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Nonprofit Awards: Special Section.

Section B.

Charged Sale: Synapse to sell car-charging network.

Page 2.

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March 22, 2013 • $2.00

CNYBJ.COM

Shabby Chic Boutique owner turns job loss into opportunity

Scolaro firm warns staff of possible health-care practice exit BY ERIC REINHARDT

BY MAYA GAO QIAN

JOURNAL STAFF

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

FAYETTEVILLE — Losing your job isn’t always a bad thing. For Lisa Hogan, being laid off two years ago brought an opportunity. Because of her company’s “last-hired, first-fired” policy for downsizing, Hogan was fired in 2011 from a salon/spa development ERIN ZEHR/THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL partner position at the cosmetics manufacturer and Lisa Hogan, owner of Shabby Chic Boutique. On Feb. 16, Hogan distributor Aveda Corp., a unit of the Estée Lauder opened the business in an approximately 1,000-square-foot leased space on the second floor of the Canal Barn at 7070 Cedar Bay Road See SHABBY CHIC, page 5 in Fayetteville.

SYRACUSE — The Syracuse law firm of Scolaro Shulman Cohen Fetter & Burstein, P.C. on March 18 notified its staff that its health-care practice may break off to join a downstate law firm, leading to possible job losses in Syracuse. The Scolaro firm provided each staff member the WARN (Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification) notice, as required by state law. The New York WARN Act requires a business to give See SCOLARO, page 6

CenterState CEO plans to move to Pike Block by late summer The organization had considered moving since 2010 BY KEVIN TAMPONE JOURNAL STAFF

SYRACUSE — CenterState CEO, the area’s major business and eco-

nomic-development group, says it will relocate to the Pike Block project in downtown Syracuse by late summer. The group, which has more than 2,000 members, is currently housed at the former Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce building at 572 S. Salina St. The chamber and the Metropolitan Development Association of

Syracuse and Central New York (MDA) merged to form CenterState CEO in 2010. “We’ve been contemplating the possibility of relocating since we merged the two organizations,” CenterState CEO President Robert Simpson says. “We knew that we had more space than we See CENTERSTATE, page 12

PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTERSTATE CEO

David Nutting, right, speaks to CenterState CEO president Robert Simpson inside the Pike Block building, which is undergoing renovations.

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2 • The Central New York Business Journal

CNYBJ BRIEFS

March 22, 2013

Synapse to sell local car-charging network BY KEVIN TAMPONE JOURNAL STAFF

News of note for and about Central New York businesses

Former Phillips Hair Styling Institute site sold SYRACUSE — An 8,816-square-foot retail store front located at 709 E. Genesee St. in Syracuse was recently sold. It was the former home of the Phillips Hair Styling Institute. Taksum Development purchased the property from Mirabito General Partnership for $275,000. Michael Kalet of Pyramid Brokerage Company brokered this sale transaction.

Clarkson gets $150K gift from Turner Construction POTSDAM — Turner Construction Co. of New York City is donating $150,000 to Clarkson University to support the school’s construction engineering management program. Turner employs more than 5,000 people and has 46 offices in the U.S. and 18 different countries. With the donation, Shawn Rosenberger, vice president and general manager of Turner Construction in San Diego and a Clarkson alumnus, will serve on the advisory board for the school’s construction engineering management (CEM) program. The program provides education in the design, planning, construction, and management of infrastructure such as highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, railroads, buildings, pipelines, dams, and utilities. “We are particularly gratified by Turner Construction Co.’s support of CEM since it builds on our existing academic alliance,” Clarkson President Tony Collins said in a news release. “CEM courses have been taught at Clarkson for more than 30 years, but we’ve seen a four-fold increase in students focusing on this area in the last five years.”

SYRACUSE — Synapse Sustainability Trust, Inc. of Syracuse is selling its network of electric-vehicle charging stations in the region to a nationwide provider of charging services. Car Charging Group, Inc. of Miami Beach, Fla. announced plans March 12 to acquire the network from Synapse. Synapse is a nonprofit focused on sustainable environmental initiatives. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. The local network includes 68 stations at sites including Destiny USA, the Towne Center at Fayetteville, the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse University, and the Oncenter in Syracuse and the JFK Arena in Rome. The network also includes stations in the Westcott neighborhood and a total of 39 stations at commuter parking locations in downtown Syracuse. As a nonprofit, the Synapse Trust is in a position to take on innovative projects ahead of their time, says Eckardt Beck, executive director of the trust. Once those initiatives have achieved a measure of success, they can be moved to a for-profit entity. Beck notes the trust began building the local network when electric-vehicle sales were rarer than they are now. The sale to Car Charging will foster better rates for the network’s users, he adds. Car Charging operates 1,200 electric vehicle charging stations around the country.

Car-charging stations outside the Synapse corporate HQ building in Syracuse. These stations are powered, in part, by the photovoltaic array on the roof of the building.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SYNAPSE

As a result, the firm can often negotiate better electric rates for its network since it’s such a major consumer of power, Beck says. Beck says he met Car Charging CEO Michael Farkas about two years ago and the pair had been discussing rolling the Synapse network into Car Charging for a while. In addition to better rates, users of the

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Central New York network will now have access to stations nationwide, Beck notes. The local stations and Car Charging’s units all use the same software so drivers will be able to easily find all of them with Web searches. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) was a partner on deploying the Synapse network. With the acquisition, Car Charging will administer a pending NYSERDA grant that involves installing charging stations throughout upstate New York. Beck will join Car Charging’s board of directors when the acquisition closes. The Synapse deal continues Car Charging’s push into an attractive market, Farkas says. At the end of February, the company announced a deal for Beam Charging, LLC, a major provider of charging stations in the New York City (NYC) area. Car Charging installs charging stations at private residences and public locations like store parking lots and parking garages. The firm owns, maintains, and operates the units and offers subscription services for users. Car Charging expects to add to its network in the NYC area and Upstate, Farkas says. Without enough charging stations, he adds, it’s tough to offer a subscription model. “We believe New York has a lot of potential,” he says. “We believe [electric vehicle] drivers are everywhere. Sales of electric vehicles are growing, according to Car Charging. Sales in January this year were more than 300 percent higher than a year earlier and sales in February this year were up nearly 330 percent from the same month in 2012, according to the company. The firm is in the process of opening a sales and maintenance office in New York City as a result of the acquisitions. The three-person office will be responsible for the company’s efforts throughout the Northeast, Farkas says. Car Charging employs 17 people now. Car Charging says it will make use of Beck’s expertise in Syracuse and may also look to add a sales presence in the market at some point.  Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 3

March 22, 2013

New name. Familiar faces.

Alliance Bank is now NBT Bank. With the new name, you may notice a few changes. Perhaps more noteworthy, however, are all the things that remain the same. We remain a community bank headquartered here in Upstate New York. We’re the same people providing personal service to our neighbors and support for local businesses. But now we have added resources including more branches, more ATMs and more money to lend. That’s more power to help grow the Central New York economy and create jobs.

So with NBT Bank you get everything you’ve come to love about Alliance Bank. The big difference is, you get a whole lot more of it.

Rick Shirtz Jack Webb

OCUCBOLDPNt/#5#"/, Member FDIC


4 • The Central New York Business Journal

March 22, 2013

Koelmel out at First Niagara By Kevin Tampone Journal Staff

F

  irst Niagara Financial Group   (NASDAQ: FNFG) announced   March 19 that President and CEO John Koelmel has left the Buffalo–based banking company. First Niagara’s board appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer Gary Crosby as interim president and CEO. Crosby joined the bank in 2009. A news release from First Niagara described Koelmel’s departure as “mutually agreed upon” and the bank’s representatives said no one would be available for immediate further comment on the move. A filing from First Niagara with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) said Koelmel is being terminated for reasons other than for cause. In the wake of the news, First Niagara’s stock price rose nearly 5 percent to as high as $8.85 on the morning of March 20 in initial trading following the announcement. The stock declined sharply in July 2011 after First Niagara announced plans to acquire HSBC Bank’s upstate New York branch network. Shares were trading around $13.50 in late June and early July that year before the deal became public. The stock declined 40 percent following the announcement of the deal and fell even further in 2012 to a low of around $7.08 per share. “I highly value the opportunity to have driven First Niagara’s rapid growth over the last six years and to position it as one of the top regional banking franchises in the Northeast,” Koelmel said in the news release. “And I thank all 6,000 of my teammates for their tremendous support. I agree with the board that it’s in the best interests of the organization under present circumstances to move forward with new leadership.” Koelmel’s seat on First Niagara’s board of directors expires with his departure. His total compensation in 2012 was more than $3.7 million, up from $3.2 million in 2011, according to a filing with the SEC. A special committee of the First Niagara board’s independent directors will conduct a search for a permanent president and CEO. The group will consider internal and external candidates, according to First

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Niagara. The bank grew under Koelmel’s leadership with multiple acquisitions in Pennsylvania, New England, and upstate New York. The HSBC deal, which closed Koelmel last year, made First Niagara a leading player in the Syracuse, Utica, and Binghamton markets. Koelmel stressed in recent earnings conference calls that the bank was now focused on running its current operations and had no immediate plans for new acquisitions. “John Koelmel has guided the company’s transformation from a local thrift to a leading northeast banking franchise and led First Niagara during a period of difficult economic conditions and financial industry turmoil,” First Niagara Chairman G. Thomas Bowers said in the release. “The board and I are grateful to John for his leadership through this critical period in our history and for positioning us so that we can focus on enhancing shareholder value through continuing organic growth and the efficient operation of the business we have today. “We are committed to maintaining our position as a leading independent banking organization with a deep-seated focus on service to our customers and communities and to building value for our shareholders.” First Niagara has 430 branches, $37 billion in assets, and 6,000 employees in upstate New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. First Niagara is number four in the Syracuse metro area deposit market with 21 branches, more than $808 million in deposits, and a deposit market share of more than 7.5 percent, according to the latest statistics from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The bank is also number four in the Utica–Rome market with nine branches, $405.9 million in deposits, and a market share of about 11 percent. The bank is number two in the Binghamton market with 10 branches, $342.5 million in deposits, and a market share of 12.8 percent. q Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com

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March 22, 2013

SHABBY CHIC: Hogan is the owner, manager, and currently the only employee Continued from page 1

Companies, Inc. After applying for new jobs and considering several offers, she decided to leave the corporate world and pursue her childhood passion — interior design. “My mother is an exceptional interior decorator, my sister is an art teacher, and my brother is landscape architect. I think it’s in the bloodline,” Hogan says. “I decided to open up a little boutique to help people affordably have home décor in Central New York.” On Feb. 16, Hogan opened Shabby Chic Boutique in an approximately 1,000-square foot leased space on the second floor of the Canal Barn at 7070 Cedar Bay Road in Fayetteville. It is the first specialized “shabby chic” store in Central New York offering vintage furniture and other decorative items for the home, she contends. Hogan is the owner, manager, and currently the only employee of Shabby Chic Boutique. She says she funded the business completely with her own funds, but declined to disclose the exact amount of the investment. Before working at Aveda, Hogan was a franchise owner of two Curves health and fitness clubs in Tully and Nedrow from 2003 to 2008. She also previously worked as a sales and marketing manager for exhibit design company Innovative Display & Design and as an exhibits and event planner for Inficon. Hogan holds a master’s degree in business administration from Syracuse University.

