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M O H AW K VA L L E Y

JANUARY 16, 2017 I MOHAWK VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL

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MV NEW HIRES & PROMOTIONS: People on the Move News.

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CLEARER RECEPTION: WRVO Public Media adds new signals in Rome, Madison Co.

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HEIDELBERG BREAD TOASTS FULL PRODUCTION AT NEW PLANT

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MVHS, PAIGE GROUP EMBARK ON COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROJECT FOR NEW HOSPITAL

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MOHAWK VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL I JANUARY 16, 2017

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MVBJ Data & Details COMING UP: Next Issue: March 6, 2017 The List: Hotels/Conference Centers WRITERS/EDITORS: Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com 315.579.3916

Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com 315.579.3915

Adam Rombel Editor-in-Chief arombel@cnybj.com 315.579.3902

Maria Carbonaro Associate Editor mcarbonaro@cnybj.com 315.579.3910

NEWS ALERTS Sign up for the Business Journal News Network’s Email News Alerts

Visit www.cnybj.com HOW TO REACH US MAIL: Send letters to: Editor, The Mohawk Valley Business Journal 269 W. Jefferson St. Syracuse, N.Y. 13202-1230 EMAIL: letters@cnybj.com PHONE: (315) 579-3902

MVBJ Briefs

New York home sales rise 9 percent for new November sales record; Mohawk Valley county numbers up even more New York realtors completed the sale of more than 10,000 previously owned homes in November, an increase of nearly 9 percent from a year earlier. Sales growth was even stronger than that in the Mohawk Valley’s two main counties. The 10,547 closed sales in November was a “new record” for the month, the New York State Association of Realtors (NYSAR) said in releasing its monthly housing-market report on Dec. 22. The November closed-sales figure pushed the Empire State total to 118,730, surpassing the 2015 annual mark of 116,671, NYSAR said. NYSAR reported that realtors sold 193 homes

in Oneida County in November, up nearly 13 percent from 171 in the year-ago month. The median sales price fell more than 1 percent to more than $112,000 from $114,000 a year prior. Sales of previously owned homes rose 12.5 percent to 45 in Herkimer County in November from 40 a year earlier, and the median sales price edged up 0.2 percent to $112,000, according to the NYSAR report. All home-sales data is compiled from multiplelisting services in New York state and it includes townhomes and condominiums in addition to existing single-family homes, per NYSAR.

New York egg production rises slightly in November New York farms produced 136.6 million eggs in November, up 0.4 percent from 136.1 million in the year-ago period, the USDA recently reported. The total number of layers in New York in November averaged 5.47 million, down 3 percent from a year prior. New York egg production per 100 layers totaled 2,497 eggs in November, up 4 percent from November 2015 levels. In neighboring Pennsylvania, egg production totaled nearly 674 million eggs during November, up 7 percent from the year-ago period, the USDA reported.

WRVO Public Media adds new signals in Rome, western Madison County WRVO Public Media has expanded its broadcast network by adding two new signals serving the city of Rome and western Madison County. One is a translator heard at 92.3 FM in Rome, located on the Mohawk Valley Community College (MVCC) Rome campus along Floyd Avenue, near the Griffiss Business and Technology Park. The second signal serves the Madison County town of Fenner and is heard at 90.5 FM. WMVQ, a full-time FM station, serves portions of western Madison and eastern Onondaga counties including the communities of Cazenovia, Chittenango, and Canastota. The new signals seek to provide “clearer reception for many listeners,” Michael Ameigh, general manager of WRVO Public Media, said in a news release. “These new signals reach into communities that either did not receive WRVO previously or experienced weak coverage. Many listeners in Oneida, Madison and Lewis counties are now able to receive WRVO reliably for the first time,” he said. Oswego–based WRVO’s radio network across the region attracts one of the largest radio audiences in upstate New York, per Ameigh. “Recent independent surveys estimate

WRVO’s weekly audience at approximately 90,000 individual listeners … making our network one of the most successful public-radio services in the country,” Ameigh says. “Expanding our reach is critical to attracting listeners to support WRVO’s public mission.” Ameigh cites Nielsen Audio for the figure on weekly audience of individual listeners. The WRVO transmitter at MVCC is the latest for the public broadcaster on regional college campuses. In addition to that transmitter, WRVO also broadcasts programming on WRVN 91.9 FM at the SUNY Polytechnic campus in Utica; on WRVD 90.3 FM at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse; and on WRVO 89.9 FM at SUNY Oswego, the home of its flagship transmitter, broadcast studios, and administrative offices. WRVO also has part-time signal availability on WRCU 90.1 FM at Colgate University in Hamilton and on WSUC 90.5 FM at SUNY Cortland in Cortland. It also transmits on WRVH 89.3 FM in Clayton and on WRVJ 91.7 FM in Watertown, according to the WRVO website. Full-time low-power WRVO-FM repeaters are also located in Geneva at 90.7 FM; in Ithaca at 92.5 FM and 104.5 FM; and in Norwich at 89.9 FM, its website says.

