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CNYBJ.COM

AccelerateCNY expands program

$2.00

Engineering firm adds to aviation capabilities at C&S BY KEVIN TAMPONE

BY MARIA CARBONARO

JOURNAL STAFF

JOURNAL STAFF

SALINA — The partners organizing the fifth annual AccelerateCNY conference have lengthened the program and expanded its scope this year. The tech-development conference for businesses, innovators, and entrepreneurs explores the latest trends in technology, manufacturing, energy, and the environment. It will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 14, at the Holiday Inn Syracuse-Liverpool on Electronics Parkway See ACCELERATE, page 5

PHOTO COURTESY OF TDO

AccelerateCNY attendees mingle at last year’s show. This year’s conference is scheduled for 8:30 a.m to 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 14, at the Holiday Inn Syracuse-Liverpool.

SUNY Upstate Medical University readies for construction of new Cancer Center It’s a $74 million project, including medical equipment BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — The State University of New York Upstate Medical University

in Syracuse is preparing for the start of work on the upcoming Upstate Cancer Center. The school anticipated contractors would begin work in March, but a “slight delay in getting approvals from Albany” has pushed back the start of work on the facility until later in the spring, Darryl Geddes, director of public and media relations at Upstate Medical University, said in an email message.

SALINA — The addition of a Scottsdale, Ariz.– based engineering firm will help the C&S Cos. continue to grow its aviation business in the Southwest, firm leaders say. Z&H Engineering, Inc. of Scottsdale is now a part of C&S. The company’s 10 employees all joined C&S, which also acquired some of Z&H’s assets. Financial terms weren’t disclosed. C&S has had a presence in the Southwest for more than 10 years. The company, which provides services including engineering, construction, software, and architecture, has offices in San Diego and Temecula, Calif. Z&H and C&S staff members kept bumping into each other while working in the region and eventually Z&H approached C&S about joining forces, says C&S President and CEO Ronald See C&S, page 15

Upstate Medical plans to locate the cancer center on a site west of Upstate University Hospital that currently houses the university’s Regional Oncology Center and a parking lot. The cancer facility will wrap around the oncology center, incorporate the Upstate Gamma Knife Center, which treats brain tumors, and connect to the

PHOTO COURTESY OF C&S COS.

C&S Cos. headquarters, located next to Syracuse Hancock International Airport in Salina.

See UPSTATE, page 6

TOP RANKS: COMMERCIAL PRINTING COMPANIES / 14 19

OPINION

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Pyramid Brokerage Company – Syracuse February 2011 April 8, 2011 sales ag For more information contact transacting Phone: 315-445-1030

• The Central New York Business Journal

CNYBJ.COM BRIEFS News of note for and about Central New York businesses

Saini Eye Care to open in Fayetteville FAYETTEVILLE — Saini Eye Care, a new full-service, eye-care provider, will open April 11 in the Towne Center in Fayetteville. The 3,900-squarefoot location will be occupied by a team of three full-time emSaini ployees and one parttime worker — led by Chief Ophthalmologist, Dr. Nita Saini, owner and operator. Prior to opening her own eye-care practice, Saini worked at Druger Eye Care in Camillus for six years and Cortland Eye Center in Cortland from July 2009 until March 2011. She previously held positions in Baltimore, Canada, and Mexico. Saini Eye Care says it will provide comprehensive family eye care, full-service eyeglass and contact-lens care, and diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases. The hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Evening and Saturday appointments are available by request. For more information about Saini Eye Care, visit www.sainieyecare.com.

New York farmers get higher prices for milk in March New York dairy farmers received higher prices for milk in March than in February and the year-ago period, according to King Whetstone, director of United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service, New York Field Office. Dairy producers in the Empire State received an average of $21.30 per hundredweight of milk sold during March, up $1.70 from February and $5.20 more than in March 2009, the field office said. Farmers also received higher prices for a number of other products last month. The preliminary “All Farm Products Index of Prices Received by Farmers” increased four points (2.4 percent) in March from February.

AECOM Technology lease among Pyramid transactions BY JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — Pyramid Brokerage Co. recently announced the completion of several local real-estate transactions it helped arrange. John Sposato of Pyramid Brokerage, representing the landlord, DeStefano Development, recently brokered a lease for 3,720 square feet at the industrial warehouse located at 503 Gordon Ave. in Syracuse. AECOM Technology, an environmental company, is the tenant, represented by CB Richard Ellis. Financial arrangements were not provided. Alpha Scents, Inc., a manufacturer of lightweight insect traps, recently purchased the 1,740-square-foot industrial flex building located at 6305 Meade Road in DeWitt. Ralph DeStefanis sold the property for $82,000 in February 2011. Gary Cottet and Mark Mojave of Pyramid Brokerage brokered this transaction. Gary Cottet of Pyramid Brokerage brokered the sale of the 6,870-square-foot retail building located at 200 Brooklea Drive, Fayetteville. The property was purchased by Eric and Kendalia Edelman for $440,000 from Brooklea Associates. Kendalia Edelman is relocating her Miracles Hair Studio from Fayetteville Square shopping center to the new freestanding building in the heart of Fayetteville’s historic Limestone Plaza District. Allied Building Products Corp., a national distributor of roofing, siding, waterproofing, interior products, windows, skylights, doors,

503 Gordon Ave. in Syracuse

6305Meade MeadeRoad Road,inSyracuse, 6305 DeWitt NY

Alpha Scents, Inc., a manufacturer of light weigh industrial flex building located at 6305 Meade R sold the property for $82,000 in February 2011. Pyramid Brokerage Company brokered this sale

158 Syracuse St. in Syracuse tools, and other construction materials and products, recently leased the 30,625-squarefoot industrial warehouse and showroom located at 158 Syracuse St. in Syracuse. The property previously served as the FW Webb Company showroom and warehouse, before Webb built a new 100,000-squarefoot facility on Townline Road in DeWitt. Allied is moving from its previous location at Frontage Road Plaza in Cicero. Allied opened for business at its new Syracuse Street location on April 1. Gary Cottet of Pyramid Brokerage repre-

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6508 Basile Rowe in East Syracuse

6508 Basile Rowe, East Syracuse, NY sented the landlord, RAM Construction, and

Advanced Care, a home basedBrokerage, infusion service, r Jim Laurenzo, also of Pyramid building located at 6508 Rowe, East Syrac represented the tenant in Basile this lease transFebruary, 2011. John Sposato of Pyramid action. Financial arrangements were not Broke disclosed. this lease transaction.

John Sposato of Pyramid Brokerage represented Advanced Care, a homebased infusion Drive, service,Fayetteville, in the lease NY of the 200 Brooklea 4,000-square-foot office/flex building located at 6508 Basile Rowe in the village of East Eric & Kendalia Edelman recently purchased the Syracuse. Advanced Care took occupancy in 200 Brooklea NY. February 2011.Drive, Lease Fayetteville, terms were not pro-200 Broo February, 2011 for $440,000. Kendalia vided.  Edelman

from Fayetteville Square shopping center to their of Fayetteville’s historic Limestone Plaza Distric Company brokered this sale.

New Dunkin’ Donuts opens in Liverpool BY JOURNAL STAFF

LIVERPOOL — Dunkin’ Donuts celebrated the opening of its newest restaurant at 7281 Oswego Road (Route 57) on March 24. Employing 20 people, the new restaurant is open from 4 a.m. – midnight, seven days a week, and offers drive-thru service in addition to a parking lot and indoor seating in the 2,000-square-foot building. The Syracuse Foodservice Group Inc., an independently owned and operated franchise network of the Dunkin’ Brands system and a division of the Wolak Group, will manage the Liverpool store. The store franchisees are Ed Wolak, Roy Clark, and Tom Santurri. The group now has 51 Dunkin’ Donut restaurants in the Watertown–Binghamton– Utica–Syracuse markets, with 30 of those locations in Onondaga County. 

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April 8, 2011

Israeli company showcases UV water system in Mohawk BY TRACI DELORE JOURNAL STAFF

MOHAWK — About three years ago, the village of Mohawk was in a tight spot over its water system. In order to continue complying with state regulations, the village was facing what could have been a costly project to add a storage tank to its water system when it heard from Atlantium Technologies Ltd., an Israeli company that specializes in ultraviolet water-purification systems. Atlantium, interested in marketing its UV system in New York, had previously contacted the state Department of Health and said it was willing to donate a system to a deserving community, Phyllis Posy, vice president of strategic services and regulatory affairs at the company, says. Atlantium met with the village and worked out the details of the donation, which resulted in a new UV purification system worth about $100,000 at the village’s pump station just off North Richfield Street. The long-term goal, Posy notes, is to help the village get away from the traditional chlorine purification, if it wants to and if the state agrees to it. Atlantium’s system uses UV light to disinfect the water by shining the UV light on the water as it passes through a glass pipe housed inside a stainless-steel chamber. The photons inside the light disinfect the water by colliding with bacteria and essentially “inactivating” the bacteria. The system is an effective one that suc-

Pictured are Phyllis Posy, vice president of strategic services and regulatory affairs at Atlantium, with Andrew Steele, plant operator of the village of Mohawk’s municipal water-treatment plant, in front of the village’s UV water-treatment system.