Shabby-chic style

Shabby Chic Boutique offers refurbished and repurposed vintage furniture and a mix of new and old home décor accessories. Hogan seeks to provide customers a unique shopping experience and to broaden the traditional upscale shabby-chic market by attracting middle-income consumers. Hogan also hopes that the store’s location, a 30-year-old renovated barn alongside Erie Canal, can inject a historic vibe into her shop. The shabby-chic style combines two seemingly paradoxical elements — “shabby,” which is dilapidated and faded, and “chic,” which is elegant and stylish, according to “Shabby Chic,” a book written by British designer and Shabby Chic furniture retailer founder Rachel Ashwell. The style is characterized by repainted aged furniture and decorative items — such as velvet bedspreads and floral embroidered pillows — with washed-out colors, she says. For Hogan, shabby chic is more than just a trending home décor fashion; it is a style that can add zest and pleasure to people’s daily lives. “I think it’s just great to introduce what was used many, many years ago in today’s living,” Hogan says. “You can serve tea in a vintage silver teacup, instead of microwaving a cup of hot water and using a mug. It’s a bit fancier and more formal. And you can really have fun with people in your home.” Starting last October, Hogan traveled around Central New York to accumulate old furniture through people’s yard and garage sales and then refurbished them. Her store now holds more than 400 pieces, including an assortment of shabby-chic

style furniture, vintage glassware, lamps, and paintings. Hogan says her products are “a mix of old and new,” with both oneof-kind unduplicated furniture and all-new accessories with vintage looks. In the past month since it opened, the boutique has sold 50 pieces. She adds new items to the store’s lineup every week. In order to better demonstrate the furniture, Hogan created thematic arrangements in her showroom. All furniture is grouped and organized for a specific room setting, such as a dining room or a children’s bedroom. She also offers visitors a free cup of tea or coffee, or a glass of wine. “I want to offer a fun and lighthearted experience, as opposed to just going into a showroom full of furniture,” said Hogan. Even though shabby-chic style furniture is renovated old furniture, the prices aren’t always inexpensive. Thus, it usually attracts a high-income customer. But Hogan wants to broaden the market by offering affordable prices. The prices of her products range from $2.99 for small items to $1,500 for Victorian style sofa. “I wouldn’t want to quarter myself into saying it’s for only middle-income people. I have college students coming to my shop and I also have people living in high-end houses coming to my shop,” Hogan says. “But I think the prices speak middle-income.” In addition to furniture sales, the boutique offers several individualized services. Customers can ask for a specific type of piece, such as a silver candle set or a

ERIN ZEHR/CNYBJ

Lisa Hogan, owner of Shabby Chic Boutique, arranges a place setting on a table in her store. Middle-Age style dining table, and then Hogan will try to find matched pieces for them. Moreover, through partnering with local artists, the store offers painting service for its customers, like decorating furniture or replicating faded paintworks. When discussing her future plans, Hogan says she is still reluctant to start selling her store’s items online. “I think it goes back to my distinct shopping boutique experience,” Hogan says. “The only way to get that is to experience it, to touch, feel, and see it in my shop.” Shabby Chic Boutique (www.shabbychiccny.com) is open from Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

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6 • The Central New York Business Journal

March 22, 2013

Number of energy-efficient homes in New York rose by 10 percent in 2012 BY JOURNAL STAFF

T

he New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) on March 19 said that the number of New York homes certified as energy efficient increased by 10 percent last year, compared to 2011. The figure is higher, despite housing starts nationwide remaining at low levels, NYSERDA said in a news release. Construction companies built a total

of more than 2,260 Energy Star-certified homes in 2012, compared with nearly 2,050 in 2011, NYSERDA said. According to the U.S. Census, construction starts in 2012 were at one of their lowest levels since 1959, when the Census began reporting housing starts. New York Energy Star-certified homes are offered under NYSERDA’s low-rise residential new-construction program, which supports new construction and substantial renovation of environmentally

friendly homes that are cost-effective to own and operate. These programs offer technical assistance and financial incentives for builders and developers, NYSERDA said. Each New York Energy Star-certified home must pass an evaluation that includes a computer-based energy analysis of the home’s design, field inspections, and third-party performance testing to certify compliance with the required standards. 

SCOLARO: Firm currently has 62 full-time and two part-time employees total Continued from page 1

early warning of a closing and layoffs. A Long Island law firm been talking to the Scolaro law firm about merging with its health-care practice, says Barry M. Shulman, president and CEO of the Scolaro firm. Shulman declined to name the downstate firm involved in the negotiations. “[It’s] a law firm in the Long Island area, the metropolitan area … and they have discussed taking the health-care department from here and merging it into that other firm,” Shulman says, noting that he believes the downstate firm has about 70 attorneys focusing solely on health-care issues. As Shulman understands it, the Long Island firm has made a proposal to the Scolaro firm’s health-care practice group. “At the moment, our health-care section here is negotiating attaching itself with that other firm,” he says. Those negotiations, so far, haven’t led to a definitive conclusion, Shulman says, noting it’s possible the talks could “fall apart.” The Scolaro firm’s management met with the entire staff on March 18 and explained what management believes might happen if the deal is consummated. “We just, in a conservative way, wanted to provide them with these notices, so that

they could take steps, if they wanted to, to protect themselves,” Shulman says. The Scolaro law firm currently has 62 full-time and two part-time employees total, Shulman says. The employees include attorneys, secretaries, and paralegals, he added. Even though state law requires the WARN notice, he says he doesn’t want to predict the precise number of job losses at the firm. The talks may not lead to any job losses or layoffs, Shulman notes. The state WARN Act applies to businesses with 50 or more full-time workers in New York, and it covers closings or layoffs affecting 25 or more workers. Companies are required to provide 90 days notice. “We are over 50 people. We have no idea … I want to stress that … We have no idea that 25 or more will be adversely affected, but we still wanted to issue the notice to be careful lawyers,” Shulman says. He couldn’t provide an exact number of how many staff members could eventually be affected if a deal happens, noting that some attorneys work in the healthcare practice in combination with additional practice areas. Shulman adds that he has “no idea” when the firm might know the outcome of the ongoing negotiations. Otherwise, the business of the law firm

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is moving forward “seamlessly,” he says. “Other than the fact that we’ve issued the WARN notice, and other than the fact that this may or may not happen, nothing here, with regard to client service, has changed,” Shulman explains.

Health-care practice group

The attorneys in the Scolaro firm’s healthcare practice group represent licensed physicians, dentists, optometrists, chiropractors, podiatrists, physical and occupational therapists, diagnostic and treatment centers, multi-specialty groups, and other health-care professionals, their respective practices, and professional organizations, according to the Scolaro website. In addition, the firm serves as special counsel to a large number of area hospitals in matters involving hospital/physician joint ventures and practice acquisition and development, the website says. Attorney Stephen Cohen chairs the Scolaro health-care practice group, according to the site. Cohen wasn’t immediately available for comment on the story before publication deadline. Editor’s note: The Central New York Business Journal is a client of Scolaro Shulman Cohen Fetter & Burstein, P.C.  Contact Reinhardt at ereinhardt@cnybj.com

STAFF WRITER/REPORTER — SYRACUSE The Central New York Business Journal has an opening in its Syracuse office for a full-time staff writer/reporter to cover breaking business news and several reporting beats in our 16-county Central New York region. Beats include technology & innovation, banking & finance, education & training, and energy/environment. Coverage includes newspaper articles, online breaking news, and shooting photos and video reports. A successful candidate will have two years or more of news writing and reporting experience in a deadlinedriven environment, or other relevant experience. Qualified candidates will have strong writing and reporting skills, self-editing abilities, attention to detail, an eye for news and story ideas, the ability to meet tight deadlines, good organizational skills, and the ability to work independently as well as part of an editorial team. Experience and skills in Web publishing, video, photography, and social media are a plus. This is a full-time position with a competitive salary and benefits package. The Central New York Business Journal is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send résumé, cover letter, and two examples of your work to arombel@cnybj.com. No phone calls please.


March 22, 2013

Energy/

The Central New York Business Journal • 7

SPECIAL REPORT

Environment

GREEN BUSINESS

Smart grid lab comes online at Syracuse University By Kevin Tampone Journal Staff

SYRACUSE — A lab focused on smartgrid technologies that has been planned since 2010 is up and running at Syracuse University (SU). A $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy helped establish the facility, located at SU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science. The lab will help the school train the future engineers who will be responsible for running the nation’s power grid in the coming years. “We wanted [students] to have very good hands-on experience,” says Chilukuri Mohan, chairman of the department of electrical engineering and computer science. “Not just in the context of a specific tool, but rather getting used to a way of doing “We wanted things which inhands-on [students] to volves work.” The grant have very helped pay for the good hands- equipment that students will use on experiin the lab, Mohan ence,” says says. It includes a model that simuChilukuri lates the entire electric grid from Mohan, generation to chairman transmission and distribution. of the deThe model serves as a sandpartment box allowing stuof electrical dents to see how real-world engineering various scenarios affect and comput- and stress the grid. It includes er science. elements involving renewables like wind and solar power so students can see how typical fluctuations in those energy sources affect the rest of the grid. “Students would be able to see this and figure out how to mitigate it,” Mohan says. The grant aims to help SU develop coursework for engineering students, utility  workers, and unemployed personnel focused on smart-grid technolo-

photo courtesy of syracuse university

Tomislav Bujanovic, a professor at Syracuse University (SU), left, speaks with students. A $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy helped establish the facility, located at SU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science gies. The university is collaborating with grid skills. The mean age for the current other groups including National Grid, crop of electrical engineers in the business the State University of New York Buffalo, is in the 50s, Mohan says. Buffalo State College, Clarkson University, “For a long time, people have not been the University of Rochester, and Onondaga hired,” he says. “In the coming years, Community College. there’s going to be a huge manpower A similar lab is logap to operate the cated in Buffalo so grid.” experiments can be “It could really cripple the In addition, the run simultaneously technology that and results can be country,” Mohan says. “We runs the power compared, Mohan grid is changing need to educate new says. The schools dramatically. The engineers who can work will also exchange days of one-way information on their transmission from with this technology.” lab-oriented coursgenerator to cones. sumer are over, High demand is Mohan says. expected in the energy industry in the Small-scale, renewable-power generacoming years for engineers with smart- tion can be installed at homes and busi-

nesses and much of that energy can flow back through the grid when it’s not in use on site, he explains. “Technically, anyone could put up something in their own backyard and feed electricity back into the grid,” Mohan notes. The advances are exciting and impressive, but make running the grid more challenging. As more and more of our essential infrastructure in finance, communication, and other areas depends on a reliable power grid to function, the security threat from major blackouts increases, Mohan adds. “It could really cripple the country,” he says. “We need to educate new engineers who can work with this technology.” q Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com


8 • The Central New York Business Journal

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/GREEN BUSINESS

March 22, 2013

Cleanup at Massena GM site moves ahead with redevelopment efforts BY KEVIN TAMPONE JOURNAL STAFF