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Greater Oneida Chamber names 2017 board ONEIDA — The Greater Oneida Chamber of Commerce recently announced its 2017 board of directors: Officers • Jennifer Cossette, President - NBT Bank • Dr. Matthew Allen, Vice President Allen Eye Associates • Rachel Siderine, Treasurer AmeriCU Directors • Craig Bailey - OneGroup • Vincent Bailey - Bailey Property Services • Doreen Borders - NBT Bank • Ken Brewer - Community Carwash • Kim Caro - Caro-Northrup Agency • Duane DeFrees - Oneida Printshop • Frank Duck, Wilber-Duck • Ryan Mosack - Community Bank • Kevin Prosser - Oneida Healthcare • Ryan Rifenburg - Graphic Design • Monique Smith - Global Dictation • Sharon Taylor - Real Estate Holdings • Jayne Wentworth - Kay Real Estate The Greater Oneida Chamber of Commerce, based in the city of Oneida, was founded in 1893 and has more than 150 members. Its executive director is Royale Scuderi.


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BY NORMAN POLTENSON npoltenson@cnybj.com FRANKFORT — Aug. 12, 2016, was recognized as National Kool-Aid Day, National Sewing Machine Day, and World Elephant Day. At the Route 5S South Industrial Park in Herkimer County, Aug. 12 was celebrated as the day Heidelberg Bread ramped up to full production at its much-needed new plant. “We just couldn’t handle the volume at our old bakery,” says Boyd Bissell, president and master baker of Heidelberg Group, Inc. “We were shipping 65,000 loaves weekly running two shifts in 7,800 [square] feet, and there wasn’t enough space to accommodate the operation, especially room to allow the loaves to cool. We ship daily to supermarket chains and independents as far away as the Capital District, Hudson Valley, the Southern Tier, and Syracuse. You can find Heidelberg products in the bread section at Big M, Hannaford, BJs, Price Chopper, and many other outlets. With our focus on adding more distributors, the demand will only continue to grow.” The new facility has the capacity to quadruple the current production. Heidelberg bakes 15 varieties of bread from sourdough to Jewish Rye. All of the breads are certified kosher by the Orthodox Union. “The key to our success and continued

Background on the construction firm Charles A. Gaetano was a successful masonry contractor in the 1950s working in the Utica area. In the 1960s, he expanded into building and contracting services. The second-generation construction company offers full-service general contracting, construction management, and design-build services. In 1982, Gaetano Construction acquired the Butler Manufacturing Co. franchise for Oneida, Madison, and Herkimer counties and recently added Onondaga County. Since acquiring the franchise, Gaetano Construction has completed more than 3 million square feet of Butler projects. The company employs 24 office staff, 18 project superintendents, and 30 to 70 field staff. Its annual sales average $50 million to $60 million. Kleps, who earned an A.A.S. degree in construction management at SUNY Canton, has 36 years of experience in the construction field. He joined Gaetano Construction in 1979 and, during his career, has managed the Butler franchise and overseen the growth of the designbuild delivery method on renovations and conventional projects as well as Butler buildings. Lucas Saltsman, an estimator and project manager at Gaetano since 2003, managed the architectural design and estimating and also served as the overall project manager on the Heidelberg Bread project. He is a 2003 graduate of SUNY Delhi with a degree in construction management. — N.P.

growth is that Heidelberg only produces fresh, artisan breads that are hand-crafted without any chemicals or additives,” Bissell asserts. “We offer the supermarket public a natural and tasty alternative to the mainstream breads.” The bake shop and café, located in Herkimer, continues to produce specialty items and pastries and serves the retail public. The Business Journal estimates that the company generates annual sales in the $6 million to $7 million range. Bissell is the sole stockholder of the operating company and the sole stockholder of Cobblescote Associates, LLC., which owns the real estate. As of December, Heidelberg Bread employed 58 people, up from 50 employees in January. Bissell worked with the Herkimer County Industrial Development Agency which, at its May 2015 meeting, approved a basket of incentives including a 10-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreement, a salestax exemption, and a mortgage-fee-filing exemption. The mortgage-recording-tax exemption totaled $52,000 and the sales-tax exemption another $165,000. Cobblescote Associates paid $52,000 for the property, $2.9 million to construct the plant, and Heidelberg invested $1.3 million in machinery and equipment. Adirondack Bank provided a commercial loan for $4.7 million. Bissell says his total investment was well over $5 million.

NORMAN POLTENSON/BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

Heidelberg Bread toasts full production at new plant

Kevin Phillips, left, the project manager for the new Heidelberg Bread plant in Frankfort, oversees staff unloading bread from a new $600,000 oven. The current investment in plant and equipment is more than $5 million with a second oven due for installation in June.