TRACI DELORE/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

cessfully treats water without the use of additional chemicals, Posy contends. Mohawk’s UV-purified water recently received state certification for meeting 4-log virus-disinfection requirements, which means 99.99 percent of viruses are removed from the water or inactivated, Posy notes. Mohawk was the first municipality in New York to get an Atlantium UV system and is the first to attain the 4-log certification, she notes. Atlantium has since installed other UV systems, including one that will go online soon in Fort Plain in adjacent Montgomery County. The company is in talks with other municipalities, but finds that there is a lot of edu-

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cation needed, Posy says. “Most folks are still at the chlorine side of life,” she says. But as general interest in greener technologies grows, interest in the UV systems grows as well, she says. The system appeals to people because it doesn’t use chemicals such as chlorine to disinfect the water. Chlorine, while an effective disinfectant, causes some concern because it remains in the water and is consumed, she notes. UV disinfection does not leave any residual product in the water. And aside from the maintenance of replacing bulbs when they burn out, the system is relatively low-cost to operate and could save a municipality money through reduced or

discontinued chlorine purchase. Previously, UV disinfection was primarily used as a supplemental disinfection system along with chemical disinfection because the systems did not offer a way to measure results. However, Atlantium has patented a system, which uses fiber-optic and hydraulic principles, to provide measurable results, according to information provided by Posy. Along with Fort Plain, Atlantium has sold systems to Coca-Cola plants in New York, a Nestle water plant in Allentown, Pa., and also to the Aquafina bottled water unit of Pepsi-Cola Co. The typical UV system, similar to the one in Mohawk, costs about $100,000, Posy says. Andrew Steele, plant operator at the Mohawk pumping station, says he really likes the UV system, which is simple to operate and likes the option that the village may one day be able to do away with adding chlorine to the water. Atlantium Technologies (www.atlantium. com) is a privately held green-technology company with a research and development and assembly facility in Beit Shemesh, Israel and sales staff around the world. Founded in 2003, Atlantium has installed systems in the United States, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, and Australia. Along with serving municipalities, Atlantium works with the dairy, food and beverage, and aquaculture industries.  Contact DeLore at tgregory@cnybj.com

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• The Central New York Business Journal

April 8, 2011

New law firm launches in Syracuse, focused on property tax law By Kevin Tampone Journal Staff

SYRACUSE — An attorney with more than 30 years of experience in real property tax law is launching his own firm. Jon Cooper was most recently with Gilberti Stinziano Heintz & Smith, P.C. of Syracuse. He launched his new firm, The Cooper Law Firm, in March. “It’s something I always wanted to do,” Cooper says of starting his own practice.

“I felt that if I didn’t do it now, I probably would never do it. And I really wanted to do it.” Real property tax law is a complex field, Cooper says. There aren’t many attorneys with deep experience in it and even fewer who dedicate their entire practices to it. That’s why Cooper says he saw demand for a practice like his. “It’s a very specialized and difficult area,” he says. It’s actually easier and more productive

in the real property field to be a smaller operation, he adds. It means he can give his clients more attention on those issues since real property issues are all he handles. Cooper represents commercial property owners on valuation and assessment issues. In layman’s terms, he says he helps them lower their property tax bills. He’s worked with clients in all types of industries and on properties including shopping malls, office buildings, hotels,

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retail locations, nursing homes, apartment complexes, condominiums, manufacturing sites, industrial facilities, golf courses and more. Property taxes, Cooper adds, can account for 20 percent to Cooper 50 percent of a building’s operating costs. Most of his clients are in Central and upstate New York, but he has worked throughout the state. “Virtually every commercial property owner in New York State pays real-estate taxes,” Cooper says. “They’re all potential clients.” He says the first step with any new client is an analysis of their tax situation. There’s no obligation for that, Cooper notes. He says he’s paid based on how much the client saves in taxes. “If he doesn’t save any taxes, there are no legal fees,” Cooper says. “The property owner basically has no risk in having his situation analyzed. Our goal is to make sure that they’re paying their fair share of taxes.” Cooper is sharing space with The Stanley Law Offices, LLP at 500 S. Salina St. The practice employs three people — Cooper and two support staff members. At the moment Cooper will continue as the only lawyer in the practice. He says that’s because there’s a steep learning curve for anyone starting out in the real property tax field and finding attorneys with experience in the field is no easy task. Taxes have always been a concern for property owners, but Cooper has seen even more attention to the topic lately. “People are definitely paying more attention because of the economy and what the economy has done to real-estate values,” he says. Assessment boards tend to take grievances more seriously if owners come in with a lawyer, Cooper adds. That’s because they know a lawsuit is a real possibility if a claim is denied. Most of the towns in New York have their grievance days May 24, Cooper says. If property owners miss that date, they’re stuck until next year. q Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com

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The Central New York Business Journal • 5

April 8, 2011

ACCELERATE: A new addition to this year’s event is the PitchFest, a short-format forum Continued from page 1

in Salina. Last year’s event had been reduced to a half-day program. It attracted between 285 and 300 attendees. The partners are hopeful that the expanded agenda this year will increase attendance. The conference partners — CNYTDO, the CASE Center at Syracuse University, the Tech Garden, and SyracuseCOE — have each contributed to the event. Also, three sponsors — NYSTAR, Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP), and Heslin Rothenbert Farley & Mesiti P.C. — have brought together some of the top and most innovative companies in the region, who will be presenting and demonstrating “best-in-class” products and services, says Robert Trachtenberg, president and CEO of CNYTDO. Trachtenberg says that AccelerateCNY is the only event where businesses can go to hear from companies that have implemented successful strategies and they can become educated while networking. “This is the only event all year that has not only networking, but also a real meat-and-potatoes educational component,” he says. Ben Baldanza, CEO of discount carrier Spirit Airlines, will give the luncheon keynote address, entitled “The Spirit of Innovation.” Baldanza is a Rome native and Syracuse University alumnus. Trachtenberg notes that Baldanza’s experience with Spirit Airlines and his local background enable him to talk knowledgably about business transformation and the regional economies.

PitchFest

A new addition to this year’s AccelerateCNY event is the PitchFest. The short-format forum will feature cutting-edge technology companies and startups “pitching” their most compelling technologies and products designed to attract funding from the investors in attendance. The PitchFest presentations will also include overviews by angel and venture investors describing the latest trends in venture capital and explaining what they seek from a business in which they might invest. The PitchFests run at the same time as the other three tracks (series) of workshops: Accelerated Business Growth, Manufacturing Excellence, and Technology Innovation. The conference will offer three sets of these workshops.

The Accelerated Business Growth track has workshops about using metrics, online marketing for manufacturing and tech businesses, and online marketing for international markets. The Manufacturing Excellence track covers supply-chain trends, sustainability initiatives, and scaling up your work force. The Technology Innovation track offers workshops on open innovation, cloud computing, and best practices and trends in intellectual-property strategies. “The [workshops] are set up to be small and intimate,” encouraging greater participation, explains Shandrist Hillsman, event planner for the AccelerateCNY conference, and owner of Ascension Concierge, an eventplanning company. Area businesses and organizations with speakers participating in the conference

include Currier Plastics, Site-Seeker Inc., Nixon Gear & Gear Motion, Mohawk Global Trade Advisors, Welch Allyn, Marquardt Switches, Inc., Blue Highway LLC, Syracuse University, Pall Corporation, Cleantech Practice Group, and Heslin Rothenbert Farley & Mesiti P.C. Hillsman sees AccelerateCNY as a “rejuvenation” for the business community, offering the opportunity to see new processes and innovations. The registration fee is $75, and includes the workshops, the luncheon, networking, free parking, and a continental breakfast. Visit www.AccelerateCNY.com for more information or to register.  Contact Carbonaro at mcarbonaro@cnybj.com

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• The Central New York Business Journal

April 8, 2011

UPSTATE: The construction cost is estimated at $50M, with another $24M in equipment and furnishings e see you and your ideas

closest to the Regional Oncology Center, according to Geddes. Upstate Medical University will release hospital’s west wing. Upstate needs to relocate the current the remaining bid packages this month and then award them in June. traffic circle in front of Upstate B:11 in University “Actual girders and cranes will probably Hospital, and change someT:10.5 access patterns in to the current Regional Oncology Center, show up in about September,” Kohman S:9 in Dr. Leslie Kohman, medical director for says. The medical school has chosen the Upstate Cancer Center, says in an inPhiladelphia–based EwingCole as the projterview. ur own business. Moving into a bigger space. Expanding your footprint. Whatever The school awarded the contract for the ect architect. Rochester–based LeChase n, you need a financial services that notConstruction only sharesServices, your belief in operates your which an foundation and site work to provider Hueber-Breuer at 609 Erie you Blvd.deserve W. in Syracuse, Construction Co.,and Inc. of Syracuse, accordbut has the experience ability to bring it to office life. We think that will serve as the construction ingpower to Geddes. Upstate Medical bidding bank. The to get more out ofisyour money. The power of Firstmanager. Niagara. Upstate Medical University expects the the construction work in eight separate center to open in September 2013. packages, he added. Hueber-Breuer’s work should start as soon as Upstate closes the parking lot Funding and scope Continued from page 1

d i f f e r e n t l y.

On Nov. 8, 2010, Upstate Medical University announced plans for the Upstate Cancer Center, a five-story, $74 million facility that will bring the school’s outpatient cancer services under one roof. The construction cost is estimated at $50 million, with an additional $24 million in medical equipment and furnishings, according to Upstate Medical University. Upstate’s capital expansion and renovation program will provide $50 million of the project’s cost, including the issuance of bonds that it will repay with interest from revenue generated by the cancer center. Upstate Medical University is also in the midst of a fundraising campaign, called “Give Hope a New Home,” that seeks to raise $15 million for the project. An ad-

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ditional $9 million will come from hospital operations, Upstate Medical said in a news release. The $15 million goal in that campaign includes $10 million to support construction of the extra patient amenities incorporated in the design, and another $5 million to pay for programmatic endowments in adultmedical oncology, children’s oncology, surgical oncology, brain tumors, breast cancer, and the Upstate Cancer Research Institute. “We’re very close to the halfway point [in the campaign],” Kohman says, noting that’s “encouraging” so early in the campaign. Upstate Medical University employees and local businesses have been the major contributors to this point. Upstate events, such as Paige’s Butterfly Run on June 4 and the Upstate Open golf tournament on July 29, are dedicated to the Cancer Center fundraising campaign, Kohman says. Upstate Medical University announced the public launch of the campaign at its Upstate Gala on Dec. 11. The Cancer Center will encompass 90,000 square feet on three stories and feature 27 private-infusion areas, a meditation room, a family resource center, and a boutique for patient apparel. The facility will also include two additional floors to accommodate future expansion. The employee count at the Cancer Center will include a mix of existing and “a number of additional employees” since the center will be capable of serving more patients, Kohman says. She wasn’t able to provide a specific number. The Cancer Center is currently developing its first budget, Kohman adds, which will start in July and mostly focus on people and programs because the building won’t yet exist. Upstate says vendors will design and build and the medical school will operate the new Cancer Center in an environmentally and socially responsible fashion, enabling Upstate to pursue a silver rating under the U. S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system.