MASSENA — Environmental cleanup at a former General Motors (GM) site in Massena should wrap up sometime in the next few years. Work at the carmaker’s shuttered powertrain operation near the banks of the St. Lawrence River should finish by late 2015 or early 2016, says Brendan Mullen, New York cleanup manager for the RACER Trust, which owns the site. The trust was created in March 2011 by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court as part of GM’s bankruptcy, which was filed in 2009. The trust is working on cleaning and redeveloping former GM sites throughout the country. When first formed, RACER owned a total of 44 million square feet of industrial space in 66 buildings, although it has since sold some of its properties. A sale is the ultimate goal for the Massena site, says Bruce Rasher, RACER’s redevelopment manager. As the cleanup process proceeds, RACER is already talking with parties potentially interested in acquiring the 220-acre site. It’s possible, a sale could close before cleanup is even complete, he says. RACER would continue to oversee the cleanup work if that happened. Rasher declined to discuss details of the prospects he’s been in touch with, but says they include companies in manufacturing and energy. The site, Rasher says, has access to high-capacity, low-cost power, rail,

that were below the building and cleaned contaminated soils, Mullen says. That project wrapped up in 2012. A third phase will start at the end of March or in early April, Mullen says. Perras Environmental Control, Inc. of Massena won the contract for the work. The firm has worked on the GM site in the past, according to RACER. In the current phase, Perras will dismantle three buildings remaining at the site, including one structure totaling 21,500 square feet and another totaling 10,000 square feet. Perras will also excavate and remove about 58,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil, according to RACER. Three processwater lagoons will also be drained, excavated, and filled with clean soil. All of the contaminated material will be sent off site in rail cars, according to RACER. Between 25 and 30 Perras emPHOTO COURTESY OF RACER TRUST ployees will be at work on the project most Demolition and environmental cleanup at a former General Motors (GM) site in days. Massena should wrap up sometime in the next few years. The current phase should end in November, Mullen says. After that, RACER still must complete some additional excavaand waterways that make it attractive to A large amount of cleanup work New has York Central Business Journal tion and removal of contaminated material. firms in those sectors. already been done on the site, Mullen says. LET THE SUN ELIMINATE YOUR TAX LIABILITY (3/5/13) Edition) The trust also plans to install a ground“We think that the site is extremely valu- A project to demolish the site’s main plant, 1/4 Page Color Advertisement – 9.75”w x 6.75”h able in terms of attracting a user with jobs which totaled 855,000 square feet, had water recovery and treatment system, that will make investments and redevelop already started when the trust formed in Mullen says. When finished, the cleanup work will the site,” Rasher says. 2011. He says he doesn’t have an estimate of That project finished in late 2011, Mullen leave mostly open land, Mullen says. Two when a deal for the site could close. says. It was followed by a second phase small structures related to water treatment  “We have some parties that are taking a that involved the concrete slab below the will remain. very serious look at that property,” Rasher building. says. Workers removed the slab and tunnels Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com

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March 22, 2013

energy/environment/green business

The Central New York Business Journal • 9

Electronics recycler plans Earth Day event to kick off 2nd year in business By Traci DeLore contributing writer

DeWITT — Not quite one year after forming their electronics recycling company, Patrick Duffy and Scott Seymour are enjoying their 2012 successes, carving out their 2013 goals, and looking forward to Earth Day as they work to continue to spread the word about electronics recycling. Their business, Coast 2 Coast Electronic Recyclers, Inc., will celebrate Earth Day April 20 by allowing Onondaga County residents to drop off electronic items for free from 8 a.m. to noon at the company’s facility at 6600 Deere Road in DeWitt. Duffy, president of Coast 2 Coast, says he expects to collect about 100,000 pounds of recyclable electronic products such as televisions, computers, cell phones, and batteries. While many view those items as disposable, he says, New York state actually requires that they be recycled. Most electronic items contain plastics and metals that can be recycled for other uses. In addition, many also contain harmful items such as mercury or lead that need to be kept out of the landfills, Seymour, the company’s CEO, notes. Along with diverting lots of electronic items from landfills, Duffy and Seymour hope their Earth Day event also helps raise awareness for Coast 2 Coast, which provides recycling services to businesses as well as consumers. The pair formed the company last May

photo courtesy of coast 2 Coast electronic recyclers, inc.

Patrick Duffy, president, left, and Scott Seymour, CEO, right. Their business, Coast 2 Coast Electronic Recyclers, Inc., will celebrate Earth Day April 20 by allowing Onondaga County residents to drop off electronic items for free from 8 a.m. to noon at the company’s facility at 6600 Deere Road in DeWitt. and began collecting recyclables in midAugust. By the end of the year, Coast 2 Coast had collected about 160,000 pounds of recyclables. “It was quite a stellar end of the year for us,” Seymour says. Coast 2 Coast has built a solid client base, Duffy says, that includes residen-

tial customers as well as privately owned businesses and county, state, and federal entities. While he declined to name specific clients, Seymour says Coast 2 Coast’s customer base spans Onondaga County and also includes Jefferson, Lewis, Oswego, and Oneida counties.

As word about Coast 2 Coast continues to spread, Duffy says he expects client numbers to continue growing. In many cases, the company hears from businesses that have been holding on to old electronics equipment because they didn’t know how to dispose of the items. In some cases, he says, businesses didn’t have means to transport the equipment to a recycler. Coast 2 Coast solves that problem for businesses by offering a free pick-up service to businesses. Coast 2 Coast does charge a fee for the recycling, Seymour says, but makes the bulk of its revenue by breaking down items into about 34 different commodities like plastic and wires, which it then sells to downstream vendors. Some of the vendors that Coast 2 Coast works with include New Jersey–based Metalico, Inc., which operates several facilities in upstate New York; DeWitt–based CNY Resource Recovery, Inc.; and Owego–based Upstate Shredding, LLC. Employment has also increased at Coast 2 Coast as the company has grown. Duffy and Seymour, who started as a two-man operation, now have a staff of 10 full- and part-time employees, exceeding their goal of adding five employees in 2012. Over the next several years, they hope to grow the work force to 50 employees, starting with between five and seven new employees this year. Seymour and Duffy declined to share See coast 2 coast, page 11


ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/GREEN BUSINESS

10 • The Central New York Business Journal

March 22, 2013

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SYRACUSE — Envision hiking and biking trails, a boat rental company, and even a beach and some swimming. All could one day be an option in and around Onondaga Lake as a $1 billion cleanup project continues. For more than 125 years, industrial and chemical operations disposed myriad pollutants into the 4.6-square-mile lake, including mercury and other heavy metals, chlorobenzene, toluene, xylene, and PCBs. Municipal sewage also polluted the lake. By 1940, swimming in the lake was banned, and in 1972 fishing was prohibited. In 1994, Onondaga Lake became a federal Superfund site, meaning the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) declared it contaminated and in need of remediation. Morristown, N.J.–based Honeywell International has been a large part of the cleanup project due to its 1999 acquisition of Allied Signal, which operated a location near Onondaga Lake. Work to date has included five years of design and engineering, cleanup of upland industrial sites, and the construction of a barrier wall to keep groundwater from entering the lake before it can be treated. The state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), the U.S. EPA, and the state Department of Health (DOH) are overseeing the project. Last July, work began to dredge and cap the bottom of the lake, with the removal of 230,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment through November, says John McAuliffe, Syracuse program director with Honeywell. Dredging and capping work will resume this spring and continue through 2015 and 2016, respectively. “By the end of 2013, we anticipate being halfway done with the dredging,” McAuliffe says. In total, dredging will take place on 185 acres of the lake representing about 6 percent of the 3,000-acre lake bottom. Additional dredging will take place on 21 acres in three areas adjacent to the lake, according to the DEC. About 2 million cubic yards total will be removed. While Honeywell works to make

Onondaga Lake a “greener” place, it’s using as many environmentally friendly methods and products as possible, McAuliffe says. “Sustainability is very important to Honeywell,” he says. More than half of the products used for the project offer energy-efficiency benefits. Honeywell has used “green” concrete products, organic biosolids and fertilizers, biodiesel fuel, and reclaimed lumber. Solar panels and green electricity are helping to reduce greenhouse gases and Honeywell procures locally whenever it can, McAuliffe notes. Honeywell will also create 450 acres of new habitat on the bottom of the lake, which has an average depth of 35 feet, after capping — adding more than 1 million native plants. In addition, with help from the Onondaga Lake Conservation Corps, Honeywell is restoring habitat along Geddes Brook and Nine Mile Creek. The company has made information about the cleanup project available online at www.lakecleanup.com, and Honeywell opened a visitor’s center in November, McAuliffe says. “People here in Syracuse really are excited about the project,” he says. So far, nearly 1,000 people have come to the visitor’s center, located at exit 7 off Route 690, where they can learn about the cleanup project first hand. Visitors can view videos about the details of the cleanup effort and look out at the lake, McAuliffe adds. Onondaga County has undertaken its own partner efforts to ensure the lake’s water is clean and stays that way, says Matthew Millea, deputy county executive for physical services. As documented on its www.savetherain.us site, the city has not only made improvements to its wastewater treatment center, but has also implemented green and gray infrastructure to allow the county to better handle stormwater to prevent recontamination of the lake, he says. Green and gray infrastructure includes measures that help capture rainwater and prevent runoff, and that is especially important in Syracuse where the stormwater and sanitary sewer systems are combined, See CLEANUP, page 11


ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT/GREEN BUSINESS

March 22, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 11

CLEANUP: People are energized about the cleanup project

Continued from page 10

Millea says. The goal is a healthy ecosystem from top to bottom, and that could, in turn, foster some economic growth around the lake, he says. The county commissioned a report by F.O.C.U.S Greater Syracuse (www. focussyracuse.org), which showed that county residents are really interested in seeing recreational opportunities open up around the lake, Millea says. That includes access to the water, fishing, biking, and even a swimming beach. While the majority of the land surrounding the lake is publicly owned, there are opportunities

for focused retail development that would further the recreational use of the lake, he adds. That could include a shop that rents kayaks and other boats or an icecream stand. People are energized about the cleanup project and all the potential surrounding the lake, he adds. “It was just seen as a liability and not an asset, he says. That is changing now as the cleanup progresses. “Onondaga Lake is going to be important to the community as a healthy, sustainable asset for future generations,” McAuliffe says. 

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any revenue goals. In 2012, Coast 2 Coast also successfully completed a project to make “green” improvements at its 20,000-square-foot facility including installing LED lighting and upgrading the production line to pneumatic equipment. The changes reduced the company’s carbon footprint by about 30 percent and boosted its production efficiency, Duffy says. For 2013, Seymour says the company hopes to add more new equipment that will further boost Coast 2 Coast’s production capacity and efficiency. This year, the company will also work to achieve its Recycling Industry Operating Standard (RIOS) and Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) certifications. The business began work on the certifications last year in hopes of attaining them in 2012, but pending changes to the R2 certification put the process on the back burner, Seymour says.

It didn’t make sense to get the certification and then have to possibly apply for it again when new requirements were put in place. Now he plans to achieve those certifications by the end of 2013. Coast 2 Coast is currently registered as an electronic-waste recycling facility with the state Department of Environmental Conservation. Headquartered on Deere Road in DeWitt, Coast 2 Coast (www.c2ceri.com) also provides data-destruction services and remarkets electronic items that are still in good working condition. The company does not accept appliances for recycling. Prior to forming Coast 2 Coast, Seymour and Duffy worked together at CXtec in Salina. Seymour was the director of CXtec’s LIFECYCLExpress electronics-recycling division, while Duffy headed a sales division that handled business with the federal government.  Contact The Business Journal at news@cnybj.com

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12 • The Central New York Business Journal

March 22, 2013

CENTERSTATE: Pike Block is at the historic heart of downtown Syracuse Continued from page 1

needed in that building. It’s been on our radar screen.” The 130,000-square-foot Pike Block project involves four adjacent structures: the Chamberlin Building, Witherill Building, Wilson Building, and Bond Building. The $25 million development is located at the corner of South Salina and West Fayette streets. VIP Development Associates, the development arm of VIP Structures of Syracuse,

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is Pike Block’s developer. The company is transforming the buildings into a combination of apartments, offices, and groundfloor retail space. Work began in 2011. CenterState CEO was able to start working more aggressively toward a move when it started seeing interest in the former chamber building. The group spoke with several interested buyers and the South Salina Street building is now under contract for sale, Simpson says. The organization hasn’t disclosed the buyer yet, but Simpson says that will happen in the next few weeks. When it came time to find a new home, there was no shortage of options. CenterState CEO considered sites including the Merchant Commons project at 220 S. Warren St. and the Onondaga Tower, the former HSBC building, at 125 E. Jefferson St., Simpson says. But Pike Block is at the historic heart of downtown Syracuse and developers have spoken of it as an effort to extend the success of Armory Square into a new area of the city. “At the end of the day, this project, it met our needs from a size standpoint and I think speaks to what we stand for as an organization,” Simpson says. “I think it was really important to us as we thought about making a move to be part of a project that was part of the renaissance of the city and in our downtown area in particular.” The project takes advantage of the New York State Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit, which CenterState CEO pushed for strongly, he adds. Beyond that, the group has a long history with the Pike Block buildings.

