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SOHO Syracuse: Official Show Guide.

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April 19, 2013 • $2.00

CNYBJ.COM

Maffei jobs plan focuses on investment, workforce development BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — U.S. Rep. Daniel Maffei (D–DeWitt) on April 15 announced what he called a “blueprint” for expanding the region’s middle class, growing its economy, and creating more jobs. Maffei, who represents the 24th Congressional District of New York, used the announcement to mark his first 100 days in ERIC REINHARDT/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL office. The Democrat spoke at the Central New U.S. Representative Daniel Maffei (D-DeWitt), left, discusses a jobs plan that the Democrat unveiled on April 15 at the Central New York Philanthropy Center/ York Philanthropy Center/Central New York Central New York Community Foundation at 431 E. Fayette St. in Syracuse. Maffei invited several members of the local economic-development community to join See MAFFEI, page 5 him in explaining the components of his jobs plan.

SU launches second round of Connective Corridor Façade Improvement Program BY MAYA GAO QIAN CONTRIBUTING WRITER

SYRACUSE — Syracuse University (SU) recently received $250,000 from the Central New York Regional Economic Development Council to fund the launch of the second round of the Connective Corridor Façade Improvement Program (FIP) to spruce up See PROGRAM, page 4

Mohawk Global Logistics acquires Chicago firm BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SALINA — Mohawk Global Logistics has acquired a Chicago competitor, OEC Freight Chicago, Inc., to expand its presence in the Midwest and boost its freight volume. Neither company released financial terms of the transaction, which the two sides completed on April 15. Mohawk Global Logistics, headquartered in Salina, is a third-party freight

transport company, providing international and domestic transportation, customs brokerage, and international-trade consulting. OEC Freight Chicago provides similar services and is based in Bensenville, Ill. Mohawk Global Logistics has been focused on targeting clients in the Midwest, says Michael Kuhn, the firm’s senior vice president of sales and marketing. “In order to do that … it’s important to have a gateway operation,” Kuhn says, noting that Chicago is going to be its entryway for the Ohio Valley and the Midwest.

Since its inception in 1970, Mohawk Global Logistics has primarily focused on upstate New York, New York City, and the Northeast. The company sees Chicago as a “strategic spot” and as a way to migrate from Northeast into the Midwest, Kuhn says. Mohawk Global Logistics plans to integrate OEC Freight into its existing Chicago CNYBJ FILE PHOTO location, which it opened in the spring of 2011. A Mohawk Global Logistics truck backs into the loading dock of the firm’s Salina headquarters. See MOHAWK GLOBAL, page 4

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2 • The Central New York Business Journal

CNYBJ BRIEFS News of note for and about Central New York businesses

Human Technologies leases Teall Ave. property SYRACUSE — Human Technologies Corp., a Utica–based not-for-profit corporation, recently leased 3,000 square feet of space at the property located at 2101 Teall Ave. in Syracuse. Mike Kalet of Pyramid Brokerage Company brokered this lease transaction. Financial arrangements were not disclosed.

State-government tax collections hit a record $795B in FY 2012, NY ranks 2nd Total state-government tax collections in the U.S. increased 4.5 percent to a record $795 billion in the 2012 fiscal year compared to 2011, the Census Bureau reported April 11. The previous high for state tax collections totaled $780 billion in 2008, before the onset of the global financial crisis. New York state collected more than $71.5 billion in total taxes in fiscal-year 2012, second only to California’s $112 billion. The Empire State brought in almost $39 billion in individual income taxes in 2012, up 7.1 percent from the year before, according to the Census data. The state also amassed nearly $12 billion in general sales and grossreceipts taxes last fiscal year, up 2.8 percent from the 2011 fiscal year. For the U.S. as a whole, overall state tax revenue on individual income totaled more than $280 billion for 2012, up 8.1 percent from 2011, while general sales tax revenue totaled almost $243 billion for 2012, up 2.9 percent from 2011, the Census Bureau reported. “The latest data show that state tax revenue is continuing to recover, albeit slowly, from the depth of the recession,” Donald Boyd, a senior fellow at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government at the University at Albany, said in a news release. Forty-seven states generated an increase in total tax revenue in fiscal year 2012, led by North Dakota (47 percent), Alaska (27.3 percent), Illinois (19.1 percent), and Connecticut (15 percent), the Census Bureau reported.

email your company news to news@cnybj.com

April 19, 2013

Rome Memorial adds software to measure breast density for early cancer detection BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

ROME — Rome Memorial Hospital is using new computer software to help doctors detect breast cancer in its earliest stages when it is easiest to treat. The software, called Volpara, assists radiologists in accurately determining the density of a woman’s breast tissue during a routine mammogram. Studies have identified breast density as a factor in assessing a woman’s risk for breast cancer and detecting it early, the hospital says. Designed to help overcome the limitations of mammography in detecting cancer in women with dense breasts, the Volpara software generates objective, automatic measurement of volumetric breast-density values along with a breast-density classification for mammograms acquired from commercially available digital-mammography systems. Rome Memorial had already been planning to pursue the software, but new legislation in Albany provided it further impetus to purchase the technology. The New York State Legislature in January approved the Breast Density Inform law that requires all imaging centers to notify patients who have higher breast density that additional tests may be recommended, says Dr. John Restivo, radiologist and chairman of the hospital’s

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROME MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

From left: Patricia Lane, M.D., a radiologist at Rome Memorial Hospital, looks at a bi-lateral mammogram along with Michele Rossi, Linda Lyon, and Justine Cimarolli, who is training staff on the proper use of the recently purchased Volpara software.

medical-imaging department. Radiologists have used a standard numbering system for breast-density measure-

ment, and in the past, measurements have been subjective, such as dense or not dense, based upon a visual review of the mammography image, he says. “If this is going to be utilized by our providers, we certainly want to provide a very consistent breast-density measurement so that the referring physicians have a very consistent baseline in terms of talking with their patients and being able to help them,” Restivo says. The Volpara software uses algorithms for a “very objective” breast-density measurement from information contained in the mammogram, Restivo says. “It looks volumetrically at the breast tissue, and it tells you what category of breast density the breast falls into,” he says. Breast density is measured on a scale of one to four, with one being the least dense. Changes in a woman’s breast density are normal and can be attributed to a number of physical and environmental factors including age, diet, caffeine consumption, changes in hormones, and significant changes in weight, he adds. Calculating density with the Volpara software ensures that any measured change isn’t a function of a different radiologist reading the mammogram or using a different piece of equipment. It’s a true change in the density of the breast tissue, Restivo explains. If a measurement falls into category three or four, or a very dense tissue, then what radiologists try to tell the patient is to contact her doctor and talk to her clinician about other options for imaging and screening for breast cancer. The options include screening breast ultrasound and breast magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). Radiologists like to have the patient and the doctor have that conversation See VOLPARA, page 8


April 19, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 3

Ithaca chocolatier Sarah’s Pâtisserie to open second store

New name. Familiar faces.

BY MAYA GAO QIAN CONTRIBUTING WRITER

ITHACA — Chocolate retailer Sarah’s Pâtisserie will open its second location in downtown Ithaca this spring, according to a news release of the Downtown Ithaca Alliance (DIA). The new store is located at 130 N. Tioga St. & E. Seneca St., one block away from the Ithaca Commons shopping mall at East Martin Luther King Jr. Street. The store will be open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., the release said. Sarah’s Patisserie, founded in the spring of 2004, offers French-inspired chocolates, pastries, fruit tarts, cakes, coffee, and tea, among other items, according to its website. The business also provides personalized cake-design service for weddings. The first Sarah’s Pâtisserie is located at 200 Pleasant Grove Road in Ithaca. Chef Tammy Travis, the store’s owner and founder, graduated from the pastry program of the French Culinary Institute in New York City in 1999. She worked as a pastry assistant at the four-star French restaurant Le Cirque in Manhattan from 1999 to 2000, according to the store’s website. Her partner in the venture is Sarah Jefferis. The new Sarah’s Pâtisserie is an Art Deco-style store built by The Pike Company, of Rochester, in collaboration with local LEED-accredited interior designer Cathy Emilian. Customers will be able to watch Travis transform blocks of chocolate into gourmet confections infused with key lime, fruit, chili, and dozens of other exotic flavors, the DIA release said. The DIA noticed Sarah’s Pâtisserie during its Race for the Space competition last year where local entrepreneurs competed for a chance to win free rent for one year in a prime downtown location. While Sarah’s finished a close runner-up, the owners maintained their interest in opening another downtown location. “Sarah’s is an example of a growing number of downtown businesses that offer experiential retailing. It’s not just about buying online or at a mall,” Gary Ferguson, DIA executive director, said in the release. “These retailers, like Sarah’s, engage you at all levels — sight, smell, taste, and sound.” Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH’S PÂTISSERIE

Tammy Travis, chef, owner and founder of Sarah’s Pâtisserie in Ithaca. The store is opening a second location at 130 N. Tioga St. & E. Seneca St; one block away from the Ithaca Commons shopping mall at East Martin Luther King Jr. Street. The store will be open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

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4 • The Central New York Business Journal

April 19, 2013

MOHAWK GLOBAL: Most of the firm’s business in the Midwest is focused on international trade Continued from page 1

“Along with that comes the OEC [customer list] as well as their employees,” Kuhn adds. The acquisition includes between seven and 10 employees, which will more than double the five employees Mohawk Global Logistics already has in Chicago. Altogether, Mohawk Global Logistics employs 110 people in five offices, including 60 in its Salina home office, Kuhn says. Besides Salina and Chicago, the firm also operates locations in Rochester, Albany, and Buffalo. “We’ve been expanding into Cleveland as well as the Ohio Valley, and Chicago is a gateway for us [internationally], whether it be air or ocean cargo into those areas,” Kuhn says. Most of the firm’s business in the Midwest is focused on international, overseas trade, the company says. With an office in Chicago, Mohawk Global feels more comfortable approaching clients in the Midwest. “It just opens us up to talk to more clients who are based in the Midwest [Ohio Valley to the west],” he says, noting that includes Indiana and Wisconsin. The firm has also developed several clients that have been serviced through the

Chicago area. “The OEC Freight office has been the Chicago agent for our largest partner in Asia,” Kuhn says, noting that partner is Hong Kong–based Cohesion Freight Worldwide. The Chicago office is also working to grow the firm’s consulting division called Mohawk Global Trade Advisors, which the company launched in 2010. The division specializes in training and compliance. Consultants work with clients to ensure they’re following all the international trade and security regulations involved in modern shipping. The consulting business also strengthens Mohawk Global’s relationship with current customers, company leaders say. Kuhn declined to disclose the firm’s firstquarter revenue figure, but said it was up 25 percent compared to the same quarter in 2012. The company doesn’t have a projection for the remainder of the year, but “we certainly don’t see any reason why the current growth rate will not continue through the year,” he adds. Mohawk Global’s revenue rose by a “double-digit” percentage in 2012 compared to 2011, according to Kuhn. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