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Upstate Medical University has cancer treatment and diagnostic services located in many different parts of its campus. The university wants to locate them all in one place for patient convenience and provider interaction, Kohman says. Cancer treatment is one of Upstate’s “core businesses,” she notes. “It’s one of our highest priorities, and it is also one of the most significant health problems in Central New York as well as everywhere else,” she adds. Kohman noted that one of every two men and one of every three women will develop cancer in their lifetime. “Cancer is overtaking cardiovascular disease as the major cause of death in this country,” Kohman says, noting it will probably be the leading cause of death for adults within the next 10 years. Upstate Medical University started thinking about the center more than a decade ago. The building was placed on the school’s strategic plan in 2006, Kohman says. q Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com


April 8, 2011

Employee SPECIAL REPORT

The Central New York Business Journal • 7

Benefits

Human Resources

Shaping the future of the work force

EBRI survey: Workers grow more pessimistic about retirement

by eric reinhardt journal staff

SYRACUSE — People entering the work force in the next few years will need to think globally, have the proper skill sets, and display leadership ability. That was the consensus of a panel discussion called “FutureWork: Employment Trends for the 21st Century,” held March 29 at Grewen Hall at Le Moyne College. The Madden Institute for Business Education sponsored the event. The panelists included Kevin Walling, vice president and chief human-resources officer of Latrobe, Pa.–based Kennametal, Inc., a provider of tooling for the mining and highway-construction industries; Kevin Brogan, human-resources manager at Welch Allyn, a medical-device maker based in Skaneateles Falls; and Donna McManmon, corporate vice president of learning and talent effectiveness at the Lifetime Healthcare Companies, the parent of Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, the largest health insurer in Central New York. Walling told the gathering that the future success of U.S. companies and employees would require anticipating where their consumers and talent will be, noting it will include the “emerging economies of China and India.” The global marketplace is “fundamentally” changing how businesses evaluate talent and how they will produce goods and services in the future, Walling said. He emphasized three themes, including knowing how to “mobilize in a very effective speedy way” the talent needs and demands of an organization. Secondly, he addressed how to leverage the best idea on how to serve a customer (even if the idea originates half a world away), and distributing the message around the globe. Lastly, he said the future work force, the millennials, will and are changing the way companies think about how to manage. Most firms, Walling said, have not caught up to these trends yet and they’ll need to, “quickly.” Walling said individuals in the future work force will need to ensure that they are highly competitive in this new marketplace, demonstrate global awareness, and be able to differentiate themselves with their managers and customers to ensure success. “If you can demonstrate global per-

by eric reinhardt journal staff

A

photo courtesy of le moyne college

Seated left to right are Kevin Walling, vice president and chief humanresources officer for Kennametal Inc. in Latrobe, Pa.; Kevin Brogan, human-resources manager at Welch Allyn in Skaneateles Falls; and Donna McManmon, corporate vice president of learning and talent effectiveness at Lifetime Healthcare Companies. They participated in a panel discussion called “FutureWork: Employment Trends for the 21st Century,” held March 29 at Le Moyne College. spective and ability to go where the growth is, to go where the opportunity is, you will have a leg up on most of the other talent,” Walling said. Walling is a 1987 graduate of Le Moyne College. Brogan echoed Walling’s belief about understanding the global marketplace. He said Welch Allyn has “had to change from being a [medical-] device company” to one that creates software for electronic medical records, so the information from the devices can be uploaded to a computer. “So, software will become a big part of our future,” he says, noting much of Welch Allyn’s growth will happen internationally. Seven countries where the firm believes the software products will sell include the United Kingdom, Australia, Mexico, France, China, Canada, and Saudi Arabia. Future employees of Welch Allyn will need to have qualifications that are in high demand, including program- and project-management skills, software engineering, and marketing, sales, and service skills, Brogan noted. Brogan referenced the thoughts of Edward Gordon, founder and owner of Chicago–based Imperial Consulting Corp., who said young people love using technology, but they don’t want to design, manufacture, repair, or manage it.

Brogan noted that Gordon, an author and former college professor, projects that by 2020, the U.S. will have 123 million high-tech, high-skill, high-paying job openings, but only 50 million Americans will have the right education to fill them. “U.S. companies are already turning, he says, to other countries to supplement the local talent and almost surely they will be doing more of that in the coming years,” Brogan said, further referencing Gordon. Welch Allyn also believes global thinking requires a new kind of leader, he added. “We think that a leader functioning in an international capacity will require a different and expanded skill set that includes cultural competence,” Brogan said. An example of cultural competence, he noted, is the proper manner of handing and accepting a business card from a Japanese business contact. “Very ceremoniously,” he said. Brogan, a 1978 Le Moyne College graduate, believes companies nationwide will train their leaders to conduct themselves properly in international settings. McManmon talked about her belief “that leadership is the business of relaSee futurework, page 8

  merican workers in a new survey are   more pessimistic about their chances for   a comfortable retirement than at any time in the past two decades. The survey found 27 percent of employees say they are “not at all confident” about retirement, up 5 percent from last year. The findings are part of the 2011 Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) released March 15. The Washington, D.C.–based Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc., a market-research firm, also in Washington, conducted the survey. EBRI is a private, nonprofit research institute that focuses on health, savings, retirement, and economic-security issues. The groups have conducted the survey for 21 years, making “it the longest-running annual-retirement survey of its kind in the nation,” according to A EBRI. The percentage of workers saying they are “very confident” of a comfortable retirement remains the same at 13 percent, the lowest rate ever measured by the survey, EBRI said. The past few years saw a sharp decline in Amer “It was twice that [figure] just four years financially retirement. ago,” survey comfortable co-author Mathew GreenwaldWhat of has h Greenwald Associates said during a March 15 indicators&are improving? conference call with reporters. The analysis indicates that the decline came Confidence in Having a Comfortable Retirem almost entirely among the people with financial assets of less than $100,000, Greenwald said. (RCS) find The 2011 Retirement Confidence Survey Thecomfortably report alsothroughout found thattheir 70 percent of years h live retirement workers say they are behind schedule when it reporting they are not at all confident has climbed to comes to planning for retirement, a “substantial 2010 andfrom the recent lowyears of 10ago percent 2007). increase” just six wheninonly 55 percent said they were behind schedule, Thirteen percent Greenwald said. of workers now say they are very c Thethe findings with low ofare 13 actually percent “positive” observed because in 2009 and we respondents (Figure 1). are recognizing the level of savings realistically needed for a comfortable retirement, Jack VanDerhei, EBRI research director and the report’s co-author, said during the conference call. Fig Worker Confidence in Ha See survey, page 11Comfortably Througho

2011 RCS F

Retirement

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8

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS & HR

• The Central New York Business Journal

April 8, 2011

Differing views on health law’s small-biz tax credits BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

W

ith the federal health-care reform law now more than a year old, there remains a sharp division over whether the law has helped small businesses nationwide to offer health-care coverage. The law is “putting more tools in the hands of small businesses to help them cover their employees, grow their businesses, so they can create jobs,” Karen

Mills, administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) asserted in a March 21 conference call with reporters. On the call, she discussed the law’s tax credits to small businesses for offering health insurance, which went into effect for the 2010 tax year. Historically, small firms have been less likely to buy and keep health-care coverage because their costs are about 18 percent higher than large firms “just because they’re small,” Mills said. “High healthinsurance costs have been the number

one concern for small businesses for decades.” Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, Central New York’s largest health insurer, wasn’t able to provide numbers on how many customers took advantage of the smallbusiness tax credits because they apply for the credit directly through the IRS, Elizabeth Martin, the company’s vice president of communications, said in an email. “We do believe that the tax credits along with our … prices contributed to the substantial growth we experienced in our

Save The daTe!

small-group market in 2010,” Martin said. Minneapolis–based UnitedHealthcare in 2010 added 75,000 new customers nationally who work for businesses with fewer than 50 employees, the SBA’s Mills said on the conference call. “So, we’re seeing the marketplace respond to the incentive, as it was intended,” Mills contended. Maria Gordon-Shydlo, spokesperson for UnitedHealthcare, said in an email that the 75,000 figure represents total net new small-business members, but noted the health insurer “could not say whether that was all due to the tax credit.” UnitedHealthcare’s upstate New York office is located in DeWitt.

Tax-credit eligibility

Small businesses are eligible for a tax credit if they employ fewer than 25 fulltime workers, pay average annual wages of less than $50,000, and pay at least half the cost of health insurance for their employees, according to the website of the Kaiser Family Foundation. See CREDITS, page 12

FUTUREWORK:

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Continued from page 7

tionships.” She thinks of leadership as a pyramid with “self” at the bottom and building up to “team” and “organization.” McManmon said the self-perspective involves how leaders are interacting with their teams and supporting their organizations. She noted The Lifetime Companies includes more than 500 people in leadership, and more than 70 percent of those employees will participate in a leadership program spanning five to eight months. The program will include a “coaching” component, McManmon said. Leaders should also see themselves as coaches because “coaches ask questions; coaches don’t give the answers,” McManmon said. “We need leaders who ask questions. We don’t need subject-matter experts, who have all the answers,” she added. Her company also believes that leaders should be “environmentalists” (not the green kind) with the ability to create an environment that helps the colleagues on their team to thrive. Leaders should also be “connectors” who can bring together different generations and people in different locations for meetings. As for a leader’s relationship to an organization, McManmon said the person should be aligned to the organization’s mission and strategy, be able to shift the manner in which people perform their work, and can drive growth in their organization’s thinking.  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

CNY BJ ad.indd 2

1/7/11 2:42 PM


EMPLOYEE BENEFITS & HR

April 8, 2011

The Central New York Business Journal • 9

New law allows Upstate University Hospital to manage CGH pension plan niority and paid time-off and preserve the growth of their individual pension funds, Dr. John McCabe, CEO of Upstate University Hospital, said during the January forum. When asked about the pension options for CGH employees at the March 24 briefing, McCabe said Upstate intends to keep the CGH pension plan “intact.” The option would allow “the most fairness and most flexibility for the employees, and it preserves what they’ve put in already [time and money],” McCabe said. Besides the pension option, the adopted budget also contains legislation that increases Upstate’s spending authority by $135 million once its acquisition is complete and CGH becomes part of Upstate’s operations. The measure does not provide any form of state taxpayer-supported revenue to Upstate. Instead, it provides Upstate the ability to spend hospital-generated revenues on hospital-related expenses, Upstate said.