The project itself began in 2005 when Adapt CNY, Inc., a nonprofit entity spun out of the 40 Below young professionals organization, secured control of the Wilson Building from the city of Syracuse. Adapt CNY eventually raised more than $1 million toward redevelopment. 40 Below is now sponsored by CenterState CEO. The former MDA eventually acquired three of the Pike Block buildings, packaged the properties together, and negotiated the redevelopment as one project. CenterState CEO will serve as an anchor tenant at Pike Block and occupy 12,000 square feet on the second floor of the Witherill Building and the first floor of the Chamberlin Building. The first floor space will be a reception area and include information for visitors. CenterState CEO affiliates, including the Syracuse Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Downtown Committee of Syracuse, and Benefit Specialists of New York, will also relocate to Pike Block. The MDA-chamber merger left CenterState CEO with 21,000 square feet of space at the former chamber building, which is more than it needs, the group said. Office areas are divided tightly and the space includes several large common areas the chamber used in the past for events. CenterState CEO has been holding most of those functions at member businesses in recent years, Simpson says. It’s a move that allows local companies to showcase their work. “We were hearing more and more from folks that they wanted to do that,” he says. CenterState CEO employs about 70 people. All of the organization’s staff mem-

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bers, except those at the Syracuse Tech Garden, will be housed at Pike Block after the move. VIP announced Pike Block’s first retail tenant, Tim Hortons Cafe & Bake Shop, earlier this month. “We were not in the market for office tenants,” VIP Chairman and CEO David Nutting says. “We want the lights to be on. At 11 o’clock, we want the lights to be burning.” But if there is one office tenant VIP would want for Pike Block, it would be CenterState CEO, he adds. Given the group’s history with the project and its role in downtown’s redevelopment, it’s a great fit, he says. CenterState CEO is taking some space originally meant for residential units, Nutting says. The finished project will now have 68 apartments instead of 78. Between Tim Horton’s and CenterState CEO’s ground-floor space, about 20 percent of the development’s 25,000-square-foot retail area is spoken for, he adds. VIP is close to signing a lease with another tenant for 7,000 square feet and is in talks with four or five others, Nutting says. The company expects to wrap up all of the work on the project by the end of September. Pike Block is set to host the Downtown Living Tour in May so much of the residential areas will be finished by then, he says. VIP has the rights to the building adjacent to Pike Block to the south and expects to redevelop that structure next, Nutting adds. q Contact Tampone at ktampone@cnybj.com


The Central New York Business Journal • 13

March 22, 2013

opinion

Business Journal C e n t r a l

N e w

Y o r k

Raymour & Flanigan says yes to education

Volume 27, No. 12 - March 22, 2013 NEWS Editor-in-Chief........................Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com Assistant Editor..............Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com Staff Writers........................... Kevin Tampone (Online Editor) ktampone@cnybj.com ....................................................Norm Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com .........................................................Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com Contributing Writers................Traci DeLore Maya Gao Qian Columnists....................................Tom Morgan Production Manager.......................Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com Research Manager.................. Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com SALES Sr. Account Managers....................................... Bernard B. Bregman bbregman@cnybj.com Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Account Manager..............Deborah Bowyer dbowyer@cnybj.com

O

  n March 5, at a New York City   gala, Raymour & Flanigan   announced a pledge of $500,000 to the Say Yes to Education Endowment Fund. The gift will be matched by SRC, Inc., which committed $5 million to the program in 2011. The Raymour & Flanigan pledge is the largest received since the match was announced. Say Yes to Education, Inc. is a national, nonprofit education foundation committed to increasing high-school and college graduation rates for the nation’s from the urban youth. The propublisher gram provides comprehensive support, including the promise of free college tuition. Locally, the Say Yes to Education scholarships provide last-dollar funding for any student graduating from the Syracuse City School District. Students can attend any SUNY or CUNY institution or choose from more than 25 private colleges and

norman poltenson

universities. The owners of Raymour & Flanigan — Neil, Steve, and Mike Goldberg — are smart businesspeople who grew a $6 million operation into a $1 billion enterprise, making the company the largest retail, furniture dealer in the Northeast and the seventh largest in the country. I asked Neil why the family chose to support Say Yes with such a substantial gift. “The Goldbergs grew up in Syracuse. My father and uncle went to Central Tech, and my brother and I graduated from Nottingham High School. The Goldberg family has done business for over 60 years in this community … It’s our hometown; we wanted to give back … The city [of Syracuse] has challenges and [the kids] need role models. They need opportunities … Say Yes is a new way to help the inner cities become vibrant.” In addition to the financial commitment, Raymour and Flanigan “… has set up paid, summer internships for five or six city residents. At our campus in Liverpool, the students can work in marketing, finance, merchandising, distribution, the call center, and the service group … I’m excited that this will lead to careers at Raymour & Flanigan,” says Neil Goldberg.

I asked Neil why the company made the pledge now. “We’ve been monitoring Say Yes for months … I met with the founder, George Weiss … We’re encouraged by the broad collaboration among the city, county, Syracuse University, the school board, the head of the teachers’ union, and private business … We’ve gained confidence in the program watching the first students graduate from college. I’m confident of the program’s results.” Neil Goldberg has also stepped up to the plate to co-chair the fundraising effort to reach the $20 million goal set by the foundation. He serves with Allen Naples, the regional president of M&T Bank. Goldberg has also joined the national board of Say Yes. “We need to provide opportunities for our urban youth,” says Goldberg. “Our failure to help is not only a loss to the individual but also to the community.” The Goldbergs hope that other area businesses will join them and support Say Yes, not just for philanthropic reasons but because it makes good business sense. q Norman Poltenson is publisher of The Central New York Business Journal. Contact him at npoltenson@cnybj.com

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The TSA uses no logic in its security measures

CIRCULATION Circulation Management....(315) 579-3927 Administrative Publisher..........................Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com Chief Operating Officer......Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com Business Manager..................... Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

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S

  o now you are allowed to carry   a knife on board an airplane.   Yes, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) announced that if your knife’s blade is no longer than 2.36 inches, you will be allowed through security and onto the plane. You must leave your 10-ounce tube of toothpaste behind. And your 6-ounce bottle of shampoo. And your bottle of water. Because you might be a terrorist, and terrorists can bring down planes with toothpaste. Or with whatever they put in the tube. There is apparently morgan no Logic Office at the TSA. Clearly, a terat large rorist can do a lot of damage with a blade 2.36 inches long. As much damage as the 9/11 terrorists did with the much shorter blades of box cutters. If the TSA fears terrorists, allowing them such blades makes no sense. Nor do the bans on stuff like toothpaste and shampoo. The TSA worries that a terrorist might carry an explosive in the

tom morgan

containers. But if those containers hold less than 3.4 ounces, no problem. Duh, what if a terrorist carries one 3-ounce tube? And his brother carries one? And his cousin carries one? And his uncle carries one? It has to be pretty easy for these killers to sit near each other and mix them together to create enough explosive to blow the tail off a 747. Or to blow open the door to the cockpit. Or to create enough liquid to fill spray bottles with acid to blind crew members. Or whatever deadly mayhem they can devise. Until now, the TSA confiscated all knives. Along with anything that could become a sharp weapon. Meanwhile, the airlines served up wine in small bottles. Bottles that could easily be turned into lethal cutting weapons. They served water in first class in heavy, thick glassware. Terrorists could be trained to crack such glassware into razor-sharp chunks. They could clamp the chunks into devices they could wield. And, they would be easily as dangerous as say, 2.36-inch knife blades. Imagine if you gave a few cases of beer to a bunch of geeks at your local college. You asked them to come up with ways to bring down a large airplane. I bet they would

produce 50 ways before they got through half the beer. Remember the air marshal the TSA used to place on planes? He was supposed to be aboard secretly. To thwart any would-be terrorist. It seemed not-too-smart to me that the TSA made him wear a suit and tie. On weekend flights to Fort Lauderdale in August, he did stand out. Especially, when he was ushered on board before everyone else. “Mr. Smith, please report to the counter.” He showed no ticket, no ID. He simply walked by all the agents and onto the plane. And he carried no bag. He did carry a bulge on his ribs. And he sat in the first row. He should have just worn a sign on his forehead. “Yes. I am an air marshal.” Maybe I am too tough on the TSA. Maybe he was a decoy. The real air marshal was the old lady with the walker. Armed with a knife with a 2.4-inch blade and a family-sized tube of Crest.  From Tom ... as in Morgan. q Tom Morgan writes about political, financial, and other subjects from his home near Oneonta, in addition to his radio shows and TV show. For more information about him, visit his website at www.tomasinmorgan. com


14 • The Central New York Business Journal

march 26 n Women TIES Syracuse Luncheon: “Using Traditional Public Relations to Gain Exceptional Corporate Exposure” from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Maplewood Inn, 7th North St., Liverpool. The speaker is Allison DiMatteo, founder of Crème della Crème Copywriting & Communication. The cost is $29. Visit www.womenties.com for details.

march 27 n 2013 Nonprofit Awards from 11 a.m to 2 p.m. at the Oncenter in Syracuse. Nonprofit leaders will be honored in five categories: Executive of the Year, Board Leadership, Board Development, Impact Award, and Career Achievement. For more information about the event, visit www.bizeventz.com or contact Joyl Clance at (315) 579-3917, or email: jclance@bizeventz.com n Lunch and Learn Seminar: “Weathering the Legal Storms in Small Business” Essential Law for the Small Business Owner at noon at the Owego Treadway Inn and Conference Center, presented by attorney Jo A. Fabrizio. The cost of the event is $15 for Tioga County Chamber of Commerce members, $20 for non-chamber members. Lunch is included. Reservations for this event are required; contact the Tioga County Chamber at (607) 687-2020 email: info@tiogachamber.com

march 28 n State of the City and County Luncheon from noon to 2 p.m. at the Holiday Inn, 75 North St., Auburn. The luncheon is presented by the Cayuga County Chamber of Commerce and sponsored by Tompkins Trust Company. The cost is $35 per person. RSVP required by calling (315) 252-7291 or email: admin@cayugacountychamber.com

APRIL 2 n Certification Workshops for Women Entrepreneurs and Minorities from 6- 8:30 p.m. at the Herkimer County Chamber of Commerce in Herkimer. The event will feature Deborah J. Cabral, president and owner of Cabrel Enterprises, LLC, and provide light refreshments, program materials, and networking opportunities for a cost of $12 per person. Reservations and payment for the event need to be made in advance one week prior at www.womenties.com. For more information, contact Tracy Higginbotham at Women TIES at (315) 708-4288 or Donna Rebisz of the Women’s Business Center at (877) 844-9848.

APRIL 4 n CCMR Facilities 101 workshop from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Cornell University, Clark Hall of Science, Ithaca. Learn how to take advantage of the worldclass resources at your local university. The cost is $55 (includes lunch, parking, and reference materials). For more information, visit http://www.ccmr. cornell.edu/industry/facilities101 n Search Engine Optimization Presentation from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at CenterState CEO headquarters, 572 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Presented by Site-Seeker, Inc., this session will explore what is important to the search engines and the implications of the convergence of search and social media. For details and registration information, visit www. CenterStateCEO.com/events

APRIL 5 n CNY ASTD Breakfast Club from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at The Gem Diner, 832 Spencer St., Syracuse. The topic will be “Delivering Training.” For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@cnyastd.org

APRIL 8 n CenterState CEO Annual Meeting — re: invention — Embracing Continuous Renewal from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Nicholas J. Pirro

March 22, 2013

Business Calendar

OF EVENTS

Convention Center at the Oncenter in Syracuse. Xerox Corporation U.S. President Kevin Warren will provide the keynote presentation. The cost for CenterState CEO members to attend is $65 per person; for nonmembers, it’s $80 per person. Contact Lisa Metot at (315) 470-1870 or email: lmetot@centerstateceo.com for additional information.