PROGRAM: FIP is part of the Connective

Corridor program

Continued from page 1

downtown buildings. “I think it’s an opportunity for us to build on the success of the first round in which we worked with property owners to make meaningful changes to their buildings that activated them for more economic opportunities,” Linda Dickerson Hartsock, director of SU’s Office of Community Engagement and Economic Development, said at an April 12 event to kick off round two of FIP. The first round of the Façade Improvement Program provided a total of $625,000 in funding to 40 businesses and nonprofit organizations for their outdoor renovation, lighting displays, window and door replacement, and other architectural enhancements, according to the Office of Community Engagement and Economic Development. Local businesses and community organizations it funded include the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology, St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, Berry Dental, Harvey’s Pharmacy, PJ’s Pub & Grill, the Hill Medical Center, Syracuse Eye Center, and PHP Realty, among others. The second round of FIP, in addition to continue improving exterior aesthetic elements of the buildings, will emphasize the lighting component, according to Hartsock. “We have buildings here with architectural significance that are the envy of other cities,” said Hartsock. “How we work to light them, showcase them, and encourage evening activities downtown is something we are really looking for.” Any commercial, industrial, nonprofit or mixed-use property owners located directly on or adjacent to the Connective Corridor map, can apply for an FIP award at the SU Office of Community Engagement Development

on the fourth floor of 350 W. Fayette St. or online at http://connectivecorridor.syr. edu/resources/. The Connective Corridor map can be found at: http://connectivecorridor.syr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/ CorridorProject_web.pdf. The maximum award is $25,000 per property. Applicants must provide a 10 percent equity match toward the amount awarded. Funding cannot be used for improvements that are not visible from the street, according to the Office of Community Engagement and Economic Development. “There are very few programs left for small businesses with this direct financial assistance for this kind of improvement. It’s really wellsuited for small businesses,” said Hartsock. All applications for the second round of FIP will be evaluated by the Façade Review Committee that includes representatives from the city of Syracuse, the Downtown Committee of Syracuse, and SU faculty in architecture and landscape design. Hartsock said a few businesses had already applied for the second round of the program. But she declined to disclose their names. FIP is part of the Connective Corridor program, a civic-engagement initiative launched by SU that aims to link the university hill with downtown Syracuse and spur urban revitalization. SU has secured $42.5 million in external funding for the Connective Corridor, according to the program’s website. More than 400 students and faculty members are engaged in this project. Its funding sources include New York state funds, federal TIGER grants, Onondaga County green infrastructure funds, National Grid economic-development funds, and other local public and private funding. q Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 5

April 19, 2013

MAFFEI: In total, Maffei says he heard from more than 150 small-business owners Continued from page 1

Community Foundation at 431 E. Fayette St. in Syracuse. Maffei’s plan includes investing in small businesses, creating public and private partnerships, focusing on education and workforce development, improving infrastructure and transportation, and utilizing the region’s competitive advantage, including its proximity to population centers and its abundance of colleges and universities. The plan followed what the lawmaker referred to as, “a district-wide listening tour” that focused on job creation and economic growth following Maffei’s return to office as a Congressman. “It lays out essentially what we’ve heard and some of the basic conclusions that we can make from it,” Maffei said. In total, Maffei says he heard from ������ more than 150 small-business owners and economic-development leaders. He also �.�x�.��� toured local manufacturing plants, businesses, and �c hospitals over the past few months. Maffei visited businesses such as the Auburn location of Charlotte, N.C.–based Nucor Corp. (NYSE: NUE); the Oswego location of Atlanta–based Novelis, Inc., an aluminum-product maker; as well as Upstate Medical University and the South Side Innovation Center in Syracuse, according to Maffei’s office. Maffei called upon leaders in the Central New York economic-development community to share details about the various components in his jobs plan, including investment in small businesses. “The plan that the Congressman has laid out calls for leveraging our strengths in key industries … biomedical, clean technology, advanced manufacturing, agriculture, tourism,” Robert Simpson, president and CEO of CenterState CEO, said during his remarks. CenterState CEO is a Syracuse–based nonprofit organization focused on business leadership and economic development in a 12-county region of Central New York. It represents more than 2,000 members. Simpson referred to those sectors as “places where we have strong capabilities” for helping to reduce the regulatory burden on small businesses, providing targeted-tax relief to small businesses that are looking to hire and train employees. Linking companies and skilled employees requires training and education, said Ann Marie Taliercio, president at Central New York Area Labor Federation, AFL-CIO Workforce Development and Training. Companies talk a lot about the need for skilled workers that they can’t find. “but as long as we provide and create the linkages that the businesses need, we can put people back to work,” Taliercio said. The Maffei plan talks about giving tax incentives to employers who take the lead in keeping their workers’ skills current and provide the training needed by the new workers they’ll hire. In recent years, she said, many workers have lost their jobs due to unfair trade agreements. “Existing worker-training programs like the Trade Adjustment Assistance need to be maintained and expanded so that these displaced workers can get back to work. All anybody wants to do is work and provide for the family,” Taliercio said. Besides small-business investment and workforce development, the plan also lists improved infrastructure and transportation as a key component to building a strong economy.

C&S chairman’s comments

Infrastructure is the foundation on which our community, and truly our society, is based, says Orrin MacMurray, chairman of Salina–based C&S Companies, who also spoke during the event. C&S is a group of companies specializing in a range of services, including transportation, civil infrastructure, construction, energy, and planning. “The American Society of Civil Engineers recently published a new report card on American infrastructure, and gives the infrastructure of our country nationally a D-plus, not a grade that I think any of us are proud of,” MacMurray said at the event.

New York has more than $27 billion in drinking-water needs that need to be addressed in the next 20 years, according to MacMurray. In addition, the state has more than $30 billion in needs in wastewater treatment. New York also has 141 public-use airports, and Hancock International Airport locally also needs “continued improvement and development,” MacMurray said. He also called the Port of Oswego a “great resource” that needs improvement and development to improve its infrastructure. And about 60 percent of New York’s 115,000 miles of roads are considered to be in poor to mediocre condition, according to MacMurray. “Thousands of people, as have been recog-

nized in this report, could be working today if we were addressing these needs effectively. One billion dollars in infrastructure investment leads to between 30[,000] and 35,000 jobs,” MacMurray said.  After the time Maffei spent listening, he said the report is intended to start the conversation. “It’s clearly a basic document. We’re not talking about a doctoral thesis here. We’re talking about something that lays out some key areas, some key themes that I heard throughout the district from many, many people,” Maffei said. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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J.R. Clancy: Let the show go on 6 • The Central New York Business Journal

April 19, 2013

history from oha

n By Karen y. cooney

If you have ever attended a Broadway production, you can be guaranteed that some of the stage hardware was manufactured by J.R. Clancy, Inc. Recently, J.R. Clancy observed its 125th anniversary and is one of several local companies that have served this area for well over a century. John Richard Clancy was born in 1859, the son of an Irish immigrant. Early in high school, Clancy was stricken by a serious illness that lasted several years and required him to drop out of school. Once recovered, he gave up on his education to pursue his thespian interests. In 1882, at the age of 23, he became the assistant treasurer for the Grand Opera House in Syracuse. A popular melodrama during this time, “Romany Rye,” was scheduled to be shown at the theater. This gypsy drama was considered to be the “heaviest” drama of the day in that it severely taxed the mechanical abilities of the host theater. Clancy’s boss wanted to cancel the production, but J. R. volunteered to build scenery that would be more manageable. At the time, canvas scenery was con-

structed on heavy frames that moved on the floor via rollers or were set at right angles and fastened down with metal braces, thus limiting the amount of scenery that could be used for theater productions. Clancy made rough drawings of a more efficient pulley system which was attached to scenes painted on lightweight linen fabric that could be pulled up above the stage when not in use. Since suitable hardware was not available, he special ordered the hardware from a local machine shop and then successfully installed it at the Grand Opera House. Clancy opened his first factory at 72 N. Salina St. in Syracuse after spending six years standardizing his designs. His career designing, constructing, and installing hardware for stage productions had officially begun. Initially, he had to sell other items to supplement his

Sewing scenic sandbags — a photo from 1956.

livelihood such as burglar-proof window sash locks, billiard chalk holders, and pure oxygen for medicinal purposes. However, when the company was inundated with orders for theater riggings, he limited his stock to stage hardware, and in 1886 he produced his first catalog. To help better promote his products, the catalog included ads from well-known scenic artists from across the country that had used his hardware. With an eye on safety and attention to detail, the company flourished. After a very serious fire in a Chicago theater in 1903 that resulted in the deaths of more than 600 people, Clancy designed a fire-curtain mechanism, parts of which are still utilized today, to prevent a similar event from recurring. He

went on to design specialized theater lighting and develop more elaborate control systems for the mechanical aspects of theater. The company continues that tradition today. Outside the company, Clancy was active in several charitable local organizations such as the Red Cross, St. Joseph’s Hospital, the establishment of the CNYSPCA, and the Chamber of Commerce. He also served as a U.S. Congressman from 1913 – 1915. J. R. Clancy ran his company until his unexpected death at age 73. q Karen Y. Cooney is support services administrator at the Onondaga Historical Association (OHA) Museum (www.cnyhistory.org) at 321 Montgomery St. in Syracuse.


The Central New York Business Journal • 7

Mid-Market

April 19, 2013

SPECIAL REPORT

Editor’s Note: Engineering firm picks new leader, maps out strategic plan Introducing the MidMarket special report By Traci DeLore

contributing writer

W

  elcome to the first   edition of our new Mid   Market special report.   In this section, we will generally cover Central New York businesses with roughly between 100 and 500 employees and/or annual revenue between $10 million and $50 million. But we may also write about firms a little smaller or a little bigger than that. Mid-market businesses are key drivers of economic growth in our region and the U.S. as a whole. Our coverage of mid-market firms will include profiles of the businesses or their leaders and news on expansions, moves, growth plans, and other key company initiatives. The section will also contain stories about issues (employee benefits, human resources, economic development, regulations, etc.) that affect and are important to these mid-market companies. We hope you find this new special report to be informative and useful to your business, whether it is a mid-market firm or not. And, please let us know if you have any story ideas. Mid-Market special reports will also appear in the June 28 and Sept. 27 issues of The Central New York Business Journal. q —Adam Rombel (arombel@cnybj.com)

WATERTOWN — Engineering firm Bernier Carr & Associates kicked off spring with a changing of the guard as Kris D. Dimmick steps up as vice president of operations, leading its day-to-day operations. And CEO Bernard H. Brown and Board Chairperson Pamela Beyor both announced their retirement effective at the end of this year. Those changes tie in with the work the company has done in over the past year to develop out its strategic plan, President Rick W. Tague says. “We mapped out this strategic plan. We needed someone who could focus on that,” he says. Dimmick, who has been with Bernier Carr since 1991, and has served as a member of the firm’s management team and as principalin-charge of many of the firm’s local municipal clients, was just a natural choice to lead its operations, Tague says. Dimmick is excited about his new role at the company and the impact it will have. Leadership transition is an important part of strategic planning at a company, he notes. The leadership change is the latest in a string of good news and happenings for the firm, Tague contends. “We’ve done well over the past few years,” he says. “We’re growing. We’ve expanded markets.” Bernier Carr has also seen 19 of its employees receive Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) recognition of some sort — three employees are LEED accredited professionals while 16 are LEED green associates. “We did that because we wanted to invest in our people and invest in the direction of our industry,” Dimmick says. LEED is becoming more and more popular as clients look to become more eco-friendly, he notes. Bernier Carr (www.thebcgroup.com) offers its services as architect, engineer, surveyor, and construction manager to an array of clients including local municipalities, state and federal entities, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and the health-care industry across the northern portion of New York. The firm has a solid backlog of work that will keep it busy through 2013 and beyond,

photo courtesy of Amanda Morrison/Watertown Daily Times

The Bernier Carr & Associates staff, outside their Watertown headquarters. Tague says. In fact, the firm is looking to expand on its current staff of about 80 employees by hiring three to five more people. Some of the Bernier Carr’s current and recent projects include Samaritan Medical Center in Watertown, municipal sewer projects in the villages of Philadelphia and Owego, a sewer and storm water project in the village of Gouverneur, and a new county office building in Lewis County. Also on the agenda is a search for a new CEO to replace the retiring Brown, Tague says. He did not provide further details on that process. In a company press release, Brown said he plans to pursue a number of personal interests in his retirement as well as work with community-based organizations and his church. Beyor said both she and Brown plan to continue to contribute actively to the firm as well as the community. Over the remaining months of this year,

responsibilities currently managed by Brown and Beyor will be transitioned over to Dimmick and others at the firm. In addition to Tague and Dimmick, there are nine other partners that make up the firm’s leadership team: Joseph L. Thesier, Mari L. Cecil, Matt J. Cooper, Michael J. Harris, Jason S. Jantzi, Mark B. Kimball, Gerald A. Kostyk, Mickey G. Lehman, and Shawn M. Travers. James T. Bernier opened the engineering practice in 1970 in Watertown. The firm, headquartered at 327 Mullen St., Watertown, is a multi-disciplined architectural, engineering, land surveying, and construction management firm serving public and private clients. The company declined to disclose revenue information. The Business Journal estimates that Bernier Carr generates more than $15 million in annual revenue. q Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

Brown & Brown advises clients on health-care reform, adds employees by eric reinhardt journal staff

SYRACUSE — Brown & Brown Empire State, a unit of Florida–based Brown & Brown, Inc. (NYSE: BRO), has added employees to its Syracuse office in the past nine months. And the firm is also guiding its employee-benefits clients on dealing with the national health-care reform law. The Central New York Business Journal (CNYBJ) spoke separately with two compa-

ny officials on its hiring and health-reform law issues. The officials were Nicholas Dereszynski, president of Brown & Brown Empire State and regional vice president for parent company Brown & Brown, and Jeffrey Wittig, senior vice president of Brown & Brown Empire State’s employeebenefits group.