BY ERIC REINHARDT JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — Employees of Community General Hospital (CGH) will have more pension options if they become public employees through Upstate University Hospital’s acquisition proposal, the acquirer says. The newly adopted state budget contains two “key pieces” of legislation that Upstate officials believe “will help move” the acquisition process forward. The legislation also provides the spending authority necessary for hospital operations if the acquisition is approved, which Upstate expects to happen sometime around July 1. Upstate on March 24 announced it had filed a certificate of need with the New York State Department of Health, which started the formal review process. Lawmakers approved a bill that enables Upstate to offer an additional retirement option to all CGH employees who will join the Upstate work force. The CGH employees who transition to state employment can either remain with the CGH pension plan, which Upstate would manage, or enroll in the “appropriate” state-retirement program option, according to Upstate. The approved pension legislation reflects favorably on the acquisition process, Community General CEO Thomas Quinn said in a news release. Community General employees are part of the upstate division of 1199SEIU, a union for health-care workers. It represents about 900 employees at Community General.

ERIC REINHARDT/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

Thomas Quinn, left, CEO of Community General Hospital (CGH), and Dr. John McCabe, right, CEO of Upstate University Hospital, discuss with reporters Upstate’s filing for a certificate of need to acquire CGH. Both officials expect the New York State Health Department to complete its review by July 1. Ruth Heller, the union’s area vice president, spoke during a January 20 community forum on the proposed merger at the Central New York Philanthropy Center in Syracuse. Heller said it wouldn’t be fair to transfer the CGH employees to the state pay-

Information can be a

Social Experience Sch ool of

Info rma tion

roll because under state civil-service law, they would start as new employees, even though some have decades of seniority at Community General. The hospitals are working toward a public-employment model for CGH workers that would recognize employees’ se-

Upstate University Hospital believes Community General Hospital is facing “insurmountable financial obstacles” that would force it to close “within a matter of months.” CGH has lost nearly $7 million over the past four years and its patient volume fell 19 percent over the last five years. If CGH were to close, more than “1,100 people will be immediately out of work and

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Central New York Contacts: Mark G. Burgreen  Susan L. Dahline  Stephen C. Daley  Brian K. Haynes Richard D. Hole  Ted Lewkowicz  Aaron M. Pierce

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• The Central New York Business Journal

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS & HR

April 8, 2011

CGH: The transaction is an asset acquisition Continued from page 9

the impact of patient needs on the other hospitals in the area would be more than could be absorbed.” Upstate addressed the lost revenue, patient volume, and employees in its filing for a certificate of need. The certificate-of-need process governs the establishment, construction, renovation, and medical-equipment acquisitions of health-care facilities, such as hospitals, nursing homes, home-care agencies, and diagnostic and treatment centers. The transaction is an asset acquisition, said McCabe. Under the agreement, Upstate would acquire all of CGH’s assets and property that includes equipment and real estate, such as the main hospital building. The total value of the purchased assets is estimated at between $50 million and $138 million, McCabe said. McCabe also acknowledged that people have asked how the hospital can execute the deal when the state is “short of cash.” “It’s our intent in the current plan that this is a no-cash deal … that I don’t have to write a check,” McCabe said. Upstate University Hospital intends to assume between $40 million and $50 million in CGH liabilities in return for acquiring the hospital’s assets. The largest of the liabilities is the CGH pension plan, McCabe said. “That pension is underfunded currently by about $20 million,” McCabe said, noting the dollar figure is amortized over time.

In addition, McCabe said Upstate would not assume any of CGH’s $7 million in longterm debt, which CGH will pay off before the acquisition is complete. McCabe also said Upstate plans to offer jobs to “substantially all” CGH employees. The assumed employees would become state employees, and public unions would represent the workers in accordance with their job classifications, he said. Upstate and CGH would operate as one hospital with two campuses with a total bed size not to exceed 715. Upstate currently has 409 licensed beds and CGH maintains 306 licensed beds. McCabe noted the number of occupied beds on March 24, the day of the briefing, totaled more than 500 between the two hospitals. “So, we will ultimately end up with some number of beds less than 715 and more than the 540 that are occupied today,” McCabe said. Upstate is requesting $20 million in funding from the Health Care Efficiency and Affordability Law for New Yorkers (HEAL NY) to help “jump start” the operation, if the state approves the acquisition, McCabe said. The Office of the State Comptroller and the Office of the Attorney General must also approve the acquisition, Upstate said. Both hospitals anticipate the state approving the acquisition by July 1.  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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reporting they are not at all confident has climbed to a new high of 27 percent (up from 22 percent in 2010 and the recent low of 10 percent in 2007). Thirteen percent of workers now sayemployee they are very benefits confident about having a comfortable retirement, level The Central New York Business Journal • 11 & hr with the low of 13 percent observed in 2009 and well below the high of 27 percent observed in 2007 (Figure 1).

April 8, 2011

SURVEY: The RCS found that many systemic conditions are forcing Americans to redefine retirement least [not] yet,” VanDerhei said.

Continued from page 7

Figure 1 Worker Confidence in Having Enough Money to Live Comfortably Throughout Their Retirement Years

Other findings However, one of the most important The survey also found one-fifth of workthings Americans should know, Greenwald ers say the age at which they expect to retire said, is what their savings goal should be in has increased in the past year. Statistically, order to have the retirement lifestyle they Very Somewhat Not Too Not At All Don't Know/Refused this is similar to the percentage indicating want, but the findings indicate respondents they were planning to postpone retirement have not made those calculations. 6% 10% 10% 13% 14% 16% 16% 17% 16% in 2010 (24 percent). 17% “Most workers have not even tried to 22% 22% 27% 19% Among the reasons for postponing their figure out how much they should accumu19% 19% 18% 17% 17% 17% retirement, respondents most frequently late,” he added. 18% 23% 21% 22% 24% cited the poor economy (36 percent), The RCS in 2000 indicated that 53 percent 23% a lack of faith in Social Security/govof workers tried to calculate the figure, but 43% ernment (16 percent), their employment 47% the latest survey found only 43 percent calcu44% 44% 55% 40% 45% 41% 41% 43% situation (15 percent), and the fact they lating how much they need for retirement. 38% 41% 36% cannot afford to retire (13 percent), the Many Americans should be worried RCS found. about their retirement prospects and the 27% In addition, the age at which workers 25% RCS indicates why, VanDerhei added. 24% 24% 23% 22% 21% 19% 18% 18% 16% 13% 13% expect to retire is gradually rising. In 1991, For instance, a large share of workers half of workers (50 percent) planned to have virtually no savings or investments. 1993 1996 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 retire before age 65, compared with just 23 Among survey respondents who provided percent now in 2011. this information, well over a quarter, 29 Source: Employee Benefit Research Institute and Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc., 1993-2011 Retirement EBRI and Mathew Greenwald & percent, said they have less than $1,000. Confidence Surveys. Associates conducted the retirement sur“More than half of all workers, 56 pervey in January 2011 through phone calls cent, say the total value of their household to 1,258 individuals (1,004 workers and 254 savings and investments, excluding the value of the home and any defined benefit as a 401(k) or an individual-retirement ac- health-care costs; lower investment returns; retirees). The margin of error on the surpension, is less than $25,000,” VanDerhei count (IRA), were far less likely than those a surge in the older population, putting vey is plus or minus 3 percentage points, Retiree confidence having enoughtomoney fortheir a comfortable whichprograms leveled off in 2010, is according to EBRI. said. without inthose accounts tap into stress onretirement, social-insurance such statistically Twenty-four percent say they as areSocial very Security confident, 17 percent indicate they arethan two dozen organizations fundMore The survey also found that roughly one- unchanged. savings. andand Medicare; longer life third of both workers and retireesnot said atthey all confident about having a comfortable retirement (Figure 2,and nextvarious page).other long-term ed the survey through contributions, acVanDerhei noted that the RCS found expectancies; cording to EBRI. q had to dip into their savings last year to pay that many systemic conditions are forcing factors. for basic expenses, according to EBRI. Americans to redefine retirement, such as “Unfortunately, the RCS does not find In addition, the survey found that re- high unemployment rates; federal, state, evidence that Americans are changing their Contact Reinhardt at spondents with retirement savings, such and local government fiscal crises; rising behavior about preparing for retirement, at ereinhardt@cnybj.com COME JOIN US FOR BUSINESS AND NETWORKING!

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Broome County Veterans’ Memorial Arena 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. www.binghamtonbusiness.com 1.800.836.3538 ext. 120 2011 will mark the 24th year for the Greater Binghamton Chamber Business Show. This event is the best way to GET CONNECTED with our business community! It’s great opportunity to expand your contacts and RE-CONNECT with familiar faces. Representing a variety of businesses and services, the Chamber Show is the perfect venue for doing business, networking and prospecting. Show Highlights  See a Showcase of over 140 displays of products and services!  Participate in Speed Networking at 11:30am, 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m. & 2:30 p.m. (limited to 20 people per session)  Win Prizes from various Sponsors & Exhibitors at the Show!  Free Parking the day of the show at municipal parking ramps with validated ticket from the show for free parking. Also you can park for free at Binghamton Mets Stadium, taking the free shuttle to and from the show.

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12

• The Central New York Business Journal

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS & HR

April 8, 2011

CREDITS: NFIB believes that neither the reform law nor the tax credits will make health care more affordable Continued from page 8

The Menlo Park, Calif.–based Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit research foundation focusing on the major health-care issues facing the U.S., its website said. The full tax credit is available to employers with 10 or fewer employees and average annual wages of less than $25,000. The credit phases out as firm size and average wage increases. The credit is capped, based on the average health-insurance premium in the area where the small business is located, the Kaiser website said. For tax years 2010 to 2013, eligible employers may receive a tax credit of up to 35 percent of the employer’s contribution toward the employee’s health-insurance premium, according to Kaiser. Employers are eligible to take the tax credit for two years. Up to about four million small employers could be eligible, the SBA’s Mills said on the conference call, noting that small businesses can also take advantage in 2014 of health-insurance exchanges, or marketplaces, in each state. Mills recommends small businesses visit the website http://finder.healthcare. gov. The site enables a user to compare small-employer plans from several carriers serving Central New York.