APRIL 10 n Wisdom Keeper Award event from 5 to 8 p.m. in the ballroom at the Nicholas J. Pirro Convention Center at the Oncenter in Syracuse. The award will be presented to Cornelius (Neil) Murphy, president of ESF. The cost to attend is $100-$150 per person. For details and reservation information, call F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse at (315) 448-8732 or visit http://www.focussyracuse.org/2012/11/2013wisdom-keeper

APRIL 10 & 17 n Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprise (MWBE) Certification and Benefits course for two days from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Tioga County Administrative Building, Lower Level, Classroom 2, 56 Main St., Owego. Learn how certification of businesses increases opportunities to participate in state contracts and allows businesses inclusion in the MWBE directory. The fee for the course is $10. To register, contact Broome Community College at (607) 778-5012; Course Code EX163-02.

APRIL 11 n Building Teams from the Inside Out from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Syracuse near Carrier Circle. The presenter will be Maryann Roefaro, CEO of Hematology/Oncology Associates of CNY. The cost is $40 for members, $50 for nonmembers, and $20 for student/transitional members. For details and registration information, visit www.cnyshrm.org

APRIL 12 n Competency Model — the training and development profession defined, from noon to 1 p.m. CNY ASTD will discuss the competencies that identify the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that training and development practitioners need to be successful. The cost is $10 for ASTD members; $20 for nonmembers. To register, visit www.cnyastd. org. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@ cnyastd.org

APRIL 16 n Social Media & Internet Tools Group Meeting from 9 to 10 a.m. at SUNY Center for Professional Development, 6333 Route 298, Suite 102, DeWitt. For details, call (315) 546-2783 or email: info@ cnyastd.org n Business After Hours at the WISE Symposium from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The cost is $10 for CenterState CEO members and $20 for nonmembers. Contact Lisa Metot for additional information at (315) 4701870 or email: lmetot@centerstateceo.com

APRIL 18 n Fraud Advisory Panel Discussion & Networking Event from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Syracuse Hotel, 701 E. Genesee St.,

Syracuse. For more information, contact: Sharon Graber, Upstate NY Chapter Administrator, at (716) 440-6615 or email: smgraber@msn.com

APRIL 24 n Small Business Show – SOHO from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Nicholas Pirro Convention Center at Oncenter, Syracuse. Visit www.sohosyracuse.com for details and exhibiting registration or call (315) 622-2249 for sponsorship information.

APRIL 25 n Retirement Plan Administration & Compliance seminar from 8 to 10 a.m. at CenterState CEO headquarters, 572 S. Salina St., Syracuse. Mary Rosen of the U.S. Department of Labor will discuss fiduciary duties and requirements. AXA Advisors, LLC will review plan-design options for implementing a 401(k) and profit-sharing plan. For details and registration information, visit www.CenterStateCEO.com/events

MAY 1 & 8 n Business Continuity Planning (BCP) course from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Tioga County Administrative Building, Lower Level, Classroom 2, 56 Main St., Owego. The course will be held on two Wednesdays, May 1 and 8. The instructor will be Peggy Welch. The cost is $49. To register, contact Broome Community College at (607) 778-5012 or visit www.sunybroome.edu/ce; Course Code: BN307-02.

MAY 29 n 2013 CCMR Symposium: Oxides: Saving the World at 4 K! The symposium will focus on the structure, properties and engineering of complex electronic materials. These materials have a wide range of potential applications, from information storage, display and communication to the development of energy efficient solutions and green products. For more information and registration, visit the website http://www.ccmr.cornell.edu/ symposium/

ONGOING EVENTS n Every Tuesday, Cayuga Club Toastmasters from 6 to 7 p.m. at Cornell University, Ithaca, Rhodes Hall, 6th Floor, Conference Room #655. Free and easy parking is available nearby at Peterson Lot. For more information, contact Julia Reich, (315) 364-7190 or email: juliareichdesign@gmail.com n Every Tuesday, Gung Ho Networking Group from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday Restaurant, 3220 Erie Blvd E., DeWitt. Possible referrals for you; this is not a tip club. First visit free. Contact Paul Ellis at (315) 677-0015 or visit www.GungHoReferrals. com n Every Tuesday, Syracuse Business Connections from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Hummel’s Office Plus, 6731 Old Collamer Road, DeWitt. The group meets to network and exchange referrals. For more information, email Deb Angarano at dangarano@tsys.com n Every Wednesday, Small Business Development Center at OCC from 4 to 6 p.m., Introduction to Business Startup at H-1 Hall. Please call 498-6070 or visit www.onondagasbdc.org

n Every Wednesday, Syracuse Business Networking from 6 to 7 p.m. at Barbieri’s Restaurant (upstairs level) located on Main Street in the village of North Syracuse. For more information, call Kim Bachstein at (315) 414-8223 or email: info@SyracuseBusinessNetworking.com n First Wednesday of each month, Business Innovation Days meetings from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse. Entrepreneurs and small businesses can meet one-on-one with a counselor from the SBDC for advice and customized assistance opportunities. Scheduled by appointment, call (315) 474-0910 or email: info@thecleantechcenter.com n First and Third Wednesday of each month Preferred Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at Golden Artist Colors, 188 Bell Road, New Berlin. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Fourth Wednesday of each month Preferred Toastmasters from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Chenango County Council of the Arts, 27 W. Main St., Norwich. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217. n Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://1427.toastmastersclubs.org or email: contact-1427@toastmastersclubs.org n Every Thursday, Liverpool Linguists from 7 to 8 p.m. First Thursday of every month at Liverpool Public Library and the remaining Thursdays at Liverpool First Methodist Church, 604 Oswego Road, Liverpool. For details, visit http://Liverpool.toastmastersclubs.org or call (315) 884-2668 or 457-2581. n Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at C&S Companies, 499 Col. Eileen Collins Blvd., near Hancock Airport. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802. n Every Friday, 40 Above: Workers in Transition from 9 to 11 a.m. at the library in North Syracuse (NOPL) at 100 Trolleybarn Lane, North Syracuse. Helping workers/job seekers aged 40 and above in search for work. Contact John A. Cruty at (315) 5693964, or at crutij@yahoo.com n Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 472-3104, ext. 103 or email: bbregman@ cnybj.com n First Friday of each month, Toolkit Day with SCORE by appointment at The Tech Garden. Counselors provide free, confidential, individual business mentoring to prospective or current business owners. For more information or to schedule an appointment, contact Lynn Hughes at (315) 579-2862 or email Lynn@TheTechGarden.com n Every second and fourth Friday of each month, The SUN Group (Sustainable Upstate Network) meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Tony’s Family Restaurant, 3004 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. For more information, contact Andy Picco at (315) 657-0135 or email: andrewpicco@gmail.com n Every week, Syracuse Networking Professionals. Five meetings to choose from. For details, call Kevin M. Crook at (315) 4391803, or email KevinSNP@twcny.rr.com or visit SyracuseNetworkingProfessionals.com n CNY Connects is a networking organization offering 12 groups from which to choose. If you are interested in learning more, contact Amy Kaschel of AK Consulting at akconsult@twcny.rr.com or call (315) 882-6127 or visit www.cnyconnectsonline.com To have your meetings or events in the Business Calendar, email them to movers@cnybj.com 


The Central New York Business Journal • 15

March 22, 2013

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: new hires & promotions advertising agencies Pinckney Hugo Group has promoted Susan Muench to senior media buyer and planner and Katie Duerr to digital media manager. Muench has worked for the firm for four years. Prior to joining Muench Pinckney Hugo Group, she worked at L. & J.G. Stickley, as well as at another Central New York advertising agency. She has a bachelor’s degree in communication from SUNY Oswego. Duerr has worked for Pinckney Hugo for two Duerr years. Prior to joining the agency, she gained experience at another Central New York advertising agency, the Associated Press, and the Department of Communication at Cornell University. She has a bachelor’s degree in communication with a minor in marketing and a concentration in media studies from Cornell.

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT ADMAR Supply recently hired Greg Downing as director of branch operations. This includes seven branch locations in New York and Pennsylvania. He has more than 20 years experience in telecomDowning munications, construction, and manufacturing, most recently as the U.S. product manager for Algeco Scotsman, a global constructionservices company. Downing received his bachelor’s degree in sociology and psychology from St. John Fisher College.

CREDIT UNIONS GHS Federal Credit Union has introduced a new venture, GHS Investment Services. Financial advisor Edward Abdallah will lead the division. He brings nearly 30 years experience to GHS Abdallah Investment Services. He holds his Series 7 and 63 securities licenses and life, accident, health, and variable annuity insurance licenses. Abdallah graduated from Broome Community College and SUNY Brockport. His office is located in the main GHS Federal Credit Union in Binghamton, and he will be available to meet with members at all three GHS branches.

EDUCATION & TRAINING Le Moyne College has named Dr. Dennis DePerro as the inaugural dean of graduate and professional studies. He will lead a newly created school at Le Moyne — the

School of Graduate and Professional Studies — and will oversee graduate and undergraduate programs in education, nursing, and physician assistant studies, as well as the Center for Continuing Education. DePerro Among the skills DePerro brings to the position are expertise in admission strategies, program development, and marketing, Le Moyne says. He has been with the college since 1995, working first as dean of enrollment management before being appointed vice president in 2001; DePerro has also taught as an adjunct professor in Le Moyne’s MBA, education, and educational leadership programs. Before coming to Le Moyne, DePerro served as dean of admission and financial aid at Marietta College. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Canisius College and a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania in highereducation management.

ENGINEERING Bergmann Associates has announced that Sharon Nadge has joined the company as an administrative assistant in its Syracuse office. She previously worked for Francis Cauffman Architects in Syracuse.

Nadge

FINANCIAL SERVICES M. Griffith Investment Services has promoted Michael McCabe to the position of database manager. He has been with the firm more than 12 years and is responsible for the firm’s internal databases and client reporting.

Rick Fernandes has joined The Fortus Group as a project coordinator. Prior to joining Fortus, he worked as a sales/ customer-service representative at CNY Awards and Apparel in the New Harford Shopping Center. Fernandes is a graduate of SUNY Oswego. Tracey Ross has joined the team as a service-excellence coordinator. Prior to joining The Fortus Group, she worked for Omnicare as an administrative assistant.

Fernandes

Testani

Thall

Ross

Walworth

Forbes

HOSPITALITY Oneida Nation Enterprises has named Melissa Olsen director of sales at Turning Stone Resort Casino. She brings extensive experience in the hospitality industry, most recently as director of sales and Olsen marketing at the W San Diego. Prior to that, she was director of sales for Starwood Hotels and Resorts’ group of four properties in San Diego, Calif. Olsen previously served as director of sales and marketing for the Hard Rock Hotel San Diego, and held various salesleadership positions at other Starwood Hotel and Resort properties on the West Coast. She is a graduate of SUNY Geneseo.

INSURANCE

McCabe

HEALTH CARE Leor Roubein, M.D., has joined Bassett Medical Center as chief of gastroenterology in the Division of Digestive Diseases. He has practiced as a gastroenterologist for nearly 30 years, primarily workRoubein ing in Texas, Louisiana, and Kentucky, and from 1985 to 1995 worked at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Since 2004, Roubein has been in private practice in Tulsa, Okla. He also was associate professor at the University of Kentucky. Roubein earned his undergraduate degree at Rutgers University and his medical degree at Louisiana State University School of Medicine. He completed an internal medicine residency at University of Texas Affiliated Hospitals and a fellowship in gastroenterology at Baylor College of Medicine.

Eric Ulatowski has joined CH Insurance as an account executive. He will be managing the group benefits division, new business, and client education on healthcare reform initiatives. Ulatowski comes from Ulatowski Emblem Health, where he was a marketing representative for upstate New York. He is a graduate of SUNY Oswego. Preferred Mutual Insurance Company has recently named several employees as managers. Michael DeGironimo was named auto-property damage claims manager. He has been with DeGironimo the company since 2002. Timothy Kamp was named applications manager. He has been with the company since 2012. Anthony Testani was named manager of quality assurance and agency interface. He has been Kamp with the company since 2001. Daniel Thall was named no-fault claims manager. He has been with Preferred Mutual since 2006.