Q&A

CNYBJ: How is the implementation of the health-care reform law affecting

Wittig

Dereszynski

Brown & Brown Empire State and your customers?

Jeffrey Wittig: I think it’s affecting our customers in a number of ways. In 2013, it’s affecting clients from an administrative perspective. For example, the customers we work with that issue more than 250 W-2s are required to report that [the cost of coverage under an employer-sponsored group-health plan] on their employees’ W-2 forms. So, from an administrative standpoint, that is one of the new requirements See brown & brown, page 11


MID-MARKET

8 • The Central New York Business Journal

April 19, 2013

Tully Rinckey’s Cortelyou discusses the law firm’s growth, marketing strategy BY ADAM ROMBEL JOURNAL STAFF

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SYRACUSE — Tully Rinckey PLLC, an Albany–based law firm that has a Syracuse office, recently promoted Graig D. Cortelyou to chief of operations. Tully Rinckey says the promotion follows its recent expansion into the Syracuse and Buffalo markets, and positions it for more growth in the future. As chief of operations, Cortelyou directs Tully Rinckey’s marketing, business development, strategic planning, and corporate-communication efforts firm-wide. He oversees a number of initiatives, including public relations, client relations, recruiting, and information technology, the company says. Tully Rinckey’s practice areas include family and matrimonial law, estate planning, employment law, military law, real-estate law, commercial litigation, bankruptcy, personal injury, and criminal defense, including DWI and traffic tickets. Its Syracuse office is located at 507 Plum St. Prior to his promotion, Cortelyou was Tully Rinckey’s chief marketing officer. He first joined the law firm in 2007. The Business Journal talked with Cortelyou by phone to discuss the firm’s growth plans and marketing approach.

Q&A

Business Journal: How many total employees does Tully Rinckey have now? Cortelyou: The law firm is up to nearly 100 now. He expects it to increase, but doesn’t have a firm target. Tully Rinckey is hiring in Albany; Washington, D.C.; Syracuse; and Rochester. Business Journal: You opened your Syracuse office last September. How many

total employees does the office have now and how many attorneys? And, what are your plans? Cortelyou: “We have five attorneys and three staff members. So, eight total.” The ofCortelyou fice has been open 7 ½ months and the firm plans to get up to nine attorneys “within the next 6 to 12 months,” he says. “We’ve been engaged in intense hiring, making sure that established attorneys know we are filling the office.” “We’re overwhelmed by the amount of support the firm has received from the Syracuse community. We’re extremely happy to be here and happy to grow,” Cortelyou adds. Business Journal: What’s your annual revenue? Cortelyou: Tully Rinckey generated $8.8 million in revenue in 2012, up from $7.6 million in 2011. The firm has no target for 2013 revenue. Business Journal: What percentage of the firm’s work is with business clients? Cortelyou: “Probably about 25 percent in Syracuse, and that’s similar to the rest of the firm. We’re definitely trying to grow the services offered to businesses. The Washington, D.C. office does a great deal of employment law, working with businesses. That’s our bread and butter there.” Business Journal: Please give us an update on Tully Rinckey’s rapid growth plans? Cortelyou: “We had a great year last year. Our recent office opening in Buffalo is one piece of the puzzle. We’re focused now on [opening an office in] Rochester.

And after Rochester, we’re evaluating other offices. Buffalo opened in the first week of January. We’re trying to open as soon as possible in Rochester. It’s contingent on the attorneys coming through the door. We’re seeking attorneys with established client bases and books of business.” Business Journal: Provide an example of the marketing strategies Tully Rinckey has employed to generate its growth. Cortelyou: “First is the emphasis that the firm has always had on web marketing. One piece to the puzzle is the You Tube channel we put together. We have at least 450 videos and 455,000 views on the channel. With video, there are a whole slew of reasons why you want to do it. We’re communicating very complicated areas of law to individuals. And it’s important to break that down. We build rapport [with clients] and facilitate the sales process through the use of video.” “Another example is the firm’s public relations — lending ourselves to the media 24/7. We target reporters on social media. We use video in our press work: shooting B roll for reporters. We proactively pitch ideas to the media including TV stations. We have had CNN call to have one of our military attorneys come onto ‘The Situation Room’ program.” Cortelyou received his bachelor’s degree from SUNY Oswego. He is a member of the Association of Legal Administrators, Legal Marketing Association, American Association of Inside Sales Professionals, and the Public Relations Society of America. He has been featured as a legal marketing expert in local and national media outlets and has spoken at major legal conferences.  Contact Rombel at arombel@cnybj.com

VOLPARA: Use of software helps Rome Memorial meet state-law requirement Continued from page 2

to determine if they want to look further, or screen for the cancer in another way. Restivo calls it a “very personal decision” that needs to be made with the clinician. “So our goal is to help the clinician have a reliable and reproducible measurement of density, so they can have a much more beneficial discussion with the patient,” Restivo says. Dense breasts have a lot more breast tissue compared to fat, Restivo says. When reviewing a mammogram, a radiologist is trying to find changes in the mammogram, such as small masses, and a lot of breast tissue can make it much more difficult to find

smaller abnormalities or delineate subtle changes, he adds. “In theory, if you have a denser breast, it is harder to find breast cancer,” Restivo says, noting at that point, it’s recommended the patient look at other options for screening for breast cancer, especially if there’s a strong family history or another higher risk. The use of the Volpara software helps Rome Memorial meet the state-law requirement, make a reliable scientific measure of density, and help the clinician, Restivo says. “That was our commitment,” he says. Rome Memorial Hospital declined to disclose the exact cost of the Volpara software, but indicated the purchase did not require outside financing because it was less than $75,000.

Wellington, New Zealand–based Matakina Technology produces the Volpara software. The world’s top imaging scientists designed Volpara and has been validated by comparison to expert radiologists over thousands of images, according to its website volparadensity.com Rome Memorial Hospital has nearly 1,000 full and part-time employees, 181 physicians, 130 acute-care beds, 80 longterm care beds, and 6,000 yearly patient visits, according to its website. The hospital’s total operating budget in 2012 was $93 million.  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

Reach us on the Web Equal Housing Lender Membership restrictions apply Federally insured by NCUA

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mid-market

April 19, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 9

Currier Plastics close to completing expansion project by eric reinhardt journal staff

AUBURN — Currier Plastics, Inc., a custom blow-molding and injection-molding manufacturer, is “90 percent complete” with an expansion project that started back in October. That’s according to John Currier, company president, who spoke with The Central New York Business Journal on April 8. “We are in the new manufacturing facility right now,” Currier says, noting a warehouse addition is also finished. Meanwhile, the expansion of the office area is about “50 percent” finished, he adds, noting he was speaking during the phone interview from temporary office space, which he’ll vacate in a few weeks. The project increases the firm’s location from the previous 65,000 square feet to about 120,000 square feet. Currier Plastics has added equipment annually for the past five years. So, the company “…just basically ran out of square footage,” Currier says. The manufacturer currently employs 100 fulltime workers, and, with the expansion, hopes to add 50 additional full-time workers over the next three years, according to Currier. Work on the $21 million project began last fall. The total cost includes $8 million for improvements to the building and infrastructure and $13 million for new equipment purchases in the next three years. Syracuse–based VIP Architectural Associates, PLLC and VIP Structures, Inc. designed and are handling the expansion project. Currier Plastics used “mostly” private financing, along with a loan from First Niagara Bank, Currier says. He couldn’t recall the exact amount of the bank loan the company used for the project. New York state also approved $1 million in Excelsior tax credits, and a $750,000 Economic Transformation from Empire State Development, the state’s primary economicdevelopment agency, to help pay for the project, he adds. The company is able to apply the tax credits when it buys new equipment. “They’re helpful,” he says. “[They] certainly weighed heavy in our consideration to stay here [in Auburn].” The company had considered moving to sites in Pennsylvania and Virginia before deciding to stay in Central New York.

Company growth

When asked why the company pursued

photo courtesy of currier plastics

The four owners of Currier Plastics, Inc. (from right to left): Gary Kieffer, the firm’s vice president of new product development; Michael Cartner, Currier chief financial officer; James Currier, and his brother, company president John Currier are pictured at the November groundbreaking ceremony for the firm’s expansion project.

the expansion project, Currier simply says, “Business has been good.” Currier Plastics generated revenue of $25 million in 2012, representing a 12 percent increase over 2011. The manufacturer is projecting a revenue increase of 10 percent in 2013. Currier Plastics had several years of double-digit sales growth and outgrew its space. “We had several existing customers and new customers that wanted us to do more work for them, so we either had to turn those new jobs down or expand the facility,” Currier says. For example, Currier Plastics has generated revenue growth in the molding of packaging containers. “The packaging area is where we’re most heavily focused,” he says. The company blow molds bottles and canisters, and injection molds caps and lids for packages, items the industry refers to as “closures,” Currier says. Currier Plastics, founded in 1982, is also seeing growth in the amenities market, producing packaging for shampoo and mouthwash containers, he says. John Currier is one of four men who share ownership of the company. The other three owners include John’s brother, James Currier; Gary Kieffer, vice president of new product development; and Michael Cartner, the firm’s CFO. John Currier declined to disclose the percentage of ownership between the four men

Omission In the March 29 issue of The Central New York Business Journal, the Sales & Marketing Excellence (SME) Awards special report contained write-ups of the award winners. But, we inadvertently left out one of the SME Award honorees: Alan Smith, of CXtec. His write-up, which was written by his employer, is below:

ALAN SMITH CXtec

Alan Smith joined CXtec five years ago and has proven himself a great asset to the company. He is dedicated and possesses a solid understanding of the Canadian market. Smith is a true team player, working with his peers, reinforcing their personal strengths, and increasing their technical knowledge to best serve customers’ needs. In his short time with CXtec, he has proven that it is possible to achieve every award: Starman, four out of five years, President’s Club, Million Dollar Club, and recently earning his new role as Team Leader. He is one of those people that everyone wants to be like but is difficult to match.

but said the percentages weren’t equal. The company primarily serves commercial clients in the Northeast, especially originalequipment manufacturers (OEM). “We are a custom manufacturer, so we don’t have any product line … of our own. Everything we make is specifically for an individual customer,” Currier says.

Consulting on CCC program

Currier Plastics is working with Cayuga Community College (CCC) to create its first

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plastics-technology program, the firm announced April 3. CCC is using grant funding it obtained last fall to develop an advanced-manufacturing project in the plastics industry for New York and to support workforce development initiatives statewide, according to a news release from Currier Plastics. “We’ve been assisting them with our expertise in facility layout. We’ve got several individuals that have plastics technology andor plastics-engineering degrees from Penn State, so we’ve been advising them on the curriculum,” Currier says. Sam Ware, automation engineer at Currier Plastics, recently spent time with CCC architecture students working on the designs for the new plastics lab, the company said. The idea is to have an injection-molding machine (IMM) with a press-mounted industrial robot, Ware said in the news release. “The IMM would have a conveyor tied in so that students could troubleshoot the interfaces between the conveyor system and the IMM. There are also plans for a multiaxis robot that would be on a mobile station so that students could perform different ‘real world’ tasks with it,” Ware said. CCC plans to eventually build a “mini factory,” which would give students the hands-on learning experience of a real molding facility. Cayuga Community College is one of 64 accredited institutions that make up the State University of New York. q

Insurance Brokerage, Inc.