Lack of awareness

The advocacy group Small Business

Majority has conducted surveys on interest in the health exchanges, John Arensmeyer, the organization’s founder and CEO, said during the conference call. Small Business Majority is a Sausalito, Calif.–based nonprofit that describes itself as “promoting progressive 21st century solutions to small business needs, with a particular focus on the health care crisis faced by America’s entrepreneurs.” The group launched a coalition to support the health-care reform law. Arensmeyer is a board member of Bay Area Democrats, a San Francisco–area political-action committee. Small Business Majority on Jan. 4 released a national opinion poll of 619 small-business owners with fewer than 50 employees that indicated that fewer than half of small businesses really understood anything about the tax credits. The survey found 43 percent of respondents were “very or somewhat familiar” with the provision, while 56 percent were “a little or not at all familiar” with that part of the health-care law, according to the organization’s website. However, when business owners were made aware, one-third of respondents who currently do not offer insurance said they would be more likely to do so because of the credits or the exchanges, Arensmeyer said on the call. “The new law is obviously not perfect and it’s not a panacea [a total solution],

“The new law is obviously not perfect and it’s not a panacea [a total solution], but it is clearly a huge step in the right direction.”  JOHN ARENSMEYER

CEO, Small Business Majority butit is clearly a huge step in the right direction,” he asserted.

NFIB

The small-business membership association, the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), has a much different take on the health-care reform law’s impact on small businesses. The Washington, D.C.–based NFIB, which operates offices in all 50 state capitals, filed a lawsuit, along with 26 states, to stop the law on the grounds that it’s unconstitutional, particularly the mandate that individuals purchase health insurance. The NFIB on its website lists the healthcare tax credit as one of seven ways that the health-care reform law is “failing��� small businesses. The benefits of the small-business

health-care tax credit, which the NFIB calls “temporary and narrow,” are overstated and misleading, according to the group. The NFIB says the credit will help some of the smallest, lowest-wage businesses with financial assistance for “a few years,” but contends that many businesses simply don’t qualify for the credit. “…It isn’t the saving grace it is being made out to be,” the organization states on its website. The NFIB believes that neither the health-care reform law, nor the tax credits, will make health care more affordable for small businesses in the long term. The organization is also questioning the potential effectiveness of the upcoming health-insurance exchanges. The NFIB says the exchanges are “supposed” to create competition and increase choice in the marketplace for individuals and small business. But “new and highly restrictive regulatory rules” that require loading basic-benefit packages with “expensive mandates” will further damage the marketplace for small businesses, the organization asserted. Small businesses have made it clear that cost and choice are the main drivers for success in an exchange, the group added. Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

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April 8, 2011

321 Montgomery St. Syracuse, N.Y. 13202 Phone: (315) 428-1864 Website: www.cnyhistory.org E-mail: ohamuseum@cnyhistory.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS

Thomas E. Riley Thomas Burton Louis J. Steigerwald, III W. Bradley Hunt Charles Baracco

PRESIDENT Testone, Marshall & Discenza, LLP VICE PRESIDENT Onondaga Community College VICE PRESIDENT Cathedral Candle Co. SECRETARY Mackenzie Hughes LLP TREASURER ParenteBeard LLC

BOARD MEMBERS

Lt. Jonathan L. Anderson Onondaga County Sheriff’s office Zina Berry, D.D.S. Berry Good Dental Care, PC Nancy A. Bottar community volunteer John T. Cowin Deputy Mayor of Syracuse George W. Curry SUNY-ESF Lee DeAmicis M&T Bank Joel Delmonico Clear Channel Syracuse Carolyn Hendrickson Rescue Mission-Syracuse Marilyn Higgins Syracuse University Brian Hoke Bentley & Hoke LLC James R. King King + King Architects, LLP Frank Kobliski CNY Regional Transportation Authority David B. Liddell Hiscock & Barclay LLP David M. Marnell, Sr. community volunteer John McCann Hancock & Estabrook LLP James Monahan Monahan Development Corp. Hon. Martha E. Mulroy New York State Family Court David Murray, M.D. community volunteer Sally Starr community volunteer Jim Stoddard, Jr. Haylor, Freyer & Coon, Inc. Suzanne Thorin Syracuse University Gregg Tripoli Onondaga Historical Association Robert R. Tyson Bond Schoeneck & King, PLLC

SERVICE AREA Onondaga County

Revenue Sources for OHA Contributions & Grants Program Services Investment Income Other Total Revenue

Expenditures for OHA

Salaries & Employee Benefits Program Services Management & General Fundraising Total Expenses Surplus for the year

$367,211 389,584 39,083 70,786 $866,664 $441,810 234,946 75,196 38,751 $790,703 $ 75,961

Profiling local nonprofit organizations

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Gregg Tripoli Executive Director Executive Director’s Compensation: $76,587 Tom Hunter Assistant Director/Curator of Collections Dennis Connors Curator of History Karen Cooney Support Services Administrator Matt Mac Vittie Assistant Curator of History/Gift Gallery Manager Mike Piscitell Accountant Scott Peal Education Associate Pamela Priest Archivist/Research Center Manager Dave Mulligan Facilities Maintenance/Housekeeping

FINANCIAL DATA

Year ending Dec. 31, 2009, via IRS Form 990

rof r np ne No or C

Onondaga Historical Association Museum and Research Center

COMPILED BY JULIE SHARKEY

OHA builds community awareness through renovation project BY JULIE SHARKEY JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — When Gregg Tripoli became executive director of the Onondaga Historical Association Museum and Research Center (OHA) about three years ago, he knew that if the organization was to survive in the Cathedral Square neighborhood, it had to change its ways. The nonprofit needed to stop being introspective by nature and instead focus on showcasing its exhibits and highlighting the great heritage of the region to the entire community. Last fall, Tripoli’s vision was bolstered when OHA secured grants from New York State, totaling $150,000, for three capital-improvement projects at its historic building at 321 Montgomery St. New York Assemblyman Bill Magnarelli (D–120th) helped the nonprofit obtain the funding. The improvements will help attain several economic-development goals, recently set by a number of local and state management plans, which focus on strengthening the region’s urban core, and also speak directly to the community’s desire to see more retail stores in the downtown area, OHA said in its fall 2010 newsletter. The largest grant from New York State, at $125,000, will be used to renovate the building’s façade and main

foyer. The project will include restoring the large street-level bricked-in windows to their original glass composition, as they were when the building was first constructed in 1906 for the New York Telephone Company. The money from the grant will also be used to create a new “Heart of New York” exhibit on the first floor summarizing the history of Onondaga County. “The windows will allow us to open up to the community literally and figuratively,” says Tripoli, adding that OHA will be able to showcase its collections, have great window displays, and ultimately enhance the pedestrian experience on Montgomery Street. Another New York State grant will provide technology equipment, such as a new microfilm-reading machine that also makes copies, for the newly remodeled Richard and Carolyn Wright Research Center and Library, located on the second floor of the building. The research center houses photographs, maps, documents, genealogical material, and many other records related to the history of Syracuse and Onondaga County. “It’s where the meat and heart of OHA is,” says Tripoli. The center has provided countless professors, researchers, and authors from around the world with materials from its vast holdings that cannot be found anywhere else.

OHA Facts  Year Established: 1863  Full-Time Employees: 9  Volunteers: 20 regular, 60 occasional  Mission: “Onondaga Historical Association Museum & Research Center exists to inspire people’s understanding that the history we share as a community is the foundation for our future together. Our purpose is to encourage a diverse audience from the neighborhoods of Syracuse and the communities of Onondaga County to explore, appreciate and utilize their past. To do so, we offer engaging exhibits and programs, pursue partnerships with other cultural organizations and community groups, and develop and care for a definitive collection related to local history. We operate a museum and research center in Syracuse, New York and are committed to ensuring the vitality of our historic urban location.”

The last grant will help create a new museum-related, history-themed retail store. The new store, managed by Matthew MacVittie, assistant curator of history at OHA, will “create a niche not filled by any place in the community,” says Tripoli. The store will

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See OHA, page 16


14

• The Central New York Business Journal

April 8, 2011

TOP RANKS: COMMERCIAL PRINTING COMPANIES

11. 12. 13. 14. . 16. 17. 18. . 20.

Elec. Pagination

10.

Diecutting

9.

Dellas Graphics, Inc. 835 Canal St. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 474-4641/ 474-4650 www.dellasgraphics.com Midstate Printing Corp. 230 Ainsley Drive Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 475-4101/ 475-5129 www.midstateprinting.com KinaneCo 2925 Milton Ave. Syracuse, NY 13209 (315) 468-6201/ 468-6202 www.KinaneCo.com Eagle Newspapers 2501 James St. Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 434-8889/ 434-8883 www.eaglenewsonline.com Syracuse Blue Print Co., Inc. 825 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 476-4084/ 476-7578 www.syracuseblueprint.com Eastwood Litho, Inc. 4020 New Court Ave. Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 437-2626/ 432-9227 www.eastwoodlitho.com Seaboard Graphics 7570 Oswego Road Liverpool, NY 13090 (315) 652-4200/ 652-4902 www.seaboardgraphics.com Midstate Litho 1 N. Loder Ave. Endicott, NY 13760 (607) 754-0020 www.midstatelitho.com Quartier Printing 5795 Bridge St. East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 449-0900/ 449-3299 www.quartierprinting.com Liverpool Litho, Inc. 400 Old Liverpool Road Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 457-7007/ 457-4860 www.liverpoollitho.com FLP Group 301 Clark St. Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 252-7583/ 253-4070 www.fingerlakespress.com Lettergraphics 433 W. Onondaga St. Syracuse, NY 13201 (315) 476-8328/ 476-1818 www.lettergraphics.net Camillus Business Forms, Inc. 4464 Milton Ave. Camillus, NY 13031 (315) 672-3929/ 672-3940 www.camillusbusinessforms.com

Addressing

8.

Bindery

7.

Color Separation

6.

Platemaking

5.

Typesetting

4.