Utica for the electrical work. Kleps says conversations with Heidelberg Bread began in the summer of 2014, when the company reached out to him. “Heidelberg had been working with a consultant on the project, but there were concerns about the plans he had developed. Heidelberg decided to have us start over and work with Kevin Phillips, Bissell’s nephew, who was the project manager retained by Bissell. (Phillips is currently the plant operations manager and specialprojects manager.) Kevin has a background in construction and was familiar with all aspects of the plan: mechanical, electrical,

and site preparation. He was also very helpful in handling the paperwork and working with the county to obtain the property as the first tenant in the new business park, securing the tax exemptions, putting together the financing, and handling other legal matters. The project went very smoothly with only minor changes, such as reconfiguring the gas pipes to accommodate the need for low-velocity air diffusion. For Gaetano, there was a learning process, including training the crew to properly install the insulated-metal-panel roof system roof and SEE HEIDELBERG, PAGE 7 4

Construction

“Boyd chose … the [Charles A.] Gaetano Construction Corp. [of Utica] to build the new facility on a design-build basis, which included site, structural, architectural, mechanical/electrical, and the construction,” notes David L. Kleps, VP of design-build at Gaetano Construction. “In its final configuration, the 28,800-square-foot Butler building has three separate areas: dough preparation, 5,760 feet; baking, 8,640 feet: packaging, approximately 10,000 feet; plus room for inventory, offices, a locker room, and a break room.” Lucas Saltsman, Gaetano’s project manager, adds that “…the ceilings are 25.5 feet high to accommodate a future system of circulating belts designed to cool the bread. The building has a high-R value both in the factory, insulated metal wall (R25) and in the 4-inch roof (R32). The interior wall-surface and roof are designed for a food-processing facility, which means you can even wash down the walls without concern for damaging the insulation. The 6.6 acre site can accommodate a 20,000-squarefoot addition for any future offices, baking space, and retail outlet.” Gaetano Construction used a number of sub-contractors and designers on the project: Alesia Crewell Architects of New Hartford, Kernan Engineering of Oriskany for the mechanical and electrical design, Central Paving of Frankfort for the site preparation, Superior Plumbing & Heating of Utica for the HVAC and plumbing, Associated Fire Protection of Cicero for the sprinkler system, and Boscar Electric of

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MVHS, MVHS,Paige PaigeGroup Groupembark embark communityengagement engagement ononcommunity effortfor fornew newhospital hospital effort

BY NORMAN POLTENSON BY NORMAN POLTENSON npoltenson@cnybj.com npoltenson@cnybj.com

project-steering committee, whose role project-steering committee, whose role is to provide technical and financial overis tosight,” provide technical and financial she says. “There also willoverbe a she says. “Theregroup also established will be a UTICA — Building a hospital is not ansight,” community-advisory UTICA — Building a hospital is notonly antwocommunity-advisory established everyday occurrence, considering after the architect group is on board, which everyday onlyover two theafter the architect is onand board, which haveoccurrence, been built inconsidering New York state gathers, synthesizes, shares comhave been built incentury. New York over is thecom-gathers, and feedback shares comlast quarter Thestate process munitysynthesizes, input, providing to the last quarter is com- munity input, providing feedback the plex andcentury. extends The over process many years. project-steering committee. Theto Paige plex and“This extends over many committee. The Paige community hasyears. a tremendous op-project-steering Group is focused on proactively having “This community tremendous op- Group portunity,” says has Bob aScholefield, executive is focusedwith on proactively conversations stakeholders,having giving VP/chief officer (COO) at theconversations informationalwith presentations, creating mulportunity,” saysoperating Bob Scholefield, executive stakeholders, giving Mohawk Valleyofficer Health (COO) System at(MVHS). tiple channels (website, phone, meetings, VP/chief operating the informational presentations, creating mul“TheValley decision to build a brand(MVHS). new health-tipleetc.) for community input, partnering with Mohawk Health System channels (website, phone, meetings, center in a adowntown local and regionalinput, media to keep people “The care decision to build brand newlocation health- willetc.) for community partnering with a huge, impact, but it will informed, and facilitating the advisorycare have center in a positive downtown location willalsolocal and regional media to keep people be disruptive. Every resident will be affectgroup’s work. To date, outreach meetings have a huge, positive impact, but it will also informed, and facilitating the advisoryed by thisEvery decision, and …will [it be is incumbent have work. included owners,meetings residents, be disruptive. resident affect- group’s Tobusiness date, outreach upon us] to bring the community into the educators, and the area’s elected leadered by this decision, and … [it is incumbent have included business owners, residents, decision-making process. We have to get ship. In January, we are planning a comupon us] to bring the community into the educators, and the area’s elected leaderthis right.” MVHS has retained The Paige munity meeting to explain both the vision decision-making process. We have to get ship. In January, we are planning a comGroup, a Utica–based marketing-commu- and the process and to create a dialogue.” this right.” MVHS has retained The Paige munity meeting to explain both the vision nications firm, to guide the community- MVHS began the engagement process in Group, a Utica–based marketing-commu- andlate the2015, process to create a dialogue.” engagement process. andand to date, has held 18 differnicationsNancy firm, Pattarini, to guide president the communityMVHS began the engagement in and CEO ent presentations. The Paigeprocess Group has engagement process. late 2015, and to date, has held 18 differof The Paige Group, explains how the committed three employees to the project Nancy Pattarini, CEOis aent topresentations. Paige process is beingpresident organized.and “There work with the The MVHS staff.Group has of The Paige Group, explains how the committed three employees to the project process is being organized. “There is a to work with the MVHS staff.