CHInsurance.cc


mid-market

10 • The Central New York Business Journal

April 19, 2013

Will Your HR Department Withstand a Government Audit? Now is a good time to ask

W

  oody Allen once quipped   “confidence is what you have   before you understand the prob-

lem.” The 10 words sum up what many businesses, including middle-market and small companies, are starting to feel as 2013 brings in broader workplace requirements for employers and hard-line enforcement by government agencies.

A few news items to think about: The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) stated last year that it had secured $365.4 million in monetary damages against employers — a $700,000 increase over the previous year and the highest level of monetary relief that the agency has ever reported. In 2012, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) assessed $13 million in fines, and arrested more than 200 employers accused of criminal violations related to employment.

Since September 2011, the Wage and Hour Division has collected more than $9.5 million in back wages, primarily for minimum wage and overtime violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act, which resulted from more than 11,400 workers being misclassified as independent contractors or otherwise not properly treated as employees. “In this climate, all companies should pay close attention to regulation changes, especially in the health-care area,” said Mary Beth DiBacco, assistant vice president,

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specialty manager at the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies office in Rochester and expert in Employment Practices Liability Insurance. To avoid becoming part of the fiscal year 2013 statistics, DiBacco said, employers should carefully reexamine their HR viewpoint policies, procedures, and practices. The good news (sort of) is that agencies like the EEOC have made it easy to prioritize compliance efforts for 2013 and beyond. The EEOC’s new strategic enforcement plan points to hiring, pay, and harassment as three areas of focus. Armed with this guidance, employers of all sizes should consider conducting an HR audit to ensure that their policies and practices are not creating liabilities for their companies.

candace walters

What is an HR audit?

Used optimally, a human-resource audit provides senior management with an analysis of how well the company is complying with government regulations and specifically identifies gaps in compliance. An audit uncovers exposures and defines an action plan for addressing them. Below is a short list of 2013 “hot topics” that should be part of any HR audit:

Health-care reform

A number of Affordable Care Act deadlines are upon us: One is the requirements that employers notify employees this summer of the availability of state and federal health exchanges, which are required to be ready for open enrollment later this year. Large employers (those who issued 250 or more W-2s in 2011) were required in January 2013 to disclose the annual cost of their group health-insurance coverage to employees on the 2012 W-2 forms. All employers will be required to disclose this information on 2013 W-2 forms. A major change set for 2014 is the mandate that employers with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees provide affordable, minimum value health insurance or pay a tax penalty.

Independent contractors

The U.S. government loses approximately $3 billion a year on taxes for misclassified workers. In 2011, the IRS vowed to be more vigilant in finding employers who improperly classify workers as independent contractors. Adding to the confusion for small firms is that an employer’s view of who is an independent contractor may not align with the government’s definition. The guidelines defining independent contractors can be difficult to interpret. The stakes are higher than ever for employers, particularly those who have close to 50 full-time employees. Worker misclassification can trigger the healthcare employer mandate. This could result in having to pay back taxes in addition to See walters, page 11


April 19, 2013

mid-market

BROWN & BROWN: Wittig: An employer with over 50 employees is potentially subject to penalties, as it relates to health-care regulations Continued from page 7

under the legislation. We’re often asked, does that mean it’s taxable income? Well, not yet, it’s not taxable. It’s hard to say what the future will bring, but it is a requirement for the larger end of the mid-segment market employers. There’s also some reporting requirements and some notification requirements for employers such as the summary of benefits and coverage (SBC), which is part of the new regulation. The SBC requires employers to distribute the employees’ planned benefits in a glossary of terms in a uniform template. And so, that uniform template has been provided by the insurance carriers and then we work with the employer to provide them with that summary of benefits and coverage. We actually help facilitate them getting that and distributing that to their employees as well as helping them incorporate that into their orientation packets for new hires because part of regulation is to provide that notification to employees. The other employee notification is related to the upcoming health-insurance exchange and was originally set for March, but that’s been delayed. Employers will be required to provide notification to employees regarding the New York state exchange [called the New York Health Benefit Exchange], and that has been delayed to late summer or early fall. We would anticipate that [notification] being, at the latest, by Oct. 1 because that is the date at which [New York’s exchange] is going to begin accepting applications for a Jan. 1 effective date. More importantly, though, is the impact the legislation will have beginning on Jan. 1, 2014. CNYBJ: Tell us about that. Wittig: An employer with over 50 employees is potentially subject to penalties, as it relates to health-care regulations. If an employer is going to continue offering insurance to employees, they’re still subject to potential penalties if they don’t meet large-group requirements as it relates to the definition of offering insurance to an employee who works 30 hours per week. The plan also has to meet a minimumvalue requirement, secondly, and, thirdly, the plan has to meet an affordability test … An individual cannot pay more than 9.5 percent of their income toward insurance or they would be considered not being offered affordable insurance. If an employer meets those requirements, then they are not subject to the $3,000 penalty (or it can be a $2,000 penalty, whichever is less according to the

middle-market company shapshot Brown & Brown Empire State 500 Plum St. • Syracuse, N.Y. 13204 n Website: www.bbempirestate.com n Type of business: Insurance agency n Employees: 98 n Annual revenue: $20 million (2012) n Company president: Nicholas Dereszynski

regulations). However, if they do have some employees who don’t meet the affordability test (these could be lowerincome wage employees who are paying more than 9.5 percent of their income toward their health insurance), the employees could be eligible to purchase their coverage through the exchange in 2014, and if the workers do so, the employer, or our client, is then subject to a $3,000 penalty — if, and only if, the employee enrolls in the New York exchange. The second part of that … employers can also decide not to offer insurance and that’s referred to as (the “pay” part of the “pay or play” model). The pay part is the employer deciding not to offer insurance anymore and paying the $2,000 penalty (after the first 30 employees), and at that point, permitting the employees to purchase their coverage through the individual exchange. So, there’s a lot of planning, a more strategic look at the current structure, and then how employers could be impacted by those penalties, and whether they should consider not offering insurance at all. There are a number of implications to consider if an employer decided to pay the penalty and not offer insurance. On the surface, if you look at employer’s monthly contribution to an employee’s health coverage … the $2,000 penalty for most employers, they’re actually going to be able to save money by not offering insurance and paying the $2,000 penalty. However, there are implications in doing that and those implications can impact employees because going to the exchange … only certain employees are going to get a subsidy or credit for purchasing their coverage through the exchange. Some will get more of a credit than others. Some may not get a credit at all. And that purchase through the exchange is also not pre-tax the way it is in today’s environment, so there are tax implications for both the employer and the employee by doing that. When employers look beyond just the $2,000 penalty and look at the retention and recruitment of employees and … at what the subsidies will look like for their employee base, that will certainly help employers make an informed decision about how they deliver health insurance to their employees going forward. CNYBJ: You wanted to add a few remarks about new fees and taxes. Proceed. Jeffrey Wittig: There are new taxes and fees that are associated with the health-care reform regulations. There’s a health-insurance fee or tax. There’s what’s referred to as the PCORI (the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute) tax or fee, and then there’s a reinsurance tax or fee. Those are three very important components that are being implemented in January that, unfortunately, have a negative impact on our clients and our employers because those fees and taxes are being passed through in the premium and those fees and taxes can have a negative impact on upcoming premiums and renewals before any other factors are applied, so I think that’s another important thing that needs to be considered…. Those fees could have an impact of about 4 percent to 5 percent on an upcoming renewal.

The Central New York Business Journal also spoke with Nicholas Dereszynski, president of Brown & Brown Empire State, about the firm’s plans to hire more people. CNYBJ: Upon returning to Syracuse last August, you had mentioned that hiring and recruiting talented salespeople was a priority for Brown & Brown Empire State.  How has that process unfolded? Nick Dereszynski: We’ve hired five individuals here in our Syracuse office. A couple of those individuals would be on the employee-benefits side, and a couple would be on our commercial-insurance side. We continue to look for high-quality individuals, both in sales, and also in our claims division and claims support. Being an advocate for our clients is critical to our success long term. And so we are investing in our talent internally, and again, that’s both internal folks and individuals that are client facing on a day-to-day basis, so that we have the best product and service in this marketplace for our clients. CNYBJ: Are the people that you’ve hired sales agents or in other areas of the company?  Dereszynski: Of the folks we’ve hired thus far, we’ve hired four new sales agents, and we’ve hired one operations manager in our employee-benefits division, and, again, we would continue to look in those areas and also in our policy-holder services and our claims division. CNYBJ: You’ve mentioned that Brown & Brown, Inc. wants to grow its annual revenue level to $2 billion. Is that part of the reason why the firm is pursuing new hires?  Dereszynski: That’s correct. Whether you look at it on a corporate level … we’re a $2 billion company at the corporate level. We have approximately 6,300 employees around the country in 38 states, or whether you look at that on an upstate New York basis. In upstate New York, we’re approximately $40 million in revenue in total [including Brown & Brown, Inc.’s other units]. We’re probably 200, 250 employees in upstate New York, so, yes our goal is to double, and that means we need double the teammates, whether it’s on a local basis or a national basis. We believe that the way to get there is through attracting, developing, and retaining talent, which will enhance our client base. CNYBJ: The Brown & Brown Empire State unit has generated $20 million in revenue in both 2012 and 2011. What is the company’s projection for 2013? Dereszynski: Our revenue projection for 2013 would be to increase 5 percent. So $21 million is our target. Our business is very much a microcosm or a mirror of the general broad-based economy, and so, as the economy continues to bump along, we do believe that it’s trending in the right direction, and so, as economic factors get better, that does support our business. There’s also pressure on insurance premiums for our customers. We advocate for our customers, but premiums and rates are continuing to trend upwards. So that, from a business model standpoint, does give us a lift in our revenues as well. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

The Central New York Business Journal • 11

WALTERS: More

often than not, smallto mid-size companies find audits yield immediate benefits Continued from page 10

potential penalties associated with the health-care law, should the revised classification push the firm’s employee headcount over the threshold.

Background checks

The EEOC has issued updated guidelines on employers’ use of arrest and conviction records in employment decisions. Policies or practices that exclude candidates with any criminal record will not satisfy the EEOC’s requirements.

Form I-9 compliance

The seemingly simple, one-page, I-9 form is accompanied by a manual of almost 70 pages of instructions and frequently asked questions. Failure to execute the Form I-9 or comply with its complex requirements has resulted in millions of dollars of sanctions against employers. Even when filed, employers may be fined for errors found on the Form I-9. Fines for substantive violations and uncorrected technical violations range from $110 to $1,100 per violation.

The “other” reasons for doing an HR audit

If staying on the right side of the law and reducing legal exposure are not enough incentive to launch an audit, there are a couple more reasons to consider: cost savings and strategy. More often than not, small-to mid-size companies find audits yield immediate benefits. Correcting benefit-premium errors and overpayments, for example, can generate many thousands of dollars in savings. Audits also can be used to identify opportunities to outsource areas within human resources that offer little value to the company. It’s important to remember that HR can serve a strategic purpose — one that has proven to be a competitive advantage and a boost to the bottom line. Companies that complete a thorough HR audit for compliance and cost reasons can also use the insight they gained to ensure that HR practices are linked to and play a vital role in the company’s strategic planning and execution. q Candace Walters is president of HR Works, Inc. (www.hrworks-inc.com), a humanresource outsourcing and consulting services firm, which is based in Fairport and also has a DeWitt office. To reach HR Works, contact Director of Business Development Adam Dusseault at (315) 299-6982 or email: Dusseault@hrworks-inc.com.

The Central New York Business Journal Call (800) 836-3539 today to subscribe


12 • The Central New York Business Journal

April 19, 2013

JANITORIAL SERVICE COMPANIES

THE LIST

Ranked by No. of FT Employees

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. .

Free Estimates

4.

Night Cleaning

3.

Day Cleaning

2.

Bonded

1.