-

-

-

Y

Y

-

-

envelopes, business cards, stationery, corporate identity, digital

-

Y

Y

-

Y

-

-

-

Y

variable data printing, transactional documents, data management, marketing services including electronic statements, and check printing/mailing

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

-

computer-to-plate technology, binding, finishing, fulfillment

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

-

Y

-

printed fiberboard, folding cartons, package inserts, digital printing

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

-

-

custom-print label materials including paper, film, and synthetics; non-pressure sensitive substrates include: SBS board and carton-stock printing, film printing

Y

Y

Y

-

-

-

Y

-

-

-

high-speed digital color

Y

Y

-

-

52

-

Y

-

-

-

offset and digital printing, mailings, fulfillment, Web-based ordering

-

Y

Y

49

-

Y

-

-

-

large or small-volume mini-folding, six-color printing with aqueous coating

-

Y

45

-

Y

Y

-

-

large-format printing, full-service design, 4-color direct digital and offset, business forms, back-lit signs, direct-mail printing, digital copies, barcodes, die cutting, mailing services, full-service bindery

Y

36

-

-

-

-

-

offset web, full-process color tabloids, catalogs, newsletters, forms

35

-

Y

-

Y

Y

28

-

Y

Y

Y

25

-

Y

-

25

Y

Y

22

-

16

Jet Envelope

3.

Y

Business Form

2.

Scotsman Press, Inc. 750 W. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 472-7825/ 234-2355 www.scotsmanonline.com Dupli 1 Dupli Park Drive Syracuse, NY 13218 (315) 472-1316 www.duplionline.com Cathedral Corp. 632 Ellsworth Road Rome, NY 13441 (800) 698-0299/ 338-5874 www.cathedralcorporation.com Vanguard Printing LLC 17 Hall Woods Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 272-1212/ 272-6360 www.vanguardprintingllc.com The Mid-York Press, Inc. 2808 State Highway 80 Sherburne, NY 13460 (607) 674-4491/ 674-4088 www.midyorkpress.com Syracuse Label & Surround Printing, Inc. 110 Luther Ave. Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 422-1037/ 422-6763 www.syrlsp.com Dataflow, Inc 117 Metropolitian Drive Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 457-0472/ 453-3840 www.godataflow.com

Letterpress

1.

Sheet-fed/Offset

Rank

Heat-set Web

Name Address Phone/Fax Website

Graphic Design

Ranked by Number of CNY Employees

-

Y

-

Y

-

150

-

Y

Y

-

Y

145

-

Y

Y

Y

135

Y

Y

-

81

-

Y

80

-

55

No. of CNY Employees 190

Specialties & Other Services full-process color tabloids, books, catalogs, brochures, newsletters, programs, publications, forms, letterhead, menus

Company Executives William Veit, VP Comm. Printing Donald Lincoln, Production Manager Linda L. Brown, Sales Manager

Year Estab. 1954

J. Kemper Matt, CEO Peter Hujar, CFO J. Kemper Matt, Jr., EVP John Hudack, VP Ops. Robert Shaffery, VP SM Marianne W. Gaige, President & CEO Aart Knyff, VP of Operations

1965

Y

Mark Ploucha, President Steve Smith, CFO Tom Birch, Director of Regional Sales & Marketing

2006

Y

Y

Robert W. Tenney, CEO Patrick W. Dowdall, CFO Shawn M. Aikins, VP Ops. John M. Zieno, VP SM

1946

-

Y

-

Peter Rhodes, Chairman Kathleen Alaimo, President Paul Roux, VP Development

1965

Y

-

-

Y

1958

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Dale Zimmerman, Chairman Julie McCormick, Partner Dan Zimmerman, Partner Victor Gomez, Managing Director Kris Stark, Director, Information Technology Thomas J. Dellas, CEO

Y

Y

Y

-

-

Y

John Williams, III, President Robert Williams, Vice President

1938

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Gregory Kinane, CEO

1975

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

David Tyler, Publisher Colleen Farley, Associate Publisher Lisa Congdon, Business Manager

1992

large-format digital printing, documentmanagement services & distribution, Hewlett Packard- & Xerox- authorized dealers, finishing & framing department

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Carl Nye, President Andy Nye, Vice President

1909

-

10-color press, custom index-tab cutting, in-house die cutting, automated pocket-folder converting, FSC/SFI certified

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Mark J. Mohr, CEO Patrick H. Mohr, CFO Andrew F. Mohr, VP Ops. Michael J. Clary, VP SM

1946

-

-

variable printing, mailing, large-format printing, six-color printing, iGen digital color, b&w copies, screen printing, embroidery, promo items

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Laurence Kuhn, President Melinda Kuhn, CFO

1986

Y

-

-

digital pre-press, sheet-fed, web printing, binding, mailing service

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Neil A. Rose, President

1972

Y

-

-

-

certified G7 master-printer, six-color press with aqueous coating

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Thomas Quartier, President

1962

-

Y

Y

-

-

4-color process printing, digital printing

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Tom Wallace, Jr., Co-owner Ralph Stewart, Co-owner

1977

12

-

Y

Y

-

-

digital printing, 6-color with aqueous coating

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Greg Kinane, President

2008

12

-

Y

-

-

-

4-color digital press, sheet-fed offset press, mailing lists, 2- and 4- color offset presses, fulfillment/ warehouse storage, hand assembly, mailing services, inkjetting

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Nancy Osborn, President John Davidson, CFO John Horner, VP Ops.

1910

11

-

Y

-

Y

-

business forms, letterhead, envelopes, brochures, mailers, prescription pads, legal forms, charting supplies

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

-

-

Stephen Wilson, CEO Cynthia Wilson, CFO Robert Tedd, VP Ops. Raymond Young, VP SM

1989

Note: Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to requests for information. Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca,St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

1954

1979

RESEARCH BY JULIE SHARKEY 12/10 jsharkey@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 15

April 8, 2011

C&S: About three-quarters of C&S’ work in the Southwest is focused on aviation Peckham. With the addition of Z&H, C&S will have 30 employees in the Southwest. “Finding good technical people is difficult in any time,” Peckham says. Z&H brings a team of engineers with long experience in the region and the aviation market there, he notes. About three-quarters of C&S’ work in the Southwest is focused on aviation while the remainder is on the municipal side. Z&H specializes in aviation engineering, especially airfield-development projects. The firm’s local expertise will be an asset as C&S seeks to grow in that area, Peckham says. Every region of the country has its own challenges in airport work when it comes to materials and climate, he notes. “They’re not worried about frost penetration,” he says of airports in the Southwest. “But they are worried about significant impacts of the sun and heat.” Z&H has been in business since 1980. The firm has completed more than 400 airport design and construction projects across Arizona and California. Some C&S projects in the region include aviation projects for the city of Phoenix, county of San Diego, Las Vegas McCarran International Airport, and more than 20 other municipal airports across Arizona and California. C&S began in the Southwest with work

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on improving noise levels in residential areas surrounding busy airports. The firm grew into broader airport planning and engineering work from there. Peckham says the company’s strengths Peckham in sustainability and energy will be assets in growing its work on aviation. Airports, he notes, are major consumers of energy. The Southwest in particular offers strong opportunities for solar arrays. Facilities in that area are also highly sensitive to water conservation. In addition to maintaining the Z&H office in Scottsdale, C&S is launching a new office in Sacramento, Calif. to join its San Diego and Temecula locations. One of the principals at Z&H saw an opportunity for business there given the integration with C&S, Peckham says. “So we really have a wire frame of four offices in the Southwest to continue to grow our practice there,” he says. He adds that C&S’ diversification has allowed it to weather the recession well. The firm generated $80 million in revenue in 2010 and expects the same amount this year.

Peckham says holding steady is a good result in the current environment. That’s especially when much of C&S’ work is concentrated in the public sector, he adds. C&S employs just under 500 people and expects to have more than 500 by this summer, says John Spina, C&S senior vice president. The firm, headquartered in Salina on the

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16

nonprofit corner

• The Central New York Business Journal

April 8, 2011

OHA: Nonprofit has developed more permanent off-site exhibits for a variety of companies and organizations Continued from page 13

sell unique products, such as pieces from the Syracuse China collection. It will be located just inside the building’s front doors and will help draw people into the museum as well as increase pedestrian traffic on Montgomery Street. OHA will install new fire-suppression systems throughout the entire building and add an enhanced security system, capable of monitoring all public areas, during the renovation process. The museum will celebrate its grand reopening with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and celebration event, on Wednesday, June 22.

Partnerships

Beyond increasing OHA’s street presence, Tripoli has been integral in expanding the nonprofit’s outreach by collaborating with other organizations around the city. Recently, the museum launched an ongoing partnership with Syracuse Stage to present lobby exhibits with a local perspective during the run of certain plays. These exhibits, often underwritten by local companies, then make their way to Onondaga County Public Library branches to promote reading programs related to the plays and themes that inspired them, the nonprofit says. OHA’s newest exhibit is on display through April

23 at Syracuse Stage in conjunction with performances of “The Miracle Worker.” In addition, OHA has developed more permanent off-site exhibits for a variety of companies and organizations wishing to showcase their history. The most recent offsite exhibit, being developed by Onondaga Community College, in collaboration with OHA and the Town of Onondaga Historical Society, will be located in the main entry lobby of the college’s new Regional Higher Education Center that is scheduled to open this year. The exhibit will chronicle the historical significance of the “Poor House” property that the college acquired in 2007. And, OHA was once again the sponsor of

this year’s Central New York History Day competition that took place on March 26 at Morgan Road Elementary in Liverpool. The regional contest was open to students in grades six through 12 who reside in Oswego, Onondaga, Cortland, Madison, or Oneida counties. The theme this year was “Debate & Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences.” Students submitted theme-based projects ranging from documentaries, exhibits, and historical papers to performances and websites. The students with the top two projects in each category will compete in the state contest in Cooperstown on April 29. Those winners will continue on to Washington, D.C. to compete in the National History Day Contest, held June 12 to 16.

Shifting model

presents

Congratulations to the 2011 Nonprofit Award Honorees Left (l-r): Allen Naples, M&T Bank, Christine Steenstra, honoree on behalf of Vera House, Inc., and Anne Ruffer, Mackenzie Hughes Law Firm

Above: Attendees listen to JoDee Kenney, mistress of ceremonies. Right: Allen Naples, M&T Bank, James Hill, honoree on behalf of Human Technologies Corp. (HTC), and James Brockway, M&T Bank Below: Allen Naples, regional president of M&T Bank.