Locally sponsored by:

Nationally sponsored by:

Locally sponsored by:

Bob Scholefield, executive VP/chief operating officer at the Mohawk Valley Health System (MVHS), and Nancy Pattarini (right) president andVP/chief CEO of The Paige Group, have teamed up to Valley engageHealth the community in the building of aPatBob Scholefield, executive operating officer at the Mohawk System (MVHS), and Nancy new health-care centerand in downtown new have facility is projected open inthe latecommunity 2021 or early 2022. tarini (right) president CEO of TheUtica. PaigeThe Group, teamed up toto engage in the building of a new health-care center in downtown Utica. The new facility is projected to open in late 2021 or early 2022.

The most commonly asked questions keen interest in the new hosThe“There most iscommonly asked questions

pital,” avers Scholefield, there a “There is keen interest“and in the neware hosnumber of questions at each presentation. pital,” avers Scholefield, “and there are a What’s clear is that three main questions number of questions at each presentation. are on everyone’s mind: “Why does the What’s clear is that three main questions area need a new hospital,” “Why is it sited are on everyone’s mind: “Why does the downtown?,” and “What will happen to area need a new hospital,” “Why is it sited MVHS?” Let me answer them in order.

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MOHAWKVALLEY VALLEYBUSINESS BUSINESS JOURNALI JANUARY I JANUARY 16, 2017 MOHAWK JOURNAL 16, 2017

parking slots are available, the parking area will accommodate thousandsthe of visitors parking slots are available, parkingto area the And fifth, the development willauditorium. accommodate thousands of visitors to ofthe theauditorium. downtown site willfifth, provide infrastrucAnd the development ture upgrades of the surrounding area, of the downtown site will provide infrastrucincluding water, gas, and sewer plus ture upgrades of the surroundingbike area, and pedestrian routes.” including water, gas, and sewer plus bike

and pedestrian routes.” What happens to MVHS? In 2014, St. Elizabeth Medical Center What happens to MVHS? (SEMC) affiliated with Faxton St. Luke’s

downtown?,” and “What will happen to In 2014,(FSLH) St. Elizabeth Center MVHS?” Let me answer them in order. Why build a new hospital? Healthcare to form Medical MVHS, gov(SEMC) affiliated with Faxton St. Luke’s “The St. Elizabeth and St. Luke’s cam- erned by an 18-member board of direcWhy build a new hospital? Healthcare (FSLH) to form MVHS, puses are 60 to 100 years old; … [needless tors. “The corporate structure for the newgovSt. Elizabeth St.care Luke’s cam- hospital erned by board directo“The say] the delivery ofand health is much has an not18-member been finalized, but of it cerpuses are 60 to 100 old; facilities … [needless tors. will “The structure for with the anew different now. Theyears current are tainly be corporate a single corporate entity toconstrained say] the delivery health care much new hospital has not beenstresses. finalized, butnew it cerby theirof age, layout, andisphysiname,” Scholefield “The different now. Consolidating The currentour facilities are name tainlyhas willnot be yet a single with a cal limitations. resources been corporate chosen …entity The new constrained by their age, layout, and physinew name,” Scholefield “The eliminates redundancies and provides ef- health-care system will notstresses. be Catholic, butnew ficiencies; allows us to expand depth certain traditions of been SEMC will continue cal limitations. Consolidating ourthe resources name has not yet chosen … Thetonew and breadth of our services; practiced and respected. eliminates redundancies andimproves providesthe ef- be health-care system will notThe be downtown Catholic, but quality of our health-care delivery;the ensures replaceof theSEMC in-patient now to ficiencies; allows us to expand depth hospital certainwill traditions will care continue greater coverage specialized care; and at FSLH SEMC.”The downtown and breadth of ourforservices; improves the provided be practiced andand respected. elevates the health-care patient experience proquality of our delivery; by ensures hospital will replace the in-patient care now sheetat and funding viding all private inpatient-rooms, accomgreater coverage for specialized care; and Fact provided FSLH and SEMC.” Currently, MVHS has 574 acute-care modating family members and visitors, elevates the patient experience by probeds and 202 long-term-care improving communications, and providing viding all private inpatient-rooms, accom- Fact sheet and funding beds. As of 2016, the system 4,054 the convenience one-stop access to mul- January Currently, MVHS hasemploys 574 acute-care modating family ofmembers and visitors, tiple providers. A new, state-of-the-art hospi- full-time equivalents and operates on a improving communications, and providing beds and 202 long-term-care beds. As of tal will also help us to attract physicians to budget projecting $532 million in annual the convenience of one-stop access to mul- January 2016, the system employs 4,054 our system to meet the growing demand of revenue. In 2015, the emergency departfull-time equivalents andand operates on a tiple providers. A new, hospi- ments treated 77,976 visits, the hospian aging population forstate-of-the-art health care. Finally, budget projecting $532 million in annual tal will also help us to attract physicians to a new hospital will cost less to operate and tals admitted 24,541 patients. The system revenue. In than 2015,36,000 the emergency departour systemthan to meet the growing demand of records more urgent-care visits maintain our existing facilities.” ments treated 77,976 visits,Group and the an aging population for health care. Finally, annually. The MVHS Medical hashospi19 tals admitted 24,541 apatients. The system aWhy new hospital cost less to operate and primary-care site thewill hospital downtown? locations; Children’s Health recordsa more thanHealth 36,000Center; urgent-care visits maintain our existing After than reviewing a dozenfacilities.” sites within a Center; Women’s general, annually. The MVHS Medical Group has 5-mile to 10-mile radius of downtown Utica, orthopedic, and neurological surgeons; as 19 Why site the primary-care a Children’s Health Scholefield sayshospital the MVHSdowntown? board of direc- well as a Cancerlocations; and Breast Care Center. After reviewing dozen sites within a Women’s Health Center; tors chose a locationa between Oriskany anda Center; “The proposed 430-bed hospital wasgeneral, origColumbia Streets across from the Utica projected to neurological occupy 830,000 square as 5-mile to 10-mile radius of downtown Utica, inally orthopedic, and surgeons; Memorial Auditorium. $573and million,” the Scholefield says the MVHS board of direc- feet welland as acost Cancer Breastobserves Care Center. Oneida, and “The430-bed project-steering comtors“MVHS chose a serves locationMadison, between Oriskany and MVHS “TheCOO. proposed hospital was origHerkimer Streets Counties,” the COO downsized the original specifiColumbia across fromnotes. the “The Utica mittee inally has projected to occupy 830,000 square new hospital is centrally located to serve all cations to cost a 750,000-square-foot, 400-bedthe Memorial Auditorium. feet and $573 million,” observes of“MVHS our residents. downtown a cost of $480 million, which servesSecondly, Madison,theOneida, and facility MVHSwith COO. “The project-steering comsite is on Counties,” major bus the routes, which people with thedownsized project-funding plan. Thespecifi25Herkimer COO notes. “The aligns mittee has the original can hospital easily access. Third, this project will site has room for the hospital, a new is centrally located to serve all acre cations to ample a 750,000-square-foot, 400-bed help to fuel Utica’s urban revival, which is parking garage, separate-office buildings, of our residents. Secondly, the downtown facility with a cost of $480 million, which already underway. Thousands of MVHS and still have room for future developsite is on major bus routes, which people aligns with the project-funding plan. The 25employees will work downtown every day ment. Funding for the hospital will come can easily access. Third, this project will acre site has ample room for the hospital, a patronizing restaurants and other business- from three sources: New York State has help to fuel Utica’s revival, which parking $300 garage, separate-office buildings, es. Some may moveurban downtown to be closeris allocated million to support the projalready underway. Thousands of MVHS and still have room for future developto work. Fourth, the downtown location al- ect, MVHS will raise another $30 million, employees will work area downtown everyboth day and ment. Funding for has the so hospital will on come locates a substantial for parking, because MVHS little debt patronizing restaurantsofand from three sources: New York State has for the convenience theother staff businessand the es. Some In may downtown to be of closer allocated $300 million to support the projvisitors. themove evening, when many the SEE MVHS, PAGE 6 4 to work. Fourth, the downtown location al- ect, MVHS will raise another $30 million, locates a substantial area for parking, both and because MVHS has so little debt on for the convenience of the staff and the