Insured

Rank

1,200 600

500

construction cleanup, cleaning consulting, facility management, wood-floor restoration, carpet cleaning

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

May 3

Office Parks

187 87

145

carpet cleaning, vending machines

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y Patrick M. Gogliardo, Founder, 1979 General Manager

May 10

Conference and Meeting Facilities

150 500

175

clean room services, medical waste disposal, Y general maintenance, green cleaning, hard surface floor care, restroom sanitation, window cleaning

Y

Y

Y

Y Mark Falvey, Branch Manager

1909

May 17

MBA Programs

May 24

74 118

70

Y

Y

Y

Y

Richard Sebastian, President/ CEO

1977

Commercial PropertyManagement Companies

54 97

200

division of Human Technologies Corp. offers green Y cleaning services; event, construction, & emergency cleanup; grounds and landscaping, snow plowing, facilities maintenance management facilities maintenance, green/LEED janitorial, Y emergency water restoration, window washing

Y

Y

Y

Y

Cindy Parella, President

1995

50 100

120

construction cleanup, wood-floor care, carpet maintenance, cleaning consulting

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

David Maione, President

1978

38 45

85

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Larry Posselt, President

1970

30 0

0

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Jennifer Peterson, President

1999

18 22

120

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Patrick Martin, President & CEO Jane S. Martin, VP

1989

8 16

30

corporate, commercial, industrial, retail, and institutional customers; 24/7 coverage; tenant industrial floor scrubbers; janitorial supplies and equipment WBE certified business, commercial, industrial, and office cleaning services, construction, green cleaning, and distributor of janitorial, industrial, and office supplies construction cleaning services, warehouse and industrial facilities, concrete floor painting, fire, water and mold damage restoration, carpet and upholstery cleaning, pressure washing stripping and waxing floors, carpet cleaning, restroom sanitation

3 22

30

3 17

130

No. of Employees: FT PT

Name Address Phone/Website Matrix Integrated Facility Management 19 Avenue D Johnson City, NY 13790 (607) 766-0700/cleanforhealth.com Vencor Services, Inc. P.O. Box 814 DeWitt, NY 13214 (315) 446-4647/vencorservices.com ABM Industries Inc. 6171 E. Molloy Road East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 431-4552/ABM.com Property Management Group 2260 Dwyer Ave. Utica, NY 13501 (315) 724-9891/htcorp.net Cleantec 8 Adler Drive, Suite 3 East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 463-5353/cleantec.us The Night Shift 2721 E. Main St. Endwell, NY 13760 (607) 748-7794/thenightshift.com LCS Janitorial Service & Supply, Inc. 6680 Martin St. Rome, NY 13440 (315) 336-4383/lcscleaning.com Visible Solutions Inc. (VSI) 670 Thompson Road Syracuse, NY 13211 (315) 463-5319/vissolutions.com Genie Services, Inc. 6878 Greenfield Road Rome, NY 13442 (315) 336-2948 DOHL Development Corp. 210 Court St., Suite 5 Watertown, NY 13601 (315) 788-2347/dohl.com Ri-Coz Building Services 217 S. Salina St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 478-5230/rbsclean.com MLS Cleaning Service 80 Center Road Pennellville, NY 13132 (315) 263-5191

Research by Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com (315) 579-3911

No. of CNY Clients

Services Offered

daily and periodic schedules, dormitory/student housing, hardwood floor refinishing/installation VCT maintenance, marble/natural stone polishing medical/industrial/professional office cleaning, new construction, residential cleaning

Top Executive James R. Peduto, CEO & President

Year Estab. 1996

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Michele R. Jeican, COO Hollis Crowe, Janitorial Division Manager

1988

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Daniel L. Cramer, President

1987

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Martha L. Schond, President

1995

Upcoming Lists:

Electronic versions of all our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website, cnybj.com/Research.aspx

NOTES Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations.

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April 19, 2013

opinion

Business Journal C e n t r a l

N e w

Y o r k

Myths and marriage

Volume 27, No. 16- April 19, 2013 NEWS Editor-in-Chief........................Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com Associate Editor.............Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com Staff Writers.............................. Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com ....................................................Norm Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Contributing Writers................Traci DeLore Maya Gao Qian Production Manager.......................Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com Research Manager.................. Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com SALES Sr. Account Managers....................................... Bernard B. Bregman bbregman@cnybj.com Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Multi Media, Sales and Marketing Manager..................................Deborah Bowyer dbowyer@cnybj.com Marketing .......................BBB Marketing Inc. CIRCULATION Circulation Management....(315) 579-3927 Administrative Publisher..........................Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Chief Operating Officer......Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com Business Manager..................... Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

The Central New York Business Journal (ISSN #1050-3005) is published every week by CNY Business Review, Inc. All contents copyrighted 2012. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. Cover Price $2 Subscription Rate $89 per year Call (800) 836-3539

HOW TO REACH US MAIL: Send letters to: Editor, The Central New York Business Journal 269 W. Jefferson St. Syracuse, N.Y. 13202-1230 EMAIL: letters@cnybj.com PHONE: (315) 472-3104

The Central New York Business Journal • 13

R

  obin Hood is a heroic, English   outlaw known for robbing from the   rich and giving to the poor. He and his merry band of rogues discomfited the unscrupulous sheriff of Nottinghamshire, who had dispossessed Robin of his property. The myth has persisted for more than 800 years. Horatio Alger, Jr. wrote more than 100 books designed for young, working-class men, which are best described as rags-toriches stories. His first book appeared shortly after the Civil War. His novels portrayed young men who led exemplary lives, rising from poverty and other adversities. The from the protagonists realized publisher the “American Dream” based on honesty, thrift, self-reliance, and industry. Which myth persists today? Both. Robin Hood and his merry band currently reside at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. They are still focused on extracting the earnings of the “rich” and redistributing them to the less fortunate. The wealthy “1 percent” continues to suppress the less fortunate, inhibiting their social mobility and smothering fairness, defined as “economic inequality.” Government is now the sheriff, and the welfare state is the mechanism for righting this evil. Horatio Alger lives in the breasts of entrepreneurs. America is enjoying an explosion of dreamers who imagine a new product or service and who are willing to risk time, talent, and treasure to pursue their dreams. Thousands are still drawn to our shores as immigrants, seeking a society based on meritocracy and the opportunity for social mobility. Which myth best propels U.S. economic growth — economic inequality or social mobility? America has long opted for social mobility as long as economic advancement

is a realistic goal and capitalism does not become a caste system. Supporters of both myths agree that education is a critical benchmark to achieve mobility. What is too often overlooked is another benchmark — marriage. The breakdown of marriage has spawned the rise of the single-parent household. In 1980, about 18 percent of births were to unmarried women; by 2009, the number had escalated to 41 percent. The increase among whites rose from 11 percent to 36 percent; among blacks, the number jumped from 56 percent to 72 percent; and Hispanic numbers increased from 37 percent to 53 percent. Concomitantly, the number of children living with two parents has dropped since 1970 from 82 percent to 63 percent. On average, children in singleparent homes have lower grades, do more drugs, and have higher arrest rates. The drop in marriage rates exacerbates income inequality of those in the lowest income quintile, creating a fault line separating economic classes. Fifty years ago, marriage rates for the most- and leasteducated adults were identical. Today, twothirds of college graduates are married, compared with less than half of those with a high-school diploma or those who did not graduate. The numbers also tell us that those with less education are both more likely to cohabit and are quicker to divorce. The fault line is also widened by who marries whom. Fifty years ago, it was not uncommon for the boss to marry his secretary, who probably came from a different economic strata and level of education. Today, marriage is largely between those with equal education: I met my spouse in med school or law school. The couple then most likely resides in a clustered community of like-educated couples, further segregating economic classes The numbers are important because a strong determinant of educational achievement is being raised in a stable, two-parent home. By age 12, two-thirds of children born to cohabiting parents will see them split up, compared with just a quarter of

Calling All Opinion Writers

benefits • Unions • Health-care reform and costs Have an opinion about any of these topics or others? Please send us your opinion in the form of a letter or opinion article to letters@cnybj.com. Here are some general guidelines for how to compose your opinion piece: • Length should be no more than 800 words. • It should be written for a business audience — specifically business owners and managers. The topic must affect and appeal to this audience. • Pick a theme or trend you want to focus on and then build your opinion around that, making your key points.

norman poltenson

The Business Journal is seeking to provide its readers with more opinion articles and more opposing viewpoints. The goal would be to publish a set of “Points/Counterpoints” on various issues of importance to businesses. The topics could include: • Economic-development policies • Entrepreneurship • Green business • Government spending • Taxes and regulations • Public-sector compensation and

children born to parents who are married. Educational achievement, in turn, usually determines lifetime income. The result: fewer marriages mean more economic inequality. Which brings us to men in the lowest income quintile. For them, it is most difficult to find employment, because they are undereducated and have adjusted poorly to a marketplace requiring more office work and less factory work, construction, and transportation. This, in turn, marginalizes them as prospective marriage partners. Our stagnant economy exacerbates the situation, causing many to simply drop out of the labor market. In March, the U.S. Labor Department reported that 496,000 people had exited the labor force. The data shows a direct correlation between falling earnings of poorly educated men and declining marriage rates. It also suggests that the implosion of stable families costs taxpayers $112 billion annually. Economic mobility, then, is a family enterprise. But, it’s also an individual enterprise. We all marvel at immigrants who arrive penniless in America, unable to speak the language, and in a few years, many create thriving enterprises and their children are the class valedictorians who go on to professional careers. The family culture stresses education and the Horatio Alger attributes of thrift, self-reliance, and hard work. Clearly, America is still a land of opportunity for those who don’t buy into the Robin Hood concept based on envy and resentment. The multicultural dogma tells us that all cultures are equal. Put that in the baloney column. Horatio Alger may be a myth, but cultures built on Alger’s principles nurture real rags-to-riches stories. The biggest obstacle to mobility in our society is the growing stratification of the lowest economic quintile. The best answer is to promote stable, two-parent families. Marriage matters. q Norman Poltenson is publisher of The Central New York Business Journal. Contact him at npoltenson@cnybj.com

We find that lists and bullet points work well to get your views across to the reader. • Include a tag line at the bottom that tells the reader who you are (name, hometown, organization) and how to contact you (e-mail address). For example: John Doe of Syracuse is managing partner at Doe Wood Smith LLC. Contact him at jdoe@dwsllc.com. • Article must be in Word format • The Business Journal will edit the article, including cutting out portions, to fit space as it sees fit. So whether you’re a conservative, progressive, or anything in between, please get your opinion seen and send it to: letters@cnybj.com


14 • The Central New York Business Journal

APRIL 22 n Unity House Annual Board Recognition Dinner and Award Ceremony beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Auburn Holiday Inn, 75 North St., Auburn. The community is invited. The cost is $35 per person. More information, an invitation, and an RSVP card may be found at www.unityhouse.com. Or, contact Kelly Buck at (315) 253-6227, email: kdbuck@unityhouse. com, or visit www.unityhouse.com/fredatkinsaward

APRIL 23 n Women TIES Greater Watertown Spring Luncheon & Mini-Tradeshow, “Becoming More Organized to Become More Successful” from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, 1290 Arsenal St., Watertown. The featured speaker will be Ann Michael Henry, founder of Mise-En-Place. The cost is $29; reservations are due by April 21. For details, visit www.nywbc. org or www.womenties.com

APRIL 24 n Small Business Show – SOHO from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Nicholas Pirro Convention Center at Oncenter, Syracuse. Visit www.sohosyracuse. com for details and exhibiting registration or call (315) 622-2249 for sponsorship information. n Leadership Greater Syracuse Distinguished Community Leader Awards Luncheon from 11:30 to 1:30 at the Holiday Inn Syracuse/Liverpool. The event will recognize Chuckie Holstein, Lt. Col. Edward Cook, and SRC, Inc. The cost is $50 per person. Call (315) 422-5471 or register at www.leadsyr.org

APRIL 25 n Retirement Plan Administration & Compliance seminar from 8 to 10 a.m. at CenterState CEO headquarters, 572 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Mary Rosen of the U.S. Department of Labor will discuss fiduciary duties and requirements. AXA Advisors, LLC will review plandesign options for implementing a 401(k) and profit-sharing plan. For details and registration information, visit www.CenterStateCEO.com/ events

april 30 n HealtheConnections Connecting for Better Health event from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool. Rachel Block, New York deputy commissioner for health information technology transformation, will speak about electronic medical records and Ann Monroe, president of the Health Foundation of Western and Central New York, will talk about the changing business of health care. The presenting sponsor is Excellus BlueCross BlueShield. The cost is $75. For more information, visit www.healtheconnections. org/Conference. n Women TIES Binghamton Luncheon: “Baking Up a Niche Market” from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Traditions at the Glen, 4101 Watson Blvd., Johnson City. The featured speaker will be Bonni Stacconi Phelps, founder of Baked Euphoria Cakes & Pastries. The cost is $29; reservations are due by April 27. For details, visit www.nywbc.org or www.womenties.com

MAY 1 & 8 n Is Your Business Prepared? course from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Tioga County Administrative Building, Lower Level, Classroom 2, 56 Main St., Owego. Large or small disasters can happen and your business can be disrupted. The course offers information on getting ready. Offered by Tioga County Economic Development and Planning and Broome Community College, the cost is $49. To register, contact the Broome Community College at (607) 778-5012 and/or www.sunybroome.edu/ce. Course code BN30702

April 19, 2013

Business Calendar

OF EVENTS

MAY 2 n The Eight Biggest Challenges Facing the Next Generation of Leaders and Managers in Family Business from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the CNY Philanthropy Center, 431 Fayette St., Syracuse. The speaker will be Greg McCann, presented by the NY Family Business Center and Home Builders & Remodelers of CNY. NYFBC members are prepaid; the fee for Home Builders & Remodelers of CNY is $25, and nonmembers are $35. The main portion of this event will be open to family businesses only. However, a morning session with McCann will be open to professional advisors and other members of the business community from 8 to 9:30 a.m. This session will cost $15. Please RSVP to Donna Herlihy at DHerlihy@nyfbc.org or (315) 579-2871.