Below: Allen Naples, M&T Bank, Chuckie Holstein, honoree on behalf of F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse, and Nancy Smith, Nancy H. Smith Consulting. Right: Timothy Foley, honoree on behalf of the Center for Family Life and Recovery, Inc. and guest.

Left (l-r): Dr. Michael Kelberman, honoree on behalf of the Kelberman Center, Inc. and guests.

Right (l-r): Allen Naples, M&T Bank, Jeff Crouse, honoree on behalf of Syracuse Behavioral Healthcare, and Jeremy Klemanski, honoree on behalf of Syracuse Behavioral Healthcare.

Thank You to the 2011 Sponsors

Above: JoDee Kenney, News Anchor, YNN Right: Allen Naples, M&T Bank, Rich Pratt, honoree on behalf of the Center for Family Life and Recovery, Inc., and Cassandra Sheets, Center for Family Life and Recovery, Inc.

In an effort to attract repeat visitors, the museum will also be transitioning from showcasing predominantly permanent exhibits to more of a temporary exhibit-based model. “That way we’ll constantly have something new… that’s old,” says Tripoli, noting that the renovations will also include adding two temporary exhibit galleries to the museum’s first floor, allowing OHA to operate two large and two smaller temporary exhibit spaces concurrently. Last year, OHA began offering self-guided, cell-phone tours of its exhibits and the building’s history. After the renovation is completed, many of the exhibits will also have new audio/visual components that Tripoli hopes will be more attractive to the younger generation of museum goers. “There’s not an artifact in this building that can hold a candle to the story behind it,” says Tripoli. He says the cell-phone tours and new audio/visual components will allow museum visitors a chance to obtain much more information about an exhibit in the same amount of time as it would normally take to read a traditional written exhibit label. Some of the upcoming temporary exhibits OHA has scheduled will cover areas such as fashion, sports, the Civil War Sesquicentennial (150th anniversary), as well as hosting the “Landmarks of New York” architectural exhibit from the New York Historical Society. It will also include a section highlighting local architectural landmarks. The museum also has a number of events taking place this summer, such as its first annual Oakwood Cemetery Ghostwalk in June, and a mansion and garden tour in Solvay’s historic Piercefield neighborhood, also scheduled for two weekends in June. And, OHA’s 15th annual “Our Glorious Workplaces” signature event, celebrating Syracuse’s notable workplaces, will be held at Syracuse University this year on Nov. 19. Onondaga Historical Association is chartered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. Its programs are supported, in part, by funds provided by Onondaga County, New York State, the city of Syracuse, and OHA members. In the fiscal year ending Dec. 31, 2009, OHA generated $866,664 in revenue, according to its IRS Tax Form 990, with $160,633 coming from government contributions and grants. The organization allocated almost $442,000 in salaries and benefits for its nine full-time employees that same year. q Contact Sharkey at jsharkey@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 17

April 8, 2011

OPINION

Business Journal C e n t r a l

N e w

Y o r k

N.Y. Small Business Cheers Repeal of Costly Federal Health-Care Mandate

Volume 25, No. 14- April 8, 2011 NEWS Editor-in-Chief........................Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com Assistant Editor..............Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com Staff Writers........................... Kevin Tampone (Online Editor) ktampone@cnybj.com ............................................................Traci DeLore tgregory@cnybj.com .........................................................Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com Production Manager.......................Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com Research Manager................... Julie Sharkey jsharkey@cnybj.com SALES Sr. Account Managers....................................... Bernard B. Bregman bbregman@cnybj.com Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Marketing .......................BBB Marketing Inc. CIRCULATION Circulation Management....(315) 579-3927 Administrative Publisher..........................Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Chief Operating Officer......Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com Business Manager.....................Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

The Central New York Business Journal (ISSN #1050-3005) is published every week by CNY Business Review, Inc. All contents copyrighted 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. Cover Price $2 Subscription Rate $86 per year Call (800) 836-3539

T

  he National Federation of   Independent Business (NFIB)   applauded passage in the U.S. Senate of a bill to repeal one of the most burdensome elements of the federal health-care law, known as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. “The tax reporting provision of the health care law is enormousOPINION ly expensive and time consuming, and we are very happy that it was repealed [April 5] with bi-partisan support,” said Mike Durant, NFIB’s interim state director for New York. The controversial provision requires all

NFIB

T

hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars every year in order to be compliant. “Every time they purchase a service, materials, equipment or supplies, they would have to pay a professional to file another tax form,” said Durant. “It is a senseless mandate that even the IRS had doubts about enforcing and I’m glad that Congress repealed it before it caused too much damage.” The legislation now goes to the White House for President Obama’s signature. Editor’s note: This editorial is drawn from a news release the NFIB issued April 5 in response to the U.S. Senate voting 87-12 to repeal the 1099 tax-reporting requirement.

Solving the Housing Crisis

  he lack of imagination and   innovation in how we are dealing   with the many supposedly intractable problems across our nation currently is striking. Take for instance the housing crisis. According to nearly all forecasts, it seems certain to worsen and even extend into the next OPINION decade. One way of innovatively resolving this crisis is by allowing homeowners to raffle their homes and releasing them from all federal and state laws that make this option legally impossible. A raffle fundamentally changes the home-selling/home-buying paradigm and offers many benefits. With this option, there is no need for banks. And, hassles, such as the failure to qualify or secure loans, are erased. With a raffle, home sellers can be certain of getting cash and potential homebuyers can acquire a home without any kind of mortgage hassle or debt. A raffle option exponentially increases the amount of financial interest in a home by allowing persons to have an affordable and reasonable opportunity to own a home. With tickets reasonably priced, along with listservs (electronic mailing lists) that could immediately reach tens of thousands quickly, homes are certain to change hands rapidly. The raffle gives realtors another way to dispose of homes, and thereby can help resuscitate an industry that is in dire straits. This option can fundamentally revitalize this industry by finally releasing realtors of the tedious and time-consuming tasks of showing homes and hassling with buyers and sellers. Now, realtors can simply

amardo rodriguez

businesses to file an IRS 1099 tax form for every business-to-business transaction of more than $600. Entirely unrelated to health care, the measure was included merely as a way to siphon money out of the private sector in order to finance the mammoth program.   “This mandate had nothing to do with improving health care or making it more accessible,” said Durant. “It functions as a tax increase on small businesses and it strangles them with red tape.” Durant noted that small businesses spend an average of $74 per hour on tax preparation. With hundreds of transactions every year exceeding the $600 threshold, most small businesses would have to spend

focus on securing an agreement to raffle the home, determining the appropriate home value, acquiring all the necessary inspections, clearances and photos, listing the home on massive listservs that have already been developed by various realtors, and processing the legal paperwork to transfer ownership. This option also releases buyers, sellers, and realtors of the uncertainty and anxiety that comes with process. A raffle promises to help revitalize the economy in many significant ways. It affords an attractive opportunity to many who will probably never have such opportunity through other means to become a homeowner, and thus securing a vital means to achieving economic mobility. Also, the option allows for the creation of sufficient wealth that can spur the rise of new businesses and enterprises. It can also be a means that others use to generate resources for notfor-profit organizations. States, cities, towns, and local municipalities are given a better way — certainly over auctioning — of disposing of buildings, houses, and properties, and in so doing, allowing these entities to acquire much-needed funds and resources quickly and reliably. In fact, this option also gives banks another option of quickly disposing of bad real-estate debt that is currently jeopardizing their viability. A raffle offers states and local municipalities a new revenue stream that places no burden on taxpayers. For this option to work effectively, a small state entity would be necessary to ensure that the process is fully transparent and devoid of mischief. I envision a state website run by this entity where tickets can be purchased electronically. This entity would also be responsible for disbursing funds

to homeowners and realtors. I also envision a system where the realtor receives an agreed-upon commission rate — like the current 3.5 percent in most places — and a comparable amount given back to the local school district from where the home was raffled and put into an educational fund. In this way, a new funding stream could be created for local school districts. Finally, a raffle restates and even deepens our commitment to liberty. In regards to our Constitution, liberty is fundamentally about our ability to exercise control over our person and property, as long as doing so poses no threat to the well-being of others. Therefore, if liberty should mean anything, it should at least mean the ability to dispose of our property in ways that pose no threat to others. Allowing homeowners to raffle their homes, including allowing others to do so on their behalf, easily meets this standard. Most economists acknowledge that resolving the housing crisis is integral to the economy. There is also agreement that government interventions to alleviate this crisis have stalled so far, and that the banking sector seems paralyzed. I am by no means contending that a raffle option will end this crisis. However, I am certain that it can play a vital role in helping us resolve it and, in so doing, save us from the dire problems that are certain to come if this crisis continues to worsen. In sum, the upside is potentially enormous. q Amardo Rodriguez, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies at the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University. Contact Rodriguez at rodrigu@syr.edu

HOW TO REACH US MAIL: Send letters to: Editor, The Central New York Business Journal 269 W. Jefferson St., Syracuse, N.Y. 13202 E-MAIL: letters@cnybj.com • PHONE: (315) 472-3104 • FAX: (315) 472-3644


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• The Central New York Business Journal

BANKING & FINANCE Rick Giannini has been named assistant vice president, indirect lending manager at Solvay Bank. He was previously the branch manager at Solvay Bank’s North Syracuse location. His professionGiannini al background includes extensive experience in auto, marine, and RV financing. Giannini is a graduate of the State University of New York at Oswego.

EDUCATION & TRAINING James B. Steinberg, U.S. Deputy Secretary of State, has been named Dean of Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and University Professor of Social Steinberg Science, International Affairs and Law. The appointment will become effective this summer. Steinberg is an internationally recognized expert in public affairs and foreign policy. Prior to serving as deputy secretary of state, he was dean of the Lyndon

April 8, 2011

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: New Hires and promotions

B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas. He previously was vice president and director of foreign policy studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. From 1996-2000, Steinberg served as deputy national security adviser to President Clinton. During that period, he also served as the president’s personal representative to the 1998 and 1999 G-8 summits. Prior to becoming deputy national security adviser, he served as director of the State Department’s policy planning staff and as deputy assistant secretary for analysis in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research. Steinberg is the author of and contributor to numerous books and articles on foreign policy and national security topics. He received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard in 1973 and J.D. from Yale Law School in 1978.