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JANUARY 16, 2017 I MOHAWK VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL

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JetBlue, Premier forge agreement for maintenance, painting work at Griffiss BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com ROME — JetBlue Airways Corp. (NASDAQ: JBLU) and Premier Aviation on Jan. 4 announced a five-year, heavy maintenance and paint agreement for the Embraer 190 (e-190) at Premier’s facility at Griffiss International Airport in Rome. JetBlue didn’t release any terms of the agreement in its news release. Trois-Rivieres, Quebec–based Premier Aviation, which employs more than 150 people in Rome, currently performs maintenance on aircraft carriers at a former Air Force hangar at the Griffiss Business & Technology Park, per a previous news release from the office of U.S. Senator Charles Schumer (D–N.Y.). Schumer, who is now the Senate Minority Leader, had issued the release encouraging the air carrier to consider Premier Aviation at Griffiss for some of those operations. Under the terms of the agreement, the aircraft maintenance of two lines of E-190 aircraft started in Rome on Jan. 4, JetBlue said. The agreement also includes the painting of two lines of aircraft, which will initially happen at Premier’s Trois-Rivieres, Quebec facility in 2017. The JetBlue release describes Premier Aviation as the “largest Canadian-owned aircraft maintenance, repair, overhaul and painting (MRO) aircraft company in North America.” The maintenance and paint lines are expected to add “skilled” jobs to the Oneida County area and recruitment for the Rome facility is “ongoing,” the New York City– based air carrier said. JetBlue didn’t indicate how many jobs the agreement will create. Premier has estimated that it could need to hire at least 100 people to complete this potential work, Schumer’s office said in its release. Premier was in talks “to do business” with JetBlue at the time, according to the office. “It’s game-changing news that JetBlue will land with a plane full of new jobs at Griffiss and expand maintenance operations at Premier Aviation,” Schumer said in a statement. “That’s exactly why I called the JetBlue CEO [Robin Hayes] directly and urged the company to bring this new business to New York and continue their great track record of creating jobs here in New York and investing in our state’s economy… Simply put, [this] agreement will allow Premier to create new, good-paying jobs, and allow for the economic benefits to reverberate throughout Oneida County and Central New York,��� Schumer added. The top official at the Quebec–based firm said the company is “pleased” to wel-