Brent Walworth was named applications manager. He has been with the company since 2011. William Forbes was recently promoted to business analyst in the strategic business solutions department at Preferred Mutual. He has been with the company since 2006. Prior to joining Preferred Mutual, he worked for BristolMyers Squibb. Forbes holds a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Buffalo. Roger A. Coyle has joined the Utica National Insurance Group of New Hartford as director of premium audit. He 36 years of experience, having worked in premium audit at the carrier Coyle level and as a consultant. Coyle was most recently with Global Indemnity Group, Inc., of Bala Cynwyd, Pa., where he was director of premium audit, loss control & statistical reporting. Coyle previously served as assistant vice president of premium audit for Zurich Financial Services of Baltimore, Md. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Shippensburg University in Shippensburg, Pa., and studied strategic management at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Business in Evanston, Ill.

RIGGING SYSTEMS Philip Lunas has joined the staff of J. R. Clancy, Inc., as the company’s financial manager. He will serve on the Clancy leadership team. Lunas brings 15 years of progressive finance experience to his new position, stemLunas ming from his years as senior financial analyst at Pall Corp. in Cortland. He holds an MBA from Syracuse University.

TECHNOLOGY TERACAI has promoted Terry Duffy to regional sales manager. He has been with TERACAI since 2009, previously serving as strategic account executive. Prior to this, he served as account manager and account executive at CXtec, a sister company of TERACAI. q


16 • The Central New York Business Journal

March 22, 2013

COMMERCIAL PRINTING COMPANIES

THE LIST

. . 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. . . 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. . 23. . 25. .

Platemaking

Color Separation

Bindery

Addressing

Y

Y

-

-

-

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

125

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

120

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

108

-

Y

-

Y

-

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

80

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Elec. Pagination

Typesetting

145

Research by Nicole Collins ncollins@cnybj.com (315) 579-3911

Diecutting

5.

Graphic Design

4.

Jet Envelope

3.

Business Form

2.

Vanguard Printing LLC 17 Hall Woods Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 330-7148/vanguardprintingllc.com Cathedral Corporation 632 Ellsworth Road Rome, NY 13441 (315) 338-0021/cathedralcorporation.com Dupli 1 Dupli Park Drive Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 472-1316/duplionline.com Scotsman Press, Inc. 750 W. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13204 (315) 472-7825/scotsmanonline.com Syracuse Label & Surround Printing 110 Luther Ave. Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 422-1037/syrlsp.com The Mid-York Press, Inc. 2808 State Highway 80 Sherburne, NY 13460 (607) 674-4491/midyorkpress.com Vicks Corp. 5166 Commercial Drive Yorkville, NY 13495 (315) 736-9344/http://vicks.biz/ Avalon Document Services, Inc. 901 N. State St. Syracuse, NY 13208 (315) 471-3333/teamavalon.com Brodock Press, Inc. 502 Court St. Utica, NY 13502 (315) 735-9577/brodock.com Midstate Printing Corp. 230 Ainsley Drive Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 475-4101/midstateprinting.com Dataflow, Inc 221 Washington St. Binghmaton, NY 13901 (607) 772-2001/goDataflow.com Eagle Newspapers 2501 James St. Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 434-8889/eaglenewsonline.com Syracuse Blue Print Co., Inc. 825 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 476-4084/syracuseblueprint.com KinaneCo & FLP Group 2925 Milton Ave. Syracuse, NY 13209 (315) 468-6201/kinaneco.com Courier Printing Corp. 24 Laurel Bank Ave. Deposit, NY 13754 (607) 467-2191/courierprinting.homestead.com/ home.html Seaboard Graphics 7570 Oswego Road Liverpool, NY 13090 (315) 652-4200/seaboardgraphics.com Eastwood Litho, Inc. 4020 New Court Ave. Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 437-2626/eastwoodlitho.com Dellas Graphics, Inc. a Member of the Canfield & Tack Family 835 Canal St. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 474-4641/dellasgraphics.com Quartier Printing Co., Inc. 5795 Bridge St. East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 449-0900/quartierprinting.com Carr Printing 3400 East Main St. Endwell, NY 13760 (607) 748-0481/carrprinting.net Cooley Group, Inc. 6700 Kirkville Road East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 432-1029/cooleygroupusa.com Ansun Graphics, Inc. 6392 Deere Road Syracuse, NY 13206 (315) 437-6869/ansun.biz The Jacobs Press Inc. 87 Columbus St. Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 252-4861/jacobspress.com Steffen Print and Design 9584 Main St. Holland Patent, NY 13354 (315) 865-4100/steffenprintanddesign.com G.W. Canfield & Son 600 Plant St. Utica, NY 13502 (315) 735-5522/gwcanfield.com Rapid Reproduction, LLC 4511 State Highway 12 Oxford, NY 13830 (607) 843-2221/rapidone.com

No. of CNY Employees

Letterpress

1.

Name Address Phone/Website

Sheet-fed/Offset

Rank

Heat-set Web

Ranked by No. of CNY Employees

Key Management

Year Estab.

-

Y

Steve Smith, CFO

2006

N

Y

1916

Y

Y

-

Y

-

Y

Marianne W. Gaige, President & CEO Aart Knyff, VP and Lincoln Plant General Manager James Kopp, VP Sales for Nonprofit Solutions David Cavitt, Rome Plant General Manager J. Kemper Matt, Chairman J. Kemper Matt, Jr., President Peter Hujar, CFO Robert Shaffery, VP of Sales William G. Veit, President Thomas C. Cuskey, Publisher Linda L. Brown, Sales Manager John J. Badoud, III, Controller Kathleen Alaimo, President Paul Roux, VP Development

N

Y

N

Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations.

1965

Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

1954

Upcoming Lists: April 5

1967

April 12 April 19

80

80

-

Y

Y

Y

-

N

Y

N

-

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Robert W. Tenney, CEO Patrick W. Dowdall, CFO Shawn M. Aikins, VP Operations John M. Zieno, VP SM Dwight Vicks, III, President

Largest Employers HCP Physical Therapy Providers

1946

Architects/Landscape Architects Janitorial Companies GB Largest Employers

April 26

Museums

1918

For information on how to get on a list, contact Nicole Collins at ncollins@cnybj.com 70

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

John P. Midgley, CEO Shawn J. Thrall, President

2000

60

-

Y

-

-

-

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

1959

46

-

Y

-

-

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Craig S. Brodock, CEO Robert J. Hausle, CFO James Clarey, VP Operations Barbara F. Brodock, VP General Manager John Williams, III, President Robert Williams, Vice President

45

-

Y

-

Y

-

Y

Y

-

-

Y

-

-

Y

Dan H. Zimmerman, CEO

1958

35

-

-

-

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

David Tyler, Publisher Lisa Congdon, Business Manager

1992

30

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Carl Nye, President Andy Nye, VP

1909

30

-

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Gregory Kinane, CEO

1975

30

-

Y

-

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Hilton Evans, President Brenda Degraw, VP SM Maria Bachrach, Production Manager

1848

27

-

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Laurence Kuhn, President Melinda Kuhn, CFO

1986

25

-

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

1946

24

N

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Mark J. Mohr, CEO Patrick H. Mohr, CFO Andrew F. Mohr, VP Operations Michael J. Clary, VP SM Thomas J. Dellas, CNY Regional Director of Business Development and Acquisitions

23

-

Y

-

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Thomas Quartier, President

1962

1938

1979

19

-

Y

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

-

Holly Reyan, General Manager Mark Bliznik, Sales/Marketing

1969

12

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Stuart Boyar, President James Bonaventura, VP Ops. Syracuse

1945

12

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Jeffrey Schoenfeld, President & CEO Todd W. Thomas, VP & CFO James Mahon, Sales Manager

1995

11

N

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Michael K. Trapani, CEO Laura Call Posecznick, Director of Business Development

1915

11

N

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Sally M. Steffen, Owner Preston P. Steffen, VP

1949

6

N

Y

N

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

-

-

Y

Mark W. Canfield, President Anne Kuhn, VP Operations

1909

6

N

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

-

Bryant La Tourette, Senior Member

1977

The new Book of Lists is now available online! n Download the 60-plus lists in Excel format files immediately to your desktop. n The electronic version contains 1,808 more contacts than the print edition, for a total of 3,385 unique contacts.

To purchase the digital 2013 Book of Lists, go to cnybj.com/Research.aspx


presents

March 27, 2013 • Oncenter • 11 AM - 2 PM Presented By:

Media Partners:

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2B • The Central New York Business Journal

NONPROFIT AWARDS

JUDGES NICOLE COLLINS

Nicole Collins is a native of Adams. She holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of South Carolina and a master’s degree in magazine, newspaper, and online journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. She more than four years experience in conducting statistical research for Rodale Press in Allentown, Pa., where she acted as the senior research editor of Men’s Health magazine. Collins moved back to the Central New York area in July 2011 when she accepted the research manager position at The Central New York Business Journal. In her role there, she compiles data for the weekly Top Ranks list and the Book of Lists, as well as reports and writes the monthly Nonprofit Corner column. Nicole and her cat, Clover, currently reside in Jamesville.

KELLY GAGGIN

Kelly Gaggin has more than a decade of experience working in marketing and communications and is currently director of marketing and communications for United Way of Central New York. In this position she steers all marketing and communications efforts of United Way, working closely with staff in United Way’s Development, Community Impact and Volunteer Resources departments, as well as the local media to communicate United Way’s message and promote the organization’s work in the community. She also currently serves on the board of directors of the Syracuse Model Neighborhood Corporation as well as the Public Relations Society of America – Central New York Chapter where she is co-chair of programs. Additionally, she is an active member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, and a member of the ZONTA Club of Syracuse. Gaggin is a graduate of Fayetteville-Manlius High School and Le Moyne College, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration, with a concentration in marketing and a minor in economics. She resides in Fayetteville.

DANIELLE HURLEY

Danielle Hurley is a program officer at the Central New York Community Foundation in Syracuse. She works within a team that manages and implements the Community Foundation’s community grantmaking program, special initiatives, and affiliate funds. Hurley is a native of Corning, N.Y. and received her degree from Keuka College. Prior to joining the Community Foundation in 2007, she was the program director at the Irish American Heritage Museum and events coordinator at the New York Newspaper Publishers Association, both in Albany. Hurley is also a 2009 Leadership Greater Syracuse graduate.

DAVID KILPATRICK

David Kilpatrick is the grants manager at the Central New York Community Foundation where he has worked for three years. In addition to the rest of the Grants & Community Initiatives team, he helps manage the foundation’s grantmaking activities. Kilpatrick is a native of Central New York and holds a degree from Colgate University. He was a scholarship recipient of the Wegman’s Scholarship Program. Prior to joining the Community Foundation, Kilpatrick served as an intern for the chambers of U.S. Magistrate Judge George H. Lowe.

March 27, 2013

BOARD LEADERSHIP HONOREES STEPHANIE CROCKETT  Nonprofit: 40 Below  Years affiliated with the organization: Five  Description of the nonprofit: 40 Below provides opportunities for young professionals and community members with a passion for local revitalization and a dedication to promoting Crockett all that Central Upstate New York has to offer.  Number of board members: 18  As a board member, describe a significant undertaking that you have led and its outcome: 40 Below developed and launched Syracuse Coworks in late 2012, the region’s first and only coworking space dedicated to supporting start-up businesses run by young professionals. The idea for Syracuse Coworks came out of a strategic planning process the board underwent in 2011, and we successfully partnered with Harris Beach and the Syracuse Technology Garden to open this space in October. It has been extremely well-received and we are well above goal for occupancy.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? 40 Below will continue to act as a vehicle for members to pursue passions and instill a sense of pride in the community through civic engagement and public arts. We will continue our monthly networking and speaking events, as well as our annual New Year’s Eve Party, adding new events that meet the needs of our membership. 40 Below explores opportunities to partner with other great organizations and initiatives around CNY that support our mission of promoting the region as a vibrant place to live, work, learn, and play.