MAY 3 n 25th CNY Prevention Conference from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the DoubleTree Hotel Syracuse, 6301 Route 298, DeWitt. This is a oneday conference for professionals in the prevention field and all others who work with youth. Its goal is to address the risk factors associated with youth substance abuse and other addictions. For details and registration information, contact Alis Sefick, Central Region Prevention Resource Center, at (315) 471-1359 or email: asefick@preventionnetworkcny.org n CNY ASTD Breakfast Club from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at The Gem Diner, 832 Spencer St., Syracuse. This is an informal group discussion on areas of expertise in learning and performance roles. The topic will be coaching. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@ cnyastd.org

The cost is $25 for members and $40 for nonmembers. To register, visit www.cnyastd.org. For more information, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org

MAY 29 n 2013 CCMR Symposium: Oxides: Saving the World at 4 K! The symposium will focus on the structure, properties, and engineering of complex electronic materials. These materials have a wide range of potential applications, from information storage, display and communication to the development of energy efficient solutions and green products. For more information and registration, visit the website http:// www.ccmr.cornell.edu/symposium/

June 5 n 4th Annual North Country Technology Symposium from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Clarkson University, Potsdam. The cost is $60/ person. Pre-registration is required. Contact Erica Tremblay, event coordinator, by phone at (315) 274-9164 or email: nctechsymposium@ gmail.com

June 6 n 6th Annual CNY BEST Learning and Performance Awards Ceremony at 5:30 p.m. at DoubleTree by Hilton Syracuse, near Carrier Circle. This event will recognize learning and performance practices in the CNY area. The cost is $75. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org

June 7

n 13th Annual Crystal Ball Awards from 1 to 4 p.m. at Traditions at the Links, 5900 N. Burdick St., East Syracuse. Jackie Robinson will be the guest emcee. The cost is $35 per person, and reservations are due by April 30. For details, visit www.womenties.com

n 2013 Annual Full Day Conference, “On the Cutting Edge of Human Resources: Engage, Lead, Innovate” from 7:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Syracuse. This conference is presented by the CNY chapter of SHRM, with corporate sponsor, Bond Schoeneck & King. Registration cost is $85 for members, $95 for non-members, $50 for students and members in transition. For details, visit www. cnyshrm.org

MAY 7

ONGOING EVENTS

n Women TIES Mohawk Valley Luncheon, “Strategies to Having Higher SEO Rankings” from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Chesterfield’s Restaurant, 1713 Bleeker St., Utica. The featured speaker will be Tamara MacDuff, founder of Webizing. The cost is $29; reservations are due by May 5. For details, visit www.womenties.com

n Every Tuesday, Cayuga Club Toastmasters from 6 to 7 p.m. at Cornell University, Ithaca, Rhodes Hall, 6th Floor, Conference Room #655. Free and easy parking is available nearby at Peterson Lot. For more information, contact Julia Reich, (315) 364-7190 or email: juliareichdesign@gmail.com

MAY 8, 15, & 22

n Every Tuesday, Syracuse Business Connections from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Hummel’s Office Plus, 6731 Old Collamer Road, DeWitt. The group meets to network and exchange referrals. For more information, email Deb Angarano at dangarano@tsys.com

MAY 5

n Small-Business Startup Training Program from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day at 222 Water St. in downtown Binghamton. The program is being offered by the Binghamton University Small Business Development Center. For a class program and to enroll, contact Ginny Thompson at the SBDC (607) 777-4026, or email: Thompson@binghamton.edu

MAY 14 n Emotional Intelligence in Action discussion from 7:30 to 11 a.m. at The Palace Theatre, 2384 James St., Syracuse. CNY ASTD will discuss leveraging emotional intelligence for greater business and career success. The presenter will be Leslie Rose McDonald, Pathfinders CTS, Inc.

n Every Wednesday, Small Business Development Center at OCC from 4 to 6 p.m., Introduction to Business Startup at H-1 Hall. Please call 498-6070 or visit www.onondagasbdc.org n Every Wednesday, Syracuse Business Networking from 6 to 7 p.m. at Barbieri’s Restaurant (upstairs level) located on Main Street in the village of North Syracuse. For more information, call Kim Bachstein at (315) 414-8223 or email: info@

SyracuseBusinessNetworking.com n First Wednesday of each month, Business Innovation Days meetings from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Entrepreneurs and small businesses can meet one-on-one with a counselor from the SBDC for advice and customized assistance opportunities. Scheduled by appointment, call (315) 474-0910 or email: info@thecleantechcenter.com n First and Third Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at Golden Artist Colors, 188 Bell Road, New Berlin. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Fourth Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Chenango County Council of the Arts, 27 W. Main St., Norwich. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://1427.toastmastersclubs. org or email: contact-1427@toastmastersclubs. org n Every Thursday, Liverpool Linguists from 7 to 8 p.m. First Thursday of every month at Liverpool Public Library and the remaining Thursdays at Liverpool First Methodist Church, 604 Oswego Road, Liverpool. For details, visit http://Liverpool.toastmastersclubs.org or call (315) 884-2668 or 457-2581. n Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at C&S Companies, 499 Col. Eileen Collins Blvd., near Hancock Airport. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802. n Every Friday, 40 Above: Workers in Transition from 9 to 11 a.m. at the library in North Syracuse (NOPL) at 100 Trolleybarn Lane, North Syracuse. Helping workers/job seekers aged 40 and above in search of work. Contact John A. Cruty at (315) 569-3964, or at crutij@ yahoo.com n Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 472-3104, ext. 103 or email: bbregman@cnybj.com n First Friday of each month, Toolkit Day with SCORE by appointment at The Tech Garden. Counselors provide free, confidential, individual business mentoring to prospective or current business owners. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Lynn Hughes at (315) 579-2862 or email Lynn@ TheTechGarden.com n Every second and fourth Friday of each month, The SUN Group (Sustainable Upstate Network) meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Tony’s Family Restaurant, 3004 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. For more information, contact Andy Picco at (315) 657-0135 or email: andrewpicco@gmail. com n Every week, Syracuse Networking Professionals. Five meetings to choose from. For details, call Kevin M. Crook at (315) 4391803, or email KevinSNP@twcny.rr.com or visit SyracuseNetworkingProfessionals.com n CNY Connects is a networking organization offering 12 groups from which to choose. If you are interested in learning more, contact Amy Kaschel of AK Consulting at akconsult@twcny. rr.com or call (315) 882-6127 or visit www.cnyconnectsonline.com To have your meetings or events in the Business Calendar, email them to movers@cnybj.com 


April 19, 2013

BANKING & FINANCE M&T Bank has promoted Mylene SerranoKalinich to administrative vice president at M&T Bank. She is a member of M&T’s retail banking division.

DISTRIBUTORS Robert E. Baber has been appointed president of Energy Efficient Products (EEP). EEP is one of eight companies that make up Giotto Enterprises and is located in Oriskany. Baber had served as director of Baber marketing for the eightcompany enterprise that includes Fiber Instrument Sales, Inc.

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES Contemporary Personnel Staffing (CPS) and Professionals Incorporated have announced the promotion of Suzanne Benderski to executive assistant/project manager. As an active member of the International Association of Administrative Professionals (IAAP), she has been awarded the IAAP Member of Excellence, is a past president of the Syracuse Chapter, and a certified administrative professional with an emBenderski phasis on organizational management. Benderski holds the distinction of certified catalyst professional and earned an associate degree from Empire State College.

ENGINEERING Spectra Engineering, Architecture, and Surveying, P.C. has hired two engineers who will provide bridge and culvert inspections under Spectra’s ongoing term agreements with the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT). Russell Dunderdale is a team leader/quality control engineer. He is certified as a bridge inspector with the NYSDOT and is a licensed professional engineer with New York State. Dunderdale has 23 years experience as an engineer. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Clarkson University. Mian (Youself) Shah is an assistant team leader. He has five years experience as a bridge inspector and engineering technician and holds a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Institute of Technology.

FINANCIAL SERVICES Ridgeway & Conger, Inc. has promoted/ hired the following staff members. Christine Zarzecki has been promoted to department manager of operations. She joined Ridgeway

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: new hires & promotions & Conger in 2009 as an operations specialist. Zarzecki holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from SUNY Albany. Kristy L. Springer has been promoted to vice president of operations. She joined the firm in Zarzecki 2008 as an operations specialist. Springer has a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and sociology from Sage College. Ryan R. McParland has joined Ridgeway & Conger as general counsel. He is currently pursuing a Springer master’s degree in public policy & administration at Northwestern University. McParland is a graduate of Albany Law School and Manhattan College; he is admitted to practice law in New York. David R. Greenfield McParland has joined the company as an operations specialist. Prior to joining Ridgeway, he worked for 10 years in the fields of customer service and sales within the telecommunications and banking industries. He is a graduate of Le Moyne Greenfield College with a bachelor’s degree in business. Greenfield also holds an MBA from Le Moyne College. Michael Delorme has joined Ridgeway & Conger as an operations specialist. Prior to joining the firm, he was a financial adviDelorme sor for Morgan Stanley and Metlife. He has a bachelor’s degree in finance from the New York Institute of Technology.

HEALTH CARE Rural/Metro Medical Services recently added five new employees to its Syracuse staff. The hires resulted from a combination of newly created positions and operational expansion. Joining the staff as billing representatives are Traci Hanus, Debra Dobb, Laci Gillen, Elmer Gal, and Sara Hooper. The following individuals have joined St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center’s active medical staff: Katherine M. Nacca, M.D. and Nicholas E. Nacca, M.D. in emergency medicine; Ahmed R. Nizar, M.D. in psychiatry; and Vladan N. Obradovic, M.D. in surgery. Rachel Petkovsek recently joined the rehabilitation staff at Valley Health Services (VHS) as a physical therapy assistant. A

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graduate of Herkimer County Community College, she served one of her college internships at VHS. And after graduation from HCCC, Petkovsek accepted a position in the Albany area. And then, Petkovsek she returned to the MV area, working in Utica for more than five years. Aspen Dental announced that Gregory McCraith, D.D.S., has joined its dental practice in Cortland. He brings more than 25 years of dentistry experience to the Cortland community. McCraith McCraith received his doctorate in dental surgery from the University of Buffalo and served as chief of dental medicine at Olean General Hospital prior to joining Aspen Dental.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY M.A. Polce Consulting, Inc. has added two new staff members. Michael Maher was hired as a senior consultant and has more than 16 years experience in IT consulting. He has certifications with Citrix, Cisco, Maher VMware, HP, Microsoft, and Symantec and has worked with financial, health care, government, and educations institutions as well as other verticals. Michael Rejman was hired as the accounting/finance manager and has more Rejman than 10 years experience in the accounting and finance field. He has experience working with a variety of accounting applications. Rejman holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Utica College of Syracuse University and is a CPA.