A JetBlue Embraer 190 arrives at Premier Aviation’s facility at Griffiss Airport in Rome. New York City–based JetBlue Airways and Trois-Rivieres, Quebec–based Premier Aviation on Jan. 4 announced a five-year, heavy maintenance and paint agreement for the Embraer 190 (e-190) at Premier’s facility at in Rome.

come JetBlue to Premier. “It is gratifying that our significant success in the E-175/190 fleet has led to the winning of this contract,” Ronnie Di Bartolo, CEO for Premier Aviation, added in the JetBlue release. n

PHOTO CREDIT: JETBLUE WEBSITE, BUSINESS WIRE

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MOHAWK VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL I JANUARY 16, 2017

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THE LIST

MOHAWK VALLEY COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES Ranked by Full-Time Enrollment (undergrad./grad.) 2016-2017 Name Address Rank

Phone/Website

1.

Mohawk Valley Community College 1101 Sherman Drive

FT Enrollment

PT Enrollment

Undergrad.

Undergrad.

/Grad.

/Grad.

Part Time

Budget

Tuition Employees

6,547

5,636

603

$49.9M

$4,084

6,547/0

5,636/0

135

Utica, NY 13501

Faculty Full Time 2016-2017 In-State

FT

450

Year President/Top Official

Estab.

Randall J. VanWagoner, President 1946

2.

1600 Burrstone Road

3,883

1,202

433

2,752/1,131

769/433

146

Utica, NY 13502

$74.8M

$19,996

426

Laura Casamento, President

1946

$23.7M

$4,270

196

Cathleen McColgin, President

1966

NA

$6,470

NA

Bahgat Sammakia, Interim

1966

287

(315) 792-3111/utica.edu

3.

Herkimer County Community College 100 Reservoir Road

2,018

3,043

2,018/0

3,043/0

Herkimer, NY 13350

173 62 111

(315) 866-0300/herkimer.edu

4.

SUNY Polytechnic Institute 100 Seymour Road

1,9041

8831

NA

1,7391/1651

3381/5451

NA

Utica, NY 13502

President

5.

198 College Hill Road

1,850

0

232

1,850/0

0/0

189

Clinton, NY 13323

ABOUT THE LIST Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. Organizations had to complete the survey by the deadline to be included on the list. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations. This list features institutions in Herkimer, Oneida, and Otsego counties.

NA

(315) 792-7500/sunypoly.edu Hamilton College

FOOTNOTES 1. 2016 figures not provided. Data is from 2015.

468

(315) 792-5400/mvcc.edu Utica College

Research by Vance Marriner vmarriner@cnybj.com (315) 579-3911 Twitter: @cnybjresearch

$180M

$50,730

677

David Wippman, President

1812

$46.3M

$42,050

299

Margaret L. Drugovich, President

1797

43

NEED A COPY OF A LIST? Electronic versions of all of our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website: cnybj.com/ListsResearch.aspx

(315) 859-4011/hamilton.edu

6.

Hartwick College

1,362

34

183

One Hartwick Drive

1,362/0

34/0

110

Oneonta, NY 13820

73

WANT TO BE ON THE LIST?

If your company would like to be considered for next year’s list, or another list, please email topranks@cnybj.com

(607) 431-4150/hartwick.edu

MVHS: Funding for the project is not based on raising local taxes the books, we should be able to borrow $150 million. Preliminary talks are already underway with area bankers to create a consortium to authorize a loan.” MVHS points out that funding for the project is not based on raising local taxes.

Progress to date and timeline

Planning began in 2015 when the state originally included the $300 million grant in the annual budget. “MVHS retained Hammes Company [of Brookfield, Wisconsin], the leading developer of health-care facilities in the U.S., to help us with the concept,” recalls Scholefield. “The board [of directors] worked with Mohawk Valley EDGE, a landscape-architecture firm, and an engineering firm to review potential sites. In May [of this year], the board also asked EDGE to help with evaluating downtown properties in order to establish a fair-market value before issuing [conditional] purchase offers for potential sites. Work began in late September, and appraisal letters have already gone out to 39 owners of 77 different properties. Half of the sites are owned by the city. To complete the evaluation process in three months, the EDGE retained three appraisers. MVHS officials have also issued a request-forproposal to 14 architects, 11 engineers, and seven construction managers, all of whom have experience in health-care projects of this scope. Wherever possible, our goal

is to use resources available here in the Mohawk Valley. We expect that this phase will take several months to complete.” All of the above efforts represent just the first phase of the project. “The key now to moving forward is securing the $300 million from the state,” intones Scholefield. “We are currently in the process of completing the ‘Request for Application’ from the state for funding. It will be submitted towards the end of January [2017], and we hope to hear soon … regarding securing the funds: The $300 million lays the foundation for funding project. The [state] Department of Health (DOH) must finalize the disposition of the state grant before planning and design of the new hospital can really begin. The DOH also needs to issue a certificate of need. Completion of this phase is not expected until late in 2017 or in early 2018. The construction phase will take another three years before the new facility opens sometime in 2021 or 2022.”

Other questions

Pattarini and Scholefield are also peppered at their engagement sessions with several other questions. For example, what will happen to the existing MVHS campuses? While the facilities will be repurposed, it’s proposed that certain departments, such as human resources and the business office, the Cancer Center, the Center for Rehabilitation and Continuing Care Services, and the St.

