medical University as it develops the system.

Support for job creation

Grants for Growth has a “proven” record of success, CenterState CEO contends. For every $18,041 invested in the program a job that pays more $68,000 is created. The investment made through this round has the potential to create

$38.1 million in new revenue for the region, the organization said. CenterState CEO credits support from the New York State Senate with making the Grants for Growth program possible. State Senator John DeFrancisco (R–Syracuse) has secured $5 million in funding for the program, the organization said. “By targeting investments based on a company’s development stage and provid-

ing the tools they need to bring their ideas and products to the next level, I am confident that we will see even more success,” DeFrancisco said in a news release. CenterState CEO, a nonprofit, regional economic-development organization, serves 2,000 members in a 12-county area of Central New York. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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construction/real estate

June 7, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 7B

U.S. construction spending edges up 0.4 percent in April, led by nonresidential projects Spending on hotel and motel projects jumps from year-ago period By Adam Rombel Journal Staff

S

  pending on U.S. construction   projects rose 0.4 percent in April   compared to March, the U.S. Commerce Department reported on June 3. The April figure is 4.3 percent higher than what the department estimates was spent in the year-ago period. During the first four months of 2013, national construction spending totaled $250.7 billion, up 4.5 percent from $239.8 billion for the same period in 2012, according to the Commerce Department report.

adam rombel/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

Construction of the Inns at Armory Square — a Residence Inn and a Courtyard by Marriot — nears completion in downtown Syracuse. Spending on lodging construction projects nationally increased 0.2 percent in April compared to March, but surged 20.7 percent from April 2012 levels, according to the Commerce Department. The increase in construction spending in April, compared to March, was led by a 2.2 percent rise in private nonresidential construction. Spending on construction of power facilities increased 10.8 percent in April from March. Spending on amusement and recreation projects rose 3.5 percent in the same period, according to the report. Spending on lodging construction projects

increased 0.2 percent in April compared to March, but surged 20.7 percent from April 2012 levels, according to the Commerce Department. That was the biggest year-overyear increase in any private industry. Residential construction spending dipped 0.1 percent in April compared to March, but was up 18.8 percent from April 2012, the Commerce Department reported.

Total private construction spending increased 1 percent in April from the prior month and rose 9 percent from the year-ago period, according to the report. Meanwhile, total public construction spending slipped 1.2 percent in April from March and fell 5.1 percent from April 2012. q Contact Rombel at arombel@cnybj.com


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June 7, 2013

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June 7, 2013 Issue of The Central New York Business Journal

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