LAW The Wladis Law Firm, P.C. has added Maureen Keser to its government relations team. She recently served as an advisor for AXA Advisors. Keser holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from SUNY Brockport. Mackenzie Hughes LLP has hired Bronson T. Kopp as an associate attorney in the law firm’s litigation department. His practice will concentrate on appellate litigation, commercial disputes, and personal injury. Prior to joining Mackenzie Hughes, Kopp worked as a law clerk for a local independent law practitioner. He also acted as a student attorney for Syracuse University College of Law’s Legal Defense Clinic. Kopp previously

The Central New York Business Journal • 15

interned with the Legal Aid Society of MidNew York and the Heritage Foundation. Kopp holds a J.D. from Syracuse University College of Law and a bachelor’s degree from St. John Fisher College.

MANUFACTURING MACNY, The Manufacturers Association, recently hired Cindy Nave as chief operating officer. She joins MACNY with more than 19 years experience in managing business operations, developing new business opportunities, and coordinating company efforts. Her most recent Nave role was as vice president of Professionals Incorporated. Nave is a certified professional consultant.

MILITARY Lt. Col. Joseph Biehler, a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, took command of the New York Army National Guard’s 27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, headquartered in Syracuse on April 6. Biehler replaces Col. Geoffrey Slack, who commanded the 27th Brigade Combat Team since August 2009. Biehler was commissioned as an Infantry officer in May 1987 and joined the New York Army National Guard. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic Course, Infantry Officer Advanced Course, Combined Arms Staff Service School, Intermediate Level Education, Infantry Pre-Command Course, Airborne School, Air Assault School, and Ranger School. Biehler is currently enrolled in the Army War College, a military school for senior Army leaders. He earned bachelor’s degrees in both accounting and management from St. John Fisher College and is a finance senior manager for Rochester’s Harris Corporation in civilian life. Biehler’s awards include the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal National Defense Service Medal, Army Achievement Medal, and Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Basic Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Ranger Tab, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. His new position will also bring a promotion to Colonel. q

Send your People-on-the-Move news via email to: movers@cnybj.com

www.cnybj.com


16 • The Central New York Business Journal

April 19, 2013

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Don’t miss your chance to celebrate with the Best Places to Work in CNY! Event Date: May 14, 2013 7:30 AM-10:30 AM DoubleTree by Hilton, East Syracuse

6ˆÃˆÌÊLˆâiÛi˜Ìâ°Vœ“ÊvœÀʓœÀiʈ˜vœÀ“>̈œ˜ÊœÀÊ̜ÊÀi}ˆÃÌiÀÊ̜Ê>ÌÌi˜`]Ê œÀÊVœ˜Ì>VÌÊœÞÊ >˜ViÊ>ÌʭΣx®ÊxǙ‡Î™£ÇʜÀʍV>˜ViJLˆâiÛi˜Ìâ°Vœ“ Presented By:

In Partnership With:

Media Sponsors:

Award Sponsor:

BUSINESS CENTRAL NEW YORK

JOURNAL

Produced By:


The Networking Event for Small Business! Celebrating 15 Years!

HELP YOUR SMALL BUSINESS THRIVE!

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 9AM - 5 PM

Convention Center at Oncenter Syracuse, NY

✔ Free Presentations on Small Business topics. ✔ Business Opportunities, Financial, and E-Business Areas. ✔ Latest Social Media support for your small business! ✔ Free Networking Reception with refreshments, entertainment, and prizes.

The only upstate New York business show customized for Small Business owners (companies with 30 or fewer employees), managers, entrepreneurs, and executives with home offices. The event is a showcase with over 130 display booths of products, services and resources for Small Business.

For more information call

(315) 622-2249 or visit

www.sohosyracuse.com Presented & Produced by:

Sponsored by:

BUSINESS CENTRAL NEW YORK

JOURNAL


2B • The Central New York Business Journal

SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

April 24, 2013

Exhibitors, town hall planned for return of SOHO business show BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — Small-business owners can learn about the products, services, and resources that are available in a single location on the same day. Premier Promotions is organizing the 15th SOHO Syracuse Small Business Show on Wednesday, April 24, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Nicholas J. Pirro Convention Center at Oncenter. SOHO is short for small office/home office. It is meant to target small-business owners that generally have 30 or fewer employees, says Steve Becker, owner of Premier Promotions, Inc., who has helped in producing all the previous 14 SOHO shows. SOHO Syracuse hopes to attract the owners or managers, presidents, CEOs, entrepreneurs, and people looking to start their own business, Becker adds. “If you look at the economy right now, that [small-business sector] is the backbone. It’s been the backbone for the last few years,” Becker says. The attendees could range from a pizzashop owner or the top official at an information-technology (IT) office, Becker says. The attendees are people who need help in determining what their options are, whether it’s related to finances or even a new computer, he adds. Becker is anticipating about 130 exhibitors for this year’s show and between 800

PHOTO COURTESY OF PREMIER PROMOTIONS

Visitors to a previous SOHO show network with vendors. Premier Promotions is organizing the 15th SOHO Syracuse Small Business Show on Wednesday, April 24 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Nicholas J. Pirro Convention Center at Oncenter. and 1,000 attendees. “Between attendees and exhibitors … probably a good 700 to 800 companies being represented,” he adds. Becker is more concerned about the types of people attending (managers and entrepreneurs), than the amount of “foot traffic” at the event, Becker says. Whoever attends gets access to a lot of information that could be helpful to starting, managing, or growing a business. The SOHO show includes six half-hour

length, small-business presentations on topics that focus on health insurance, banking, getting your business news coverage, legal matters, joining a local chamber of commerce, and a small-business town hall. The presentations begin at 10:30 a.m. with “How to get your story into The Business Journal,” offering advice on what the publication and website (cnybj.com) look for and report about local businesses. Business owners can also learn more about the New York Health Benefit Exchange in a

Your local source for business news and information

www.cnybj.com

presentation set to begin at 11:15 a.m. “[Joseph Muldoon, director of broker relations is] going to show how … by buying into the pool, it will help lower their health [insurance] costs,” Becker says. New York has established the New York Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). The presentation will discuss SHOP and how the state plans to implement the program. Then, a noontime presentation will focus on banking options for small businesses. Also in that same hour, Engel Law Offices of Manlius will present “Legal Check-Up for Small Business,” covering some common legal questions for small-business owners, such as forming an LLC (limited-liability corporation) or other type of corporation. The Greater Liverpool Chamber of Commerce will outline the benefits of joining a chamber of commerce in a presentation set for 1:30 p.m. “They’re going to bring in eight of their members in their [display] area that will have a chance to be part of the show, [display] their products and services as well,” Becker says. The final presentation is a Small Business Town Hall at 2:30 p.m. featuring representatives from the city of Syracuse, surrounding towns, Onondaga County, and New York. The panel will discuss programs targeting small businesses and how business owners can utilize them. See SOHO, page 6B

BOOKMARK US TODAY

SMALL BUSINESS WORKSHOP May 8th 8:30am-3pm

$40 prepay or $45 at the door Centerstate/Chamber Bldg at 572 S. Salina St., Syracuse

CALL OR CLICK TO REGISTER!

Veterans and their families attend free

www.syracuse.score.org I (315) 471-9393 x245


SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

April 24, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 3B

SOHO BOOTH MAP S Y R A C U S E

APRIL 24, 2013 • 9 A.M. - 5 P.M. • EXHIBIT HALL A • CONVENTION CENTER AT ONCENTER

Concessions

Internet Connect Center

Concession Seating Area

323

422

321

420

319

418

423

522

421

520

419

518

107

216

217

316

317 416

105

214

215

314

315

R

318

A

219

516

415

514

519

618

623

722

719

621

720

717

619

718

517

616

617

716

515

614

615

714

209

308

309

408

206

207

306

307

406

204

205

304

305 404

202

203

302

303

402

200

201

300

301

400

208

411

510

409

508

407

506

405

504

403

502

401

500

SPONSOR AREA

410

O

311

N

310

O

211

210

S

R

414

417

P

104

218

S

106

109

Networking & Break Area

108

Locally CNY

E

Financial area

A

Presentation Area

511

610

611

710

509

608

609

708

507

606

607

706

505

604

605

704

503

602

603

702

501

600

601

700

The Business Opportunities Center

2 0 1 3

Restrooms 715 713 711

709 707

705 703

701

Entrance

REGISTRATION

Exit

Lobby

More booths BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Presented & Produced by:

BUSINESS CENTRAL NEW YORK

JOURNAL


4B • The Central New York Business Journal

Company

SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

EXHIBITOR LIST Booth number

ADK Merchant Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Ambit Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 722 AmeriCU Credit Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400, 402 Answer Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 AXA Advisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 Baldwinsville Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700, 702 Bath Fitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614 BD Trauma Scene Clean, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 623 Business Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401, 403 Cartridge World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Cindy Griffith (Skaneateles Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 707, 709 CNY Central.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405, 407 CNY Jazz Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 CNY Latino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500, 502 CNY Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 COCARD (Baldwinsville Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700, 702 Columbia College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 704 Cooperative Federal (Locally CNY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105, 107, 109 Daily Orange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 D’Arangelo & Co. LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514 Dinosaur Bar-B-Que . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Durham Commercial Capital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Eagle Newspapers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404, 406 EmbroidMe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Empire State Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701 Employee Benefits & Testing (Locally CNY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 108, 110 Energy Lounge (Baldwinsville Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700, 702 Engel Law Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Everson Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 Exhibits And More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504, 506 FASTSIGNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Fehr Rubbish Removal, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 618 First Niagara Bank N.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Flamingo Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615 Gr8 Show (Locally CNY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105, 107, 109 Greater Liverpool Chamber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714, 716, 718, 720 GreenSavers Window & Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Hampton Inn & Suites, Downtown Albany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610 Hancock Estabrook, LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 Healing Point Chiropractic & Acupuncture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Hearth Management (Baldwinsville Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700, 702 Home & Bath Renew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Humor Advantage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Image Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 IMS Barter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 JetBlue Airways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423 Liberty Mutual Insurance (Liverpool Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . 714, 716, 718, 720 Lyoness (Liverpool Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714, 716, 718, 720 Maria DeSantis Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Mary Kay Cosmetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 MassMutual Central New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 McClurg Remoldeling & Construction Svcs. (Liverpool Chamber) . 714, 716, 718, 720

Company

April 24, 2013

Booth number

McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 Medicare Made Simple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 New York State Health Benefit Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 705 New York State Insurance Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 708 Newsradio 570 WSYR - Clear Channel Media + Entertainment . . . . . . 415 Northeast Decorating & Exhibit Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317, 319, 321, 323 Northside Collision (Liverpool Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714, 716, 718, 720 NY State Dept. of Labor - On-Site Consultation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 711 NYS Public Service Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 709 Onondaga Nation Arena / Tsha’Hon’nonyen’dakhwa’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602 Pinnacle Investment (Locally CNY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106, 108, 110 Plus Sign & Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 PostNet (Liverpool Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714, 716, 718, 720 Premier Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Printing & Promotional Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 Richard Foley Professional Tile Installer (Liverpool Chamber)714, 716, 718, 720 Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603 SCORE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717 Scotsman Media Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .508, 510 Seaboard Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 SEFCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608 SERVPRO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Signature Music, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607 Skaneateles Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 707, 709 Small Business Development Center at OCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703 Smile Seal (Liverpool Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714, 716, 718, 720 Smile-Therapy (Locally CNY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105, 107, 109 Solon Quinn Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 Speach Family Candy Shoppe, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Spinnaker Custom Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609 Staff Leasing, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409, 411 Summit Cars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507, 509, 511 SUN - Sustainable Upstate NY (Locally CNY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106, 108, 110 SuperMedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Sustainable Office Solutions, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215, 217, 219 Syracuse Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Syracuse Crunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605 Syracuse Media Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414, 416, 418, 420 Syracuse New Times & Family Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611 Syracuse Silver Knights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619 Syracuse University - University College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 715 TAG Mechanical Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604, 606 The UPS Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405, 407 UnitedHealthcare Community Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 Verizon Small Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Visual Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501, 503, 505 WCNY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408, 410 WonderWorks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Yummies Cheesecakes, LLC (Baldwinsville Chamber) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700, 702

List complete as of April 17

Sponsors in bold


SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

April 24, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 5B

AT THE SHOW THERE WILL BE FREE SMALLBUSINESS PRESENTATIONS! ALL ATTENDEES AT THE PRESENTATIONS WILL BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN A FREE BOOTH FOR YOUR COMPANY AT NEXT YEAR’S SHOW‌AND OTHER PRIZES!