JOANNA GRECO  Nonprofit: The Arc, Oneida-Lewis Chapter  Years affiliated with the organization: 17 years  Description of the nonprofit: The Arc, Oneida-Lewis Chapter is a not-for-profit agency that provides serGreco vices and supports for more than 2,000 men, women, and children with developmental disabilities. It has been a part of the community for nearly 60 years enabling people to live richer fuller lives through employment, day hab, residential and community/family services.  Number of board members: 12  As a board member, describe a significant undertaking that you have led and its outcome: I have been an active board member leading the way as the agency went through

a massive change when the prior executive director retired and they had to do an executive search for the next head of The Arc. After becoming president, I created a board development committee, which has been working on various tools that will enable The Arc to find the best candidates as potential board members. They also are working on training procedures, now have a board website that provides all board members with the most up-to-date information, and are planning a board retreat for current board members. I have also worked with staff on a Sibling Support Group “Sharing and Caring With Friends” that started in March 2012, which has been a long-time goal.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? The Arc, Oneida-Lewis Chapter continues to maintain a strong connection in the community, while providing much-needed services for the most vulnerable people. As technology, society, and the economy all begin to change, so too does The Arc … bending and molding itself to fit the needs of the 2,000 people with developmental disabilities and their families, while never losing site of the mission and core values of compassion, dignity, dedication, integrity, progressive, and person-centered, family-based services and care.

DIANA PEREZ  Nonprofit: Nosotros Radio, Inc.  Years affiliated with the organization: 11  Description of the nonprofit: Nosotros Radio, Inc. is a bilingual radio program whose mission is to provide quality on-air educaPerez tion and music for the encouragement and strengthening of the Latino community, and the promotion of intercultural sharing among communities.  Number of board members: Eight  As a board member, describe a significant undertaking that you have led and its outcome: In 2011, in response to a need to improve the organization’s capacity, Nosotros Radio, Inc. underwent a process to create a strategic plan for the organization. Together with the board president, I wrote a grant to fund a consultant, helped craft the strategic plan, and am currently helping to implement action steps. This process has improved the organization’s fundraising efforts, grown its board, and enhanced the quality of its programming.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Our plans are to grow the program from its current 7.5 hours a week, to an around-the-clock program that can be heard via traditional radio and the Internet. We hope to reach a larger and larger audience of Latinos who seek access to important information and non-Latinos who seek to know more about the Latino community.

THANK YOU

to Michael Benny and CNY Central for your participation and Support of the Nonprofit Awards.

Is Proud to Cong�at�late Susan Crossett and Jim Jerose

on being recognized for their extraordinary volunteer support of the Syracuse community.


nonprofit awards

March 27, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 3B

career achievement honorees n Nonprofit: American Heart Association (AHA), among others n Years affiliated with the organization: AHA – three; others, decades n Description of the nonprofit: The American Heart Association is a naJerose tional volunteer agency dedicated to building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular disease and stroke. We strive to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans. n Number of board members: 15 at present n How did you end up in the nonprofit sector? I began my working career in the nonprofit health care and the health insurance profession and I became a life-long volunteer with several NFP health and human service organizations for which I have served in various roles. n What roles have you had in nonprofits over the years? I have held president and other officer positions, board service, and I have specialized in board development and governance including nominating committees, fundraising, advisory, membership recruitment, and other aspects of volunteer service. n Looking back, if you had to describe your career in three words, what words would you choose? Service, persistence, collegiality

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DEBORAH (DEBBIE) E. MOORE n Nonprofit: Make-AWish Foundation of Central New York n Years affiliated with the organization: Since 1995 n Description of the nonprofit: Since 1985, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central Moore New York has granted the wishes of more than 1,200 Central New York children with lifethreatening medical conditions. n Number of board members: 21 n How did you end up in the nonprofit sector? A friend introduced me to Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central New York in 1995 and I was elected to the board of directors. n What roles have you had in nonprofits over the years? Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central New York – board of trustees, 1995-2001, chair, 1998-2000; ex-officio member executive committee, 2000-present; wish granter MakeA-Wish of America – board of directors, 20012004; leadership council, 2007-2009 Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Central New York Affiliate – board of directors, 2006-2012, president, 20092011; grants chair, 2012-present; Advocates in Science, Susan G. Komen for the Cure – 2008present; Francis House – board of directors, 2010-present; vice president, 2011-present; Maxwell Memorial Library – board of trustees, 2012-present; Catholic Lawyers Guild – 2006present; president, 2007-present; Franciscan Collaborative Ministries – board of directors, 2006-2012, president, 2009-2012. n Looking back, if you had to describe your career in three words, what words would you choose? Blessed, amazing, rewarding

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n Nonprofit: F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse n Years affiliated with the organization: Since its inception in 1997‌ although I’ve been involved in nonprofits since I can remember. n Description of the Holstein nonprofit: 1) Promotes intelligent, inclusive, sustainable decision-making by citizens through education and outreach. 2) Encourages, facilitates, and nourishes citizen engagement. 3) Enhances the quality of our lives and economic future by enabling citizens, organizations, and government to work together. n Number of board members: 14 n How did you end up in the nonprofit sector? There was an expectation from both my immigrant parents and my in-laws of giving back to our community and leaving it better for future generations. n What roles have you had in nonprofits over the years? n Founder or founding partner: F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse, Leadership Greater Syracuse, Youth Leadership Greater Syracuse, Syracuse Commission for Women, Meals on Wheels, City/ Count Office of the Aging, Citizens Academy, All University Gerontology Center (Syracuse University). n International leadership roles: Honorary vice president of The American Jewish Committee; Leader of delegation to meet government offices and presidents of Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and Brazil; Leader of delegation to United Nation’s NGO World Conference on Women, Beijing, China; Co-leader of delegation to UN NGO World Conference of Women, Nairobi, Kenya; Co-leader for Women’s Interreligious Mission in Egypt, Syria, Jordan and Israel; Selected delegate to meet with Pope Paul II at the Vatican; Co-leader of Interfaith Group to meet officials at the Vatican, Israel, and Qualikilia in the Palestinian Territories; Member of Jacob Blaustein Institute for the Advancement of Human Rights; n National and state leadership roles: Trustee, NYS Lawyers Fund for Client Protection; chair AJC National Committee on the Role of Women; chair, AJC, National Jewish Communal Affairs Commission; chair AJC, National Commission on Social Welfare; served President Jimmy Carter on the White House Conferences on Families; served Gov. Nelson Rockefeller as vice chair of the NYS Board of Social Welfare; served as community member of the Ethics Committee for the American Association for Homes and Services for the Aging n Syracuse/Onondaga County: Chair of Loretto; member of the district board of KeyBank; trustee of Cazenovia College; chair of advisory boards for Syracuse University School of Social Work and College for Human Development; vice chair of Manlius Pebble Hill Board; SUNY College at Brockport Foundation; president of Community Nursery School, Pioneer Homes; chair of Child Day Care Council for United Way; president of Jewish Community Center board of directors; co-chair for educational services for Syracuse Jewish Federation; vice president of the Syracuse section of the National Council of Jewish Women. n Looking back, if you had to describe your career in three words, what words would you choose? Believe in Tomorrow

JAMES N. JEROSE

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CHARLOTTE “CHUCKIE� HOLSTEIN


4B • The Central New York Business Journal

nonprofit awards

March 27, 2013


NONPROFIT AWARDS

March 27, 2013

The Central New York Business Journal • 5B

EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR HONOREES Less than $1 million

$1 million - $5 million

$5+ million - $20 million

PAULETTE PURDY

MARCI ERLEBACHER

BOB ROBERTS

 Nonprofit: Learning Disabilities Association of Central New York (LDACNY)  Years affiliated with this organization: 17  Description of the nonprofit: LDACNY’s mission is to enhance the quality of life for Purdy children and adults with learning disabilities, ADHD, and related disorders by providing advocacy, programs, and educational resources  Number of board members: 13  Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: Individuals with learning disabilities and related disorders are capable individuals who often are able to obtain competitive employment but not able to maintain it long term due to their disability issues. LDACNY works with these individuals to provide support services to maintain their employment. This is a benefit to the employee as well as the employer and our community as a whole. Less employee turnover is a cost savings for everyone.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? This spring, we are launching a coaching program for high school and college students, as well as for adults in the workforce. This program will provide support for individuals who experience challenges at home, school and/ or work. Coaching will provide assistance in organizational, social, and time-management skills, as well as in setting goals and creating a framework to move towards accomplishment of those goals.

 Nonprofit: Jewish Community Center of Syracuse  Years affiliated with this organization: 27  Description of the nonprofit: The Jewish Community Center (JCC) of Syracuse, which is the second oldest Erlebacher JCC in North America, is well known in the community for providing high-quality programs and services to both Jewish and non-Jewish individuals and families in Central New York for 150 years.  Number of board members: 36  Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: A day does not go by where the JCC has not made a difference in the lives of those in our community. Working parents who have young babies and children know that their children are receiving the highest levels of care at our Early Childhood Development Program and After School Program as well as The SPOT Teen Center. In addition, thousands of children experience the joys and friendships summer camps provide. Children with special needs are integrated into the programming as well. The JCC also provides senior citizens a hot, kosher meal and many times this is their only means of socialization, five days a week.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? This year the Jewish Community Center celebrates 150 years of serving the Central New York Community and has done so by realizing the importance of welcoming and adjusting to change. The main goal for the future of the JCC is to meet the changing needs of our community so those that live and work in Central New York can depend on our services and programming for another 150 years.

 Nonprofit: Kids Oneida  Years affiliated with this organization: I have been affiliated with the organization for a total of 10 years, first as a contract provider beginning in 2002 and then as employee beginning in 2007. Roberts  Description of the nonprofit: Kids Oneida is a unique home and community-based organization that provides individualized traditional and non-traditional services to the highest risk youth with social, emotional, and behavioral challenges.  Number of board members: Nine  Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: In response to sky-rocketing, outof-home placement numbers and increased financial strain, Kids Oneida was identified as the lead agency in both Oneida and Herkimer counties tasked with independently assessing all children in institutional care. The goal of this Return Home Early Project was to identify children in placement that would benefit from intensive community-based services as opposed to more restrictive levels of care. In Oneida County after four plus years into its endeavor, Kids Oneida’s Return Home Early project identified and returned home 143 children from placement. The project resulted in the prevention of more than 14,000 days of care for a cost avoidance of approximately $4.4 million. Since its inception, the total number of children placed at the Residential Treatment Center and

PETER WAACK  Nonprofit: The Daily Orange, Corp.  Years affiliated with this organization: 12  Description of the nonprofit: The Daily Orange is the independent daily newspaper written by Syracuse University students. Waack The content focus in on Syracuse University news but also includes city and national news, sports, and entertainment information.  Number of board members: Eight  Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: The Daily Orange employs more than 50 students a year to work on all phases of a newspaper and website. Our training has been instrumental in helping these students get the experience they need to get hired. Over the last four years, our students tend to get jobs much faster than their fellow graduates without similar experience. A current example is Mike Cohen, who was hired as the Post Standard SU football beat reporter while he is still in his senior year. Without his experience and exposure as a sports reporter for The Daily Orange over the past four years, he would not have been considered for this job.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? We plan on continuing to publish our printed edition four or five days a week during the school year. To do this and keep our readership levels growing, we are actively involved in a complete redesign of the paper to make it more visually appealing while also overhauling our content to make it more interesting to our readers, both on and off campus.