NONPROFITS Marie Parsons has been named assistant administrator of the Ladies Home of Oswego. Parsons has been involved with the Ladies Home since 2006. Parsons has a total of 12 years of Parsons health-care experience. Prior to joining the Ladies Home, Parsons worked for Loretto for seven years in the rehabilitation unit.

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Parsons is a Hannibal High School graduate is also a certified nursing assistant, licensed phlebotomist, and currently a business major at University of Phoenix. Vera House, Inc. recently named Jenny Hicks of Manlius as director of development. Hicks has been employed by Vera House as the elder abuse educator since 2009 and has also Hicks been the coordinator of the Syracuse Area Domestic & Sexual Violence Coalition’s Elder Abuse Committee. She previously interned with the organization in the advocacy program. Hicks comes to the position with a master’s degree in social work from Syracuse University as well as a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Ithaca College. Prior to joining the Vera House staff, Hicks had a 19-year career in accounting and finance. She was chief financial officer of a division of a public company.

REAL ESTATE-RESIDENTIAL Jeannine Larose has joined the Skaneateles office of RE/MAX Masters Real Estate. She is a licensed real-estate salesperson with extensive sales and salesmanagement success. She will be specializing in the buying and selling of residential properties throughout Central New York.

TECHNOLOGY Inficon announced that Glenda Abbate was recently promoted to accounting manager. She has worked in the company’s finance department for 24 years, most recently as senior cost accountant. Abbate Abbate has a bachelor’s degree in economics from SUNY Oswego and recently completed her MBA, also from SUNY Oswego. Stephanie Manfredi was promoted to finance manager. She has worked in the company’s finance department for 26 years, most recently as senior accountant. Manfredi has an associate degree in accounting from Cayuga Community College.

WINERIES Christine A. Nowak recently joined Thousands Islands Winery as the tasting room manager. Prior to joining the business, Nowak was tasting room manager for Kluge Estate Winery & Vineyard in Charlottesville, Va. and Martha Clara Vineyards in Riverhead, N.Y. She also worked for 13 years as the director of the Long Island Chapter for the NYS Restaurant Association. q


The Central New York Business Journal • 19

April 8, 2011

Space is limited.

ONGOING EVENTS

Business Calendar

n Every Tuesday, Gung Ho Networking Group from noon to 1:30 at Ruby Tuesday Restaurant, 3220 Erie Blvd E., DeWitt. The cost is $10 which includes lunch. Contact Paul Ellis at (315) 677-0015 or visit www. GungHoReferrals.com

OF EVENTS

april 12 n CenterState CEO Annual Meeting from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Oncenter War Memorial Arena. The meeting will feature the $250,000 Emerging Business Competition, the Business of the Year Awards, and more. n 9th Annual WISE Symposium at the Holiday Inn Convention Center in Liverpool. For more information, contact Lindsay Wickham at (315) 443-3550 or register online at www.wiseconference.com

april 13 n Business Development Taste Test Workshops Tactics one 2-hour session in Canton. Offered by CITEC Manufacturing & Technology Solutions, Rob Oram, CITEC’s business development director and sales consultant will be the presenter. The Taste Test Workshops are introductory seminars designed to help North Country companies improve operations by providing a taste to business leaders on important program topics. Advance registration is required to attend and seating is limited. For more information and to register, visit the Training page at www.citec. org or call CITEC at (315) 268-3778.

april 14 n AccelerateCNY from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Holiday Inn SyracuseLiverpool. The keynote speaker will be Spirit Airlines CEO Ben Baldanza. The cost is $75 to attend. To learn more or register for updates, visit www. AccelerateCNY.com n Effective Use of Social Media for Learning discussion from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at New Horizons Computer Learning Center, 6711 Towpath Road, DeWitt. Hosted by the CNY ASTD, the cost of the event is $15 for ASTD members and $25 for nonmembers. Registration is required. For more information or to sign up, visit www.cnyastd. org, call (315) 546-2783, or e-mail info@ cnyastd.org

april 20 n Grantseeking Orientation – Nonprofit Resource Center Training Connecting Grantseekers with Grantmakers Workshop from 7 to 8:15 p.m. at the Liverpool Library. The goal is to help 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations to find new funding sources, target their grant proposals, and advance their mission. Bring your laptop for hands-on training. This is a free workshop. Call (315) 457-0310 to pre-register.

april 21 n Tech Talk: Alternative Financing from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Verizon Theater

at the Syracuse Technology Garden. This is the first of two workshops on how to find alternative financing and connect for government contracts. Admission is free. For more information, email: info@ thetechgarden.com or call (315) 4740910.

april 27 n The Bare Necessities of Starting A Business, New Venture Orientation from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the South Side Innovation Center, 2610 S. Salina St., Syracuse. The Innovation Center, part of the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, will host this session led by Joanne Lenweaver, director of the WISE Women’s Business Center. This session will provide information on the initial steps that are critical to launching a successful business and ultimately achieving profitability. This class is free. For information, contact Alicia Millington at (315) 443-8634 or email: acmillin@syr.edu n Disney’s Approach to Business Excellence from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel at 701 E. Genesee St. in Syracuse. It’s presented by CNY ASTD. For details, visit www. cnyastd.org, call (315) 546-2783, or email: info@cnyastd.org

april 28 n 14th SavorSyracuse event, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Syracuse-Liverpool on Electronics Parkway. It’s a gourmet tasting gala to benefit the Food Bank of Central New York. During the event, guests will be able to enjoy delicious tastings from more than 40 of the region’s finest restaurants, wineries, and breweries. The tickets are $70. Visit www. SavorSyracuse.org or call (315) 4371899, ext. 246 for tickets or information.

APRIL 28, MAY 12, MAY 26, JUNE 9 n Business Venture Startup: Developing a Comprehensive and Credible Business Plan from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Tech Garden. This is a four-part Tech Garden seminar series offered by entrepreneur Mark Cornett, founder and COO of Fused Solutions LLC/SpiceCSM LLC. Session topics are cumulative, so it is important to attend all four sessions. Participants must register with the Tech Garden. There is a one-time registration fee of $40, which covers all four sessions, payable to the Tech Garden. Deadline for registration is April 20. For more information, email: info@thetechgarden.com or call (315) 474-0910

april 29 n Tech Talk: Opening Doors to Federal Procurement Opportunities from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Verizon Theater at the Tech Garden. This is the

second of two workshops on how to find alternative financing and connect for government contracts. Admission is free. Presenters include James Quackenbush, business-development specialist at the SBA, and Joyce Spears, procurement analyst with the SBA. For more information, email: info@thetechgarden.com or call (315) 474-0910.

may 5 n A Time to Build Awards Program from noon to 2 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Syracuse-Liverpool on Electronics Parkway. This is a recognition program designed to honor those construction projects and partners that reflect excellence in craft and quality. Check out www.bizeventz.com for more information.

may 12 n MACNY’s 98th Annual Dinner & Manufacturers Wall of Fame 11th Annual Induction, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Syracuse Oncenter Complex. The cost is $80 per person ($750 for a table of 10). For reservations, contact Carol Waters at cwaters@macny.org or call (315) 474-4201, ext. 21.

may 17 n Business Cyber Fraud: Who’s Minding Your Business? Event begins at 7:30 a.m. at the Doubletree Hotel Syracuse, near Carrier Circle. For more information, visit www.bizeventz.com or call (315) 579-3925.

may 24 n The 2011 CCMR Symposium at the Statler Hotel (Carrier Ballroom), Cornell University, Ithaca. Presented by the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR), the event will include information on biomaterials, biomimetics, crystal engineering, self-assembly, and engineered tissues. To register or to obtain further information, visit the CCMR website at www.ccmr.cornell.edu/symposium/registration

may 26 n Transportation Club of Central New York’s 92nd Annual Dinner and Vendor Show at the Doubletree Hotel Syracuse, near Carrier Circle. For ticket information, contact Arlene Anderson at (315) 415-1449 or visit www.transportationclubcny.org

June 9 n Foundation Directory Online Database Refresher Workshop from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. at the Robert P. Kinchen Central Library (meet on Level 4 in the Pass Computer Lab). This is a refresher class on how to search the Foundation Center’s premiere database. Call (315) 435-1900 to pre-register.

n Every Tuesday, Networking @ Noon from noon to 1 p.m. at Justin’s Grill, near Carrier Circle. The growing networking group is always looking for new members. E-mail Bill Wood at whwood@ ft.newyorklife.com for further information. n The first Wednesday of each month, Business Innovation Days meetings from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. This is an opportunity for entrepreneurs and small businesses to meet one-on-one with a counselor from the Small Business Development Center to obtain advice and customized assistance opportunities. Scheduled by appointment, call The Tech Garden at (315) 474-0910 or e-mail: info@thecleantechcenter.com n Every Wednesday throughout 2011, Salt City Technical will offer free consultation to entrepreneurs or inventors who would like to have their product ideas evaluated by a staff of trained engineers. For more information about Salt City Technical services and to schedule a consultation, call (315) 456-8461, or visit www.saltcitytechnical.com n Second Wednesday of each month, Salt City Technical assistance by appointment at the Tech Garden; free consultation to entrepreneurs or inventors who would like to have their product ideas evaluated by a staff of trained engineers. For details or an appointment, call (315) 474-0910 or e-mail: info@thetechgarden.com n Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://estm.freetoasthost.info or e-mail: president@estm. freetoasthost.info n Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at C&S Companies, 499 Col. Eileen Collins Blvd., near Hancock Airport. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802. n Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 472-3104, ext. 103 or e-mail: bbregman@cnybj.com n Every Friday, The Mature Workforce Alliance from 9 to 11 a.m. at Westcott Community Center, at the corner of Westcott and Euclid streets in Syracuse. For further information, call John Cruty at (315) 569-3964 or e-mail: crutij@yahoo. com n Every week, Syracuse Networking Professionals. Five meetings to choose from. For details, call Kevin M. Crook at (315) 439-1803, or email KevinSNP@twcny.rr.com or visit SyracuseNetworkingProfessionals.com

To have your meetings or events in the Business Calendar, e-mail them to movers@cnybj.com 


20

• The Central New York Business Journal

April 8, 2011

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