The Small Business Presentations are FREE. However, seating is limited and it is suggested you pre-register online at www.sohosyracuse.com. After preregistered attendees & exhibitors for the presentations are seated, other show attendees & exhibitors will be able to take any of the remaining seats. You can attend as many of the presentations as you would like to see‌

SMALL-BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS The following will take place in the Presentation Area located in the Exhibit Hall (aisle 100) Presentations are subject to change. 10:30am

“How to get your story into The Business Journal?� (30 minutes) Central New York Business Journal Adam Rombel, the editor-in-chief of The Central New York Business Journal, will offer practical tips for getting the news out about your business. Attendees will gain an understanding of the type of news The Business Journal looks for and reports.

11:15am

“The New York Health Benefit Exchange for Small Businesses� (30 minutes) NY Health Benefit Exchange - Joe Muldoon, Director, Broker Relations The New York Health Benefit Exchange is expected to enroll over 1 million New Yorkers in health-care coverage starting in 2014. Qualified individuals and small businesses with 50 or fewer employees will be able to purchase private health insurance through the Exchange which will begin open enrollment on October 1, 2013, and begin providing coverage effective Jan. 1, 2014. New York State has established the New York Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). This presentation will discuss the SHOP program and how it will be implemented in the state.

12:00pm

“Bank Like A Business� (30 minutes) AmeriCU Banking solutions for your business: commercial deposit & lending options, specialized insurance services, and employer & employee benefit solutions.

12:45pm

“Legal Check-Up for Small Businessâ€? (30 minutes) Engel Law Offices You’re careful about your own health and get a check-up with your doctor every year, but what about the health of your business? In this presentation, some common legal questions will be covered on what you need to know to protect the health of your company. Learn specific practices you can use to take your businesses from start-up to best-run. • I started my business as a DBA - should I form an LLC or corporation? • Should I require my employees sign a non-compete agreement? • What happens to my business if something happens to me? • One of my competitors is using a name very similar to mine. What should I do? • Should I sue non-paying customers?

1:30pm “Why Join a Chamber of Commerce – What’s In It for You� (30 minutes) Greater Liverpool Chamber of Commerce This presentation will show the benefits, training & exposure that a Chamber can give your company. It will give you the insights on how to make the most of your membership. Hear what local members say about their Chamber and the great opportunity to network with some of the best companies in Central New York.

2:30pm

“Small Business Town Hall� (45 minutes) Representatives & elected officials from the City of Syracuse, surrounding towns, Onondaga County & New York State will be participating. Opportunity to interact & find out how there is support for your small business. The panel will discuss programs that are dedicated to small business and how you can utilize these incentives for your small business. There will be a question & answer segment with the audience as well.

LIMITED SEATING AVAILABLE: Register NOW! (315) 337-1700 www.RomeChamber.com The Rome Chamber of Commerce welcomes DISNEY INSTITUTE to Central New York! Members: $399 Non-Members: $449 ASK ABOUT GROUP DISCOUNTS! Registration Forms and Program Details at RomeChamber.com Continuing Education Credits may apply for Healthcare and Accounting RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY! (315) 337-1700

$+!'$+&!$ $&+&!+!'$'% %% !    ) $ ! !'% $%" && )  %"$ *  &$!'!'& +!'$ !$ ,&!  +!'1$$+&! 1  $  +!'$ '% %%  %   ) ) %!) +!'  $ %"2 )+ ! !!  & & "$!%   %  )&1% "$!+ $+ $&   $! & ! +!' . %+ &( %!'&! % & Disney Institute+!' $ &!& $ &+$+!'$+ !' &!" (%! -& $$&2&"!+% (!"%$("!%!"+-& '%&!$%!$ $&!!$&('&'$

Rome Area Chamber of Commerce welcomes DISNEY INSTITUTE to The Field House, SUNYIT, Marcy, NY (315) 337-1700 Thursday, May 16, 2013 7:30am - 4:30pm   / ($.

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      DISNEY INSTITUTE   WALT DISNEY WORLD(   

The Rome Chamber of Commerce recognizes and appreciates support for this program from Marketing Participants:


SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

6B • The Central New York Business Journal

April 24, 2013

SOHO: The event will conclude with a networking reception for exhibitors and attendees between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. Continued from page 2B

“We’re looking at the incentives for small business that are [available] through the city, the county, and the state,” Becker says. Panelists will include Van Robinson, president of the Syracuse Common Council; Benjamin Walsh, deputy commissioner for economic development for the city of Syracuse; Mark Nicotra, supervisor, town of Salina; and Assemblyman Samuel Roberts (D–Syracuse). Matt Mulcahy, news anchor and reporter for WSTM-TV in Syracuse, will moderate the discussion. The event will conclude with a networking reception for exhibitors and attendees between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m., that’ll include free refreshment, music from the DeSantis Trio, and prize giveaways, such as a pair of round-trip tickets from JetBlue to anywhere in the U.S. Complimentary tickets are available on the show’s website, but the cost at the door is $5 if people attend without a complimentary ticket, Becker says. Becker and Norman Poltenson, the publisher of The Central New York Business Journal, came up with the idea for the

PHOTO COURTESY OF PREMIER PROMOTIONS

Visitors to a previous SOHO show listen to a presenter speak about a local business topic. This year’s Small Business Town Hall panelists will include Van Robinson, president of the Syracuse Common Council; Benjamin Walsh, deputy commissioner for economic development for the city of Syracuse; Mark Nicotra, supervisor, town of Salina; and Assemblyman Samuel Roberts (D–Syracuse). Matt Mulcahy, news anchor and reporter for WSTM-TV in Syracuse, will moderate the discussion. SOHO show in the fall of 1997 and organized the first one in April 1998. SOHO became an autumn event the following year, but has now shifted on the

calendar to spring. The trade show took a one-year hiatus in 2012 to avoid conflicting with the CenterState CEO Business Showcase, an

event that has now moved to the fall. Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

April 24, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 7B

Survey finds credit spigot opening for small businesses BY JOURNAL STAFF

F

ICO, a California–based company that makes predictive analytics and decision-management software, recently released results from its quarterly survey of U.S. bank risk managers that provides an optimistic forecast for smallbusiness lending. Sixty-two percent of survey respondents said the supply of credit for small-business loans in the next six months would satisfy demand, and 89 percent said the approval rate for small-business loans would hold steady or increase. The survey, conducted for FICO by the Professional Risk Managers’ International Association, also found that 79 percent of respondents believe the delinquency rate

on small-business loans would remain flat or decrease during the next six months. This was one of the most optimistic forecasts for small-business lending in the survey’s three-year history, according to FICO. “This quarter’s survey was positive overall, but the results for small business lending were particularly striking,” Dr. Andrew Jennings, FICO’s chief analytics officer and head of FICO Labs, said in a news release. “In the past, the banking professionals we survey haven’t been as optimistic about credit for small businesses as they have been for other types of lending. The upbeat sentiment makes me think it’s possible that we’ll see small businesses picking up the pace of investing and hiring in the months ahead.”

Supply and demand for small-business credit seen increasing

More than 70 percent of respondents believe the amount of credit requested by small businesses will increase over the next six months. This would be a change in the recent trend — FDIC data has shown lackluster demand for credit by small businesses over the past three years, according to FICO. A majority of survey respondents (52 percent) also expect the aggregate amount of credit extended to small businesses to increase during the next half year, while just 10 percent expect a decrease in the credit extended to small businesses. Those figures were 42 percent and 15 percent, respectively, in last quarter’s survey.

“These results are much more positive than we see in our survey of European credit risk managers, released earlier this month,” Jennings noted. “Only 41 percent of European bankers surveyed believed that small businesses would request more credit, and just 29 percent expected an increase in the amount of credit granted to small businesses. Both credit demand and supply are suppressed by the continuing economic troubles across much of Europe.” A detailed report of FICO’s quarterly survey is available at http:// www.pr mia.org/PRMIA-News/Fico1stQuarterApr2013Rev1.pdf. The survey included responses from 255 risk managers at banks throughout the U.S. in February and March 2013. 

Companies get advice at recent CNY Solutions Fair in Salina BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SALINA — Representatives from area manufacturers and technology companies sought advice from experts assembled at the CNY Solutions Fair held April 11 in Salina. Empire State Development’s Division of Science, Technology, and Innovation (NYSTAR) and the Central New York Technology Development Organization (CNYTDO) organized the event at the Holiday Inn Syracuse/Liverpool on Electronics Parkway. Manufacturers used the Solutions Fair to get answers to their questions about responding to production, engineering, and product-innovation challenges in their respective companies. The purpose of the event was to match companies that have technology needs or business needs related to manufacturing and technology with some of the experts from across New York, says Marcene Sonneborn, regional innovation and SBIR specialist at CNYTDO. In some cases, Sonneborn says these companies have a specific technical question or something that they’re trying to solve. “In other cases, they’re companies look-

ERIC REINHARDT/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

The Central New York Technology Development Organization, Inc. (CNYTDO) and the Empire State Development Division of Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR) presented the CNY Solutions Fair on Thursday, April 11, at the Holiday Inn Syracuse/ Liverpool at 441 Electronics Parkway in Salina. The event was intended to connect smalland medium-sized manufacturers with the state’s technology and business resources to find answers to their production, engineering, and product-innovation challenges.

ing for new product ideas because they’re finding that some of the things that they had been doing before are either [becoming obsolete] or they’re losing their market

to overseas [competitors] and now they need to start looking at how they need to do things differently,” she says. Some of the firms seeking help might be

pursuing new ideas or adding new technologies to keep them in their respective market and keep them competitive, she adds. Companies that pre-registered for the event completed a brief questionnaire to identify their specific issues. The CNYTDO used the responses to arrange one-on-one consultations with the organizations that could best provide advice on the problem. “They [company officials] went on to the portal [a website]. They filled in information when they signed in and gave us some information about what they were looking for in terms of technology or solutions,” Sonneborn says. Officials at CNYTDO held a meeting in advance of the CNY Solutions Fair to determine which groups the early registrants should speak with, depending on what type of question they had or service they needed, she said. The organizations providing the advice included the Syracuse University Center for Advanced Systems and Engineering (CASE), Nanomaterials Innovation Center in Alfred, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA).  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

NETWORKING RECEPTION Wednesday, April 24, 2013 4 PM - 5 PM One more opportunity to make contacts . . . The show will be capped off with The Networking Reception between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. at the show in the Main Exhibit Area. This reception is a thank you to our exhibitors and sponsors. It will be a great chance for exhibitors and attendees to network with each other. There’ll be free refreshments and entertainment. Also prizes will be given away during the Networking Reception.


SOHO SYRACUSE 2013

8B • The Central New York Business Journal

April 24, 2013

Born to be a Financial Executive? For some people, understanding the world of finance just comes naturally. Do you know someone who was born to be a financial executive? Then help us honor their skills and success by nominating them for this year’s Financial Executive of the Year Awards!

NOMINATE TODAY! Nomination Deadline May 10, 2013

FINANCIAL OF THE YEAR To nominate and for more information, visit www.bizeventz.com Or call Joyl Clance at (315) 579-3917 or email jclance@bizeventz.com Title Sponsor:

Premier Sponsor:

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Produced By:


Central New York Business Journal 4/19/2013  

Central New York Business Journal 4/19/2013

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