BRENDA GREENFIELD  Nonprofit: ESF College Foundation, Inc.  Years affiliated with this organization: 14  Description of the nonprofit: The ESF College Foundation is a private, non-profit organization that provides financial support Greenfield for the students and academic programs of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNYESF).  Number of board members: 54  Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: On an annual basis, the ESF College Foundation provides more than $1 million in support to SUNY-ESF. Each year its funds provide nearly 300 student scholarships, the purchase of new equipment, and facility enhancement. The ESF College Foundation also built the first ever residence hall for SUNY-ESF students that it continues to own and operate.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Our goal is to allow SUNY-ESF to fulfill its dreams without constraint. We will accomplish this by continuing to grow our assets to provide a greater number of scholarships. We also seek to provide the resources to allow the college more physical expansion as needed.

Group Home levels of care have decreased by 50 percent in Oneida County. In Herkimer County during the same four-year period the project returned home 45 children from placement, prevented more than 8,000 days of residential care resulting in a cost avoidance of $1.5 million.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Kids Oneida is experiencing a time of exciting growth and opportunity as we expand programming throughout the Mohawk Valley Region. Our organization will continue to foster growth while incorporating the best in innovative and evidence-based treatments. Empowering Children and Families will remain a strong focus toward our vision of “Keeping Families Together.”

NEIL SNEDEKER  Nonprofit: Mercy Flight Central  Years affiliated with this organization: 21  Description of the nonprofit: Mercy Flight Central is an independent, nonprofit, air ambulance service providing critical-care Snedeker transports by helicopter and airplanes 24/7, with operation bases in Canandaigua, Marcellus, and Utica.  Number of board members: 13  Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: Mercy Flight Central has transported more than 13,000 patients in their 21-year history. The company receives calls directly from Continued on the next page

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NONPROFIT AWARDS

6B • The Central New York Business Journal

March 27, 2013

EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR HONOREES (continued) fire, police, EMS, and hospitals to transport critically sick and injured patients at 140 miles per hour, staffed with a flight nurse and flight paramedics. These patients go directly to large trauma centers and specialty hospitals so the patients have a second chance at life. ď Ž What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Mercy Flight Central will continue to develop and serve the Utica area, obtain in 2013 a national recognition through the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems for superior safety and high quality medical care and develop strategic collaborative relationships with local high quality medical organizations.

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WILLIAM “BILLâ€? HOLICKY ď Ž Nonprofit: The House of the Good Shepherd ď Ž Years affiliated with this organization: 36 ď Ž Description of the nonprofit: A Central New York provider of residential, foster care, mental health, and special education serHolicky vices for children and youth and their family members. ď Ž Number of board members: 12 ď Ž Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: We are a unique provider of residential, foster care, and community-based services to approximately 400 children and youth, and their family members. Without The House, our clients would either have to access services at a considerable distance from their home communities or would be limited to the mental

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health and/or the juvenile justice system. ď Ž What are the future plans for the nonprofit? We will continue to provide services to children and youth and their family members as we have done for 140 years while always effectively adapting to the changing needs of our Central New York community.

STANFORT J. PERRY ď Ž Nonprofit: Arc of Onondaga ď Ž Years affiliated with this organization: 13 years and 9 months ď Ž Description of the nonprofit: Arc assists people with developmental disabilities achieve their fullest Perry potential. We are a more than $27 million organization that provides a comprehensive array of specialized habilitative services and employment opportunities in Onondaga County. ď Ž Number of board members: 18 ď Ž Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: A very recent example is how Arc helped out in the wake of Hurricane Sandy devastation. Monarch, our vocational division, was hired on a last-minute emergency by National Grid to send, by the next day, 6-inch wire insulators that had been destroyed and are required to insulate the wires around electric poles. Monarch employee Jason Ash and others worked overtime to help our 25-year partner. National Grid received the insulators overnight, without which they couldn’t have restored power to thousands who lost it during the storm. ď Ž What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Our plans include the continued expansion of

ď Ž Nonprofit: Sitrin Health Care Center ď Ž Years affiliated with this organization: 27 ď Ž Description of the nonprofit: Established in 1951, Sitrin provides long-term care, comprehensive medical rehabilitation, assisted Wilson living, adult day health care, adaptive sports, child care, senior housing, and residential housing for adults with developmental disabilities. ď Ž Number of board members: 22 ď Ž Share an example of how the nonprofit has made a difference in the community or lives of others: Sitrin implemented the region’s first adaptive sports program for people with physical disabilities some 12 years ago. The STARS (Success Through Adaptive Recreation & Sports) program offers wheelchair basketball, curling, road racing, golf, adaptive shooting, paddling, cross-country skiing, and biathlon. Sitrin’s wheelchair curling team has competed in numerous World Wheelchair Curling Championships throughout the world, and in two Paralympic Games. The STARS program builds quality of life in a very personal way. Through team effort, participants enjoy the support and camaraderie of their fellow athletes, building each other’s morale through a rich matrix of shared experiences. As evidence of the STARS program’s success, Sitrin was offi-

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cially approved by the United States Paralympic Committee as a Paralympic Sport Club. ď Ž What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Last year, Sitrin implemented a Military Rehabilitation Program for injured servicemembers and veterans. Sitrin envisions extending these services to a new location at Camp Sitrin, where a lodge/medical treatment center will be constructed. Camp Sitrin, a 142-acre property, offers a serene, relaxing setting where injured service-members and veterans, as well as others with similar conditions, can heal. Sitrin’s vision also includes the construction of an equine-assisted therapy center (in conjunction with Upstate Cerebral Palsy), and an athletic training facility.

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March 27, 2013

NONPROFIT AWARDS

COMMUNITY IMPACT AWARD

IMPACT AWARD

FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL NEW YORK

SUSAN CROSSETT

 Key representatives: Thomas Slater, executive director; Kathleen Stress, chief operating officer; William Murphy, board president  Description of the nonprofit: Food Bank of Central New York is a not-forprofit organization working to eliminate hunger through nutritious food distribution, education, and advocacy in cooperation with the community.  Number of board members: 10  Number of volunteers: 441 volunteers  Annual revenue: $17 million  Highlight two of your top programs: Food Bank of Central New York acquired and distributed 12,273,003 pounds of food during their fiscal year 2011-12. Food Bank acquires food through donations, USDA foods, wholesale and grocery rescue. These nutritious foods are then distributed to 268 emergency food program partners in their 11-county service area of central and northern New York. As hunger continues to transition, Food Bank wants to ensure emergency food programs will be available to help people in need for years to come. To help programs identify all the pieces, Food Bank has created a self-assessment tool containing 26 elements that describe the activities program coordinators and volunteers put into running a successful program and move themselves from good to great.

 Nonprofit: American Heart Association (AHA)/ American Stroke Association (ASA)  Years affiliated with the organization? Two, including as 2012 Go Red Crossett for Women Campaign Chair  Description of the nonprofit: The mission of the AHA/ASA is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Locally, the AHA provides education in schools, wellness programing with employers, quality improvement programs in our hospitals, research funding, promotion of HandsOnly CPR, and education of women and heart disease.  Number of board members: 15  Describe a notable project you worked on or contributed to and how this impacted the nonprofit: By being an active part of the Go Red For Women campaign over the past two years, I have been able to contribute to the education of our community that heart disease is the number one cause of death for women, yet is 80 percent preventable through diet and exercise. My volunteer work on this lifesaving campaign has allowed women from all sectors of Syracuse to better understand their risks, get to know their heart-health numbers, and take action to improve their health. In support of the work of the AHA, I am proud that I have been able to expand the volunteer leadership of not only Go Red For Women, but also the American Heart Association in general.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Over the next few years, the AHA will continue to build activities and programs in Syracuse which can best support the health of our community. The work

YOUTH IMPACT AWARD D.J. VILLNAVE  Nonprofit: Rescue Mission  Years affiliated with the organization? Three  Description of the nonprofit: For 125 years, the Rescue Mission has provided the necessities of life to the neediest member of the Central New York community. In addition to its five-building campus in Syracuse, it now reaches out to homeless popuVillnave lations regionally which includes Whitney Place in Binghamton and Family Transitions in Cayuga County. In April, the Rescue Mission will open Court Street Place in Ithaca. In addition to the homeless, it serves the working poor and those with very low incomes who are at high risk of becoming homeless.  Describe a notable project the nominee worked on or contributed to and how this impacted the nonprofit: At the age of 9, D.J. Villnave is a rather extraordinary young man. While small in stature, he is huge of heart and has the compassion of someone five times his age. In January 2011, at the age of 7, D.J. became a benefactor and volunteer for the Rescue Million by collecting blankets for the homeless and others in need. After seeing a television news story on homelessness in Central New York, D.J. told his parents, Sara and Damon Villnave, that he wanted to help. “It’s still winter,” he explained, “and if you’re homeless, you might not have a blanket. I don’t want them to be cold.” D.J. and his parents continued to talk and then met with his Bear Road Elementary School teacher and principal. All agreed it was a worthy project. He decided to start the blanket drive after the holidays because, “People forget about other people after Christmas, but they still have to stay warm.” In early January, the principal allowed D.J. to announce his blanket drive during the morning program. By the end of the month, D.J. had collected 281 blankets. With his parents and two little sisters, D.J. helped carry all blankets into the Rescue Mission and learned they would be given to people in the community as well as those staying at the Rescue Mission and out on the streets. D.J.’s passion for the homeless didn’t end in 2011. In both January 2012 and 2013, he collected more than 100 blankets which brought the total number donated close to 500. That’s a powerful amount of warmth generated by a young boy who wanted to help and found a way.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Going forward, D.J. plans to continue this labor of love that came directly from his heart.

The Central New York Business Journal • 7B

of the AHA is not merely to fund raise, though that is a vital component. The work of the AHA is to give each of us the knowledge, tools, and resources necessary to prevent and reduce cardiovascular diseases in ourselves, our neighbors, our colleagues, and our families.

KATHLEEN HARTER  Nonprofit: Junior Achievement (JA) of CNY, Inc.  Years affiliated with the organization: Nine  Description of the nonprofit: JA of CNY is an educational organizaHarter tion dedicated to teaching students in kindergarten through 12th grade about work-readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial-literacy skills.  Number of board members: 19  Describe a notable project you worked on or contributed to and how this impacted the nonprofit: The JA Career Symposium started eight years ago as an opportunity to give young women a chance to explore non-traditional career paths. We started with 70 girls and 20 volunteers and have grown to 300, boys and girls with more than 120 professional volunteers from our community. The Symposium’s impact has been tremendous in two ways. First, the exposure to schools who had never worked with JA programs has greatly impacted our reach in our 14-county area. More specifically, the Symposium has improved our connections within the Syracuse City Schools, our biggest constituency. Secondly, the Symposium has also greatly affected our bottom line. More companies are aware of JA and are, therefore, supporting us financially, because of their participation as volunteers in the Symposium.

 What are the future plans for the nonprofit? JA of CNY hopes to be able to continue to grow its programs and services to students in the community. We serve a 14-county area in Central New York and it is our plan to continue our outreach to be sure that more students have access to the information and the wonderful professional volunteers who take that information and their own experiences into the classrooms of Central New York.

LAURENCE M. SEGAL  Nonprofit: Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund of CNY  Years affiliated with the organization? 20; since my mom and Mrs. Baldwin founded the local chapter of Susan G. Komen.  Description of the nonprofit: The purpose Segal of the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund is to raise money for breast cancer research locally at SUNY Upstate.  Number of board members: 15  Describe a notable project you worked on or contributed to and how this impacted the nonprofit: I run the pink breast cancer cart at the Syracuse Chiefs baseball stadium and have raised more than $20,000 there alone. I was also selected as the 2012 Figum Laudis Person of the Year award winner for the organization.  What are the future plans for the nonprofit? Funding research, finding a cure for breast cancer, and creating an endowment so the research goes on until a cure is found! Finding a cure is impossible without research.

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8B • The Central New York Business Journal

NONPROFIT AWARDS

March 27, 2013

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Central New York Business Journal 3/22/13