Continued from page 4

Elizabeth College of Nursing will remain at off-site locations. As for private-investment opportunities in the project, it’s likely that private capital will build and own the parking garage, medical-office buildings, and other aspects of the new medical campus. “We get so many questions like this at our meetings that I have incorporated the most common questions into my presentations,” Scholefield quips. Scholefield was born in Marcy and attended Holland-Patent High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree in professional studies from the State University of New York at Utica/Rome and is a graduate of the St. Elizabeth School of Nursing in Utica, where he earned his RN diploma. Scholefield next earned a master’s degree in health-systems management from the New School for Social Research in Utica. He was employed at SEMC for more than 30 years, where he rose to become the VP of operations. In October 2015, he was named executive VP and chief operating officer at MVHS after serving as its senior VP of operations since March 2014. He is responsible for the operations of the health-care system, overseeing a number of departments and programs as well as working with the executive director and medical director of the MVHS Medical Group. Scholefield and his wife live in Deerfield, and the couple has two grown children. Pattarini received her associate de-

gree in advertising from Mohawk Valley Community College and a bachelor’s degree in public relations from Utica College. She went on to earn her master’s in communications management from Syracuse University and is working towards a Ph.D. degree in conflict analysis and resolution from Nova Southeastern University. She started her business career in 1977 at the United Way in Utica, and two years later joined Mohawk Data Sciences (MDS), where she managed global-corporate communications. MDS, a Herkimer–based company, was famous for inventing the Data Recorder, a magnetic-tape device that superseded punch cards. When MDS was sold in 1986, she moved to The Paige Group on the assumption the new job was a landing place until she found another corporate position. Three decades later, she is still there, having spent the last 20 years guiding the agency as president and CEO. “The public-information process has been going on for more than a year,” Pattarini reminds this reporter. “Now we’ve ramped up even further, and community input is a multi-year process. The decision to build a new facility and locate it downtown raises multiple questions, and we need to ensure the community has a voice in this major initiative. We will be communicating with all of the stakeholders at each phase of the project, so they can contribute to the planning process.” n


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JANUARY 16, 2017 I MOHAWK VALLEY BUSINESS JOURNAL

People on the Move NEWS EDUCATION & TRAINING LAURA H. JACK has been named VP for communications at Colgate University, effective Feb. 6. Jack is currently VP of development and alumni relations at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She has been leading Howard’s communications efforts since 2014, when she was hired as assistant VP of marketing and branding. Prior to Howard, she developed and executed communications and recruitment strategies for the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Previously, she served for seven years as director of marketing and communications at the City University of New York’s School of Professional Studies. Jack is a graduate of Pace University, where she concentrated her undergraduate studies in marketing, advertising, and promotions. She also holds an MBA in marketing management and a master’s degree in higher-education administration from Baruch College, and completed two years of coursework toward

a doctorate degree in education at Johns Hopkins University.

ELDER CARE Daughter for Hire LLC announced it has promoted ALLISON WEBB to director of companion care. Webb began her role with Daughter for Hire in the position of caregiver and most recently, as adWebb ministrative assistant. In her new role, Webb will be responsible for managing and overseeing the operation of the company’s office. Webb graduated from St. Bonaventure University with a bachelor’s degree in English. Daughter for Hire, located at 6 Williams St. in Clinton, says it is a senior companion care company providing non-medical services to senior citizens in Oneida, Herkimer, and Madison counties, designed to promote aging in place.

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HEALTH CARE Rome Memorial Hospital has named JAMES MARQUETTE director of plant operations following the retirement of director Edward Koziarz. Marquette previously served as the departMarquette ment’s assistant director. The plant-operations department is responsible for maintenance of the hospital building and 13 off-site facilities. JENNIFER FIELDS, a nurse practitioner, has joined the Fields staff of Rome Memorial Hospital’s Regional Center for Wound Care, located at 267 Hill Road in Rome. A graduate of St. Elizabeth’s College of Nursing, Fields earned both her bachelor’s degree in nursing and master’s degree in family health administration from SUNY

Institute of Technology in Marcy (now called SUNY Polytechnic Institute). In her more than 12 years in the health-care field, Fields has served in many capacities, including providing care to military service personnel, as a charge nurse for Rome Memorial Hospital’s Critical Care Unit, and her most recent work as a family nurse practitioner in gynecology.

INVESTMENT SERVICES TAYLOR KOCH has joined M. Griffith Investment Services, Inc. as an operations assistant. She is responsible for reviewing existing client accounts, setting up new accounts, and helping maintain the firm’s Koch central database systems. Koch is a graduate of St. Lawrence University, where she received her bachelor’s degree in government and philosophy. She previously worked as a marketing analyst at Petr-All Petroleum Corp/Express Mart in Syracuse.

SUNY Poly to offer new master’s degree in systems engineering BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com UTICA — SUNY Polytechnic Institute announced that the New York State Education Department and the State University of New York have approved SUNY Poly’s new Master of Science degree in systems engineering. The 30-credit degree program will provide students with enhanced theoretical and application-oriented skills and is designed for

graduates that already have technical capabilities and an appreciation of engineering across multiple disciplines, the university said. “The approval of this new degree program is a testament to SUNY Poly’s ongoing commitment to providing cutting edge academic opportunities to its students that prepare them for the demands of the 21st century global economy,” Dr. Robert Geer, senior VP and chief operating officer at SUNY Poly, said in a news release. “The MS in Systems Engineering, like all of our graduate and

undergraduate offerings, is rooted in experiential, hands-on learning.” SUNY Poly said that graduates from many engineering backgrounds are welcome to enter the systems engineering program, as the field provides opportunities for career advancement. Systems engineering develops a critical discipline that is in “high demand in the industry,” the release stated. SUNY Poly joins just a handful of institutions nationwide that offer a graduate program sup-

porting this discipline. The addition of the master’s degree in systems engineering will strengthen the competitiveness of high-technology industries in the Mohawk Valley region and throughout New York state, SUNY Poly contends. Local companies and organizations that currently employ systems engineers include the Air Force Research Laboratory, Assured Information Security, Intelligent Automation Inc., BAE Systems, Booz Allen Hamilton, and Syracuse Research Corporation. n

HEIDELBERG: The bakery has already ordered a second oven, which should be installed by June 2017 understanding the installation instructions of some of the new equipment. We broke ground in the spring of 2015 and finished the construction in the spring of 2016. [I’m pleased to say] … the project was on time and on budget.”

Strategic plan

Bissell’s determination to grow the operation is evident from constructing the new facility and the substantial investment in equipment. The automated oven alone cost $600,000, and Heidelberg has already ordered a second oven, which should be installed by June 2017. The company plans to expand its freezer capacity. On Dec. 5, Bissell also hired Phil Kernan as company COO to drive growth. “My focus is on expanding our distribution channels,” Kernan states. “While Heidelberg enjoys good distribution between Albany and Syracuse, we can still improve our penetration there. We are also focusing on expanding our geographical reach to New York City, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts. (Heidelberg is studying flash-freezing as a method to ensure freshness to distant locations.) There is a growing audience of health-conscious consumers who will buy Heidelberg breads not only at their local supermarket, but also at independent out-

lets. Another channel for our distribution is restaurants, which cater to patrons insisting on a natural product.” That includes small eateries. Kevin Phillips explains: “We also have a niche to service smaller restaurants which can’t order in bulk. Heidelberg can mix a batch of dough weighing as little as 65 pounds and freeze the balance not shipped. This allows restaurants to buy only what they need at an economical price. With our new capacity, Heidelberg can also increase its contract manufacturing through privatelabel production. There are a number of small bakers looking for a manufacturing facility that meets their natural-food standards and can handle the packaging and help with distribution.”

The Heidelberg dream

Bissell, 72, grew up on the shores of Lake Otsego. His path to baking was serendipitous. “As a youngster growing up in Cooperstown, I was accustomed to working long hours,” he reminisces. “At age 14, I worked on a cauliflower farm for 40 cents an hour … In my 20s, I took a sabbatical from college and made multiple trips to Paris, where I spent 2.5 years [collectively]. I worked in restaurants both in France and in the States. I started at the

Otesaga [Resort Hotel in Cooperstown] as a ‘kitchen utility’ and later became the chef at a local restaurant. My interest in cooking wasn’t a surprise, because I grew up in a family where both parents were accomplished cooks.” Bissell says he had an epiphany in 1982. “I drove to Montpelier, [Vermont] to visit the New England Culinary Institute about a staffing position,” the master baker recalls. “The director of the Institute asked me whether I was aware of Upland Bakers, located nearby in Plainfield. He convinced me to visit this bakery, where I tasted the sourdough bread and was frankly astonished: It tasted just like the bread I ate in France. The very next year, I opened my first bakery in Utica and began experimenting with different recipes and flours. I used to purchase baking pans at the Family Dollar Store and shipped unsliced loaves in sacks on the Trailways bus to a customer in Cooperstown. By 1992, our sales volume had grown to $350,000, and I bought the Herkimer … [facility].” Phillips began his career in baking at the age of 15, when he learned to bake his uncle’s original recipes. He worked for 10 years in construction before returning in 2014 to his original passion, baking bread. As the project manager at Heidelberg,

Continued from page 3

Phillips oversaw the development of the new baking facility in Frankfort. He is currently training a plant manager in order to devote his time to special projects. Phillips grew up and currently lives in Richfield Springs. Kernan earned a master’s degree in economics from Harvard University and joined Arthur D. Little as a management consultant. He left Little to become director of research at a private-investment bank specializing in equity placements. Kernan also served in various corporate capacities as CFO and CEO. Upon retirement, he taught economics at SUNY Polytechnic Institute. Bissell and Kernan met while serving as trustees of the Landmark Society of Greater Utica. Heidelberg’s master baker convinced his fellow trustee to join Heidelberg with the goal of doubling sales.

The Heidelberg magic

“All breads contain the same basic ingredients — flour, water, yeast, and salt,” avers Bissell. “The magic comes in how you balance those ingredients. It took me years to bake breads that were rich in taste and texture while using only natural ingredients. I can’t recall how many times I have failed while experimenting, but I never stop until I get the perfect balance.” n


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